Daily Archives: August 2, 2014

Living in the shadow of Ebola


Living in the shadow of Ebola http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-28583051

Go Figure: The week in numbers


Go Figure: The week in numbers http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-28609554

The birds that plague the Eternal City


The birds that plague the Eternal City http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-28583052

BBC News – Syria villagers drive out Islamic State jihadists


http://m.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-28622809

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49

Alan Hovhaness – Appalachian Symphony: make music part of your life series


FROM:  100yearoldWhiskey’s You Tube channel:

Alan Hovhaness – Appalachian Symphony

ALAN HOVHANESS – Symphony No. 60 (“To the Appalachian Mountains“)

In this 2005 recording, Gerard Schwarz conducts the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra. Naxos is the official owner of this recording.

First Movement (0:00)
Photo #1: Sunrise at Canim Lake, by werner22brigitte
http://pixabay.com/en/sunrise-canim-l…
Photo #2: Sea of Fog, by MartinStr
http://pixabay.com/en/hochlantsch-mou…
Photo #3: Sunrise, by Silvicultrix
http://pixabay.com/en/sunrise-morgenr…
Photo #4: Ring, by MartinStr
http://pixabay.com/en/sunrise-mountai…
Photo #5: Sea of Clouds, by DeltaWorks
http://pixabay.com/en/sea-of-clouds-a…
Photo #6: Morning Sun, by kcssm
http://pixabay.com/en/dawn-sunrise-su…

Second Movement (10:42)
Photo #1: Glacier National Park, by dbmcnicol
http://pixabay.com/en/montana-glacier…
Photo #2: Great Salt Lake, by werner22brigitte
http://pixabay.com/en/great-salt-lake…
Photo #3: Nosedive, by Aperture
http://pixabay.com/en/fly-heli-mounta…
Photo #4: New Zealand, by Simon
http://pixabay.com/en/new-zealand-mou…

Third Movement (20:15)
Photo #1: Canton of Uri, by wernj
http://pixabay.com/en/sea-of-fog-wint…
Photo #2: Carinthia Winter, by KleeKarl
http://pixabay.com/en/austria-carinth…

Fourth Movement (23:29)
Photo #1: Säntis, by nitli
http://pixabay.com/en/s%C3%A4ntis-sno…
Photo #2: Clouds, by titigraf
http://pixabay.com/en/sky-clouds-moun…
Photo #3: Mountain Goats, by Steppinstars
http://pixabay.com/en/mountain-goats-…
Photo #4: Chipmunk, by LoggaWiggler
http://pixabay.com/en/chipmunk-cute-n…
Photo #5: Kamloops, by Werner 22brigitte
http://pixabay.com/en/rollig-hills-mo…
Photo #6: Paragliding, by Simon
http://pixabay.com/en/mountains-parag…
Photo #7: Hot Air Balloon, by LoggaWiggler
http://pixabay.com/en/balloon-hot-air…
———————————
If you’re interested in buying the CD/MP3, it is available at ArkivMusic:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/N…

And at Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Symphony-60-A-H…

The CD/MP3 also includes Hovhaness’s Guitar Concerto No. 1 and Khrimian Hairig.

new at EuZicAsa: In the public domain: Pics, Images…WIDGET(access here)


frog-208591_640

Widget: Public domain Images (Access Here)

W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major Do major) (Harnoncourt): great compositions/performances


W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major (Harnoncourt)

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2012

W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788):
1. Allegro vivace, 4/4
2. Andante cantabile, 3/4 in F major
3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
4. Molto allegro, 2/2

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

today’s holiday: Thjodhatid


Thjodhatid

Thjodhatid is a three-day “people’s feast” celebrated in the Vestmannaeyjar area (or Westmann Islands) of Iceland. The festival commemorates the granting of Iceland’s constitution on July 1, 1874; because of foul weather, the island people of Vestmannaeyjar weren’t able to attend the mainland celebration, so they held their own festival at home a month later. Most of the festivities take place on Heimaey Island. Enormous bonfires are built, and there are sporting events, dancing, singing, eating and drinking. People come from the mainland for this event, so the island is filled with campers. More… Discuss

quotation: Wisdom is a sacred communion. Victor Hugo (1802-1885)


Wisdom is a sacred communion.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

today’s birthday: James Baldwin (1924)


James Baldwin (1924)

Baldwin was a groundbreaking African-American author best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. He wrote about social taboos such as racism and homosexuality at a time when mainstream literature largely ignored them. He grew up in poverty in the New York City district of Harlem and became a preacher while in his teens. In 1947, he left the US to live in Europe, and upon his return in 1957, he joined the civil rights movement. What famous author taught Baldwin in his youth? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Iraq Invades Kuwait (1990)


Iraq Invades Kuwait (1990)

Though justified by Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein on grounds that Kuwait was historically part of Iraq, Iraq’s 1990 invasion of its neighbor was presumed to be motivated by a desire to acquire Kuwait’s rich oil fields and expand Iraq’s power in the region. Under United Nations (UN) auspices, the US formed a coalition and began massing troops in Saudi Arabia. When Iraq ignored the UN Security Council‘s deadline for the withdrawal of forces from Kuwait, the US attacked how many days later? More… Discuss

Ebola Crisis Deepens


Ebola Crisis Deepens

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed 729 lives in four countries thus far, making it the deadliest and widest ranging such outbreak the world has ever seen. Dozens of healthcare workers have fallen victim, complicating efforts to combat it. Though the disease is outpacing current efforts to contain its spread, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) still believes that the “unprecedented” outbreak could be stopped if proper steps are taken at both the national and international levels. To this end, a new, $100 million (75 million euro) Ebola response plan is being launched to combat the disease. More… Discuss

“The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story is a best-selling” (from Wikipedia)


The Hot Zone (cover).jpg
Author Richard Preston
Country South Africa, United States
Language English
Genre Non-fiction
Publisher Anchor
Publication date
1995
Media type Print (paperback and hardback) eBook and audiobook
Pages 420
ISBN 0-385-47956-5
OCLC 32052009
614.5/7 20
LC Class RC140.5 .P74 1995b


The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story is a best-selling[1] 1994 non-fiction thriller by Richard Preston about the origins and incidents involving viral hemorrhagic fevers, particularly ebolaviruses and marburgviruses. The basis of the book was Preston’s 1992 New Yorker article “Crisis in the Hot Zone“.[2]

The filoviruses Ebola virus (EBOV), Sudan virus (SUDV), Marburg virus (MARV), and Ravn virus (RAVV) are Biosafety Level 4 agents. Biosafety Level 4 agents are extremely dangerous to humans because they are very infectious, have a high case-fatality rate, and there are no known prophylactics, treatments, or cures. Along with describing the history of the diseases caused by these two Central African diseases, Ebola virus disease (EVD) and Marburg virus disease (MVD), Preston describes a 1989 incident in which a relative of Ebola virus named Reston virus (RESTV), was discovered at a primate quarantine facility in Reston, Virginia, less than fifteen miles (24 km) away from Washington, DC. The virus found at the facility was a mutated form of the original Ebola virus, and was initially mistaken for Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHV). The original Reston facility involved in the incident, located at 1946 Isaac Newton Square, was subsequently torn down sometime between 1995 and 1998.[3]

Synopsis

The book is in four sections:

  • “The Shadow of Mount Elgon” delves into the history of filoviruses, as well as speculation about the origins of AIDS. Preston accounts the story of “Charles Monet” (a pseudonym), who might have caught MARV from visiting Kitum Cave on Mount Elgon in Kenya. The author describes in great detail the progression of the disease, from the initial headache and backache, to the final stage in which Monet’s internal organs fail and he “bleeds out” (i.e., hemorrhages extensively) in a waiting room in a Nairobi hospital. This part also introduces a young promising physician who becomes infected with MARV while treating Monet. Nancy Jaax’s story is told. Viruses, and biosafety levels and procedures are described. The EVD outbreaks caused by EBOV and its cousin, Sudan virus (SUDV) are mentioned. Preston talks to the man who named Ebola virus.
  • “The Monkey House” chronicles the discovery of Reston virus among imported monkeys in Reston, Virginia, and the following actions taken by the U.S. Army and Centers for Disease Control.
  • “Smashdown” is more on the Reston epizootic, which involved a strain of the virus that does not affect humans but which easily spreads by air, and is very similar to its cousin the Ebola virus.
  • “Kitum Cave” tells of the author’s visiting the cave that is the suspected home of the natural host animal that Ebola lives inside of.

The book starts with “Charles Monet” visiting Kitum Cave during a camping trip to Mount Elgon in Central Africa. Not long after, he begins to suffer from a number of symptoms, including vomiting, diarrhea and red eye. He is soon taken to Nairobi Hospital for treatment, but his condition deteriorates further and he goes into a coma while in the waiting room. This particular filovirus is called Marburg virus.

Dr. Nancy Jaax had been promoted to work in the Level 4 Biosafety containment area at USAMRIID, and is assigned to research Ebola virus. While preparing food for her family at home, she cuts her right hand. Later, while working on a dead, EBOV-infected monkey, one of the gloves on the hand with the open wound tears, and she is almost exposed to contaminated blood, but does not get infected. Nurse Mayinga is also infected by a nun and elects to visit Nairobi Hospital for treatment, where she succumbs to the disease.

In Reston, Virginia, less than fifteen miles (24 km) away from Washington, DC, a company called Hazelton Research once operated a quarantine center for monkeys that were destined for laboratories. In October 1989, when an unusually high number of their monkeys began to die, their veterinarian decided to send some samples to Fort Detrick (USAMRIID) for study. Early during the testing process in biosafety level 3, when one of the flasks appeared to be contaminated with harmless pseudomonas bacterium, two USAMRIID scientists exposed themselves to the virus by wafting the flask. They later determine that, while the virus is terrifyingly lethal to monkeys, humans can be infected with it without any health effects at all. This virus is now known as Reston virus (RESTV).

Finally, the author himself goes into Africa to explore Kitum Cave. On the way, he discusses the role of AIDS in the present, as the highway they were on, sometimes called the “AIDS Highway,” or the “Kinshasa Highway” was where it first appeared. Equipped with a Hazmat suit, he enters the cave and finds a large number of animals, one of which might be the virus carrier. At the conclusion of the book, he travels to the quarantine facility in Reston. The building there was abandoned and deteriorating. He concludes the book by saying EBOV will be back.

Reception

In his blurb, horror writer Stephen King called the first chapter, “one of the most horrifying things I’ve read in my whole life.”[4] When asked whether any book “scared the pants off you” television writer Suzanne Collins answered, “The Hot Zone, by Richard Preston. I just read it a few weeks ago. Still recovering.”[5]

See also

The Tepee


The Tepee

The tepee was once a typical dwelling of Native North Americans of the Great Plains. Such structures usually consisted of conically arranged tent poles over which skins, often bison hide and occasionally elaborately decorated, would be tightly stretched. These dwellings provided strong shelter against the weather yet could also be easily dismantled and loaded onto pack animals when a tribe was on the move, making them ideal for nomadic hunters. How does a teepee differ from a wigwam? More… Discuss

word: penchant


penchant 

Definition: (noun) A definite liking; a strong inclination.
Synonyms: preference, taste, predilection
Usage: Our boss humored Bobby’s penchant for playing jokes on people until he found himself on the receiving end of one such prank. Discuss.

Russia bans Polish fruit and veg


Russia bans Polish fruit and veg http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-28603140

Working Lives Panama


Working Lives Panama http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-28558471