Van Gogh – Mia Feigelson Gallery From the Album: ‘Van Gogh in Paris’ “Geranium in a Flowerpot” (Paris, summer 1886)

https://www.facebook.com/MiaFeigelsonVan Gogh – Mia Feigelson Gallery
From the Album: ‘Van Gogh in Paris’
“Geranium in a Flowerpot” (Paris, summer 1886) [F201]
In 1886 and 1887 after he moved to Paris from the Netherlands, Van Gogh transformed the subjects, color and techniques that he used in creating still life paintings.
He saw the work and met the founders and key artists of Impressionism, Pointillism and other movements and began incorporating what he learned into his work. Japanese art, Ukiyo-e, and woodblock prints also influenced his approach to composition and painting.

There was a gradual change from the somber mood of his work in the Netherlands to a far more varied and expressive approach as he began introducing brighter color into his work. He painted many still life paintings of flowers, experimenting with color, light and techniques he learned from several different modern artists before moving on to other subjects.

Knowing Van Gogh’s interest in making still life paintings of flowers, friends and acquaintances in Paris sent bouquets of flowers weekly for his paintings. He also purchased inexpensive bouquets himself, choosing flowers in a variety of types and colors for his paintings. Many of his still life paintings of flowers reflect a sense of overabundance of European still lifes, where blossoms fill the canvas, blooms spill out of the vase or stems of flowers teeter on the edge of the vase.

Van Gogh had an agreement with the Agostina Segatori proprietress of Café du Tambourin, an establishment that catered to Montmartre artists, for meals in exchange for a few paintings each week. Soon the walls of the café were full of floral still life paintings

“Geranium in a Flowerpot” (Paris, summer 1886) [F201]
By Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890)
oil on canvas; 46 x 38 cm
Private Collection

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