Monthly Archives: May 2014

quotation: James Madison


I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.

James Madison (1751-1836) Discuss

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today’s birthday: Rachel Carson (1907)


Rachel Carson (1907)

Carson was an American writer and marine biologist. Her book Silent Spring, a provocative study of the dangers of certain insecticides, is generally acknowledged as the impetus for the modern environmental movement. In other well-known books on sea life, such as Under the Sea Wind, she combines keen scientific observation with rich poetic description. What did Carson’s marital status lead former Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson to conclude about her political leanings? More… Discuss
[youtube.com/watch?v=Ipbc-6IvMQI]
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this day in the yesteryear: Jawaharlal Nehru Dies in Office (1964)


Jawaharlal Nehru Dies in Office (1964)

Nehru was an Indian statesman and leader with Mohandas Gandhi in the struggle for Indian home rule. Nehru served as president of the Indian National Congress, and, in 1947, became India’s first prime minister, leading the country through the difficult early years of independence. Domestically, he promoted democracy, socialism, secularism, and unity, adapting modern values to Indian conditions. His daughter, Indira Gandhi, later served as prime minister. What is believed to have killed Nehru? More… Discuss

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article: Maple Syrup


Maple Syrup

A popular topping for pancakes, waffles, French toast, and the like, maple syrup comes from the sap of sugar maple and black maple trees. In springtime, taps inserted in the trees begin flowing with sap, which is collected, strained, and concentrated by boiling. Native Americans were the first to prepare syrup from maple sap, using hot rocks or freezing to concentrate the sap. They shared their methods with arriving colonists—and the rest is history. What is produced by boiling down maple syrup? More… Discuss

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news: Monster Dinosaur Find in Argentina


Monster Dinosaur Find in Argentina

Paleontologists have unearthed evidence in Argentina of what may have been the largest creature ever to walk the Earth. The fossilized bones, believed to be those of a previously unknown species of herbivorous titanosaur that roamed the forests of Patagonia some 95 to 100 million years ago, suggest it was 130 ft (40 m) long from head to tail, stood 65 ft (20 m) tall, and weighed a whopping 85 tons—the equivalent of 14 African elephants. More… Discuss

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word: effulgence


effulgence

Definition: (noun) A brilliant radiance.
Synonyms: refulgence, shine, radiance
Usage: It is another sun—an entirely different sun—that casts its eternal noonday effulgence upon the face of the inner world. Discuss.

FotoSketcher – manastirea sambata de sus – pencil sketch 1 (my art collection)


FotoSketcher - manastirea sambata de sus - pencil sketch 1

FotoSketcher – manastirea sambata de sus – pencil sketch 1

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FotoSketcher – manastirea sambata de sus – emergence 2 (my art collection)


FotoSketcher - manastirea sambata de sus - emergence 2

FotoSketcher – manastirea sambata de sus – emergence 2

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Pope Francis Pilgrimage to Middle East: The Important Details


Pope FrancisPope Francis Pilgrimage to Middle East: The Important Details

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make music part of your life series: Kayla Wong Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 Part 4


[youtube.com/watch?v=bMO3M5YY4BE]

Kayla Wong Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 Part 4

http://www.kaylawong.net

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Beethoven Piano Concerto n.3 op.37 – Kempff – Bernstein – NYP (Live 1966)


[youtube.com/watch?v=ZHcR_05JmqI]

Beethoven Piano Concerto n.3 op.37 – Kempff – Bernstein – NYP (Live 1966)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Title page, first edition

The Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1800 and was first performed on 5 April 1803, with the composer as soloist. The year for which the concerto was composed (1800) has however been questioned by contemporary musicologists.[1][2] It was published in 1804. During that same performance, the Second Symphony and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also premiered.[3] The composition was dedicated to Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia. The first primary theme is reminiscent of that of Mozart’s 24th Piano Concerto.

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in E-flat, 2 trumpets in C, timpani, strings and piano soloist.

As is standard for Classical/Romantic-era concertos, the work is in three movements:

  1. Allegro con brio
  2. Largo
  3. Rondo. Allegro

I. Allegro con brio

 
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This movement is known to make forceful use of the theme (direct and indirect) throughout.

Orchestral exposition: In the orchestral exposition, the theme is introduced by the strings, and used throughout the movement. It is developed several times. In the third section (second subject), the clarinet introduces the second main theme, which is in the relative major key, E-flat major.

Second exposition: The piano enters with an ascending scale motif. The structure of the exposition in the piano solo is similar to that of the orchestral exposition.

Development: The piano enters, playing similar scales used in the beginning of the second exposition, this time in D major rather than C minor. The music is generally quiet.

Recapitulation: The orchestra restates the theme in fortissimo, with the wind instruments responding by building up a minor ninth chord as in the exposition. For the return of the second subject, Beethoven modulates to the tonic major, C major. A dark transition to the cadenza occurs, immediately switching from C major to C minor.

Cadenza: Beethoven wrote one cadenza for this movement. The cadenza Beethoven wrote is at times stormy and ends on a series of trills that calm down to pianissimo.

Coda: Beethoven subverts the expectation of a return to the tonic at the end of the cadenza by prolonging the final trill and eventually arriving on a dominant seventh. The piano plays a series of arpeggios before the music settles into the home key of C minor. Then the music intensifies before a full tutti occurs, followed by the piano playing descending arpeggios, the ascending scale from the second exposition, and finally a resolute ending on C.

II. Largo

 
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The second movement, which is in E major, opens with the solo piano. The opening is marked with detailed pedalling instructions.

III. Rondo – Allegro

The finale is in a sonata rondo form. The movement begins in C minor with an agitated theme played only by the piano. The movement ends with a C major coda marked presto.

First performance

Cadenza of the first movement

The score was incomplete at its first performance. Beethoven’s friend, Ignaz von Seyfried, who turned the pages of the music for him that night, later wrote:[3]

I saw almost nothing but empty pages; at the most, on one page or another a few Egyptian hieroglyphs wholly unintelligible to me were scribbled down to serve as clues for him; for he played nearly all the solo part from memory since, as was so often the case, he had not had time to set it all down on paper.

 

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Johann Joseph Fux. Ouverture in D minor. E 109


[youtube.com/watch?v=hFJnPkzrv2s]

Johann Joseph Fux. Ouverture in D minor. E 109

Johann Joseph Fux

Ouverture in D minor. E 109

I. Grave – Allegro – Grave
II. Menuet
III. Aria
IV. Fuga
V. Lentement
VI. Gique
VII. Aria

Armonico tributo Austria
Lorenz Duftschmid, director
Recording; September 1997

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Going Home Antonin Dvorak BYU Choir


[youtube.com/watch?v=0FMUttpSllY]

Going Home Antonin Dvorak BYU Choir

William Arms Fisher, a pupil of the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak, wrote the lyrics to and adapted the music to the theme of Dvorak’s 2nd Movement to the New World Symphony. These are his words now sung by the BYU Choir.

“Goin’ home, goin’ home, I’m a goin’ home;
Quiet-like, some still day, I’m jes’ goin’ home.

It’s not far, jes’ close by,
Through an open door;
Work all done, care laid by,
Goin’ to fear no more.

Mother’s there ‘spectin’ me,
Father’s waitin’ too;
Lots o’ folks gather’d there,
All the friends I knew,
All the friends I knew.
Home, I’m goin’ home!”

NSRW Antonin Dvorak

NSRW Antonin Dvorak (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Largo, with its haunting English horn solo, is the outpouring of Dvorak’s own home-longing, with something of the loneliness of far-off prairie horizons, the faint memory of the red-man’s bygone days, and a sense of the tragedy of the black-man as it sings in his “spirituals.” Deeper still it is a moving expression of that nostalgia of the soul all human beings feel. That the lyric opening theme of the Largo should spontaneously suggest the words ‘Goin’ home, goin’ home’ is natural enough, and that the lines that follow the melody should take the form of a negro spiritual accords with the genesis of the symphony.

— William Arms Fisher, Boston, July 21, 1922.

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Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor by Irving Berlin


[youtube.com/watch?v=rsRemx7ANg4]

Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor by Irving Berlin

Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor

Words by Emma Lazarus
Music by Barbara Klaskin Silberg ©2000

To download this song, Please visit:
http://www.TinyTuneTown.com or
http://www.SongsForLearning

For more information on performing this song, please visit:
http://www.MrsMusic.com

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Credinta, poetic thought by George-B


Credinta, poetic thought by George-B

Credinta nu-i oarba:
Ea are un ochi ascuns, inautrul fiintei
de vede tot ce va sa fie…
E doar un suspin, fara alinare,
Sau poate un respir putin prea scurt,
ce parca cere mai mult,
un cascat, un pic de aer mai mult…

credinta nu-i oarba:
precum un magnet nevazut,
un instinct indrumator,
un memento in DNA, cine stie cat de batran…
credinta nu-i oarba.

http://obiectivortodox.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/manastirea-sambata-de-sus-12.jpg

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make music pat of your life series: BORODIN – In the Steppes of Central Asia


[youtube.com/watch?v=X8znXcCwQWU]

BORODIN – In the Steppes of Central Asia

Alexander Borodin
In the Steppes of Central Asia 7:27

Exlusive BBC Studio Recording
BBC Philharmonic
Vassily Sinaisky (conductor)

Recorded in Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester
on 28 April 2007

The BBC Music Magazine Collection
Vol.16 No.3

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Historic musical moments: Brahms – Symphony No. 2 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Leonard Bernstein – 1982


[youtube.com/watch?v=n-qMtWVf0NA]

Brahms – Symphony No. 2Wiener PhilharmonikerLeonard Bernstein – 1982

Johannes Brahms
Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 73

I. Allegro non troppo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (00:42)
II. Adagio non troppo – L’istesso tempo, ma grazioso . . . (21:53)
III. Allegretto grazioso (quasi andantino) . . . . . . . . . . . . (34:41)
IV. Finale. Allegro con spirito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (40:13)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein

Recorded live at the Große Musikvereinssaal
Vienna, 1-6 September 1982

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Saint of the Day – May 25: St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi


Saint of the Day

May 25 Saint of the Day

St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi
May 25: It would be easy to concentrate on the mystical experiences God … Read More

May
25
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quotation: “A friend is a second self”. Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC)


A friend is a second self.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) Disc

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today’s holiday: Argentine National Day


Argentine National Day

Argentina was one of a number of Spanish colonies controlled by the Spanish viceroy in Lima, Peru. On May 25, 1810, Buenos Aires declared its independence from the viceroyalty but continued to pledge loyalty to the Spanish crown. May 25 is observed throughout the country as the anniversary of the revolution; independence from Spain wasn’t declared until July 9, 1816. Both days are national holidays and are observed with religious services at the cathedral and special performances at the Colón Theatre in Buenos Aires. More… Discuss

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today’s birthday: Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803)


Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803)

Emerson was a poet and essayist who established himself as a leading spokesman for transcendentalism. He developed his own philosophy combining German idealism, Neo-Platonism, and Asian mysticism, and dominated the American lecture circuit of the 1830s with his winter lecture tours, which included the notable essaysThe Over-Soul” and “Self-Reliance.” Although he published many volumes of essays and poetry, his lectures provided most of his income. What famous philosopher was Emerson’s godson? More… Discuss

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this day in the yesteryear: Edict of Worms Declares Martin Luther an Outlaw and Heretic (1521)


Edict of Worms Declares Martin Luther an Outlaw and Heretic (1521)

The Diet of Worms was an assembly opened by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V to deal with the question of Martin Luther’s recalcitrant behavior. Luther was asked to retract his teachings condemned by the pope, but he refused. Various theologians argued with him for a week, but he would not change his position. On May 25, Luther was formally declared an outlaw in the Edict of Worms, and the lines of the Reformation were thereby hardened. Who hid Luther to protect him from the edict’s enforcers? More… Discuss

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news: Measles Virus Used to Wipe Out Cancer (multiple myeloma)


Measles Virus Used to Wipe Out Cancer

Researchers are cautiously optimistic about an experimental cancer treatment that uses a modified measles virus to target and kill cancerous cells. Two out of six multiple myeloma patients who were treated with extremely high doses of the engineered viruses responded to the treatment, with one appearing to enter into complete remission. These two patients were found to have few or no circulating measles antibodies, important because this affords the virus a chance to attack the cancer cells before the patient’s immune system begins fighting off the virus. More… Discuss

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article: Genetic Counseling


Genetic Counseling

Genetic counseling is the process by which patients at risk of developing or transmitting an inherited disorder are advised of the nature and consequences of the disorder, the probability of developing it or passing it on, and the available treatment options. Typically, people seek counseling because they have a family history of genetic disorders or because their job or lifestyle exposes them to health risks like radiation or chemicals. What are some of the conditions commonly screened for? More… Discuss

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word: despotism


despotism 

Definition: (noun) Rule by or as if by a despot; absolute power or authority.
Synonyms: authoritarianism, Caesarism, dictatorship, monocracy, one-man rule, totalitarianism, tyranny, absolutism
Usage: The despotism of heaven is the one absolutely perfect government. Discuss.
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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Edvard Grieg – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16


[youtube.com/watch?v=mD1lFO6dLPo]

Edvard GriegPiano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16

Leif Ove Andsnes, piano.
Berliner Philharmoniker, conducted by Mariss Jansons.

The concerto is in three movements:
  *Allegro molto moderato (A minor)
  *Adagio (D flat major)
  *Allegro moderato molto e marcato – Quasi presto – Andante   maestoso (A minor → F major → A minor → A major)

Edvard Grieg

Cover of Edvard Grieg

The first movement is noted for the timpani roll in the first bar that leads to a dramatic piano flourish. The movement is in the Sonata form. The movement finishes with a virtuosic cadenza and a similar flourish as in the beginning.
The second movement is a lyrical movement in D flat major, which leads directly into the third movement.
The third movement opens in A minor 4/4 time with an energetic theme (Theme 1), which is followed by a lyrical 3/4 theme in F Major (Theme 2). The movement returns to Theme 1. Following this recapitulation is the 3/4 A Major Quasi presto section, which consists of a variation of Theme 1. The movement concludes with the Andate maestoso in A Major (or in A mixolydian), which consists of a dramatic rendition of Theme 2 (as opposed to the lyrical fashion with which Theme 2 is introduced).
Performance time of the whole concerto is around 28 minutes.

Edvard Grieg: Born in Bergen 1843.

Berliner Philharmoniker

Cover of Berliner Philharmoniker

After being taught piano by his mother, he went to the Leipzig Conservatory at the age of 15 to study music where his teachers included Ignaz Moscheles and Carl Reinecke. He then lived in Copenhagen and came under the influence of Niels W.
Gade who encouraged him to compose a symphony and there also met fellow Norwegian composer Rikard Nordraak who inspired Grieg to champion the cause of Norwegian music. He went on to become his country’s greatest and most famous composer who excelled in many genres including orchestral, chamber, solo piano, vocal and choral. His output of purely orchestral music was small but included
his Piano Concerto, Symphonic Dances and the 2 Suites derived from his incidental music to Ibsen’s “Peer Gynt.”

Painters:
Ludvig Skramstad
Nils Hansteen
Philip Barlag
Ole Juul
Thorolf Holmboe
Sophus Jacobsen
Lyder Wenzel Nicolaysen
Niels Björnson Möller

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUOR LIFE SERIES: Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)


[youtube.com/watch?v=FLlKgu1sx4s]

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)

Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Paris Bourse

Mov.I: Adagio maestoso – Allegro con brio 00:00
Mov.II: Allegretto 09:35
Mov.III: Menuetto: Vivace 13:54
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 18:04

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand’s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

Then comes a high-spirited Minuet, which, with its accented up-beats, suggests a scherzo and a popular flavor due to this low and popular gesture, and is contrasted by a graceful Ländler-like trio.

The concluding Presto in tarantella rhythm is remarkable for its bold harmonic progressions and for its wealth of dynamic contrast. This movement is in sonata form with a looser conception.

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HISTORIC MUSICAL MOMENTS: Clara Haskil: Schumann – ‘Abegg’ Variations, Op. 1


[youtube.com/watch?v=UqOvdlthl8E]

Clara Haskil: Schumann – ‘Abegg’ Variations, Op. 1

Clara Haskil (7 January 1895 – 7 December 1960) was a Romanian classical pianist, renowned as an interpreter of the classical and early romantic repertoire. Haskil was particularly noted for her performances and recordings of Mozart. Many considered her the foremost interpreter of Mozart in her time. She was also noted as a superb interpreter of Beethoven, Schumann, and Scarlatti. Haskil was born into a Sephardic Jewish family in Bucharest, Romania and studied in Vienna under Richard Robert (whose memorable pupils also included Rudolf Serkin and George Szell) and briefly with Ferruccio Busoni. She later moved to Paris, where she started studying with Gabriel Fauré’s pupil Joseph Morpain, whom she always credited as one of her greatest influences. The same year she entered the Paris Conservatoire, officially to study with Alfred Cortot although most of her instruction came from Lazare Lévy and Mme Giraud-Letarse, and graduated at age 15 with a Premier Prix. She also graduated with a Premier Prix in violin. Upon graduating, Haskil began to tour Europe, though her career was cut short by one of the numerous physical ailments she suffered throughout her life. In 1913 she was fitted with a plaster cast in an attempt to halt the progression of scoliosis. Frequent illnesses, combined with extreme stage fright that appeared in 1920, kept her from critical or financial success. Most of her life was spent in abject poverty. It was not until after World War II, during a series of concerts in the Netherlands in 1949, that she began to win acclaim. Well regarded as a chamber musician, Haskil collaborated with such famed musicians as George Enescu, Eugène Ysaÿe, Pablo Casals, Joseph Szigeti, Géza Anda, Isaac Stern and Arthur Grumiaux, with whom she played her last concert. While renowned primarily as a violinist, Grumiaux was also a fine pianist, and he and Haskil would sometimes swap instruments. She played as a soloist under the baton of such conductors as Ansermet, Barbirolli, Baumgartner, Beecham, Boult, Celibidache, Cluytens, Fricsay, Giulini, Inghelbrecht, Jochum, Karajan, Kempe, Klemperer, Kubelík, Markevitch, Monteux, Münch, Paray, Rosbaud, Sawallisch, Solti, Stokowski, Szell, among many others. One of her most prominent performances as a soloist with an orchestra is recording of Mozart’s Piano Concertos Nos. 20 and 24 in November 1960 with Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux conducted by Igor Markevitch (issued on CD by Philips Classics under No. 464 718-2); this recording features an unusually slow, pensive performance of K466’s part III and a very subtle, highly lyrical and yet, in some way, vigorous playing of K491’s part II. Haskil died from injuries received through a fall at the staircase of a Brussels train station. She was to play a concert with Arthur Grumiaux the following day. An esteemed friend of Haskil, Charles Chaplin, described her talent by saying “In my lifetime I have met three geniuses; Professor Einstein, Winston Churchill, and Clara Haskil. I am not a trained musician but I can only say that her touch was exquisite, her expression wonderful, and her technique extraordinary.” (Swiss Radio interview, 19 April 1961.) The Clara Haskil International Piano Competition is held biannually in her memory. The brochure reads: “The Clara Haskil Competition was founded in 1963 to honour and perpetuate the memory of the incomparable Swiss pianist, of Romanian origin, who was born in Bucharest in 1895. It takes place every two years in Vevey, Switzerland, where Clara Haskil resided from 1942 until her death in Brussels in 1960. A street in Vevey bears her name. The Competition welcomes young pianists from all over the world, who pursue the musical ideal that is inspired by Clara Haskil and which will always remain exemplary.”… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clara_Ha…

A link to this wonderful artists personal Website: http://www.deccaclassics.com/cat/sing…

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TODAY’S SAINT, MAY 23: St. John Baptist Rossi


Image of St. John Baptist Rossi

St. John Baptist Rossi

This holy priest was born in 1698 at the village of Voltaggio in the diocese of Genoa and was one of the four children of an excellent and highly respected couple. When he ws ten a nobleman and his … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

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TODAY’S HOILIDAY: National Family Month


National Family Month

National Family Month is observed during the five-week period between Mother’s Day in May and Father’s Day in June. It was started by KidsPeace, a private, not-for-profit organization. The organization believes that such observances provide opportunities for parents, grandparents, and caregivers to be more involved in the lives of the children for whom they are responsible. Families are urged to spend time doing things together during this five-week period, whether it is taking a family vacation or simply doing chores around the house. More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: E. M. Forster


 

The most successful career must show a waste of strength that might have removed mountains, and the most unsuccessful is not that of the man who is taken unprepared, but of him who has prepared and is never taken. On a tragedy of that kind our national morality is duly silent.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Franz Anton Mesmer (1734)


Franz Anton Mesmer (1734)

Mesmer was a German physician who experimented with an early form of hypnosis, known as “mesmerism.” He developed a doctrine of “animal magnetism,” believing that harmony could be restored in the human body by inducing “crises”—trance states often ending in delirium or convulsions. He carried out dramatic demonstrations of his ability to “mesmerize” his patients using magnetized objects. Accused by Viennese physicians of fraud, he left Austria for France. What scandal plagued Mesmer’s career? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN HISTORY: Bonnie and Clyde Ambushed and Killed (1934)


Bonnie and Clyde Ambushed and Killed (1934)

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were notorious robbers who went on a 21-month crime spree in the central US from 1932 to 1934. They captivated Americans during the “public enemy era” and continue to do so today through films and songs. Betrayed by a friend, Bonnie and Clyde were tracked, ambushed, and killed on a desolate stretch of Louisiana highway by a posse of officers using armor-piercing rounds. Though remembered primarily as bank robbers, Bonnie and Clyde actually preferred to rob what? More… Discuss

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Thai Army Declares Coup


Thai Army Declares Coup

The Thai military’s imposition of martial law in order to “preserve order and bring back peacefulness” has officially evolved into a full-blown coup. After gathering government and opposition leaders for talks, Thailand’s army chief General Prayuth Chan-ocha announced to the assembled leaders—and shortly thereafter in a televised address to the nation—that he would be taking power, marking the country’s 12th successful coup since it became a constitutional monarchy in 1932. The constitution has been suspended and nighttime curfews put in place. More… Discuss

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Persephone


Persephone

In Greek mythology, Persephone is the goddess of fertility and, having been taken captive by Hades and made his wife, queen of the underworld. Though Hades eventually allowed her to return to Earth, he first tricked her into eating pomegranate seeds—the food of the dead—thus tethering her to the underworld and making it necessary for her to return to him for several months each year. What changes are said to come over the Earth each time she leaves for or returns from the underworld? More… Discuss

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WORD: mawkish


mawkish

Definition: (adjective) Excessively and objectionably sentimental.
Synonyms: bathetic, hokey, maudlin, schmaltzy, sentimental, mushy, drippy
Usage: His pathos is often exaggerated until it passes into mawkish sentimentality. Discuss.
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Historic Musical Moments: Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP


[youtube.com/watch?v=Soe8aJ3EAJk]

Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP

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Ovidiu BADILA @ PAGANINI/BADILA ‘Moses’ Fantasy – live 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=7Z2GJmTVDn0]

Ovidiu BADILA @ PAGANINI/BADILA ‘Moses‘ Fantasy – live 2000

Niccolò PAGANINI: Variations on G string, “Moses Fantasy”, from Rossini’s ‘Mosé in Egitto’ (arr. Badila) [6’47”]
(6:57 applause; Ovidiu Badila jokes and speaks about his Rossini’s paraphrase)
Ovidiu BADILA, doublebass – unknown, piano
(Live, 26 Nov.2000 – Brechemin Auditorium, UW School of Music, Seattle)
________________________________________­
Ovidiu Badila – The Memorial Recordings
2CDs Live: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…
SUPPORT ARTISTS, BY BUYING ORIGINAL CDs
________________________________________­__________
complete Ovidiu Badila recordings: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Dolly Parton – Coat of many colors


[youtube.com/watch?v=c1zJzr-kWsI]

Dolly Parton – Coat of many colors

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The Buck Stops With Obama on Tepid Financial Reform – ProPublica


 

The Buck Stops With Obama on Tepid Financial Reform – ProPublica.

MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 4 in D, K. 218


[youtube.com/watch?v=La08LYpRiWY]

Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 4 in D, K. 218

Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major K. 218 was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1775 in Salzburg. The autograph of the score is preserved in Biblioteka Jagiellońska, Kraków. The concerto has the usual fast-slow-fast structure and lasts around 23 minutes. The movements are:
1. Allegro
2. Andante cantabile
and 3. Rondeau (Andante grazioso – Allegro ma non troppo).
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
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NOTE: I do not know who the performers of this are, nor the place and date of recording!!! Any suggestions are welcome.

Saint of the Day for Thursday, May 22nd, 2014: ST. RITA


Image of St. Rita

St. Rita

St. Rita was born at Spoleto, Italy in 1381. At an early age, she begged her parents to allow her to enter a convent. Instead they arranged a marriage for her. Rita became a good wife and mother, but … continue reading

May
22
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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: National Maritime Day


National Maritime Day

It was President Franklin D. Roosevelt who first proclaimed May 22 as National Maritime Day in 1933. Since that time, observations of this day have grown in popularity, particularly in American port cities. Ships are opened to the public, maritime art and essay contests are held, and parades and band concerts are common. Environmentalists sometimes take advantage of the attention focused on the country’s maritime heritage on this day to draw attention to pollution and deterioration of maritime environments, particularly in large commercial ports like New York City. More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Honore de Balzac


No man should marry until he has studied anatomy and dissected at least one woman.

Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Giacomo Matteotti (1885)


Giacomo Matteotti (1885)

Matteotti was an Italian Socialist leader, member of parliament, and outspoken opponent of the Fascist regime during its early days. His death at the hands of Fascist hirelings precipitated a parliamentary crisis that Mussolini overcame by disavowing the murder and tightening police control. It could be said that Mussolini’s dictatorship began when he crushed the opposition aroused by this assassination. Mussolini’s role in Matteotti’s death remains a subject of debate. How was Matteotti killed? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: Johnny Carson Hosts The Tonight Show for Last Time (1992)


Johnny Carson Hosts The Tonight Show for Last Time (1992)

Carson hosted NBC’s The Tonight Show from 1962 to 1992. His personable demeanor and wry sense of humor appealed to viewers, and during his tenure, the show became America‘s most popular late-night program. The show’s familiar formula included sidekick Ed McMahon introducing Carson by announcing, “Heeere’s Johnny!,” followed by Carson’s monologue, and then guest interviews and occasional comedy sketches. How many people tuned in to watch his last show? More… Discuss

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Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Make Crops Less Nutritious


Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Make Crops Less Nutritious

Nutrient levels in staple food crops may fall as carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere continue to rise. Researchers grew wheat, rice, soybeans, corn, sorghum, and field peas in fields subjected to carbon dioxide concentrations anticipated on Earth by the middle of this century. In four out of the six crops, zinc and iron levels were found to be reduced. The wheat and rice also had a reduced protein content. Sorghum and corn alone were able to resist the effects of the elevated carbon dioxide levels. More… Discuss

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Chopsticks


Chopsticks

Chopsticks, developed about 3,000 to 5,000 years ago in China, are the traditional eating utensils of East Asia. Various materials, including wood, ivory, bamboo, and metal, have been used to produce the tapered sticks, which range from the plain to the ornately decorated. The etiquette surrounding chopstick use, and in fact the style of the sticks themselves, varies from culture to culture. To avoid unintentional insult at the table, one should keep in mind what rules when dining in China? More… Discuss

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WORD: macrocosm


macrocosm 

Definition: (noun) The entire world; the universe.
Synonyms: cosmos, universe, world, existence, creation
Usage: Astrophysicists are concerned with the macrocosm, while nuclear physicists focus their research on tiny atomic particles. Discuss.
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Koch Brothers Exposed: The Chilling New Documentary Republicans Don’t Want You to See


[youtube.com/watch?v=7YhEgLhV6ro]

Koch Brothers Exposed: The Chilling New Documentary Republicans Don’t Want You to See

Published on May 21, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org – There is a chilling new documentary about the billionaire brothers, David and Charles Koch, that some Republicans do not want you to see. On Monday, Republican Rep. Candice Miller of Michigan tried to block an event at the Capitol unveiling the film, “Koch Brothers Exposed: 2014 Edition.” Miller claimed the documentary could violate House rules and “cross the line into partisan politics.” She unsuccessfully argued that showing the documentary was an inappropriate use of taxpayer-funded facilities. On Tuesday evening, the film event proceeded as planned. The updated documentary shows how the Koch brothers have used their vast fortunes to oppose government programs such as Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security as well as obstruct efforts to raise the minimum wage, tackle climate change and expand voting rights. We are joined by the film’s director, Robert Greenwald, founder and president of Brave New Films.

Click here to see all Democracy Now! coverage of the influence of the Koch Brothers:
http://www.democracynow.org/topics/ko…

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