The Horologion of Andronikos Kyrristos (Tower of the Winds) in the Roman Agora of Athens, Greece. About 100-50 B.C.

The Horologion of Andronikos Kyrristos (Tower of the Winds) in the Roman Agora of Athens, Greece. About 100-50 B.C.

The Horologion of Andronikos Kyrristos (Tower of the Winds) in the Roman Agora of Athens, Greece. About 100-50 B.C.

Tower of the Winds, also called “Horologium”, Greek: “Horologion” (“Timepiece”), building in Athens erected about 100–50 B.C. by Andronicus of Cyrrhus for measuring time. Still standing, it is an octagonal marble structure 42 feet (12.8 m) high and 26 feet (7.9 m) in diameter. Each of the building’s eight sides faces a point of the compass and is decorated with a frieze of figures in relief representing the winds that blow from that direction; below, on the sides facing the sun, are the lines of a sundial. The Horologium was surmounted by a weather vane in the form of a bronze Triton and contained a water clock (clepsydra) to record the time when the sun was not shining.

Text credit: britannica.com (Tower of the Winds). Photo credit: George Koronaios from Athens, Greece / Wikimedia Commons.

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