Daily Archives: June 8, 2019

16 Tenses in English Grammar


https://pin.it/iyhtbp67w47ncn

16 Tenses

16 Tenses in English Grammar

Advertisements

Today’s Holiday: Pentecost


Today’s Holiday:
Pentecost

As recorded in the New Testament in Acts 2, it was on the 50th day after Easter that the Apostles were praying together and the Holy Spirit descended on them in the form of tongues of fire, and they received the “gift of tongues”—the ability to speak in other languages. The English call it White Sunday, or Whitsunday, after the white garments worn on Pentecost by the newly baptized. In Germany it is called Pfingsten, and pink and red peonies, called Pfingstrosen, or “Whitsun roses,” are the symbols along with birch trees. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Les Paul (1915)


Today’s Birthday:
Les Paul (1915)

Paul began playing country music at 14, later switched to jazz, and started his own trio in 1936. Considered one of the finest jazz guitarists, he was famous for his amazing versatility. Dissatisfied with the sound of available instruments, Paul invented a solid-body electric guitar in 1941 that was marketed by Gibson and became extremely important in the development of rock music. Several versions of his prized guitars are still manufactured. What else did he invent? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Bhumibol Adulyadej Becomes King of Thailand (1946)


This Day in History:
Bhumibol Adulyadej Becomes King of Thailand (1946)

A member of Thailand’s Chakri dynasty, Bhumibol began his reign when his brother, King Ananda Mahidol, died in 1946 under mysterious circumstances. Bhumibol ruled with a regent until 1950, when he was formally crowned Rama IX. The longest-ruling monarch in Thailand’s history, he also became the longest-reigning ruler in the world in 2000. Although his power is largely ceremonial, he has enjoyed great popular support and serves as a focus of national unity. Who is Bhumibol’s heir apparent? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: John F. Kennedy


Quote of the Day:
John F. Kennedy

In a time of turbulence and change, it is more true than ever that knowledge is power. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Taxidermy


Article of the Day:
Taxidermy

Taxidermy is the process of skinning, preserving, and mounting dead vertebrate animals so that they appear lifelike. It began with the ancient custom of keeping skins and hunting trophies. By the 19th century, hunters were having upholsterers sew up animal skins and stuff them with rags and cotton. The term “stuffed animal” evolved from this crude form of taxidermy. Modern taxidermy involves constructing and sculpting anatomically correct manikins of clay and plaster. What is rogue taxidermy? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: a holy terror


Idiom of the Day:
a holy terror

A very troublesome, aggressive, or aggravating person; a person who is exasperatingly difficult in his or her manner or behavior. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: empower


Word of the Day:
empower

Definition: (verb) Give or delegate power or authority to.

Synonyms: authorize

Usage: The army is now empowered to operate on a shoot-to-kill basis.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Watch “Ottorino Respighi: Concerto Gregoriano per violino e orchestra (P. 135) (1921)” on YouTube


Watch “Willie Nelson – Come On Time (Official Music Video)” on YouTube


Watch “Willie Nelson – Come On Time (Official Music Video)” on YouTube


Watch “Amazing 3-year-old baby girl plays Grade 5 piano ~ 師承邱世傑” on YouTube


Watch “Amazing 3-year-old baby girl plays Grade 5 piano ~ 師承邱世傑” on YouTube


SCHOOL HACKS


https://pin.it/2b6jwjsfinpkpp

SCHOOL HACKS

SCHOOL HACKS

SCHOOL HACKS


https://pin.it/2b6jwjsfinpkpp

SCHOOL HACKS

SCHOOL HACKS

Why Your SI Joint Is Such A Pain (And 4 Exercises To Fix It)


https://pin.it/oin2op6neaabzg

Why Your SI Joint Is Such A Pain (And 4 Exercises To Fix It)

Cassie Dionne
Coach

Kingston, Canada

Physical Therapy, Mobility & Recovery, Functional Movement Screen

The sacroiliac joint can get really beaten up in some people, leading to pain and injury. We call this joint the SIJ for short, and it’s basically where your sacrum and pelvis come together.

The sacroiliac joint

The sacroiliac joint

The sacroiliac joint can get really beaten up in some people, leading to pain and injury. We call this joint the SIJ for short, and it’s basically where your sacrum and pelvis come together.

Anyone who has suffered from SIJ pain knows that it can be a real pain – in the back, in the hip, and even down the leg. It can make day-to-day activities such as rolling over or getting in and out of a car difficult, and it can lead to pain while training if you’re not in tune with how to exercise properly without further injuring your SIJ.

So what is it with this joint that causes it to be so problematic for some people?

Anatomy of the SIJ
To understand, first you need to know a little bit of anatomy. For a long time it was thought that the SIJ was immobile, and looking at its anatomy it is easy to see why. It is a very inherently stable joint. However, it is now known that mobility and movement of the SIJ is not only possible, but also essential for shock absorption during weight-bearing activities and to relieve some of the strain on the lumbar spine. What this motion looks like varies between individuals, but the quantity of motion is always small.

“In addition to strong ligaments, there are a number of incredibly strong muscles that surround the SIJ, including the erector spinae, psoas, quadratus lumborum, piriformis, abdominal obliques, gluteal muscles, and hamstrings.”
I won’t get into all of the complex anatomy of the SIJ, but know that its anatomical configuration, along with extremely strong ligaments, make the joint very stable. And that these features seem to be more pronounced in men as compared to women. Meaning, women often have less stable joints than their male counterparts (though this is not always the case).

In addition to strong ligaments, there are a number of incredibly strong muscles that surround the SIJ, including the erector spinae, psoas, quadratus lumborum, piriformis, abdominal obliques, gluteal muscles, and hamstrings. Though these strong muscles surround the joint, none of them actually act directly on it to produce active movements. Instead, movements are produced indirectly by gravity and by these muscles acting on the trunk and lower limbs.

A number of incredibly strong muscles surround the SIJ, including the erector spinae, psoas, quadratus lumborum, piriformis, abdominal obliques, gluteal muscles, and hamstrings.

The Purpose of the SIJ
Given its structure, the SIJ is designed to relieve stress and forces. It acts as a buffer between the hip and lumbar spine. It transmits forces from the spine sideways into the pelvis and then into the lower limbs (and vice versa). This is accomplished through that minor but essential movement we were talking about before.

“Given its structure, the SIJ is designed to relieve stress and forces. It acts as a buffer between the hip and lumbar spine.”
The two major ways the SIJ does this are called nutation and counter-nutation. Nutation simply refers to when your sacrum (the bottom of your spine) rotates forward against the other two bones of your pelvis. Counter-nutation is the opposite. The sacrum posteriorly rotates against the other bones. These movements – coupled with even smaller movements (such as gliding, and tilting, things you don’t really need to understand) – are what allow shock absorption to occur.

How Important Is the SIJ, Really?
A fantastic study completed by Dr. Stuart McGill looked at the forces transmitted to the SIJ during a 27kg squat. He found the total force transmitted to this SIJ during this activity was 6.5 kN – which is enough to lift a small car off of the ground!

What this actually translated to was 1,461 pounds of force going through the SIJ. And that was with a smaller lift of only 27kg. Now imagine what’s happening in our powerlifter friends who are lifting significantly more load than that.

So, what goes wrong and how do we fix it? SIJ dysfunctions fall in to two categories:

Hypermobility or instability
Hypomobility or stiffness

Simply put, if the joint moves too much, it is hypermobile, and if it moves too little, it is hypomobile.

Research published in Clinical Biomechanics in 1989 determined that muscle balancing is key, and that in order to have optimal SIJ stability (and movement) you need to focus on what they called the powerful two – the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris – as they exert shear and torsion loads proportional to the strength of their contraction.

“A fantastic study completed by Dr. Stuart McGill looked at the forces transmitted to the SIJ during a 27kg squat. He found the total force transmitted to this SIJ during this activity was 6.5 kN – which is enough to lift a small car off of the ground!”
These researchers also determined that weakness in the posterior chain (glutes and hamstrings) and tight psoas muscles can lead to aberrant SIJ motion and loading. And, as with anything in the body, it isn’t always as simple as that, as the lats and connecting thoracolumbar fascia can also play a role in indirect stability to the SIJ

This means that in order to correct a hypermobile SIJ, we need to focus on the surrounding muscles, especially those in the posterior chain, and correct any imbalances. Most commonly this means improving the strength of the gluteals, hamstrings and lats, but individual cases may vary.

Fixing a hypomobile SIJ can be a bit trickier, but believe it or not fixing muscle imbalances is exactly what we want to do in this situation, as well. We need everything to be working optimally around the joint to solve this problem.

In Summary
The SIJ is meant to be an extremely stable joint, one that has little movement.
Though it is stable, it is crucial some movement does occur in order to absorb large forces headed for our lumbar vertebrae.
Muscles imbalances absolutely affect the SIJ, even though none of these muscles directly act on the joint.
Issues usually arise when the joint is either too mobile or not mobile enough.

If you have SIJ pain, or you think you have SIJ pain, the best thing is to see a trained professional who can diagnose you, let you know exactly where your pain is coming from, and help you develop a plan to fix it. But regardless of whether you have a hypermobile or hypomobile SIJ, there are techniques and exercises you can do to alleviate and ultimately eliminate your pain and restore proper functioning of your SIJ.

“To keep your SIJ functioning properly and pain free, you need to work on optimizing your posture, core stability, hip mobility and stability, along with strength and motor control.”
Until then, if you’re beating up your SIJ without doing the work to keep it healthy, you’re going to regret it. Remember what Dr. McGill found? That is a lot of force to be messing with, and if your SIJ is not working properly that force has to go somewhere – which is going to mean pain and injury for you.

Recommended Exercises
To keep your SIJ functioning properly and pain free, you need to work on optimizing your posture, core stability, hip mobility and stability, along with strength and motor control. Even more, working on reciprocal movement patterns that challenge the core as well as work the contralateral lats and glutes is key here.

My recommendations are simple, but effective:

Bear walk
Glute bridge variations
Plank variations
Dead bugs

Watch the videos below for more instruction. Try working these into your regular routine and see if it doesn’t make a difference in how you feel.

Further Reading:

Essential Tips to Improve Natural Hip Function
Everything You Need to Know About the Iliopsoas
Rehabilitation for Lumbar Spine Recovery: The Science and the Truth
New on Breaking Muscle Today

References:

  1. FJ Vera-Garcia, JL Elvira, SH Brown, SM McGill. “Effects of abdominal stabilization manoeuvres on the control of spine motion and stability against sudden trunk perturbations.” Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology 17 (2007) 556-567.
  2. SL Forst, et al. “The Sacroiliac Joint: Anatomy, physiology and clinical significance.” Pain Physician 9 (2006) 61-68.

  3. D Lee. Pelvic Stability and Your Core. American Back Society Meeting, San Francisco 2005.

  4. S. McGill. “Recent advances in lumbar mechanics with relevance to clinicians.” The Journal of CCA (1989) 82-92.

  5. Vleeming A, Van Wingerden JP, Snijders CJ, Stoeckart R, Stijnen T. “Load application to the sacrotuberous ligament. Influences on sacroiliac joint mechanics.” Clin Biomech 1989; 4:204-209. 49.

  6. Vleeming A, Stoeckart TR, Snijders CJ. “The sacrotuberous ligament: A conceptual approach to its dynamic role in stabilizing the sacroiliac joint.” Clin Biomech 1989; 4: 201-203.

Photos courtesy of Shutterstock.

Topic: Fitness
See more about: mobility, chiropractic, injury, injuries, lifting, si joint, joints, joint health, Recovery
More Like This
The Rack Position Deserves Your TimeThe Awesome Things Helping Me Regenerate Knee Cartilage, Avoid Surgery and Snowboard a Whole LotThe Best Recovery Modality You’re Not UsingNatural Ways to Promote Recovery and Ease DiscomfortThe 101 on Muscle StrainsRecovering from InjuryLess Is Not MoreLeave Your Ego at the Door5 Suspension Trainer Moves to Build Core StrengthYou’re Confused About SupplementsDon’t Separate Flexibility and Mobility: You Need BothPreventing Injury: A Chiropractor’s PerspectiveSolving Shoulder Injuries for Gym BrosMagnetomechanical Neuromodulation Takes Pain Management to Warp Factor OneFitness Improv – An Educator’s Approach to MovementMove It! You’re Old, You’re Not DeadBlock Lunges: Release the Quadriceps and Lengthen the HamstringsThe Athlete’s Toolbox: Blueprint of the Perfect Warm UpThree Major Muscles to Always Keep LooseCommon Elbow Injuries and What to Do About ThemRespect Your Body’s Signs: Lifting Heavy and Listening CloselyFight Strength NSFW: Treating Athletes with Platelet-Rich Plasma TherapyStreamline Your Swimming for Greater EfficiencyFight Strength NSFW: Functional Range Release and Conditioning Mobility SystemsHow to Self-Assess Your Movement Pathologies
Subscribe To Newsletter
Email Subscribe
Most Popular
Parents: Get Out of the Way and Let the Coaches CoachHow to Self-Diagnose Your Shoulder Pain4 Signs You Are Taking Too Many ProbioticsSquats and Hip Dysfunction: 2 Common Problems and How to Fix ThemA Simple Workout Plan for Serious Mass GainBulletproof Your Body6 Keys to Wider and Thicker ArmsThe Top 5 Exercises to Strengthen Your Neck10 No Equipment Needed Exercises for Strong LegsThe Chief Habit: Your Ten-Minute Morning Fitness PlanHips Don’t Lie: 4 Drills to Unlock Your Stiff HipsHow to Build Up to the Front Lever6 Exercises For Rebuilding Your Core After PregnancyWhat to Eat Before Bed to Build Muscle Overnight3 Knee Friendly Quad Exercises That Aren’t SquatsWorkouts in a Box: Anytime, Anywhere Exercise Routines12 Weeks of Workouts to Rebuild After Diastasis Recti
Newest
7 Parts of the Body That Need More Stretching
The Locomotion Workout
Strategies That Can Take You From Good to Great in the Gym
Perfecting the Push-Up and Fixing The Common Faults
Heal and Prevent Hand Rips
28 Day Anti-Fragile Human Challenge
5 Common Squat Problems and How to Fix Them
Greek Pimiento Burgers
Ladies Only: Nutrition and Training for Performance and Cramps
Caprese Chickpea Burgers
Thick Thighs to Save Lives
Classical Phys Ed for All
Resistance and Adaptation: Is Your Environment Weakening You?
The Six Pack of Knowledge: Thought Leaders in Hypertrophy
Ginger Scallion Pork Burgers
3 Barbell Complexes for Fun and Profit
Never Eat Sweets Alone
Fencing: The Sport You Should Be Doing
Effort Determines Outcome
Learning to Fight
Developing Strength One Leg at a Time
6 Exercises to Fire Up Your Glutes
Auto-Regulation, HRV, and the Unplugged Approach
Fit to Fight Sleep Apnea
Ditch the Rigid Meal Plan
Related

Contributing Coaches |Write For Us |Coaches & Trainers |About |Contact |Shop |eBooks |Terms of Service |Privacy |AU |UK