Daily Archives: May 31, 2019

Horoscope ♉: 05/31/2019


Horoscope ♉:
05/31/2019

You may feel more of an urge than ever to search for your family roots. Your search could be so deep and intense that you may even go beyond genealogy and study archeology as a way to learn how to bring some cohesion to the odd bits and pieces of family remnants that you uncover.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

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Today’s Holiday: Billy Bowlegs Festival


Today’s Holiday:
Billy Bowlegs Festival

The oldest and one of the biggest festivals in northwest Florida is held in Fort Walton Beach to commemorate the pirate William Augustus Bowles, also known as Capt. Billy Bowlegs. Activities begin with fireworks on Friday night. The following day, the pirate captain and his red-kerchiefed “krewe” members storm the city from the pirate ship Blackhawk. As events move on there are musical concerts, a treasure hunt, arts and crafts, numerous food vendors, and sports events that include a midnight run. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: John Marshall Harlan (1833)


Today’s Birthday:
John Marshall Harlan (1833)

After commanding a Union regiment in the American Civil War, Harlan served as a state attorney general before being appointed to the Supreme Court by President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1877. During his tenure, which lasted until his death in 1911, he became the court’s outstanding liberal justice and one of the most forceful dissenters in its history. His best-known dissenting opinion came in Plessy v. Ferguson, in which the Supreme Court established what infamous doctrine? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Farhud Begins (1941)


This Day in History:
Farhud Begins (1941)

During the Farhud, the pogrom carried out against the Jewish population of Baghdad after the fall of the short-lived pro-Nazi government of Rashid Ali, rioters killed about 200 Jews and injured hundreds more. It took place during the Jewish holiday of Shavuot, and, according to some, marked a turning point for Iraq’s 150,000 Jews, who were thereafter targeted for persecution. Jews had lived in Iraq since about 600 BCE, but by 1951, 80% had left. How many Jews are thought to live in Baghdad now? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: W. Somerset Maugham


Quote of the Day:
W. Somerset Maugham

The important thing was to love rather than to be loved. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Deirdre


Article of the Day:
Deirdre

Often used to symbolize Ireland, Deirdre is a beautiful heroine of Irish legend. At her birth, a druid prophesied that kings and lords would go to war over her beauty. Rather than kill her outright, King Conchobar, enticed by the description of her future beauty, ordered that she be raised in seclusion until she was old enough for him to marry. However, she fell in love and fled with her lover to Scotland. After a long idyllic stay there, Conchobar lured them back to Ireland. What happened next? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: have (one’s) say


Idiom of the Day:
have (one’s) say

To express or make known one’s views, opinions, or ideas. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: unlooked-for


Word of the Day:
unlooked-for

Definition: (adjective) Not anticipated.

Synonyms: out of the blue, unforeseen

Usage: These unlooked-for blows have shaken me terribly, and these strange calamities have quite broken my spirit.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Watch “Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3 – Sir Neville Marriner, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra” on YouTube


Wikipedia

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Ottorino Respighi

Ottorino Respighi (Italian: [ɔttoˈriːno resˈpiːɡi]; 9 July 1879 – 18 April 1936) was an Italian violinist, composer and musicologist, best known for his trilogy of orchestral tone poems: Fountains of Rome(1916), Pines of Rome (1924), and Roman Festivals (1928). His musicological interest in 16th-, 17th- and 18th-century music led him to compose pieces based on the music of these periods. He also wrote several operas, the most famous being La fiamma.

BiographyEdit

Early lifeEdit

Ottorino Respighi was born on 9 July 1879 in an apartment inside Palazzo Fantuzzi on Via Guido Reni in Bologna, Italy, into a musical family.[1] His father, a piano teacher, encouraged his son’s musical inclinations and taught him basic piano and violin at an early age. Not long into his violin lessons, however, Respighi suddenly quit after his teacher whacked him on the hand with a ruler when he had played a passage incorrectly. He resumed lessons several weeks later with a more patient teacher.[2] His piano skills, too, were a hit and miss affair, but his father arrived home one day surprised to find his son performing the Symphonic Studies by Robert Schumann on the family piano, revealing that he had learned it by himself in secret.[3]

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Watch “Ottorino Respighi: Concerto all’antica (P. 75) (1908)” on YouTube


Watch “Queen – Bohemian Rhapsody Piano Cover with Crossover by Avett” on YouTube


Watch “10 Great Exercises to Improve Your Eyesight” on YouTube