Vespasian Psalter at British Library (visit The British Library here)

Vespasian Psalter_ British Lybrary_25668_2

Vespasian Psalter_ British Library_25668_2 (click to access Website)

“In Anglo-Saxon EnglandJerome’s first translation of the Psalms, the Roman version, continued to be copied, and this is the earliest surviving example of it. An Old English translation was added in the ninth century above the Latin text; this addition is the oldest extant translation into English of any biblical text. This copy was made in Kent in the first half of the eighth century, perhaps at Canterbury. As in the Lindisfarne Gospels, the frame around the picture incorporates spirals of Celtic origin. On the right is the beginning of Psalm 27 (in modern numbering) with an initial D(ominus) (Lord) with an image David with Jonathan, the earliest surviving English biblical example of an initial with a narrative scene.”

4 responses to “Vespasian Psalter at British Library (visit The British Library here)

  1. Pingback: “Lindisfarne Gospels” | History of Britain

  2. Pingback: Vespasian Psalter at British Library (visit The...

  3. I am fascinated more and more by medieval art, and its depiction of and juxtaposition with biblical texts. I have no hope of ever being more than a curious onlooker (especially as I cannot even make out some of the Latin words in the Vespasian Psalter you highlighted), but am nevertheless grateful for your bringing this additional resource to our attention!

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