Daily Archives: April 17, 2018

Watch “I Don’t Want To Talk About It (from One Night Only! Rod Stewart Live at Royal Albert Hall)” on YouTube


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Watch “Scorpions – We Built This House” on YouTube


Watch “Ronnie Milsap – She Keeps The Home Fires Burning with Lyrics” on YouTube


Crack of dawn I hit the road, set my shoulders for the heavy load
Coffee leaking through the paper sack
The foreman says I’m late again, he can’t stand it when I only grin
He’s got me eight hours, she’s got me after that
I can’t wait ’til it’s quittin’ time
She got something cookin’ for me tonight
She keeps the home fires burning
While I’m out earning a living in a world
That’s known for its pouring rain
She keeps the home fires burning
Ooh and it’s her warm loving that keeps me returning again
And again
Out of gas, just my luck, four bald tires on my pickup truck
No more credit on my credit card
When I come home and hit that door
I remember what these aching arms are for
She’s my one light when the world goes dark
Tomorrow it’s the same old grind
But she’ll be burning in my mind
She keeps the home fires burning
While I’m out earning a living in a world
That’s known for its pouring rain
She keeps the home fires burning
Ooh and it’s her warm loving that keeps me returning again
She keeps the home fires burning
Ooh and it’s her warm loving that keeps me returning again
Home fires burning
While I’m out earning a living in a world
She keeps the home fires burning
Ooh and it’s her warm loving that keeps me returning again
She keeps the home fires burning
While I’m out earning a living in a world
That’s known for its pouring rain.

Songwriters: Michael Barry Reid / Don Pfrimmer / Dennis Morgan
She Keeps the Home Fires Burning lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group

Watch “Does He Love You by Reba McEntire & Linda Davis Lyrics” on YouTube


Reba McEntire


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reba_McEntire?wprov=sfla1

Reba Nell McEntire (born March 28, 1955)

Reba Nell McEntire (born March 28, 1955)

Reba Nell McEntire (born March 28, 1955) is an American singer, songwriter, actress, and record producer. She began her career in the music industry as a high school student singing in the Kiowa High School band, on local radio shows with her siblings, and at rodeos. While a sophomore in college, she performed the National Anthem at the National Rodeo in Oklahoma City and caught the attention of country artist Red Steagall who brought her to Nashville, Tennessee. She signed a contract with Mercury Records a year later in 1975. She released her first solo album in 1977 and released five additional studio albums under the label until 1983.

This article is about the musician and actress. For her self-titled album, see Reba McEntire (album).
Quick facts: Spouse(s), Website …
Reba McEntire

Reba McEntire at the 60th Annual Grammy Awards, January 2018
Born Reba Nell McEntire
March 28, 1955 (age 63)
McAlester, Oklahoma, U.S.
Education Kiowa High School
Alma mater Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Occupation
Singersongwriteractressrecord producer
Years active 1975–present
Spouse(s)
Charlie Battles
(m. 1976; div. 1987)
Narvel Blackstock
(m. 1989; div. 2015)
Children Shelby Blackstock
Musical career
Genres Country
Instruments Vocals
Labels
MercuryMCA NashvilleStarstruckValoryNash Icon
Associated acts
Red SteagallPake McEntireSusie McEntireBrooks & DunnKelly ClarksonLinda Davis
Website http://www.reba.com
Close
Signing with MCA Nashville Records, McEntire took creative control over her second MCA album, My Kind of Country (1984), which had a more traditional country sound and produced two number one singles: “How Blue” and “Somebody Should Leave”. The album brought her breakthrough success, bringing her a series of successful albums and number one singles in the 1980s and 1990s. McEntire has since released 29 studio albums, acquired 40 number one singles, 16 number one albums, and 28 albums have been certified gold, platinum or multi-platinum in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America. She has sometimes been referred to as “The Queen of Country”. and she is one of the best-selling artists of all time, having sold more than 80 million records worldwide.

In the early 1990s, McEntire branched into film starting with 1990’s Tremors. She has since starred in the Broadway revival of Annie Get Your Gun and in her television sitcom, Reba (2001–07) for which she was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series–Musical or Comedy.

Early life
Reba Nell McEntire was born March 28, 1955, in McAlester, Oklahoma, to Jacqueline (née Smith; born November 6, 1926) and Clark Vincent McEntire (November 30, 1927 – October 23, 2014).

Her father, and her grandfather, John Wesley McEntire (February 19, 1897 – February 13, 1976), were both champion steer ropers and her father was a World Champion Steer Roper three times (1957, 1958, and 1961). John McEntire was the son of Clark Stephen McEntire (September 10, 1855 – August 15, 1935) and Helen Florida McEntire (née Brown; May 19, 1868 – May 16, 1947). Her mother had once wanted to be a country-music artist but eventually decided to become a schoolteacher, but she did teach her children how to sing. Reba reportedly taught herself how to play the guitar. On car rides home from their father’s rodeo shows, the McEntire siblings learned songs and harmonies from their mother, eventually forming a vocal group called the “Singing McEntires” with her brother, Pake, and her younger sister Susie (her older sister Alice did not participate). Reba played guitar in the group and wrote all the songs. The group sang at rodeos and recorded “The Ballad of John McEntire” together. Released on the indie label Boss, the song pressed one thousand copies.

In 1974, McEntire attended Southeastern Oklahoma State University planning to be an elementary school teacher (eventually graduating December 16, 1976). While not attending school, she also continued to sing locally. That same year she was hired to perform the national anthem at the National Rodeo in Oklahoma City. Country artist Red Steagall, who was also performing that day, was impressed by her vocal ability and agreed to help her launch a country-music career in Nashville, Tennessee. After recording a demo tape, she signed a recording contract with Mercury Records in 1975.

Music career
1976–83: Career launch at Mercury
McEntire made her first recordings for Mercury on January 22, 1976, when she released her debut single. Upon its release that year, “I Don’t Want to Be a One Night Stand” failed to become a major hit on the Billboard country music chart, peaking at number 88 in May. She completed her second recording session September 16, which included the production of her second single, “(There’s Nothing Like The Love) Between a Woman and Man”, which reached only number 86 in March 1977. She recorded a third single that April, “Glad I Waited Just for You”, which reached number 88 by August. That same month, Mercury issued her self-titled debut album. The album was a departure from any of McEntire’s future releases, as it resembled the material of Tanya Tucker and Tammy Wynette, according to AllMusic reviewer Greg Adams. The album itself did not chart the Billboard Top Country Albums chart upon its release. After releasing two singles with Jacky Ward (“Three Sheets in the Wind” b/w “I’d Really Love to See You Tonight”; and “That Makes Two of Us” at No. 20 and No. 26, respectively), Mercury issued her second studio album in 1979, Out of a Dream. The album’s cover of Patsy Cline’s “Sweet Dreams” became McEntire’s first Top 20 hit, reaching No. 19 on the Billboard country chart in November 1979.

In 1980, “You Lift Me Up (To Heaven)” brought her to the Top 10 for the first time. Her third studio album, Feel the Fire was released in October and spawned two additional Top 20 hit singles that year. In September 1981, McEntire’s fourth album, Heart to Heart was issued and became her first album to chart the Billboard Top Country Albums list, peaking at No. 2. Its lead single, “Today All Over Again” became a top five country hit. The album received mainly negative reviews from critics. William Ruhlmann of AllMusic gave it two-and-a-half out of five stars, stating she did not get creative control of her music. Ruhlmann called “There Ain’t No Love” “essentially a soft pop ballad”. Most of the album’s material consisted of mainly country pop-styled ballads, which was not well liked by McEntire herself. Her fifth album, Unlimited was issued in June 1982, and spawned her first Billboard number one single in early 1983: “Can’t Even Get the Blues” and “You’re the First Time I’ve Thought About Leaving”. The following year her sixth album, Behind the Scene was released and was positively received by music critics. In 1983, McEntire announced her departure from Mercury, criticizing the label’s country pop production styles.

1984–90: Breakthrough
McEntire signed with MCA Nashville Records in 1984 and released her seventh studio album, Just a Little Love. Harold Shedd was originally the album’s producer; however, McEntire rejected his suggestions towards country pop arrangements. It was instead produced by Norro Wilson, although the album still had a distinguishable country pop sound. Dissatisfied with the album’s sound, she went to MCA president, Jimmy Bowen, who told McEntire to find material that was best-suited to her liking. Instead of finding new material, she found previously recorded country hits from her own record collection, which was then recorded for the album. The album’s material included songs originally released as singles by Ray Price (“Don’t You Believe Her”, “I Want to Hear It from You”), Carl Smith (“Before I Met You”), Faron Young (“He’s Only Everything”) and Connie Smith (“You’ve Got Me [Right Where You Want Me”]). The album spawned two number-one singles: “How Blue” and “Somebody Should Leave”. It was given positive reviews from critics, with Billboard praising McEntire as “the finest woman country singer since Kitty Wells” and Rolling Stone critics honoring her as one of their Top 5 favorite country artists. Upon its release, My Kind of Country became her highest-peaking album on the Top Country Albums chart, reaching No. 13. The album also included instruments such as a fiddle and pedal steel guitar, and was aimed more towards a traditional country sound. McEntire was later praised as a “new traditionalist”, along with Ricky Skaggs, George Strait, and Randy Travis. That year, she won the Country Music Association Awards’ Female Vocalist of the Year, her first major industry award. The album was certified Gold.

In 1985, McEntire released her third MCA album, Have I Got a Deal for You, which followed the same traditional format as My Kind of Country. It was the first album produced by McEntire and was co-produced with Jimmy Bowen. Like her previous release, the album received positive feedback, including Rolling Stone, which called it a “promising debut”. The album’s second single, “Only in My Mind” was entirely written by McEntire and reached No. 5 on the Billboard country chart. On January 17, 1986, McEntire became a member of the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, and has been a member ever since. In February 1986, McEntire’s ninth studio album, Whoever’s in New England was released. For this album, McEntire and co-producer Jimmy Bowen incorporated her traditional music style into a mainstream sound that was entirely different from anything she had previously recorded. Country Music: The Rough Guide called the production of the title track, “bigger and sentimentalism more obvious, even manipulative”. The title track peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard Country Chart and won her a Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance the following year. In addition, the album became McEntire’s first release to certify gold in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America (and was later certified Platinum). At the end of the year, McEntire won Entertainer of the Year from the Country Music Association, the highest honor in the awards show.

McEntire in Washington, D.C., November 2000
McEntire released a second album in 1986 (her tenth overall), What Am I Gonna Do About You. Allmusic critic William Ruhlmann was not overly pleased with album’s production, saying that it lacked the features that had been set forth on Whoever’s in New England. Rulhlmann criticized the title track for “something of the feel of ‘Whoever’s in New England’ in its portrayal of a woman trying to recover from a painfully ended love affair”. The title track was the lead single from the release and became a number-one single shortly after its release. This album also spawned a second number-one in “One Promise Too Late”. The following year, her first MCA compilation, Greatest Hits was released and became her first album to be certified platinum in sales, eventually certifying triple-platinum. A twelfth studio album, The Last One to Know, was released in 1987. The emotions of her divorce from husband, Charlie Battles, were put into the album’s material, according to McEntire. The title track from the release was a number-one single in 1987 and the second single, “Love Will Find Its Way to You”, also reached the top spot. In late 1987, McEntire released her first Christmas collection, Merry Christmas to You, which sold two million copies in the United States, certifying double Platinum. The album included cover versions of “Away in a Manger”, “Silent Night”, and Grandpa Jones’s “The Christmas Guest”.

Her thirteenth album, Reba, was issued in 1988 and was not well received by critics, who claimed she was moving farther away from her “traditional country” sound. Stereo Review disliked the album’s contemporary style, stating, “After years of insisting that she’d stick to hard-core country ‘because I have tried the contemporary-type songs, and it’s not Reba McEntire—it’s just not honest’, McEntire…has gone whole-hog pop. The album peaked at No. 1 on the Top Country Albums chart and remained there for six consecutive weeks. Okay, so maybe that’s not so terrible.” Although it was reviewed poorly, the album itself was certified platinum in sales and produced two number-one singles: “I Know How He Feels” and “New Fool at an Old Game”. In addition, the release’s cover version of Jo Stafford’s “A Sunday Kind of Love” became a Top 5 hit on the Billboard country music chart. Also in 1988, McEntire founded Starstruck Entertainment, which controlled her management, booking, publishing, promotion, publicity, accounting, ticket sales, and fan club administration. The company would eventually expand into managing a horse farm, jet charter service, trucking, construction, and book publishing.

Today’s Holiday: Syria National Day


Today’s Holiday:
Syria National Day

This national holiday commemorates the withdrawal of French troops on this day in 1946, when Syria proclaimed its independence after more than 20 years of French occupation. It is also known as Independence Day and Evacuation Day. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Sirimavo Bandaranaike (1916)


Today’s Birthday:
Sirimavo Bandaranaike (1916)

Bandaranaike’s husband became prime minister of Ceylon in 1956 and was assassinated three years later. In the election that followed, Bandaranaike’s party was victorious—making her the world’s first female prime minister. She headed two coalition governments and served again as prime minister when she was appointed by her daughter, Chandrika Kumaratunga, who was elected president in 1994. While in office, Bandaranaike promoted a new constitution that changed the country’s name to what? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Ford Mustang Debuts at New York World’s Fair (1964)


This Day in History:
Ford Mustang Debuts at New York World’s Fair (1964)

Introduced at a relatively affordable $2,368, the Ford Mustang took the American auto market by storm. The initial sales projection of 100,000 units in the first year was surpassed within months, and a record 418,000 were on the road within the year. That year, the Mustang was featured in the James Bond film Goldfinger and appeared as the pace car at the Indianapolis 500, helping secure its iconic status. The original pony car, the very first Mustang model has what unusual designation? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Francis Bacon


Quote of the Day:
Francis Bacon

Boldness is ever blind; for it seeth not danger, and inconveniences.

More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: The Percy-Neville Feud


Article of the Day:
The Percy-Neville Feud

The Percy-Neville Feud was a string of skirmishes between two prominent northern English families and their followers that helped provoke the Wars of the Roses—a series of dynastic civil wars between supporters of the Houses of Lancaster and York in the 15th century. Six months after the Nevilles allied themselves with Richard, Duke of York—rival of the Lancastrian King Henry VI—the Percys met the Nevilles and the Duke in the first battle at St. Albans. What was the original reason for the feud? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: more sinned against than sinner


Idiom of the Day:
more sinned against than sinner

Less guilty or worthy of blame than others, especially those who have injured or laid such blame or guilt upon one. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: imperil


Word of the Day:
imperil

Definition: (verb) Pose a threat to; present a danger to.
Synonyms: endanger, jeopardize, menace, threaten
Usage: You imperil the lives of other road users by driving drunk.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch