Famous Fantastic Mysteries – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famous_Fantastic_Mysteries

Famous Fantastic Mysteries
Famous Fantastic Mysteries was an American science fiction and fantasy pulp magazine published from 1939 to 1953. The editor was Mary Gnaedinger. It was launched by the Munsey Company as a way to reprint the many science fiction and fantasy stories which had appeared over the preceding decades in Munsey magazines such as Argosy. From its first issue, dated September/October 1939, Famous Fantastic Mysteries was an immediate success. Less than a year later, a companion magazine, Fantastic Novels, was launched.

Famous Fantastic Mysteries

Famous fantastic mysteries

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First issue cover, September/October 1939
Editor
Mary Gnaedinger
Categories
Science fiction, fantasy, pulp
Frequency
Bimonthly, monthly
Format
Magazine
Founder
Munsey Company
First issue
1939
Final issue
1953
Country
United States
Language
English
Frequently reprinted authors included George Allan England, A. Merritt, and Austin Hall; the artwork was also a major reason for the success of the magazine, with artists such as Virgil Finlay and Lawrence Stevens contributing some of their best work. In late 1942, Popular Publications acquired the title from Munsey, and Famous Fantastic Mysteries stopped reprinting short stories from the earlier magazines. It continued to reprint longer works, including titles by G. K. Chesterton, H. G. Wells, and H. Rider Haggard. Original short fiction also began to appear, including Arthur C. Clarke’s “Guardian Angel”, which would later form the first section of his novel Childhood’s End. In 1951, the publishers experimented briefly with a large digest format, but returned quickly to the original pulp layout. The magazine ceased publication in 1953, almost at the end of the pulp era.

Publication history
By the early decades of the 20th century, science fiction (sf) stories were frequently seen in popular magazines.[1] The Munsey Company, a major pulp magazine publisher, printed a great deal of science fiction in these years,[1] but it was not until 1926 that Amazing Stories, the first pulp magazine specializing in science fiction appeared.[2] Munsey continued to print sf in Argosy during the 1930s, including stories such as Murray Leinster’s The War of the Purple Gas and Arthur Leo Zagat’s “Tomorrow”, though they owned no magazines that specialized in science fiction.[3] By the end of the 1930s science fiction was a growing market,[2] with several new sf magazines launched in 1939.[4] That year Munsey took advantage of science fiction’s growing popularity by launching Famous Fantastic Mysteries as a vehicle for reprinting the most popular fantasy and sf stories from the Munsey magazines.[5]

The first issue was dated September/October 1939, and was edited by Mary Gnaedinger. The magazine immediately became successful and went to a monthly schedule starting in November 1939. Demand for reprints of old favorites was so strong that Munsey decided to launch an additional magazine, Fantastic Novels, in July 1940.[5] The two magazines were placed on alternating bimonthly schedules,[2] but when Fantastic Novels ceased publication in early 1941 Famous Fantastic Mysteries remained bimonthly until June 1942.[6] Munsey sold Famous Fantastic Mysteries to Popular Publications, a major pulp publisher, at the end of 1942; it appears to have been a sudden decision, since the editorial in the December 1942 issue discusses a planned February issue that never materialized, and mentions forthcoming reprints that did not appear. The first issue from Popular appeared in March 1943, and only two more issues appeared that year; the September 1943 issue marked the beginning of a regular quarterly schedule. It returned to a bimonthly schedule in 1946 which it maintained with only slight deviations until the end of its run.[3]

In 1949, Street & Smith, one of the longest established and most respected publishers, shut down all of their pulp magazines: the pulp era was drawing to a close. Popular Publications was the biggest pulp publisher, which helped their titles last a little longer, but Famous Fantastic Mysteries finally ceased publication in 1953, only a couple of years before the last of the pulps ceased publication.[7]

Contents and reception
Bibliographic details
Footnotes
Ashley, Time Machines, pp. 16–23.
Malcolm Edwards & Peter Nicholls, “SF Magazines”, in Clute & Nicholls, Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, pp. 1066–1068.
Thomas D. Clareson, “Famous Fantastic Mysteries”, in Tymn & Ashley, Science Fiction, Fantasy and Weird Fiction Magazines, pp. 211–216.
Ashley, Time Machines, pp. 237–255.
Ashley, Time Machines, pp. 150–151.
“Famous Fantastic Mysteries”, in Tuck, Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy, Vol. 3, pp. 555–556.
Ashley, Time Machines, pp. 220–225.
Day, Index to the Science-Fiction Magazines, pp. 169–170.
Robert Weinberg, “Lawrence Stern Stevens”, in Weinberg, Biographical Dictionary, pp. 260–262.
Robert Weinberg, “Peter Stevens”, in Weinberg, Biographical Dictionary, pp. 262–263.
Ashley, Transformations, p. 386.
“Culture: Famous Fantastic Mysteries: SFE: Science Fiction Encyclopedia”. Gollancz. Retrieved March 17, 2013.
Mike Ashley, “Famous Fantastic Mysteries”, in Clute & Grant, Encyclopedia of Fantasy, p. 334.
Knight, In Search of Wonder, p. 187.
See the individual issues. For convenience, an online index is available at “Series: Famous Fantastic Mysteries — ISFDB”. Al von Ruff. Retrieved 17 March 2013.
Ashley, Time Machines, p. 217.
Ashley, Transformations, p. 304.
John Clute, “Martin H. Greenberg”, in Clute & Nicholls, Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, pp. 522–524.

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