Serum protein electrophoresis – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serum_protein_electrophoresis

Serum protein electrophoresis

Protein electrophoresis (schematic)

Serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP or SPE) is a laboratory test that examines specific proteins in the blood called globulins.[1] The most common indications for a serum protein electrophoresis test are to diagnose or monitor multiple myeloma, a monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS), or further investigate a discrepancy between a low albumin and a relatively high total protein. Unexplained bone pain, anemia, proteinuria, renal insufficiency, and hypercalcemia are also signs of multiple myeloma, and indications for SPE.[2] Blood must first be collected, usually into an airtight vial or syringe. Electrophoresis is a laboratory technique in which the blood serum (the fluid portion of the blood after the blood has clotted) is applied to an acetate membrane soaked in a liquid buffer.,[3][4] to a buffered agarose gel matrix, or into liquid in a capillary tube, and exposed to an electric current to separate the serum protein components into five major fractions by size and electrical charge: serum albumin, alpha-1 globulins, alpha-2 globulins, beta 1 and 2 globulins, and gamma globulins.

Serum protein electrophoresis
MeSH
D001797
[edit on Wikidata]

Normal serum protein electrophoresis diagram with legend of different zones.

Schematic representation of a protein electrophoresis gel
Acetate or gel electrophoresis
Capillary electrophoresis
Serum protein fractions

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