Daily Archives: July 5, 2014

‘Voltaire’ (FotoSketcher Emergence,) (My art collection)


'Voltaire' (FotoSketcher Emergence,) (My art collection)

Voltaire‘ (FotoSketcher Emergence,) (My art collection)

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a history lesson: American Empire


[youtube.com/watch?v=ASSOQDQvVLU]

Published on Jul 3, 2014

http://www.CGPGrey.com/
https://subbable.com/cgpgrey
Discuss: http://www.reddit.com/r/CGPGrey/comme…

Special thanks:

Alex Perelgut
Keyan Halperin
Robin McGhee
Dragos Dumitrescu
Adam Miller
Andrew Hawling
Raymond Spencer (YumSubs)
Bryan Crockett
Tom Sommerville
Damien Polglase
Andrew Escobar
Sam Duckworth

 

facebook, poetic thought by George-B (the smudge and other poems)


facebook, poetic thought by George-B

To like or not to like:
That is today’s question:
Facebook plays with my feelings of liking and disliking,
but you know that,
it’s all over the news…the betrayal of trust of confidence,
of the most basic relationship…among people:
Fairness, not taking advantage of each other,
as a tool to make yourself rich (and make another poor)
But then you knew there is nothing sincere about facebook, that some made into faithbook: big mistake, big, big mistake)

need: to return ethics to the world!

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=RZkIAVGlfWk]

Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

(C) Deusche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited , Music Publishing Rights Collecting Society, UMPG Publishing and all their respective owners. There’s no personal work here.

(C) Deutsche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited et toutes leurs propriétaires respectifs.

The Firebird

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated...

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated on Pulcinella in 1920. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article is about the ballet to Stravinsky’s 1910 music. For other uses of the word, see Firebird.

The Firebird (French: L’oiseau de feu; Russian: «Жар-птица», Zhar-ptitsa) is a ballet and orchestral concert work by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. It was written for the 1910 Paris season of Sergei Diaghilev‘s Ballets Russes company, with choreography by Michel Fokine. The ballet is based on Russian folk tales of the magical glowing bird that can be both a blessing and a curse to its owner. When the ballet was first performed on 25 June 1910, it was an instant success with both audience and critics.

Stravinsky was a young, virtually unknown composer when Diaghilev recruited him to create works for the Ballets Russes. The Firebird was his first project. Originally, Diaghilev approached the Russian composer Anatoly Lyadov, but later hired Stravinsky to compose the music.

The ballet has historic significance not only as Stravinsky’s breakthrough piece — “Mark him well”, said Sergei Diaghilev to Tamara Karsavina, who was dancing the title role: “He is a man on the eve of celebrity…” — but also as the beginning of the collaboration between Diaghilev and Stravinsky that would also produce Petrushka and The Rite of Spring.

Genesis and premiere

The ballet was the first of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes productions to have an all-original score composed for it. Alexandre Benois wrote in 1910 that he had two years earlier suggested to Diaghilev the production of a Russian nationalist ballet,[7] an idea all the more attractive given both the newly awakened French passion for Russian dance and also the ruinously expensive costs of staging opera. The inspiration of mixing the mythical Firebird with the unrelated Russian tale of Kaschei the deathless possibly came from a popular child’s verse by Yakov Polonsky, “A Winter’s Journey” (Zimniy put, 1844), which includes the lines:

And in my dreams I see myself on a wolf’s back
Riding along a forest path
To do battle with a sorcerer-tsar [i.e., Kaschei]]
In that land where a princess sits under lock and key,
Pining behind massive walls.
There gardens surround a palace all of glass;
There Firebirds sing by night
And peck at golden fruit.[8]

make music part of your life series: Maurice Ravel – Ma Mère l’Oye (Mother Goose)


[youtube.com/watch?v=5U7osEigQZM]

Maurice RavelMa Mère l’Oye (Mother Goose)

A picture by Gustave Doré of Mother Goose read...

A picture by Gustave Doré of Mother Goose reading written (literary) fairy tales (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Symphony Orchestra of the Liszt School Of Music, conducted by Prof. Nicolás Pasquet, plays Maurice Ravel’s “Ma Mère l’Oye” (Mother Goose), originally composed as a piano duet for 2 children, later transformed into a solo piano piece, then orchestrated and finally transformed into a ballet. Our Symphony Orchestra plays the Orchestra Version, which consists of 5 parts:

I. Pavane de la belle au bois dormant
Pavane of Sleeping Beauty

II. Petit Poucet
Little Tom Thumb / Hop o’ My Thumb

III. Laideronnette, impératrice des pagodes
Little Ugly Girl, Empress of the Pagodas

IV. Les entretiens de la belle et de la bête
Conversation of Beauty and the Beast

V. Le jardin féerique
The Fairy Garden

The Concert took place at the Neue Weimarhalle on December 8th, 2011

make music part of your life series: Joachin Rodrigo concert Andaluz for four guitar and


[youtube.com/watch?v=6iaz7Qntu44]

Rodrigo concert Andaluz for four guitar and orchestra

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Concierto Andaluz (Spanish: Andalusian concerto) is a 1967 work by the Spanish composer Joaquín Rodrigo for four guitars and orchestra. The piece has three movements, each having a blend of impressionistic Spanish guitar music with that of baroque influence. It was commissioned by Spanish guitarist Celedonio Romero and first performed by Los Romeros and the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Victor Alessandro in San Antonio, Texas, USA on 18 November, 1967.

Movements

  1. Tiempo de Bolero
  2. Adagio
  3. Allegretto

quotation: Edith Wharton – “…habit is necessary;…”


quotation: 

Habit is necessary; it is the habit of having habits, of turning a trail into a rut, that must be incessantly fought against if one is to remain alive.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

today’s holiday: Tynwald Ceremony


Tynwald Ceremony

The Isle of Man, located off the coast of England in the Irish Sea, was once the property of the Vikings. It was here that they established their custom of holding an open-air court for the settling of disputes and the passing of laws. Today, the Tynwald Ceremony—whose name comes from the Norse Thing vollr, meaning a fenced open parliament—is held at St. John’s on Tynwald Hill on July 5, when the chief justice reads a brief summary of every bill that has been passed during the year—first in English, and then in Manx, the old language of the island. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Jean Cocteau (1889)


Jean Cocteau (1889)

Cocteau was a French author and filmmaker who worked in many artistic mediums. In the years when he was addicted to opium, he produced some of his most important works, including the novel Les Enfants Terribles. In addition to the play La Machine Infernale and the film Beauty and the Beast, Cocteau wrote ballet scenarios and librettos for Erik Satie and Igor Stravinsky, and he illustrated numerous books with his vivid drawings. What was his connection to Pablo Picasso? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica Published (1687)


 

A page from the 1726 edition of the Principia.
A page from the 1726 edition of the Principia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica Published (1687)

Newton’s Principia represents one of the greatest milestones in the history of science and marked the beginning of the modern period of mechanics and astronomy. The text includes Newton’s three famous laws of motion, treatises on dynamics and fluid motion, the unification of terrestrial and celestial mechanics under the principle of gravitation, and an explanation of Kepler’s laws of planetary motion. Principia grew out of Newton’s correspondence with what famous astronomer? More… Discuss

Title page of 'Principia', first edition (1687).

Title page of ‘Principia’, first edition (1687). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Knee Replacement Overuse Concerns


Knee Replacement Overuse Concerns

In the past two decades, the number of total knee replacements in the US has more than doubled, and there are concerns that not all of them are justified. Recent research seems to validate these concerns, suggesting that a third of the osteoarthritis patients in the US that undergo total knee replacements are inappropriate for the procedure. Most of them had only moderate symptoms and limited joint damage. Part of the problem appears to be a lack of a standard in criteria for evaluating potential knee replacement candidates. More… Discuss

Philately


Philately

Philately is the collection and study of postage stamps and of materials relating to their history. People began collecting postage stamps soon after the first one was issued in 1840, and the scholarly study of stamps—their history and details like watermarks, perforations, and cancellations—followed within decades. Though their primary purpose is to provide proof of postage payment, stamps also serve as a sort of historic record. What was philately called before the term was coined in 1864? More… Discuss

word: exacerbate


exacerbate 

Definition:

(verb) Make worse.
Synonyms: aggravate, worsen, exasperate
Usage: The heavy rainfall merely exacerbated the region’s flood problems. Discuss.

In sickness and health: Facebook Mood Manipulation: 10 Bigger Problems – InformationWeek


Thomas Claburn
Faceboo
k Mood Manipulation: 10 Bigger Problems – InformationWeek.
Facebook Privacy: 10 Settings To Check