Daily Archives: February 2, 2015

From BBC : Austria sees first Pegida march


Austria sees first Pegida march http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-31103221

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Hommage à Frédéric Chopin – KRAKOWIAK Op.14 [1/2] – Alexis Weissenberg


Hommage à Frédéric Chopin – KRAKOWIAK Op.14 [1/2] – Alexis Weissenberg

Sviatoslav Richter plays Schumann – Papillons, Op 2


Sviatoslav Richter plays Schumann – Papillons, Op 2

guitar badri-2011 05 18 Rodrigo concert Andaluz for four guitar and orchestra


guitar badri-2011 05 18 Rodrigo concert Andaluz for four guitar and orchestra

 

 

Gioachino Rossini : La scala di seta (The Silken Ladder), Overture (N.Y. Philharmonic Leonard Bernstein Conducting


Gioachino Rossini : La scala di seta (The Silken Ladder), Overture

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.2 Op.19 in B flat major


Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.2 Op.19 in B flat major

Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 – Claudio Arrau – HD ( 3rd mov. ‘un sospiro’), great compositions/performances


Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 – Claudio Arrau – HD

 

Tchaikovsky – Andante Cantabile for Cello and String Orchestra


Tchaikovsky – Andante Cantabile in B major,  for Cello and String Orchestra

Berlioz – Rob Roy Overture


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Berlioz – Rob Roy Overture

Mozart: The Marriage Of Figaro, K 492 – 1. Overture great compositions


Mozart: The Marriage Of Figaro, K 492 – 1. Overture

Natalia Kartashova plays Liszt – La Campanella great compositions/performances


Natalia Kartashova plays Liszt – La Campanella

#PopeFrancis leads a #Candlemas procession in the Vatican — Catholic News Agency


FROM CNN : Obama: U.S. not at war on radical Islam


Obama: U.S. not at war on radical Islam
http://www.cnn.com//2015/02/01/politics/obama-radical-islam-terrorism-war/index.html

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this pressed: How Backpacking Can Put You in Touch With Your Inner Saint|National Geographic


Picture of signs along the Appalachian Trail
Picture of signs along the Appalachian Trail

Frequent mileposts break down the roughly 2,200-mile Appalachian Trail, which runs from Georgia to Maine.

Photograph by Michael Melford, National Geographic Creative

via How Backpacking Can Put You in Touch With Your Inner Saint. |National Geographic

Lucia Popp – Ruhe Sanft, Mein Holdes Leben (Mozart, Zaide)


Lucia Popp – Ruhe Sanft, Mein Holdes Leben (Mozart, Zaide)

Vlad the Impaler and the fight against the expansionism of the ottman empire


1499 German woodcut showing Dracule waide dini...

1499 German woodcut showing Dracule waide dining among the impaled corpses of his victims. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia (1431–1476/77), was a member of the House of Drăculești, a branch of the House of Basarab, also known, using his patronymic, as (Vlad) Drăculea or (Vlad) Dracula. He was posthumously dubbed Vlad the Impaler (Romanian: Vlad Țepeș, pronounced [ˈvlad ˈt͡sepeʃ]), and was a three-time Voivode of Wallachia, ruling mainly from 1456 to 1462, the period of the incipient Ottoman conquest of the Balkans. His father, Vlad II Dracul, was a member of the Order of the Dragon, which was founded to protect Christianity in Eastern Europe. Vlad III is revered as a folk hero in Romania as well as other parts of Europe for his protection of the Romanian population both south and north of the Danube. A significant number of Romanian common folk and remaining boyars (nobles) moved north of the Danube to Wallachia, recognized his leadership and settled there following his raids on the Ottomans.[1]

 

 

 

As the cognomen “The Impaler” suggests, his practice of impaling his enemies is part of his historical reputation.[2] During his lifetime, his reputation for excessive cruelty spread abroad, to Germany and elsewhere in Europe. The name of the vampire Count Dracula in Bram Stoker‘s 1897 novel Dracula was inspired by Vlad’s patronymic.[2]

 

 

 

Vlad III Dracula
Владъ Цепѣшъ
Voivode of Wallachia
Vlad Tepes 002.jpg

The Ambras Castle portrait of Vlad III, c. 1560, reputedly a copy of an original made during his lifetime[1]
Reign 1448; 1456–1462; 1476
Wives
Issue Mihnea cel Rău, Vlad IV, and Mircea (disputed name)
House House of Drăculești (branch of the House of Basarab)
Father Vlad II Dracul
Mother Cneajna of Moldavia (presumed)
Born November or December 1431[1]
Segesvár, Kingdom of Hungary
(city now known as Sighișoara, Romania)
Died December 1476 or January 1477, exact date unknown (aged 44-45)
Wallachia (exact location unknown)
Signature

 

Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia (1431–1476/77), was a member of the House of Drăculești, a branch of the House of Basarab, also known, using his patronymic, as (Vlad) Drăculea or (Vlad) Dracula. He was posthumously dubbed Vlad the Impaler (Romanian: Vlad Țepeș, pronounced [ˈvlad ˈt͡sepeʃ]), and was a three-time Voivode of Wallachia, ruling mainly from 1456 to 1462, the period of the incipient Ottoman conquest of the Balkans. His father, Vlad II Dracul, was a member of the Order of the Dragon, which was founded to protect Christianity in Eastern Europe. Vlad III is revered as a folk hero in Romania as well as other parts of Europe for his protection of the Romanian population both south and north of the Danube. A significant number of Romanian common folk and remaining boyars (nobles) moved north of the Danube to Wallachia, recognized his leadership and settled there following his raids on the Ottomans.[1]

 

 

 

As the cognomen “The Impaler” suggests, his practice of impaling his enemies is part of his historical reputation.[2] During his lifetime, his reputation for excessive cruelty spread abroad, to Germany and elsewhere in Europe. The name of the vampire Count Dracula in Bram Stoker‘s 1897 novel Dracula was inspired by Vlad’s patronymic.[2

 

 

 

Name

 

 

 

Further information: House of Drăculești

 

 

 

 

Bust of Vlad the Impaler in Sighișoara, his place of birth

 

During his life, Vlad wrote his name in Latin documents as Wladislaus Dragwlya, vaivoda partium Transalpinarum (1475).[3]

 

 

 

His Romanian patronymic Dragwlya (or Dragkwlya)[3] Dragulea,

 

Vlad Drăculea of Wallachia

Vlad Drăculea of Wallachia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Dragolea, Drăculea,[4][5] is a diminutive of the epithet Dracul carried by his father Vlad II, who in 1431 was inducted as a member of the Order of the Dragon, a chivalric order founded by Emperor Sigismund in 1408. Dracul is the Romanian definite form, the -ul being the suffixal definite article (deriving from Latin ille). The noun drac “dragon” itself continues Latin draco. In Modern Romanian, the word drac has adopted the meaning of “devil” (the term for “dragon” now being balaur or dragon). This has led to misinterpretations of Vlad’s epithet as characterizing him as “devilish”.

 

 

 

Vlad’s nickname of Țepeș (“Impaler“) identifies his favourite method of execution but was only attached to his name posthumously, in c. 1550.[3] Before this, however, he was known as Kazıklı Bey (Impaler Lord) by the Ottoman Empire after their armies encountered his “forests” of impalement victims.[6]

 

 

 

Early life

 

 

 

Family

 

 

 

English: House of Vlad III the Impaler

English: House of Vlad III the Impaler (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Vlad was born in Sighișoara, Transylvania, in the winter of 1431 to Vlad II Dracul, future voivode of Wallachia. Vlad’s father was the son of the celebrated Voivode Mircea the Elder. His mother is unknown, though at the time his father was believed to have been married to Princess Cneajna of Moldavia (eldest daughter of Alexander “the Good”, Prince of Moldavia and aunt to Stephen the Great of Moldavia) and also to have kept a number of mistresses.[1] He had two older half-brothers, Mircea II and Vlad Călugărul, and a younger brother, Radu III the Handsome.

 

 

 

 

 

In the year of his birth, Vlad’s father traveled to Nuremberg, where he was then vested into the Order of the Dragon,[1] a fellowship of knights sworn to defend Christendom against the encroaching Ottomans and European heresies, such as the Hussites.[7] During his initiation, he was given the epithet Dracul, or dragon, by the Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund.[8]

 

 

 

Vlad and Radu spent their early formative years in Sighișoara. During the first reign of their father, Vlad II Dracul, the Voivode brought his young sons to Târgoviște, the capital of Wallachia at that time.

 

 

 

The Byzantine chancellor Mikhail Doukas showed that, at Târgoviște, the sons of boyars and ruling princes were well-educated by Romanian or Greek scholars commissioned from Constantinople. Vlad is believed to have learned combat skills, geography, mathematics, science, languages (Old Church Slavonic, German, Latin), and the classical arts and philosophy.

 

 

 

Dealings with the Ottoman Empire

 

 

 

In 1436, Vlad II Dracul ascended the throne of Wallachia. He was ousted in 1442 by rival factions in league with Hungary, but secured Ottoman support for his return by agreeing to pay the tribute to the Sultan.

 

 

 

At 13, Vlad and his brother Radu were held as political hostages by the Ottoman Turks. During his years as hostage, Vlad was educated in logic, the Quran, and the Turkish language and works of literature. He would speak this language fluently in his later years.[1] He and his brother were also trained in warfare and horsemanship.

 

 

 

Despite increasing his cultural capital with the Ottomans, Vlad was not at all pleased to be in Turkish hands. He was resentful and incredibly jealous of his little brother, who soon earned the nickname Radu cel Frumos, or Radu the Handsome. Radu was well behaved and quickly earned the friendship of Sultan Murad’s son, Mehmet; he eventually converted to Islam and entered Ottoman service.[9] Conversely, Vlad was defiant and constantly punished for his impudence. It has been suggested that his traumatic experiences among the Ottomans may have molded him into the sadistic man he grew up to be, especially in regards to his penchant for impaling.[7] In 1457, Vlad helped his cousin Stephen ascend Moldavia‘s throne by providing 6,000 horsemen as military assistance against Petru Aron, who was deposed after two battles. Stephen of Moldavia‘s long lasting reign developed into the most fierce anti-Ottoman resistance.[10]

Bran Castle (click to access gallery!)

 

 

 

 

“VEGHEAȚI SĂ NU MI SE PIARDĂ CÂNTECELE”: Ion Voicu – Balada de Ciprian Porumbescu (Ballad for violin and orchestra), great compositions/performances


Ion Voicu – Balada de Ciprian Porumbescu (Ballad for violin and orchestra)

Schubert Piano Sonata No 5 in A flat, D 557 Andras Schiff , great compositions/performances


Schubert Piano Sonata No 5 in A flat, D 557 Andras Schiff

this pressed: Super Bowl ratings hit all-time high with Patriots’ win |Info 24.us


Nielsen will issue total-viewer estimates later today, but early indications are that Sunday’s Super Bowl between the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks has broken U.S. television records.In the metered-market overnights, the Patriots’ 28-24 victory earned a 49.7 household rating/72 share, eclipsing the previous high of 48.1 set two years ago when Baltimore defeated San Francisco on CBS. That game ended up averaging 108.41 million viewers in the nationals.

via Super Bowl ratings hit all-time high with Patriots’ win.

how can a deleted site allowed to become a member at a site: ‘manwithnoname.wordpress.com is no longer available. The authors have deleted this site.’ :


manwithnoname

If http://manwithnoname.wordpress.com doesn’t exist how come it became my latest member, and how come I cannot bar/block or whatever else in one simple step? wake up WordPress.com: give site admins the tools they need to protect themselves from hacking, and who know what else! 

Screenshot_1

click and enter your site, to view its archive! Its nice to see that every effort you made, all the posts and ideas you have are carefully archived at https://archive.org/ !

 

Internet Archive:   https://archive.org/

 

Saint of the Day for Monday, February 2nd, 2015: St. Joan de Lestonnac


Image of St. Joan de Lestonnac

St. Joan de Lestonnac

St. Joan de Lestonnac was born in Bordeaux, France, in 1556. She married at the age of seventeen. The happy marriage produced four children, but her husband died suddenly in 1597. After her children … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 2

962   Otto I invades Italy and is crowned Holy Roman Emperor.
1032   Conrad II claims the throne of France.
1494   Columbus begins the practice using Indians as slaves.
1571   All eight members of a Jesuit mission in Virginia are murdered by Indians who pretended to be their friends.
1626   Charles I is crowned King of England. Fierce internal struggles between the monarchy and Parliament characterized 17th century English politics.
1848   The Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo formally ends the Mexican War.
1865   Confederate raider William Quantrill and his bushwackers rob citizens, burn a railroad depot and steal horses from Midway, Kentucky.
1870   The press agencies Havas, Reuter and Wolff sign an agreement whereby between them they can cover the whole world.
1876   The National Baseball League is founded with eight teams.
1900   Six cities, Boston, Detroit, Milwaukee, Baltimore, Chicago and St. Louis agree to form baseball’s American League.
1901   Mexican government troops are badly beaten by Yaqui Indians.
1916   U.S. Senate votes independence for Philippines, effective in 1921.
1921   Airmail service opens between New York and San Francisco. Airmail’s First Day.
1934   Alfred Rosenberg is made philosophical chief of the Nazi Party.
1939   Hungary breaks relations with the Soviet Union.
1943   Last of the German strongholds at Stalingrad surrender to the Red army.
1944   The Germans stop an Allied attack at Anzio, Italy.
1945   Some 1,200 Royal Air Force planes blast Wiesbaden and Karlsruhe.
1948   The United States and Italy sign a pact of friendship, commerce and navigation.
1959   Arlington and Norfolk, Va., peacefully desegregate public schools.
1960   The U.S. Senate approves 23rd Amendment calling for a ban on the poll tax.
1972   The Winter Olympics begin in Sapporo, Japan.
1978   U.S. Jewish leaders bar a meeting with Egypt’s Anwar Sadat.
1987   Largest steel strike in American history, in progress since August, ends.
Born on February 2
1754   Charles Maurice de Tallyrand-Perigord, minister of foreign affairs for Napoleon I, who represented France brilliantly at the Congress of Vienna.
1882   James Joyce, Irish novelist and poet (Ulysses, Portrait of a Young Man).
1890   Charles Correl, radio performer.
1895   George Halas, National Football League co-founder.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.IrmCKXD6.dpuf

today’s image: The first large-scale electronic digital computer



The first large-scale electronic digital computer

A press conference for what is considered the first computer, the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator (ENIAC), was held at the University of Pennsylvania on February 1, 1946. The machine (shown here with a technician) took up an entire room, weighed 30 tons and used more than 18,000 vacuum tubes to perform functions such as counting to 5,000 in one second. ENIAC, costing $450,000, was designed by the U.S. Army during World War II to make artillery calculations. The development of ENIAC paved the way for modern computer technology–but even today’s average calculator possesses more computing power than ENIAC did.

Image: U.S. Army

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.nEYt4xhf.dpuf


Groundhog Day (2015)

There was a medieval superstition that all hibernating animals came out on Candlemas to check the weather. If they could see their shadows, it meant that winter would go on for another six weeks. The most famous forecaster in the U.S. is Punxsutawney Phil, a legendary groundhog in Pennsylvania believed to be nearly a century old. Thousands of people trek up to Phil’s burrow on February 2 and get the news directly from him. Numerous events take place in Punxsutawney surrounding February 2, including parties, live entertainment, and a winter carnival. More… Discuss

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CLIP DESCRIPTION:
Phil (Bill Murray) is completely confused by his first repeat Groundhog Day.

FILM DESCRIPTION:
Bill Murray plays Phil, a TV weatherman working for a local station in Pennsylvania but convinced that national news stardom is in his grasp. Phil displays a charm and wit on camera that evaporates the moment the red light goes off; he is bitter, appallingly self-centered, and treats his co-workers with contempt, especially his producer Rita (Andie MacDowell) and cameraman Larry (Chris Elliot). On February 2, 1992, Phil, Rita, and Larry are sent on an assignment that Phil especially loathes: the annual Groundhog Day festivities in Punxsutawney, PA, where the citizens await the appearance of Punxsutawney Phil, the groundhog who will supposedly determine the length of winter by his ability to see his own shadow. Phil is eager to beat a hasty retreat, but when a freak snowstorm strands him in Punxsutawney, he wakes up the next morning with the strangest sense of d

CREDITS:
TM & © Sony (1993)
Cast: Ken Hudson Campbell, Bill Murray, Leighanne O’Neil, Angela Paton
Director: Harold Ramis
Producers: Trevor Albert, C.O. Erickson, Harold Ramis
Screenwriters: Harold Ramis, Danny Rubin

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QUOTATION: P. G. Wodehouse


Success comes to a writer, as a rule, so gradually that it is always something of a shock to him to look back and realize the heights to which he has climbed.P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) Discuss

Valéry Giscard d’Estaing (1926)


Valéry Giscard d’Estaing (1926)

Valéry Giscard d’Estaing is a French political leader who rose through the ranks over nearly two decades to become president of France in 1974, defeating Socialist François Mitterrand, who would later unseat him in the 1981 election. A supporter of European economic integration, Giscard later served as a member of the European Parliament and as president of the Convention on the Future of Europe. What fueled rumors in 2009 that he had once had a fling with the late Diana, Princess of Wales? More… Discuss

this day in history: feature on BBG RADIO 1


On This Day In History was a feature on the BBC Radio 1 breakfast show in the UK between 1988 and 1993. It was devised by the programme’s presenter at the time, Simon Mayo.

Mayo, a history graduate from University of Warwick, used the day’s date each morning to regurgitate historical anniversaries and events which had happened on that date in years passed.

As a quirk, he would often add a mildly cynical punchline to each of the stories he recounted, and then would get his “crew” (female co-host, newsreader and producer) each to guess the age of living celebrities who were born on that day.

A tie-in book of the same title was published in later years, with much advertisement by the BBC, initially just to give away on the show to a daily winner who rang in with the correct answer to a question posed by Mayo about a specific person or event of relevance to that date.

Perhaps the most famous part of the feature was the music used to soundtrack it; a looped instrumental version of the George Michael hit I Want Your Sex; the full version of which had been banned from broadcast by Radio 1 when it was released in 1987.

The feature ended when Mayo left the breakfast show, although when he switched to the mid-morning programme, he revived it in part with a spot called Dead Or Alive?, where he would ask listeners whether celebrities or known figures born on the date in question were still living or not.

Mayo now works for BBC Radio 2 and BBC Radio Five Live and no longer does any features which show off his passion for history. However, the feature is often heard in one form or another on many commercial radio stations.

NASA: Commercial Space Flights Will Save Millions


NASA: Commercial Space Flights Will Save Millions

Contracting private space flight companies Boeing and SpaceX to fly its astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) will save NASA $12 million per person per flight, the US space agency announced last week. Since retiring its space shuttles in 2011, NASA has relied on the Russian space agency Roscosmos to transport US astronauts to the ISS at a cost of $70 million a head. The need for that taxi service could end as early as 2017, however, with the private flights estimated to cost $58 million per person. More… Discuss

Filibusters


Filibusters

A filibuster is an obstructionist tactic used in legislative assemblies. It is particularly associated with the US Senate, where the tradition of unlimited debate is strong, and it has been used by conservatives and liberals for very different purposes. It was not until 1917 that the Senate provided for cloture—or ending of the debate—by a vote of two-thirds of the Senators present. Yet, despite many attempts, cloture has been applied only rarely. What is the etymology of the term “filibuster”? More… Discuss

word: temerity


temerity

Definition: (noun) Foolhardy disregard of danger; recklessness.
Synonyms: audaciousness, audacity
Usage: Everyone was shocked at her temerity in addressing the king in such a manner. Discuss.