Daily Archives: May 7, 2015

Continents In Clouds


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P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 1 “Winter Daydreams” (Fedoseyev)


 

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 1 “Winter Daydreams” (Fedoseyev)

“Ruhe sanft, mein holdes Leben” Lucia Popp , Vienna Haydn Orchestra, István Kertész (1972 Decca Music Group Limited) , A Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus


Mozart: Zaide, K.344 / Act 1 – “Ruhe sanft, mein holdes

Leben”

Words of wisdom.


Happiness never decreases by being shared.
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today’s word of wisdom: Dalai Lama


just a thought : Is a right system of feelings more selfish than a wrong system of rationalizing?


just a thought : Is a right system of feelings more selfish than a wrong system of rationalizing?
– George-B

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


SOMEWHERE IN TIME

SOMEWHERE IN TIME

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
May 7

558   The dome of the church of St. Sophia in Constantinople collapses. Its immediate rebuilding is ordered by Justinian.
1274   The Second Council of Lyons opens in France to regulate the election of the pope.
1429   Joan of Arc breaks the English siege of Orleans.
1525   The German peasants’ revolt is crushed by the ruling class and church.
1763   Indian chief Pontiac begins his attack on a British fort in present-day Detroit, Michigan.
1800   Congress divides the Northwest Territory into two parts. The western part will becomes the Indiana Territory and the eastern section remains the Northwest Territory.
1824   Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony” premiers in Vienna.
1847   The American Medical Association is formed in Philadelphia.
1862   Confederate troops strike Union troops at the Battle of Eltham’s Landing in Virginia.
1864   The Battle of Wilderness ends with heavy losses to both sides.
1877   Indian chief Sitting Bull enters Canada with a trail of Indians after the Battle of Little Big Horn.
1915   The German submarine U-20 torpedoes the passenger ship Lusitiania, sinking her in 21 minutes with 1,978 people on board.
1937   The German Condor Legion arrives in Spain to assist Fransico Franco’s forces.
1942   In the Battle of the Coral Sea, Japanese and American navies attack each other with carrier-launched warplanes. It is the first time in the history of naval warfare where two fleets fought without seeing each other.Two crucial battles in 1942 marked the turning point of the war in the Pacific.
1943   The last major German strongholds in North Africa–Tunis and Bizerte–fall to Allied forces.
1945   Germany signs an unconditional surrender, effectively ending World War II in Europe.
1952   In Korea, Communist POWs at Koje-do riot against their American captors.
1954   French troops surrender to the Vietminh at Dien Bien Phu.
1958   Howard Johnson sets an aircraft altitude record in F-104.
1960   Leonid Brezhnev becomes president of the Soviet Union.
Born on May 7
1812   Robert Browning, English poet.
1833   Johannes Brahms, German composer.
1840   Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky, Russian composer.
1870   Marcus Loew, film executive, consolidated studios to create MGM.
1892   Josip Broz [Tito], leader of Yugoslavia during after World War II.
1892   Archibald MacLeish, American poet and statesman.
1901   Gary Cooper, film actor (High Noon, Friendly Persuasion).
1909   Edwin Herbert Land, inventor of the Poloroid Land Camera.
1919   Eva (Evita) Perón, first lady of Argentina.
1932   Jenny Joseph, English poet and novelist (The Thinking Heart, The Inland Sea).
1943   Peter Carey, Australian writer (Illywhacker, Oscar and Lucinda).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.nPmBqJGM.dpuf

image of the day: V-E Day


V-E Day

After five years, World War II in Europe ended on May 7, 1945, when Colonel General Alfred Jodl, the last chief of staff of the German Army, signed the unconditional surrender at General Dwight D. Eisenhower‘s headquarters at Rheims, France. The next morning, President Harry S. Truman‘s radio announcement of V-E Day touched off celebrations in Allied areas throughout the world. Happy Stars and Stripes staffers in London are shown here reading copies of the surrender announcement as they roll off the presses. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.gX5PNcj2.dpuf

Saint of the Day for Thursday, May 7th, 2015: St. Rose Venerini


Image of St. Rose Venerini

St. Rose Venerini

Blessed Rose was born at Viterbo in 1656, the daughter of Godfrey Venerini, a physician. Upon the death of a young man who had been paying court to her, she entered a convent, but after a few months … continue reading

Rose of Viterbo

Rose of Viterbo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

More Saints of the Day

today’s holiday: Festa di San Nicola


Festa di San Nicola

The Festa di San Nicola (Festival of St. Nicholas) is celebrated in Italy on the anniversary of the transfer of the saint’s relics by a group of 11th-century sailors from Bari. Thousands of pilgrims come to the Basilica of San Nicola in Bari, Puglia, to worship at the saint’s tomb and to ask for his help. There is a procession on this day in which a group of Barese sailors take the saint’s image down to the water, where it is placed on a flower-decked boat and taken out to sea. At night the statue is returned to its place of honor on the altar of San Nicola’s crypt. More… Discuss

quotation: What’s the use of making mysteries? It only makes people want to nose ’em out. Edith Wharton


What’s the use of making mysteries? It only makes people want to nose ’em out.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

today’s birthday Olympe de Gouges (1748)


Olympe de Gouges (1748)

Born Marie Gouze, de Gouges was a French author whose feminist writings during the French Revolution demanded the same rights for French women that French men were demanding. In 1791, alarmed that the new constitution did not address woman’s suffrage, she wrote Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen, challenging the practice of male authority and the notion of male-female inequality. Why was she executed by guillotine during the Reign of Terror? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony Premieres in Vienna (1824)


Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony Premieres in Vienna (1824)

The Symphony No. 9 in D Minor is the last complete symphony composed by Ludwig van Beethoven. One of the best known works of the Western repertoire, it is considered one of Beethoven’s greatest masterpieces. Incorporating part of Johann Schiller’s “Ode to Joy,” sung by soloists and a chorus, it is the first symphony in which a major composer utilizes human voices on the same level as instruments. How many standing ovations reportedly followed its premiere performance in 1824? More… Discuss

Chlorophyll


Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll is a green pigment that gives most plants their color and enables them to carry out photosynthesis, the process through which plants get energy from light. Chlorophyll absorbs light in the red and blue-violet portions of the visible spectrum; the green portion is not absorbed and, reflected, gives chlorophyll its characteristic green color. Only one animal has been found to use the chlorophyll it has eaten to perform photosynthesis for itself. What is it? More… Discuss

word: ultramarine


ultramarine

Definition: (noun) A blue pigment made from powdered lapis lazuli; a vivid or strong blue to purplish blue.
Synonyms: indigo, French blue
Usage: She found a piece of fabric dyed ultramarine, which would make a perfect sash for the light blue dress she was making. Discuss.

Injured Worker in ProPublica/NPR Story Testifies Before Illinois Legislature – ProPublica


An injured worker featured in a ProPublica and NPR investigation into the rollback of workers’ compensation nationwide warned Illinois lawmakers on Tuesday not to make the same drastic cuts that his state has made in recent years.

John Coffell, who lost his home after hurting his back at an Oklahoma tire plant, testified as part of an eight-hour hearing on workers’ comp before the entire Illinois state assembly. The rare hearing of “the committee as a whole” was called by Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan as a preemptive strike of sorts as newly elected Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner prepares a number of changes to reduce costs for employers.

As part of his “turnaround agenda,” Rauner has proposed:

Toughening standards so that employees must prove that work caused more than 50 percent of their injuries rather than just aggravating an existing condition

Relying more heavily on disability rating guides that reduce compensation for workers who suffer permanent injuries

Allowing workers’ comp judges to give equal weight to opinions of doctors hired by insurance companies rather than giving deference to workers’ physicians

Reducing the maximum medical fees that doctors and hospitals can charge by 30 percent

ProPublica and NPR reported earlier this year that more than 30 states have changed their workers’ comp laws since 2003, largely to appeal more to business. Those changes — which mirror some proposed in Illinois — have reduced benefits for injured workers, created hurdles to medical care, or made it more difficult for workers to qualify.

As in many states, workers’ comp in Illinois has become a bargaining chip. Rauner has insisted that changes to the laws must be made in exchange for any increase in the state’s minimum wage.

During the hearing, Rep. Jay Hoffman, a Democrat from southwestern Illinois, said the assembly should learn from the experiences of workers like Coffell, who were victims of both tragic accidents and “short-sighted policies” enacted by their legislatures.

“Their representatives may have called these actions ‘reforms.’ They may have talked about the business climate. They may have talked about the need to root out fraud. But what they really did is they denied hard-working, middle-class families the care they need and the support they deserve,” Hoffman said. “This side of the aisle will not join other states in a race to the bottom.”

The ProPublica and NPR series has led to bills to raise benefits in Alabama and prevent medical care from being cut off in California. Officials have also warned insurers in California not to abuse the process and have launched an audit of how one insurer handled a claim in which a paraplegic’s home health care was terminated. In Illinois, Coffell’s testimony appears to have been used to try to douse the governor’s proposals.

Coffell told the legislators that after injuring a disc in his back last summer, his pay dropped dramatically because Oklahoma had reduced the maximum wage-replacement benefits injured workers could receive from $801 a week to $561 a week.

Almost immediately, he said, his utilities were cut off, his truck was repossessed and his family was evicted from their rental home. Because no relative could accommodate all of them, Coffell sent his three children, aged 5 to 9, to live with grandparents. He and his wife only had enough gas money to see them on weekends. They’ve had to rely on food stamps to get by.

Asked by a legislator how it felt to not be able to support his family, Coffell said, “It’s indescribable, really. Pretty much if I was to give a crazy example, if you were to see your husband or child drowning in a pool, but not being able to get them out of it. Kind of the same feeling.”

The hearing repeatedly drew comparisons between Illinois, which has relatively high benefits and costs, and Indiana, which has relatively low benefits and the second cheapest insurance rates for employers in the country.

Workers and their families praised Illinois’ law. Christine Fuller — who lived in Indiana, but whose father died from falling off a roof on a job in Illinois — said the survivor benefits she received from workers’ comp helped pay the mortgage and put her through college and graduate school.

via Injured Worker in ProPublica/NPR Story Testifies Before Illinois Legislature – ProPublica.

From France 24 :


‘Charlie Hebdo is the first anti-racist magazine in France’

http://f24.my/1GQO0TF

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Mexico rescues 100 migrant hostages


Mexico rescues 100 migrant hostages http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-32621089

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CO2 levels reach monthly record


CO2 levels reach monthly record http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-32625429

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Pirate Capt Kidd’s ‘treasure’ found


Pirate Capt Kidd’s ‘treasure’ found http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-32621444

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