Daily Archives: May 5, 2018

Judicial Watch uncovered bombshell docs showing the Obama Admin sent U.S. taxpayer funds overseas to an org backed by billionaire George Soros – which used the money to fund its left-wing political activities benefiting the socialist government in Albania.


Check out @JudicialWatch’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/JudicialWatch/status/992233602883637249?s=09

Judicial Watch uncovered bombshell docs showing the Obama Admin sent U.S. taxpayer funds overseas to an org backed by billionaire George Soros – which used the money to fund its left-wing political activities benefiting the socialist government in Albania.
https://t.co/K7Vhff6U5M

UK regulator orders Cambridge Analytica to release data on US voter


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/may/05/cambridge-analytica-uk-regulator-release-data-us-voter-david-carroll

Support The
Guardian
The Guardian – Back to home
News
Opinion
Sport
Culture
Lifestyle
Menu
Officers of the Information Commissioner’s Office raid Cambridge Analytica’s office in March.

The Cambridge Analytica Files
UK regulator orders Cambridge Analytica to release data on US voter
In landmark cross-border decision, Information Commissioner’s Office gives company 30 days to comply with David Carroll’s request
Carole Cadwalladr
@carolecadwalla
Sat 5 May 2018 09.13 EDT

Cambridge Analytica has been ordered to hand over all the data and personal information it has on an American voter, including details of where it got the data and what it did with it, or face a criminal prosecution.

The UK Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) served the enforcement notice to the company on Friday in a landmark legal decision that opens the way for up to 240 million other American voters to request their data back from the firm under British data protection laws.

The test case was taken to the ICO by David Carroll, an associate professor at Parsons School of Design in New York. As a US citizen, he had no means of obtaining this information under US law, but in January 2016 he discovered Cambridge Analytica had processed US voter data in the UK and that this gave him rights under British laws. Cambridge Analytica had refused to accept this and told the ICO that Carroll was no more entitled to make a so-called “subject access request” under the UK Data Protection Act “than a member of the Taliban sitting in a cave in the remotest corner of Afghanistan”.

The ICO did not accept this as a valid legal argument and has now told SCL Elections, which acted as the data controller for Cambridge Analytica, that it has 30 days to comply or appeal. Cambridge Analytica and its affiliates announced this week that they had gone into liquidation, but the ICO has made it clear that it cannot avoid its responsibilities under UK law and states that “failure to comply with this enforcement notice is a criminal offence”.

It was always astonishing to us that Cambridge Analytica and SCL took such a combative approach
Ravi Naik, lawyer
Carroll said the decision was a landmark moment not just for him but for the millions of other people whose data Cambridge Analytica used in the Trump and other campaigns.

“This should solve a lot of mysteries about what the company did with data and where it got it from,” he said. “I hope that it will help the ongoing investigations in my country and yours, and other places like Canada. There’s a lot of questions that no one has been able to answer until now so hopefully this will be a major breakthrough in our understanding of what it did.”

He said the ICO’s letter was “pretty extraordinary” and “proved what we’ve been saying for a long time: this is not a normal company. To have the audacity to say that American voters are no different than jihadis hiding in a cave is pretty shocking”. He said that it was the fact that it was a British company that had processed US voters’ data in the UK in an act of “digital colonialism” that had originally inspired him to ask the company for his data back.

He went public in an interview with the Observer last year after Cambridge Analytica sent him a “profile” they had created about him but no information about how they created it: “They had given me ‘scores’ for different issues but I had no idea what they’d based this on.”

Carroll is also pursuing his right to his data through the British courts, with his case due to be heard in the high court in the next few months.

Ravi Naik, a human rights lawyer with Irvine Thanvi Natas, the British solicitor who is leading the case, said the decision “totally vindicates David’s long battle to try and reclaim his data”. He added: “The company put him through such a torturous process over what should have been a very simple subject access request. It was always astonishing to us that Cambridge Analytica and SCL took such a combative approach when the law is crystal clear. Data flows across borders, so the law follows.”

The covering letter from the ICO says that if Cambridge Analytica has difficulties complying, it should hand over passwords for the servers seized during its raid on the company’s office – something that raises questions also about what it has managed to retrieve from the servers so far.

Paul-Olivier Dehaye, a data expert who helped Carroll with his request, said that his website, PersonalData.io, had received a flood of inquiries from people who wanted to reclaim their data from Cambridge Analytica and other companies.

“The data commissioner has said that data crimes are real crimes and she is now putting this into action. This would have been unimaginable a year ago. It’s a real landmark. The ICO is showing that they are real consequences to not complying with UK data laws..

“Cambridge Analytica has been able to evade journalists’ questions and mislead both parliament and Congress, but now if they don’t answer these questions, it shows they’re criminally liable. And there’s also the potential that the truth could be even more incriminating.”

The company has claimed to have up to 7,000 data points on 240 million Americans, and if it refuses to comply with Carroll’s request or can be shown to have misused data, it could open itself up to class action from the entire US electorate – a fact that Dehaye suggests may have contributed to its decision this week to fold.

Carroll, who has studied the modern “adtech” industry for his professional work, said that he didn’t expect to find his data had been harvested from Facebook “since I’ve always been pretty paranoid about my privacy settings”, but that he expected to find a whole host of other companies implicated. “I think we’re going to find that this goes way beyond Facebook and that all sorts of things are being inferred about us and then used for political purposes.”

Cambridge Analytica has been approached for comment.

Topics
Cambridge Analytica

The Cambridge Analytica Files
Data protection

Information commissioner

news
Share on LinkedIn Share on Pinterest Share on Google+ Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger
View on theguardian.com
back to top
jobs
make a contribution
subscribe
guardian labs

about us
work for us
contact us
advertise with us

help
terms & conditions
privacy policy
cookie policy
securedrop
complaints & corrections

all topics
all contributors
facebook
twitter
digital newspaper archive
© 2018 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.

China denies using lasers to blind US fighter pilots


https://www.smh.com.au/world/africa/china-denies-using-lasers-to-blind-us-fighter-pilots-20180505-p4zdjt.html
The Sydney Morning Herald

WORLDAFRICADEFENCE
China denies using lasers to blind US fighter pilots
5 May 2018 — 1:42pm
Beijing: China has denied allegations that its forces targeted US military aircraft with high-powered lasers near its military base in Djibouti, resulting in minor injuries to two American pilots.

On Friday, the US accused China of mounting a campaign of harassment against its forces in the Horn of Africa by using military grade lasers to disorient its fighter pilots.

The port of Djibouti, an arid Horn of Africa nation with less than 1 million inhabitants, has become a military outpost for the US, China, France, Italy and Japan.
The port of Djibouti, an arid Horn of Africa nation with less than 1 million inhabitants, has become a military outpost for the US, China, France, Italy and Japan.
Photo: AP
The Pentagon issued a formal complaint, demanding that Beijing investigate a series of incidents in recent weeks in the skies above Djibouti, where China and the US operate military bases just kilometres apart. The Pentagon said the incidents represented a serious threat to US airmen and warned them to exercise caution when flying near certain areas.

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said China had informed the UUS that “after strict verification, we have told the US side that what they alleged is absolutely untrue”.

A Chinese ship heading to the Djibouti base last year.
A Chinese ship heading to the Djibouti base last year.
Photo: AP
The Defence Ministry issued a similar denial, saying it had refuted the accusations from the American side through formal channels.

“China always strictly abides by international law and the law of the country of residency and is committed to maintaining regional security and stability,” said the statement posted to the ministry’s microblog.

The pilots suffered minor eye injuries. There were no aircraft crashes or other more serious problems.

US air force personnel load pallets of medical and humanitarian aid supplies destined for Somalia at at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.
US air force personnel load pallets of medical and humanitarian aid supplies destined for Somalia at at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.
Photo: USAF/AP
Lasers present a serious problem because when aimed at aircraft they can injure pilots or temporarily blind them – which can present safety risks particularly as they are taking off and landing.

Djibouti stunned Washington by allowing China to build its first overseas military base, completed last year, within 18 miles of Camp Lemonnier, headquarters of US Africa Command.

While China stated originally that the base was intended as a logistics hub for UN peacekeeping missions and anti-piracy patrols, it is seen as part of a Chinese military expansion into the Indian Ocean that has alarmed regional rival India.

The military confrontation between the two powers is the most serious so far in Africa, where Beijing has worked assiduously to project its growing economic and geopolitical heft.

Washington’s fears that the Chinese were planning to mount surveillance operations of US counter-terrorism operations in Somalia and Yemen were brushed aside after China pledged about $1.7 billion to upgrade Djibouti’s ports and airport.

Home to 4000 US service personnel, Camp Lemonnier also serves as a platform for American special forces and drone operations against Islamist militants. Djibouti has become the scene of deep international intrigue, drawing comparisons with Vichy Casablanca.

France, Italy and Japan also have military bases in the tiny country with a population of under a million, while Saudi Arabia is believed to be angling for one.

Spanish and German troops are also stationed in Djibouti, which is considered of strategic importance because of its relative stability. It also sits on the Bab el-Mandeb, or the “Gate of Tears”, the strait separating Africa from the Arabian peninsular, which guards the entrance to the Red Sea and the Suez Canal. “It’s a serious matter and we’re taking it very seriously,” said Dana White, the Pentagon’s chief spokesman.

AP; Telegraph, London

DEFENCE
USA
The Sydney Morning Herald
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram
OUR SITES
CLASSIFIEDS
THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD
PRODUCTS & SERVICES
FAIRFAX MEDIA
Copyright © 2018
Fairfax Media

Watch “Goodbye to You | Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals | Lyrics ” on YouTube


“Goodbye To You”

I wake up feeling like i’ve aged a year
’cause I go to sleep in fear of the dawn
Head full of dreams unclear
Make the days seem twice as long

After all we’ve been through
I don’t know how to say goodbye to you

Passed by where we used to go
Where I now go alone
Everything we had to brave
I’m left here to face on my own

Maybe tomorrow I can start anew
I don’t know how to say goodbye to you

Shattered and chained to our past
Battered and too proud to ask
Walked a razor’s edge poisoned by degrees
Create each other’s voids fill each other’s needs

My options are plenty
But my choices are few
I don’t know how to say goodbye to you