Daily Archives: April 12, 2015

From France 24 :


Turkey slams pope’s remarks on Armenian genocide

http://f24.my/1ynlOKq

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Hristos a Inviat (Corul Madrigal)


Hristos a Inviat

Hristos a inviat – Hristos anesti – Christ is risen



Aceasta cantare este cantata la Sfanta Manastire Vatoped de pe Sfantul Munte Athos
This song is singed by the Monks of Vatoped the Holy Monastery of the Holy Athos mount

Hristos a Inviat!


today’s holiday: Halifax Day


Halifax Day

Also known as Halifax Resolves Day, Halifax Resolutions Day, Halifax Independence Day, or Halifax Resolutions of Independence Day, this is the day on which, in the spring of 1776, North Carolina‘s delegates to the Second Continental Congress were given permission to join with representatives from other colonies in declaring their independence from British rule. The Halifax Resolutions helped lay the groundwork for the American Revolution. Halifax Day observances take place in Halifax, North Carolina, with reenactments and living history camps. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Tom Clancy (1947)


Tom Clancy (1947)

Before beginning his writing career, American novelist Tom Clancy worked as an insurance agent. His first novel was the hit The Hunt for Red October, one of the defining works of the “techno-thriller” genre—suspenseful narratives in which military technology and espionage play a prominent part. He has 17 other bestsellers to his name, including Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger, the latter the bestselling novel of the 1980s. What are some of his nonfiction titles? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Record-Setting Wind Gust Recorded on Mt. Washington (1934)


Record-Setting Wind Gust Recorded on Mt. Washington (1934)

The highest peak in the northeastern US, New Hampshire’s Mount Washington is famous for its erratic weather, caused partly by the convergence of storm tracks from the South Atlantic, Gulf region, and Pacific Northwest. Winds exceeding hurricane force occur there an average of 110 days a year. It is also where the highest directly measured surface wind speed—not including tornadoes or hurricanes—was recorded: 231 mph (372 km/h). What broke the world’s wind speed record? More… Discuss

Mentmore Towers


Mentmore Towers

Mentmore Towers is a large Neo-Renaissance English country house built in the 1850s for Baron Mayer de Rothschild. It was passed down to members of his family until the 1970s, when the government refused to accept the contents of the house in lieu of inheritance taxes, at which point the property was sold at public auction. The house has been featured in what recent films? More… Discuss

word: prolix


prolix

Definition: (adjective) Tediously prolonged; tending to speak or write at excessive length.
Synonyms: voluble, wordy
Usage: She was engaged in editing a prolix manuscript, trying to cut the length by at least a third. Discuss.

Quotation: Pope Francis


“Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it!” he said, and stressed that evil is never something that comes from God.

“It seems that humanity is incapable of putting a halt to the shedding of innocent blood (and) has refused to learn from its mistakes caused by the law of terror,” he said, noting that the enthusiasm to end such violence that came at the end of the Second World War seems to be “disappearing.”

By the “complicit silence of others who simply stand by,” the agenda of those who seek to eliminate others continues, the Pope said.

“Today too we are experiencing a sort of genocide created by general and collective indifference, by the complicit silence of Cain, who cries out: ‘What does it matter to me? Am I my brother’s keeper?’

Pope Francis

Pope recalls slaughter of Armenians in ‘first genocide of the 20th century’ (““Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it!”):: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


by Elise Harris

by Elise Harris

.- Pope Francis today referred to the mass killing of Armenians by the Ottoman Turks in 1915 as a “genocide,” prompting the Turkish government to summon the Vatican’s ambassador for questioning.

“In the past century our human family has lived through three massive and unprecedented tragedies. The first, which is widely considered ‘the first genocide of the twentieth century,’ struck your own Armenian people, the first Christian nation,” the Pope said April 12.

Francis’ reference to the genocide was taken from a common declaration signed by both Pope Saint John Paull II and Supreme Armenian Patriarch Karekin II in 2001.

His comments took place before celebrating Mass on Divine Mercy Sunday, which is a feast instituted by St. John Paul II and is celebrated on the Second Sunday of the Church’s liturgical Easter season.

Francis offered the Mass for faithful of the Armenian rite in commemoration of the centenary of the “Metz Yeghern,” or Armenian “martyrdom.” April 24 is recognized in Armenia as the official date honoring the start of the event.

Many faithful and members of the Armenian rite were present for Sunday’s Mass, including Armenian president Serz Azati Sargsyan, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of all Armenians Karekin II, Catholicos Aram I and Patriarch Nerses Bedros XIX.

The Pope has kept strong ties with the Armenian community since his time as archbishop of Buenos Aires, and a group of Argentinian Armenians were among those gathered for the Mass.

During the Mass Francis also proclaimed Armenian-rite Saint Gregory of Narek a Doctor of the Church, making the 10th century priest, monk, mystic, and poet the first Armenian to receive the title.

Widely referred to as a genocide, the mass killings took place in 1915-1916 when the Ottoman Empire systematically exterminated its historic minority Armenian population who called Turkey their homeland, most of whom were Christians. Roughly 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives.

Reports have circulated saying that the Turkish government summoned the Vatican’s papal nuncio, Archbishop Antonio Lucibello, for questioning after the Pope’s genocide comment.

When CNA phoned the Turkish embassy to the Holy See they declined to comment, however the apostolic nunciature in Ankara responded by saying that the nuncio had in fact been called.

After Francis made his comments, the Turkish Foreign Ministry released a statement expressing their “great disappointment and sadness” at the Pope’s remarks. They said the words signaled a loss of trust and contradicted his message of peace, the Associated Press reports.

The foreign ministry also held that Francis’ words were discriminatory, because he only mentioned the pain suffered by Christians, and not Muslims or any other religious group.

Turkey has repeatedly denied that the slaughter was a genocide, saying that the number of deaths was much smaller, and came as a result of conflict surrounding World War I. The country holds that many ethnic Turks also lost their lives in the event.

However, most non-Turkish scholars refer to the episode as a genocide. Argentina, Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, Russia and Uruguay are among the states that formally recognize the massacre as such.

In his greeting ahead of Sunday’s Mass, Pope Francis noted how “bishops and priests, religious, women and men, the elderly and even defenseless children and the infirm were murdered” in the 1915 massacre, which targeted Catholic and Orthodox Syrians, Assyrians, Chaldeans and Greeks.

Francis also called to mind other tragic events of the 20th century, including the violence perpetrated by Nazism and Stalinism, as well as other mass killings carried out in Cambodia, Rwanda, Burundi and Bosnia.

“It seems that humanity is incapable of putting a halt to the shedding of innocent blood (and) has refused to learn from its mistakes caused by the law of terror,” he said, noting that the enthusiasm to end such violence that came at the end of the Second World War seems to be “disappearing.”

By the “complicit silence of others who simply stand by,” the agenda of those who seek to eliminate others continues, the Pope said.

“Today too we are experiencing a sort of genocide created by general and collective indifference, by the complicit silence of Cain, who cries out: ‘What does it matter to me? Am I my brother’s keeper?’

It’s both necessary and a duty to honor the centenary of the “immense and senseless slaughter” the Armenians had to endure, Pope Francis said, because when memories fade evil can enter and make old wounds fester.

“Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it!” he said, and stressed that evil is never something that comes from God.

In a message given to the Armenian community after the celebration, Pope Francis said that to remember the event is not only the responsibility of Americans, but of the whole world, the Pope said, so that it can serve as a warning not to repeat similar “horrors” in the future.

He expressed his hope that Turkey and Armenia would work toward a greater reconciliation, and prayed that the Mass and proclamation of St. Gregory as a Doctor of the Church would be an occasion for all Christians to unite in prayer.

At the close of the Mass, Catholicos Karekin II spoke in English, saying that the Armenian genocide is “an unforgettable and undeniable fact of history.”

The genocide is deeply engrained into the consciousness of the Armenian people, the patriarch said, therefore “any attempt to erase it from history and from our common memory is doomed to fail.”

Karekin observed that according to international law a genocide is crime against humanity that closely intertwines condemnation, recognition and repatriation for the act, so therefore the Armenian cause is one of “justice.”

In the years after the genocide the Armenian Church has never forgotten “the continuous concern, assistance and solidarity of the Church of Rome toward Armenians,” he said.

The patriarch then expressed his “deep gratitude” to Pope Francis, praying that he would be strengthened in body and spirit so as to continue his ministry “with renewed dynamism and spiritual courage.”

Tags: Pope Francis, Divine Mercy, Armenian genocide

From France 24 :


Buchenwald survivors mark 70 years since Nazi camp’s liberation

http://f24.my/1yfW5U6

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From France 24 :


Pope calls Armenian slaughter ‘first genocide of 20th century’

http://f24.my/1yn5Box

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From NPR News


In A Spanish Enclave, Women Recruit Women To Join ISIS http://n.pr/1CCnXNg

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From NPR News:


Pope Marks Killing Of Armenians In World War I, Calling It Genocide http://n.pr/1OpoHyd

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From BBC news : Turkey fury at Pope ‘genocide’ claim


Turkey fury at Pope ‘genocide’ claim http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32272604

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