Monthly Archives: April 2014

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre



Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

The composition is based upon a poem by Henri Cazalis, on an old French superstition: Zig, zig, zig, Death in a cadence, Striking with his heel a tomb, Death at midnight plays a dance-tune, Zig, zig, zig, on his violin. The winter wind blows and the night is dark; Moans are heard in the linden trees. Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds. Zig, zig, zig, each one is frisking, The bones of the dancers are heard to crack— But hist! of a sudden they quit the round, They push forward, they fly; the cock has crowed.

According to the ancient superstition, “Death” appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by a solo violin with its E-string tuned to an E-flat in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times to signify the clock striking midnight, accompanied by soft chords from the string section. This then leads to the eerie E flat and A chords (also known as a tritone or the “Devil’s chord“) played by a solo violin, representing death on his fiddle. After which the main theme is heard on a solo flute and is followed by a descending scale on the solo violin. The rest of the orchestra, particularly the lower instruments of the string section, then joins in on the descending scale. The main theme and the scale is then heard throughout the various sections of the orchestra until it breaks to the solo violin and the harp playing the scale. The piece becomes more energetic and climaxes at this point; the full orchestra playing with strong dynamics.Towards the end of the piece, there is another violin solo, now modulating, which is then joined by the rest of the orchestra. The final section, a pianissimo, represents the dawn breaking and the skeletons returning to their graves.

The piece makes particular use of the xylophone in a particular theme to imitate the sounds of rattling bones. Saint-Saëns uses a similar motif in the Fossils part of his Carnival of the Animals.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Remedios Varo,”Les Feuilles Mortes”.
Played by:National Philharmonic Orchestra,
conductor:Leopold Stokowski.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Paul Dukas – The Sorcerer’s Apprentice



Title : The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
Composer : Paul Dukas
Music : Leopold Stokowski (with the Philadelphia Orchestra)

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Dmitry Shostakovich, Festive Overture, Op. 96 (arr. for wind ensemble)



Dmitry Shostakovich
President’s Own United States Marine Band, The, President’s Own United States Marine Band, The
Festive Overture, Op. 96 (arr. for wind ensemble)
President’s Own United States Marine Band: The Bicentennial Collection
75442261012
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

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Great Compositions/Performances: Liszt Ballade 2 Bonn Beethoven-Haus Lisitsa on 97 keys



Finally a chance to use all 97 keys, live , on video 🙂
In the original score , the decending broken octaves passage ( so-called martellato, around 8:00“) is reduced in left hand to a single line at the bottom , when Liszt-times piano run out of keys to decsend. The effect of using the missing lower octave – particulalry in live setting – is simply stupendous. There is nothing that can match sound of roaring Imperial extra-low notes! It has to be heard live – or at least in analogue recording ( that I am going to make very soon , a “Liszt project ” ) . This is the piano I am going to use 🙂 Bosy rules !!!!

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Great Compositions/Performances: Liszt 3 Concert Etudes No 3 Un Sospiro Arrau Rec 1974



From Beckmesser2:  “For me. the most fascinating aspect of this recorded performance, by Claudio Arrau,is the interpolation of material not found in the original text. I suspect that these additional measures ,found after the second cadenza and three measures before the end, came from Liszt through his pupil Martin Krause, Arrau’s teacher.”

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Saint of the Day for Saturday, April 26th, 2014


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Cletus

St. Cletus

St. Cletus was the third bishop of Rome, and succeeded St. Linus, which circumstance alone shows his eminent virtue among the first disciples of St. Peter in the West. He sat twelve years, from 76 to … continue reading

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QUOTATION: Charlotte Bronte


Look twice before you leap.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855) Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SHAD FESTIVAL


Shad Festival

Since 1981, the city of Lambertville, New Jersey, has celebrated the Shad Festival, honoring the annual return of the shad fish to the Delaware River to spawn. The festival also promotes the preservation of the environment and of the Delaware River ecosystem. The two-day street festival features an arts show, cooking demonstrations, and live music concerts. Local nonprofit and community volunteer organizations use the event as a fundraiser by selling food and other items. There are also demonstrations of how the local fishing community catches shad with nets.More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: CHARLES RICHTER (1900)


Charles Richter (1900)

Richter was an American seismologist best known for creating the Richter scale, which quantifies the magnitude of earthquakes by assigning each quake a single number based on the measurement of seismic waves. The scale is logarithmic, meaning that each increase of one unit represents a 10-fold increase in the amplitude of the waves. Though the scale has no theoretical upper limit, the most severe quakes have not exceeded a scale value of 9. What earthquake measurement method succeeded Richter’s? More…Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: NUCLEAR REACTOR AT CHERNOBYL PLANT EXPLODES (1986)


Nuclear Reactor at Chernobyl Plant Explodes (1986)

The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant is regarded as the worst nuclear accident in history. Radioactive debris from the disaster drifted across parts of the western Soviet Union and Europe. Large areas of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia were badly contaminated, resulting in the resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people and a disputed number of deaths. The incident set off an international outcry over the dangers posed by radioactive emissions. What caused the accident? More… Discuss

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NEWS: MEASLES CASES ON THE RISE IN THE US


Measles Cases on the Rise in the US

Public vaccination initiatives in the US—like the Vaccines for Children program, which provides freevaccinations to low-income children—have prevented some 323 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths among those born during the past 20 years. Vaccines for Children was established in 1994 as a direct response to a nationwide measles resurgence that caused tens of thousands of illnesses and over 100 deaths; yet, as the organization approaches its 20th anniversary, the very disease it was meant to stamp out is seeing yet another resurgence. In just the first four months of this year, 129 measles cases were reported, a number greater than any similar period since 1996. More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: FORENSICS


Forensics

Forensics is the science and practice of examining physical evidence in order to resolve legal issues, particularly those related to crimes. It comprises a range of scientific disciplines, like forensic toxicology, which focuses on the effects of drugs and toxins on the body, and forensic pathology, which aims to establish cause of death through examination of the corpse. Popular TV shows glamorizing forensics have given viewers unrealistic expectations of the field, a phenomenon dubbed what? More…Discuss

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QUOTATION: Aesop


In quarreling about the shadow we often lose the substance.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: OLIVER CROMWELL (1599)


Oliver Cromwell (1599)

A controversial figure in English history, Cromwell was a leader of the parliamentary forces that battled the royalists in the English Civil War. After the execution of Charles I in 1649, Cromwell became lord protector and virtual dictator of England and raised his country’s status once more to that of a leading European power by means of a strict military administration and the enforcement of the Puritan moral code. What did the royalists do to his corpse when they returned to power in 1660? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ROBINSON CRUSOE IS PUBLISHED (1719)


Robinson Crusoe Is Published (1719)

Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe is a fictional autobiography of the eponymous English castaway marooned on a desert island for 28 years. During this time, Crusoe encounters cannibals, captives, and mutineers and endures endless hardships while preserving his human integrity. The first volume of Defoe’s Crusoe story was published in 1719 and garnered immediate acclaim. It is considered by some critics to be the first true English novel. What is the book’s full title? More… Discuss

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NEWS: BLOOD ON HANDKERCHIEF LIKELY NOT ROYAL


Blood on Handkerchief Likely Not Royal

A handkerchief long thought to be stained with the blood of guillotined French King Louis XVI is likely inauthentic. DNA analysis of the blood on the cloth suggests it most likely belonged to a brown-eyed, average-height person, whereas the king had blue eyes and was quite tall for his time. The genetics also point to French and Italian lineage, while many of Louis XVI’s ancestors came from Germany and Poland. Why then was the handkerchief stored in an elaborately decorated gourd bearing the inscription, “On January 21, Maximilien Bourdaloue dipped his handkerchief in the blood of Louis XVI after his decapitation”? One theory is that a fraudster created the fake relic for money. More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: WHAT A RELIEF!


What a Relief!

In sculpture, the term “relief” refers to any work in which the figures project from a flat background. In alto-relievo, or high relief, the protrusion is great. Basso-relievo, or bas-relief, protrudes only slightly. Mezzo-relievo is intermediate between the two. Ancient Egyptian and Etruscan art also features cavo-relievo, literally “hollow relief,” in which the design is incised deeper than the background. What commonplace item found in many of our pockets features bas-relief?More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Thomas Hardy


Poetry is emotion put into measure. The emotion must come by nature, but the measure can be acquired by art.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ST. GEORGE’S DAY


St. George’s Day

Nothing much is known for certain about St. George, but the patron saint of England is popularly known in medieval legend for slaying a vicious dragon that was besieging a town in Cappadocia. When the people saw what had happened, they were converted to Christianity. To this day, St. George is often depicted with a dragon. St. George’s Day, sometimes referred to as Georgemas, has been observed as a religious feast as well as a holiday since the 13th century. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564)


William Shakespeare (1564)

Though his true date of birth remains unknown, the birthday of famed playwright and poet William Shakespeare is traditionally observed on April 23, the same day on which he died 52 years later. Since his death, his plays, such as Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet, have been performed and studied all over the world. Some scholars have speculated that Shakespeare did not write all of the works attributed to him. Who do they suggest was responsible for authoring the Shakespearean canon? More…Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: “NEW COKE” INTRODUCED (1985)


“New Coke” Introduced (1985)

“New” Coke was the sweeter drink introduced in 1985 by The Coca-Cola Company to replace its flagship soda, Coca-Cola. The move was intended to cater to an apparent public preference for a sweeter soft drink and to combat Pepsi’s growing popularity. Public reaction was devastating, with thousands voicing disapproval, and the new cola quickly entered the pantheon of major marketing flops. What happened when Coke’s original formula, renamed “Coca-Cola Classic,” was reintroduced? More… Discuss

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Stem Cells Created from Adults’ Cells

For the first time, researchers have successfullycreated stem cells from the skin cells of adults. This is considered the first step in developing patient-specific cells lines to treat diseases like heart failure, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, and vision loss, but it is also the first step inhuman reproductive cloning, an issue fraught with ethical dilemmas. To create the stem cells, researchers fused a grown skin cell with an ovum whose DNA had been removed. The resulting embryo contains an inner lining of pluripotent stem cells. Of 39 attempts to create stem cells from adult cells, the researchers succeeded only once for each of their two skin cell donors. More… Discuss

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THE FIRST RED SCARE


The First Red Scare

After World War I, the US was gripped by fears of communist and anarchist infiltration. Pressured by Congress, the Justice Department launched massive raids—led by Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer—targeting communists, anarchists, and foreigners. More than 10,000 people were arrested and hundreds were deported, some for membership in Communist or left-wing groups, others on no greater pretext than that they looked or sounded foreign. What non-event effectively ended the Scare in 1920? More… Discuss

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Sain of the Day Feastday April 23: St. George: Patron of England & Catalonia


Image of St. George

Pictures of St. George usually show him killing a dragon to rescue a beautiful lady. The dragon stands for wickedness. The lady stands for God‘s holy truth. St. George was a brave martyr who was victorious over the devil.

He was a soldier in the army of the Roman Emperor Diocletian, and he was one of the Emperor’s favorite soldiers. Now Diocletian was a pagan and a bitter enemy to the Christians. He put to death every Christian he could find. George was a brave Christian, a real soldier of Christ. Without fear, he went to the Emperor and sternly scolded him for being so cruel. Then he gave up his position in the Roman army. For this he was tortured in many terrible ways and finally beheaded.

So boldly daring and so cheerful was St. George in declaring his Faith and in dying for it that Christians felt courage when they heard about it. Many songs and poems were written about this martyr. Soldiers, especially, have always been devoted to him.

We all have some “dragon” we have to conquer. It might be pride, or anger, or laziness, or greediness, or something else. Let us make sure we fight against these “dragons”, with God’s help. Then we can call ourselves real soldiers of Christ. 

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SAINT OF THE DAY April 22: ST. ABDIESUS April 22


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 22 Saint of the Day

ST. ABDIESUS
April 22: Also called Hebed Jesus, a deacon in the Christian community of … Read More

April
22

 

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Vatican discovers 6th century fresco of St. Paul


The restoration of a tomb in the catacombs of St. Gennaro in Naples, revealed a new discovery. The image of St. Paul…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: THE MOODY BLUES — Live at the Isle Of Wight Festival — 1970



THE MOODY BLUESLive at the Isle Of Wight Festival — 1970

01. Threshold Of A Dream
0 2. Return To The Island
03. Isle Of Wight Pop Festival 1970
04. Tear Down The Fences
05. Early Beginnings: Bo Diddley
06. The Mellotron
07. Psychedelia And Change
08. Introduction To The Concert
09. Gypsy
10. Tuesday Afternoon
11. Never Comes The Day
12. Tortoise And The Hare
13. Question
14. The Sunset
15. Melancholy Man
16. Nights In White Satin
17. Legend Of A Mind
18. Encore: Ride My See-Saw
19. Reflections
20. Late Lament

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Taj Mahal – January 16,1971 – Fillmore East – Late Show (Blues)



Taj Mahal
Fillmore East,NYC Jan.16,1971 Late Show

1-I’m So Tired (?)
2-Banjo Instrumental
3-Good Morning Miss Brown
4-Ain’t Gwine To Whistle Dixie Any Mo’
5-Sweet Mama Janisse
6-Going Up To The Country And Paint My Mailbox Blue
7-Farther On Down The Road You Will Accompany Me
8-You Ain’t No Street Walker Mama Honey But I Do Love The Way You Strut Your Stuff
9-Diving Duck Blues
10-Corinna

Taj Mahal website (You're one click away from the website)

Taj Mahal website (You’re one click away from the website)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal (musician).jpg

Taj Mahal in 2005
Background information
Birth name Henry Saint Clair Fredericks
Also known as Taj Mahal
Born May 17, 1942 (age 71)
HarlemNew YorkUnited States
Genres BluesWorld musicrhythm and bluesblues rocksoul blues,jazz bluescountry bluesdelta blueselectric bluesreggae,reggae fusion
Occupations Musician
Singer-songwriter
Instruments Guitar
Banjo
Harmonica
Piano
Ukulele
Years active 1964–present
Labels Ruf, Columbia Records
Warner Bros. Records
Gramavision
Hannibal Records
Private MusicRCA Victor
Associated acts The Rising Sons
The Phantom Blues Band
The Hula Blues Band
The Taj Mahal Trio
Buffy Sainte-Marie
Ry Cooder
Website tajblues.com
Notable instruments
National Steel[1]
Dobro[1]

Henry Saint Clair Fredericks (born May 17, 1942), who uses the stage name Taj Mahal, is an AmericanGrammy Award-winning blues musician. He often incorporates elements of world music into his works. A self-taught singer-songwriter and film composer who plays the guitarpianobanjo and harmonica (among many other instruments),[2] Mahal has done much to reshape the definition and scope of blues music over the course of his almost 50-year career by fusing it with nontraditional forms, including sounds from the CaribbeanAfrica and theSouth Pacific.[3]

Born Henry Saint Clair Fredericks, Jr. on May 17, 1942 in Harlem, New York, Mahal grew up in Springfield, Massachusetts. Raised in a musical environment, his mother was the member of a local gospel choir and his father was a West Indian jazz arranger and piano player. His family owned a shortwave radio which received music broadcasts from around the world, exposing him at an early age to world music.[4] Early in childhood he recognized the stark differences between the popular music of his day and the music that was played in his home. He also became interested in jazz, enjoying the works of musicians such as Charles MingusThelonious Monk and Milt Jackson.[5] His parents came of age during the Harlem Renaissance, instilling in their son a sense of pride in his West Indian and African ancestry through their stories.[6]

Taj Mahal at the Museumsquartier in Vienna (Jazz-Fest Wien) in 2007

Because his father was a musician, his house was frequently the host of other musicians from the CaribbeanAfrica, and the United States. His father, Henry Saint Clair Fredericks Sr., was called “The Genius” by Ella Fitzgerald before starting his family.[7] Early on, Henry Jr. developed an interest in African music, which he studied assiduously as a young man. His parents also encouraged him to pursue music, starting him out withclassical piano lessons. He also studied the clarinettrombone andharmonica.[8] When Mahal was eleven his father was killed in an accident at his own construction company, crushed by a tractor when it flipped over. This was an extremely traumatic experience for the boy.[7]

Mahal’s mother later remarried. His stepfather owned a guitar which Taj began using at age 13 or 14, receiving his first lessons from a new neighbor from North Carolina of his own age that played acoustic blues guitar.[8] His name was Lynwood Perry, the nephew of the famous bluesman Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup. In high school Mahal sang in a doo-wop group.[7]

For some time Mahal thought of pursuing farming over music. He had developed a passion for farming that nearly rivaled his love of music—coming to work on a farm first at age 16. It was a dairy farm in Palmer, Massachusetts, not far from Springfield. By age nineteen he had become farmforeman, getting up a bit after 4:00 a.m. and running the place. “I milked anywhere between thirty-five and seventy cows a day. I clipped udders. I grew corn. I grew Tennessee redtop clover. Alfalfa.”[9] Mahal believes in growing one’s own food, saying, “You have a whole generation of kids who think everything comes out of a box and a can, and they don’t know you can grow most of your food.” Because of his personal support of the family farm, Mahal regularly performs at Farm Aid concerts.[9]

Taj Mahal, his stage name, came to him in dreams about GandhiIndia, and social tolerance. He started using it in 1959[10] or 1961[7]—around the same time he began attending the University of Massachusetts. Despite having attended a vocational agriculture school, becoming a member of the National FFA Organization, and majoring in animal husbandry and minoring in veterinary science and agronomy, Mahal decided to take the route of music instead of farming. In college he led arhythm and blues band called Taj Mahal & The Elektras and, before heading for the West Coast, he was also part of a duo with Jessie Lee Kincaid.[7]

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Taj Mahal + James Cotton – Honky Tonk Women And The Rolling Stones tooooo!



44 years after their first performance at Hyde Park, Rolling Stones are back in London this summer. To recollect that historic gig of 1969 you can watch Stones performing “Honky Tonk Women

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances, Op. 35 – III. Allegro moderato alla marcia



Related articles

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: EARTH DAY


Earth Day

The first Earth Day was observed on April 22, 1970, to draw public attention to the need for cleaning up the Earth’s air and water and for conserving our natural resources. Earth Day is now observed regularly throughout the United States and in many other countries. Typical ways of celebrating Earth Day includeplanting trees, picking up roadside trash, and conducting various programs for recycling and conservation. Schoolchildren may be asked to use only recyclable containers for their snacks and lunches, and families often try to give up wasteful habits. More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Herman Melville


It is not down in any map; true places never are.

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: The Queen’s birthday


The Queen’s birthday 2014: Here’s why she has two birthdays, and you only get one

Why the Queen has two birthdays and you only get one
The Queen turns 88 today (Picture: Sang Tan/AP)

Happy birthday to the Queen! Today Her Majesty will celebrate her actual birthday (as opposed to her official birthday, which falls in June). Here’s a complete guide to why we celebrate her birthday twice each year.

So the Queen gets two birthdays? Yep. Her Majesty was born on April 21 1926, so today is her actual birthday. 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: JOHN KERRY TESTIFIES BEFORE CONGRESS ON VIETNAM (1971)


John Kerry Testifies before Congress on Vietnam (1971)

Though he was a decorated Vietnam veteran—a recipient of the Silver Star, Bronze Star, and three Purple Hearts—John Kerry was also an outspoken opponent of the war. In 1971, he appeared before the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations to urge the US to pursue an immediate and unilateral withdrawal. In his testimony, he also presented the findings of the Winter Soldier Investigation, which collected firsthand accounts of war crimes from Vietnam veterans. Why was Kerry arrested a month later?More… Discuss

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NEWS: CHILDHOOD HURTS PERSIST FOR DECADES


Childhood Hurts Persist for Decades

Yet another study, this one the first to look at the effects of childhood bullying in late adulthood, is adding to the growing body of evidence on the persistent and pervasive social, physical, and psychological effects of bullying. At age 50, people who were frequent victims of childhood bullying remained at increased risk of mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. They also tended to report a lower quality of life. The findings suggest that we never really outgrow the trauma of bullying but instead carry it with us throughout our lives. More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: SHAMANISM


Shamanism

Shamanism is premised on the belief that the visible world is pervaded by invisible spirits that affect the lives of the living. Intermediaries known as shamans are believed to have contact with these forces and to be able to cure illness, foretell the future, and control natural events. Some societies distinguish shamans who cure from sorcerers who harm, while others believe that all shamans have both curative and deadly powers. What methods do shamans use to make contact with the spirit world? More…Discuss

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Ukraine: Photos show undercover Russian troops


An armed pro-Russian man stands on a street in Sloviansk, Ukraine, on Monday, April 21. Ukraine has seen a sharp rise in tensions since a new pro-European government took charge of the country in February. Moscow branded the new government illegitimate and annexed Ukraine's Crimea region last month, citing threats to Crimea's Russian-speaking majority. And in eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian separatists have seized government and police buildings in numerous towns and cities.Ukraine: Photos show undercover Russian troops.

REGINA SPEKTOR LYRICS “The Sword & The Pen”


[youtube.com/watch?v=OSLDUqPLe4s]

REGINA SPEKTOR LYRICS

“The Sword & The Pen”

Don’t let me get out of this kiss
Don’t let me say what I say
The things that scare us today
what if they happen someday
Don’t let me out of your arms
For now

What if the sword kills the pen
What if the god kills the man
And if he does it with love
Well then it’s death from above
And death from above is still a death

I don’t want to live without you
I don’t want to live without you
I don’t want to live
I don’t want to live
Without you

For those who still can recall
The desperate colors of fall
The sweet caresses of May
Only in poems remain
No one recites them these days
For the shame

So what if nothing is safe
So what if no one is saved
No matter how sweet
No matter how brave
What if each to his own lonely grave

I don’t want to live without you
I don’t want to live without you
I don’t want to live
I don’t want to live
Without you

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26


[youtube.com/watch?v=qdGh5UqbbuA]

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: 
Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26 (1898)

[1] Allegro molto moderato
[2] Allegretto scherzando 14:30
[3] Molto andante 22:09
[4] Presto 34:16

Andrei Csaba (cello)
Dan Grigore (piano)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Arturo Toscanini – Poet And Peasant Overture (Von Suppé)



Toscanini conducts the NBC Symphony Orchestra in a rousing performance of the familiar “Poet and Peasant” Overture by Franz von Suppé. From the NBC broadcast of July 18, 1943. Originally issued on LP as RCA Victor LM-6026.

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Theme From Schindler’s List conducted by John Williams (featuring Itzhak Perlman)



Composer and Conductor : John Williams
Violin : Itzhak Perlman

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Cello Sonata No. 1 in F major, Op. 5, No. 1 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Cello Sonata No. 1 in F major, Op. 5, No. 1 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)

00:00 – Adagio sostenuto – Allegro
17:59 – Rondo. Allegro vivace

Paul Tortelier, cello
Eric Heidsieck, piano

recorded: 1972

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: SIR THOMAS BEECHAM & ‘FAUST’ Ballet Music by Charles Gounod



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: SIR THOMAS BEECHAM & ‘FAUST’ Ballet Music by Charles Gounod

This wonderfully melodic ballet music is given a superb performance by Beecham & the Royal philharmonic, the orchestra he had founded during 1946. In their time, surely Sir Thomas & Pierre Monteux where inimitable here.

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Make Music PArt of Your Life: Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence



The String Sextet in D minor “Souvenir de Florence“, Op. 70, is a string sextet scored for 2 violins, 2 violas, and 2 cellos composed in the European summer of 1890 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky dedicated the work to the St. Petersburg Chamber Music Society in response to his becoming an Honorary Member. The work, in the traditional four-movement form, was titled “Souvenir de Florence” because the composer sketched one of the work’s principal themes while visiting Florence, Italy, where he composed The Queen of Spades. The work was revised between December 1891 and January 1892, before being premiered in 1892.

1. Allegro con spirito (00:00)
2. Adagio cantabile e con moto (10:16)
3. Allegretto moderato (19:56)
4. Allegro con brio e vivace (26:11)

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SAINT OF THE DAY April 21: St. Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury and Confessor APRIL 21,A.D.


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 21 Saint of the Day

ST. ANSELM
April 21: St. Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury and Confessor APRIL 21,A.D. … Read More

April
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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: KARTINI DAY


Kartini Day

Kartini Day is an Indonesian holiday commemorating the birth in 1879 of Raden Ajeng Kartini, one of the country’s national heroes and a pioneer in the emancipation of Indonesian women. After marrying in 1903, she began a fight for the right of women to be educated and against the unwritten but all-pervading Javanese law, Adat. Throughout Indonesia on this day, women wear their national dress to symbolize their unity, and the nation enjoys parades, lectures, and various school activities. More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Gardens are not made by singing “Oh, how beautiful,” and sitting in the shade.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ANTHONY QUINN


Anthony Quinn (1915)

Quinn was a Mexican-American artist, writer, and Oscar-winning actor. He boxed in his youth and studied architecture under Frank Lloyd Wright before turning to acting. He achieved international stardom in the 1950s and 60s for his ability to portray ethnically diverse characters, most notably Zorba the Greek. He appeared in over 100 films and won Academy Awards for his supporting roles in two, Viva Zapata! and Lust for Life. His role in the latter film lasted just how many minutes? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: “RED BARON” SHOT DOWN BY ALLIED FIRE (1918)


“Red Baron” Shot Down by Allied Fire (1918)

Manfred von Richthofen, the “Red Baron,” was the World War I German aviator who commanded the flying squadron that became known as Richthofen’s Flying Circus. He was the war’s most successful flying ace, shooting down 80 aircraft before being killed in action. In April 1918, he was shot in the chest while dogfighting over France. He managed to land his plane but died soon after. The Red Baron has since become a symbol of dexterity, daring, and victory. Who fired the shot that killed him? More… Discuss

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NEWS: US GAINING GROUND IN FIGHT AGAINST HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS


US Gaining Ground in Fight against Hospital-Acquired Infections

The risk of contracting a hospital-acquired infection is dropping in the US, and that is good news, but the statistics are still far from comforting. According to theCenters for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in every 25 patients in the US will pick up an infection at a hospital or similar medical facility. This means that over the course of a year, about 600,000 patients come down with a nosocomial, or hospital-acquired, infection. Of them, about 74,000 end up battling more than one. Still, this is significantly down from the 1970s, when an estimated 2.1 million patients a year would develop a hospital-acquired infection, and even from the 1990s, when this number was about 1.7 million. More… Discuss

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