Daily Archives: August 7, 2015

Blue Bamboo Sketch


image

BLUE Bamboo Sketch

Advertisements

Violets Sketch


image

Violets Sketch

Answers Engraving


image

Answers Engraving

White House warns Chuck Schumer: disapprove of Iran deal at your own peril


White House warns Chuck Schumer: disapprove of Iran deal at your own peril

image

http://gu.com/p/4bcxf?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_WordPress

IS ‘abducts Syrian Christians’


IS ‘abducts Syrian Christians’

image

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-33818386

Rufus Wainwright – Everybody Knows by Leonard Cohen (with interview, from I’m your man DVD)


Rufus Wainwright – Everybody Knows

Breaking: APA Votes to Bar Psychologists from Nat’l Security Interrogations After Torture Scandal | Democracy Now!


By a nearly unanimous vote, the American Psychological Association’s Council of Representatives voted today in Toronto to adopt a new policy barring psychologists from participating in national security interrogations. Retired Col. Larry James, the former top Army intelligence psychologist at Guantánamo, cast the sole dissenting vote.

The vote came at the APA’s first convention since the release of a report confirming the APA leadership actively colluded with the Pentagon and the CIA torture programs.

For the past decade, a group of dissident psychologists have protested the use of psychologists to conduct interrogations at CIA black sites and Guantánamo. For years they were ignored and ridiculed. But that changed with the recent release of the “Hoffman Report,” a 542-page independent review commissioned by the APA’s board of directors. The study undermined the APA’s repeated denials that some of its 130,000 members were complicit in torture. Following the release, four top APA officials resigned, announced early retirements or been forced out.

In a special broadcast from Toronto, Democracy Now! aired three segments today on the APA vote.

Lead the Way Out of the Interrogation Room: Will American Psychological Assoc. End Role in Torture?

via Breaking: APA Votes to Bar Psychologists from Nat’l Security Interrogations After Torture Scandal | Democracy Now!.

 

biography: Chuck Schumer (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Chuck Schumer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Chuck Schumer
Charles Schumer official portrait.jpg
United States Senator
from New York
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 1999
Serving with Kirsten Gillibrand
Preceded by Al D’Amato
Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee
In office
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2015
Preceded by Dianne Feinstein
Succeeded by Roy Blunt
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York
In office
January 3, 1981 – January 3, 1999
Preceded by Elizabeth Holtzman
Succeeded by Anthony Weiner
Constituency 16th district 1981–1983
10th district 1983–1993
9th district 1993–1999
Member of the New York State Assembly
from the 45th district
In office
January 1, 1975 – December 31, 1980
Preceded by Stephen J. Solarz
Succeeded by Daniel L. Feldman
Personal details
Born Charles Ellis Schumer
November 23, 1950 (age 64)
Brooklyn, New York City
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Iris Weinshall
Children Jessica
Alison
Alma mater Harvard College (A.B.)
Harvard Law School (J.D.)
Religion Reform Judaism
Website Senate website

Charles Ellis “Chuck” Schumer (/ˈʃmər/; born November 23, 1950) is the senior United States Senator from New York and a member of the Democratic Party. First elected in 1998, he defeated three-term Republican incumbent Al D’Amato by a margin of 55%–44%. Schumer was re-elected in 2004 by a margin of 71%–24% and in 2010 by a margin of 66%–33%.

Before his election to the U.S. Senate, Schumer served in the US House of Representatives from 1981 to 1999, representing New York’s 16th congressional district, later redistricted to the 10th congressional district in 1983 and to the 9th congressional district in 1993. A native of Brooklyn and graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, he was a three-term member of the New York State Assembly, serving from 1975 to 1980.

Schumer was chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee from 2005 to 2009, in which post he oversaw a total of 14 Democratic gains in the Senate in the 2006 and 2008 elections. He is the third-ranking Democrat in the Senate, behind Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, elected Vice Chairman of the Democratic Caucus in the Senate in 2006.[1] In November 2010, he was also chosen to hold the additional role of chairman of the Senate Democratic Policy Committee starting at the opening of the 112th Congress.[2] In 2015, Reid (who is retiring after the 2016 elections) and Durbin endorsed Schumer as the next leader of the Senate Democratic Caucus.[3]

Notable former aides to Schumer include former US congressman Anthony Weiner; and current New York state senator Daniel Squadron and New York State Assembly Members Phil Goldfeder and Victor M. Pichardo.[4][5]

Early life and education

Schumer was born in Brooklyn, the son of Selma (née Rosen) and Abraham Schumer.[6] His family is Jewish,[7] and he is related to comedienne Amy Schumer.[8][9][10] He attended public schools in Brooklyn, scoring a perfect 1600 on the SAT, and graduated as the valedictorian from James Madison High School in 1967.[11] Schumer competed for Madison High on the It’s Academic television quiz show.[12]

He attended Harvard College, where he became interested in politics and campaigned for Eugene McCarthy in 1968.[13] After completing his undergraduate degree, he continued to Harvard Law School, earning his Juris Doctor with honors in 1974. Schumer passed the New York State Bar Exam in early 1975, but never practiced law, entering politics instead.[14]

State Assemblyman and Congressman

 
Chuck Schumer’s Official Congressional Portrait, 1987.

 
Schumer’s district from 1993 to 1999

In 1974, Schumer ran for and was elected to the New York State Assembly, becoming, at age 23, the youngest member of the New York legislature since Theodore Roosevelt. He served three terms, from 1975 to 1980, sitting in the 181st, 182nd and 183rd New York State Legislatures.[15][16][17] He has never lost an election.

In 1980, 16th District Congresswoman Elizabeth Holtzman won the Democratic nomination for the Senate seat of Republican Jacob Javits. Schumer ran for Holtzman’s vacated House seat and won.

He was re-elected eight times from the Brooklyn and Queens-based district, which changed numbers twice in his tenure (it was numbered the 16th from 1981 to 1983, the 10th from 1983 to 1993 and the 9th from 1993). In 1982, as a result of redistricting, Schumer faced a potential matchup with his mentor, veteran Brooklyn congressman Steve Solarz.[18] In preparation, Schumer “set about making friends on Wall Street, tapping the city’s top law firms and securities houses for campaign donations. ‘I told them I looked like I had a very difficult reapportionment fight. If I were to stand a chance of being re-elected, I needed some help,’ he would later tell the Associated Press.”[18]

As a member of the House Judiciary Committee, Schumer was one of four congressional members who oversaw the House investigation (leading the Democratic defense of the Clinton administration),[19] of the Waco siege hearings in 1995.[20]

MORE HERE

Tough lessons to learn from Hiroshima and Nagasaki: just war, nuclear disarmament :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Ruins of Nagasaki, shortly after the Aug. 9, 1945 atomic bombing of the city the United States. Public Domain, via National Archives and Records Administration.

By Kevin J. Jones

Denver, Colo., Aug 6, 2015 / 12:10 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- The 70th anniversary of the US atomic strikes on Japan has prompted reflection, commemoration, and debate about the ethics of war and the world’s nuclear arsenal.

“There’s no winning in nuclear war,” Maryann Cusimano Love, an international relations professor at the Catholic University of America, told CNA. Hiroshima and Nagasaki teach “how horrific nuclear war is.”

“Many folks are not aware of how many nuclear weapons remain with us today and how dangerous these arsenals are,” she continued. “That is why the Catholic Church has continued to argue that we have to get rid of nuclear weapons, that the presence of these weapons is very dangerous for human life and very destabilizing.”

Seventy years ago, the only wartime use of nuclear weapons took place in the Aug. 6 attack on Hiroshima and the Aug. 9 attack on Nagasaki by the United States.

The Hiroshima attack killed around 80,000 people instantly and may have caused about 130,000 deaths, mostly civilians. The attack on the port city of Nagasaki killed about 40,000 instantly and destroyed a third of the city, the BBC reports.

The attacks took a heavy toll on all of Japan’s population, but Nagasaki was a historic center of Catholicism since European missionaries such as St. Francis Xavier arrived in the 16th century. After Japan’s rulers closed the country, in part due to fears of foreign domination, Japanese Catholics survived centuries of persecution before their freedom of religion was secured again in the 19th century.

via Tough lessons to learn from Hiroshima and Nagasaki: just war, nuclear disarmament :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Pope Francis: Beware the ‘false peace’ that comes from the devil


Pope Francis greets pilgrims in St. Peters Square before the Wed. general audience April 16, 2014. Credit: Daniel Ibanez/CNA.

Pope Francis greets pilgrims in St. Peters Square before the Wed. general audience April 16, 2014. Credit: Daniel Ibanez/CNA

Vatican City, Aug 7, 2015 / 07:00 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Francis on Friday told a group of youth that the greatest challenge in his vocation so far has been finding true peace, and encouraged them to learn how to discern between this peace and the one offered by the devil.

“I would say finding peace in the Lord. That peace that only Jesus can give, in work and chores,” the Pope said Aug. 7. in response to the question, posed by one of the youth he met with in audience that day.

“The key is finding that peace which means that the Lord is with you and helps you,” he said.

Francis then stressed the importance of knowing how to tell the difference between peace from God, and the false peace offered by the devil.

True peace, he said, always comes from Jesus, and is sometimes “wrapped” in the cross, while the other, false peace that only makes you “kind of happy” comes from the devil.

“We have to ask for this grace to distinguish, to know true peace,” the Pope said, explaining that while on the outside we might think everything is ok and that we’re doing good, “way down inside is the devil.”

“The devil always destroys. He tells you this is the way and then leaves you alone,” he continued, adding that the devil is “a poor payer; he always rips you off.”

A sign of this peace, Francis said, is joy, because true joy is something that only Jesus can give.

The challenge for both them and himself “is to find the peace of Jesus, also in difficult moments, to find Jesus’ peace and to recognize that peace which has make-up on it,” the Pope said.

He made his comments during an audience with more than 1500 members of the International Eucharistic Youth Movement. They are meeting in Rome from Aug. 4-10 in honor of the 100th anniversary of their founding in 1915. The theme for the gathering is “Joy be with you.”

Six of the youth present, from Italy, Indonesia, Argentina, Brazil, Taiwan, and France got to meet the Pope personally and ask him questions on things that affect their daily life.

Among the topics discussed were tensions and conflicts within families and society, the discernment between true and false peace, signs of hope in the world and deepening one’s relationship with Jesus in the Eucharist.

In his response to the question on conflict, Pope Francis noted how there are many conflicts present in the world, and said that we should neither be afraid of them nor seek them out. Some conflicts, he said, can be good and help us to understand differences.

One problem with the world’s current conflicts is that “one culture doesn’t tolerate another,” he said, and pointed to the Rohingya as an example.

Rohingya people are an Indo-Aryan ethnic group largely from the Rakhine state of Burma, in west Myanmar. Since clashes began in 2012 between the state’s Buddhist community and the long-oppressed Rohingya Muslim minority, more than 100,000 Rohingya’s have fled Myanmar by sea, according to the U.N.

In order to escape forced segregation from the rest of the population inside rural ghettos, many of the Rohingya – who are not recognized by the government as a legitimate ethnic group or as citizens or Myanmar – have made the perilous journey at sea in hopes of evading persecution.

In May Pope Francis spoke out after a number of Rohingya people – estimated to be in the thousands – were stranded at sea in boats with dwindling supplies while Southeastern nations such as Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia refused to take them in.

This, he told the youth, “is called killing. It’s true. If I have a conflict with you and I kill you, its war.”

Conflict is normal when so many different cultures exist in one country, the Pope observed, but emphasized that there must be mutual respect in order for these conflicts to be resolved.

He said that dialogue is the best resolution to the great social problems of today, and pointed to the persecution of Christians in the Middle East as an example of when one culture doesn’t respect the identity or faith of another.

Yesterday Pope Francis wrote a letter to the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem S.B. Fouwad Toual for the Aug. 8 anniversary of the first arrival of Iraqi refugees in Jordan.

In his letter, the Pope thanked Jordan for welcoming the refugees, saying their actions bear witness to Christ’s resurrection.

He also noted how these refugees are “victims of fanaticism and intolerance, often under the eyes and silence of all,” and called on the international community to step up their efforts in putting an end to the persecution of Christians and other religious minorities.

In his speech to the youth, Francis said that even if you disagree with another culture’s practice, “Respect. Look for the good in it. Respect. In this way, conflicts are resolved with respect for the identity of others. Conflicts are resolved with dialogue.”

Another question posed to the Pope was if he sees true signs of joy in amid the problems of the 21st century.

Pope Francis responded by saying that the signs are there, and that one of them is seeing so many youth gathered together who believe that Jesus is truly in the Eucharist.

He also pointed to the family, noting that right now there are many strong tensions between generations.

Often when we speak of generations, parents and children come to mind, but grandparents are frequently left out, Francis observed.

“Grandparents are the great forgotten of this time,” he said, and encouraged the youth to speak to their grandparents, who are sources of wisdom due to the memory they have of life, tensions, conflicts and faith.

“Always when you meet your grandparents you find a surprise. They are patient, they know how to listen…don’t forget grandparents, understand?”

The last question the Pope answered, posed by a youth named Maradona, was what he would say to young people so that they might discover the depth of the Eucharist.

Francis immediately turned to the Last Supper, where Jesus gave us his body and blood for our salvation.

“The memory of Jesus…is there. The memory of the gesture of Jesus who then went to the Mount of Olives to start his Passion,” which is a personal act of love for each individual, he said.

The Pope stressed that Mass is not a ritual or a ceremony like what we see in the military or cultural celebration. Instead, going to Mass means going to Calvary with Jesus, where he gave his life for us, the Pope said.

In order to deepen in the mystery of the Eucharist, Francis suggested remembering St. Paul’s invitation to “remember Jesus Christ. When they are there at the table, he is giving his life for me. And so you deepen in the mystery.”

Pope Francis concluded by saying that although “we are at war” and there are so many conflicts, there are also many good and beautiful things, such as the hidden everyday saints among the people of God.

“God is present and there are so many reasons to be joyful. Take courage and go forward!” he finished.
via
http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/whats-pope-francis-biggest-challenge-finding-true-peace-25749/

 

Just a Thought: Some make their know their armor, while some make their ignorance their spear


Just a Thought: ” Some make their know their armor, while some make their ignorance their spear.”

-George-B.

Saint of the Day for Friday, August 7th, 2015: St. Cajetan


Image of St. Cajetan

St. Cajetan

In 1523, the Church was in sad shape. People could not get the spiritual nourishment they needed from the large numbers of uneducated and even immoral priests who took their money but returned … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

today’s holiday: Colombia Battle of Boyacá Day


Colombia Battle of Boyacá Day

Colombia, known as New Granada in the early part of the 19th century, was then ruled by Spain. Simón Bolívar, the leader of the independence movement in South America, began a military campaign to liberate Colombia in 1817. He achieved a major victory at the Battle of Boyacá on August 7, 1819, when he surprised the Spanish forces crossing a bridge and routed them. Colombians celebrate this national holiday with parades and festivals throughout the country. Ceremonies take place at the cemeteries where the fallen soldiers of the battle are buried. More… Discuss

quotation: John Quincy Adams


Whoever increases his knowledge multiplies the uses to which he is enabled to turn the gift of his Creator to his own benefit and partakes in some degree of that goodness which is the highest attribute of Omnipotence itself.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) Discuss

today’s birthday: Louis Leakey (1903)


Louis Leakey (1903)

Leakey was a British anthropologist and archaeologist whose work helped establish the course of human evolution in Africa. The son of missionaries, Leakey grew up among the Kikuyu people of Kenya. After attending university in the UK, he returned to E Africa, where he and his wife discovered the first known remains of Homo habilis, an extinct species of hominin widely regarded as the earliest member of the human genus. Who are “Leakey’s Angels,” and what have they gone on to accomplish? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Battle of Guadalcanal Begins (1942)


Battle of Guadalcanal Begins (1942)

During World War II, the Japanese occupied the island of Guadalcanal in the South Pacific. Hoping to prevent the Japanese from using this position to threaten supply routes between the US, Australia, and New Zealand, the Allies launched their first large-scale invasion of a Japanese-held island. After six months of bitter fighting on the ground, at sea, and in the air, the Allies captured the island. Why is the victory considered a strategically significant turning point in the war? More… Discuss

Ulan Bator


Ulan Bator

Ulan Bator, or Ulaanbaator, is the capital of the Republic of Mongolia. Founded in 1649 as a monastery town, today it is the junction point of the country’s major roads and caravan routes; it lies on the Trans-Siberian RR, linking Russia with Beijing. The city is home to a library of ancient Mongolian, Chinese, and Tibetan manuscripts. The 1904 British expedition to Tibet prompted the Dalai Lama to leave Lhasa for Ulan Bator, where he remained for 4 years. In whose honor was Ulaanbaator named? More… Discuss

WORD: bezant


bezant

Definition: (noun) A gold coin of the Byzantine Empire; widely circulated in Europe in the Middle Ages.
Synonyms: solidus
Usage: The gold coin I found on my archaeology dig turned out to be an authentic bezant. Discuss.

John Kerry: Vietnam war was result of ‘profound failure of diplomatic insight’


John Kerry: Vietnam war was result of ‘profound failure of diplomatic insight’

image

http://gu.com/p/4bb8q?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_WordPress