Daily Archives: April 9, 2015

this pressed: Proclaiming the Holy Year at the Holy Door | CNS Blog


Proclaiming the Holy Year at the Holy Door

Posted on April 9, 2015 by Administrator

By Elliot Williams*

VATICAN CITY — Saturday evening, in front of the Holy Door in the atrium of St. Peter’s Basilica, Pope Francis’ will give the archpriests of the major basilicas of Rome copies of his “bull of indiction,” or formal proclamation, of the Holy Year of Mercy. An aide will read portions of it at the door before participants process into St. Peter’s for evening prayer.

The Holy Door at St. Peter’s Basilica. (CNS/Paul Haring)

The Holy Door at St. Peter’s Basilica. (CNS/Paul Haring)

The site chosen for the brief rite was not made casually; the door symbolizes a passage or transition into a special year of evangelization and prayer.

Pope Francis will be back at the door Dec. 8 to formally open it and the Year of Mercy.

Popes typically announce a jubilee every 25 years, although extraordinary Holy Years have been proclaimed for special anniversaries — for example, a Holy Year was celebrated in 1983 to commemorate the 1,950th anniversary of Christ’s death and resurrection.

The Holy Door is opened to evoke the concept of forgiveness, which is the main focus of a Holy Year.

According to “Mondo Vaticano,” a mini-encyclopedia published by the Vatican, the designation of a Holy Door may trace back to the ancient Christian practice of public penitence when sinners were given public penances to perform before receiving absolution.

The penitents were not allowed to enter a church before completing the penance, but they were solemnly welcomed back in when their penance was fulfilled. Still today, Holy Year pilgrims enter the basilica through the Holy Door as a sign of their repentance and re-commitment to a life of faith.

Both the opening and closing of the Holy Door take place with formal ceremonies to mark “the period of time set aside for men and women to sanctify their souls,” the book says.

The ritual for opening the Holy Door at St. Peter’s Basilica goes back to 1499 when Pope Alexander VI opened the door on Christmas Eve to inaugurate the Holy Year 1500. This was when the door was wooden.

The bronze door panels that stand at St. Peter’s today, made by Vico Consorti, were consecrated and first opened Dec. 24, 1949, by Pius XII in proclamation of the 1950 Jubilee, a scene represented in the bottom right panel.

For centuries, the doors were opened with a silver hammer, not a key, “because the doors of justice and mercy give way only to the force of prayer and penance,” the encyclopedia says. Opening the Holy Year 2000, St. John Paul used neither a hammer, nor a key, but strongly pushed the door open.

St. John Paul II pushes open the Holy Door on Dec. 24, 1999. (CNS/Arturo Mari, Vatican)

St. John Paul II pushes open the Holy Door on Dec. 24, 1999. (CNS/Arturo Mari, Vatican)

The theme of human sin and God’s mercy is illustrated in 15 of the 16 bronze panels that make up the current door, with episodes from both the Old and New Testament, including the Fall of Adam and Eve, the Annunciation, and the Merciful Father (and Prodigal Son).

Between the panels on the door at St. Peter’s are little shields with the coats of arms of all the popes that opened it during the ordinary Holy Years, the last being St. John Paul. Pope Francis’ coat of arms will be etched onto one of the empty shields that remain for future jubilee years after he opens and closes the door.

Pope Francis will give the “bull of indiction” also to the archpriests of the Rome basilicas of St. John Lateran, St. Paul Outside the Walls and St. Mary Major, which also have Holy Doors that are opened during jubilee years. The only other Holy Doors in the world are at Quebec City’s Basilica of Notre-Dame de Quebec; the shrine of St. John Vianney in Ars, France; and at the Cathedral of St. James the Great in Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Elliot Williams is a Communication major at Villanova University. He is originally from Abington, PA, and is studying abroad at Roma Tre University, while interning for Catholic News Service’s Rome bureau. Elliot is an avid Nutella fanatic.

via Proclaiming the Holy Year at the Holy Door | CNS Blog.

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Divertimento for winds No.12 in B flat major, KV 252 (240a)


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Divertimento for winds No.12 in B flat major, KV 252 (240a)

Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261 , great compositions/performances


Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261

Hilary Hahn Valentina Lisitsa Bela Bartók Romanian dances , great compositions/performances


Hilary Hahn Valentina Lisitsa Bela Bartók Romanian dances

Mozart. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K466 – Martha Argerich (1998) , great compositions/performances


Mozart. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K466 – Martha Argerich (1998)

The SymphonyBeethoven’s No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, (the Pastoral Symphony). Wiener Philharmoniker, Christian Thielemann, great compositions/performances


Beethoven, Sinfonía Nº 6 ”Pastoral”. Wiener Philharmoniker, Christian Thielemann

Wen-Sinn Yang performs J.S. Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G major BWV 1007.


J.S. Bach – Cello Suite No. 1 in G major BWV 1007 – I. Prelude – II. Allemande – III. Courante

Suite from ‘Dances With Wolves’ – John Barry , great compositions/ soundtracks


Suite from ‘Dances With Wolves’ – John Barry

Hector Berlioz – Roman Carnival Overture, Op. 9 , great compositions/performances


Hector Berlioz – Roman Carnival Overture, Op. 9

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813) |Failoni Orchestra-Michael Halász


Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Julia Fischer – Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op 42 ,great compositions/performances


Julia Fischer – Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op 42

today’s picture: Marian Anderson Sings



Marian Anderson Sings
In early 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution denied internationally famed contralto Marian Anderson the opportunity to sing at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C., because of her race. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was so dismayed by the injustice that she resigned her own D.A.R. membership in protest. On Easter Sunday, April 9, Anderson, at the invitation of Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes, sang a triumphant outdoor concert at the Lincoln Memorial before a crowd of 75,000 and a radio audience of millions.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.4Eg64H7Q.dpuf

today’s holiday: Appomattox Day


Appomattox Day

The Civil War ended on April 9, 1865, in the village of Appomattox Court House, Virginia, when Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant of the Union army accepted the surrender of General Robert E. Lee of the Confederacy. The most widespread celebration of Appomattox Day took place in 1965 during the Civil War centennial year. The day was noted across the country with costumed pageants, books and articles reflecting on the war, and concerts of martial music. Although the anniversary is not observed on a yearly basis, reenactments of the historic surrender are held periodically. More… Discuss

quotation: When writing about transcendental issues, be transcendentally clear. Rene Descartes


When writing about transcendental issues, be transcendentally clear.Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Discuss

today’s birthday: Paul Robeson (1898)


Paul Robeson (1898)

Paul Robeson was an American stage actor, singer, and political activist. The son of a runaway slave who became a minister, Robeson graduated from Rutgers, where he was an All-American football player, and then from Columbia University law school, before turning to theater. Known for his superb bass-baritone, he gained fame for his stage role in Othello. He later became an outspoken activist on issues such as racial justice and international peace. Why was his passport revoked in 1950? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Henry V Becomes King of England (1413)


Henry V Becomes King of England (1413)

Henry was knighted by Richard II in 1399 and created prince of Wales when his father, Henry IV, usurped the throne the same year. Although his early recklessness was celebrated—and probably exaggerated—by Shakespeare, Henry became a great popular hero. He lifted England from the near anarchy of his father’s reign to civil order and a high spirit of nationalism. His main interest, however, was in gaining control of lands in France—lands that he sincerely believed to be his right. Did he succeed? More… Discuss

Ginkgo


Ginkgo

The ginkgo is a tall and slender picturesque deciduous tree with fan-shaped leaves. A “living fossil,” the ginkgo is the only remaining species of a large order of gymnosperms that existed in the Triassic period; its form has not changed in millions of years. A combination of amazing disease resistance, insect-resistant wood, and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts helps ginkgoes live more than 2,000 years. Where does the name “ginkgo biloba” come from? More… Discuss

word: lobe


lobe

Definition: (noun) A rounded projection, especially an anatomical part.
Synonyms: projection
Usage: She fastened her earrings, three brilliant pendants that glistened most beautifully, through the pierced lobes of her ears. Discuss.