Daily Archives: July 24, 2019

Horoscope ♉: 07/24/2019


Horoscope ♉:
07/24/2019

Your focus will center on your emotions today, Taurus, although being centered in itself will be quite a challenge. You may feel like a yo-yo in someone else’s hand. Don’t fall prey to victimization. Stand up for yourself even if it means that others get upset. You’re responsible for your feelings and no one else’s.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: Festivities for the Day of National Rebellion


Today’s Holiday:
Festivities for the Day of National Rebellion

This three-day national holiday in Cuba commemorates an attack that took place on July 26, 1953, when rebel forces led by Fidel Castro struck the Moncada army barracks in Santiago de Cuba. It is remembered as the beginning of the rebellion that ousted the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista in 1959. The holiday is an occasion for displays of national pride and mass rallies. Crowds of 100,000 are common in Havana, where a carnival, live music, singing, dancing and flag waving mark the occasion. Santiago de Cuba also has a large carnival, and other cities host celebrations as well. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Louise Brown (1978)


Today’s Birthday:
Louise Brown (1978)

Brown was the first baby to be conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF), a procedure used to overcome infertility in which a woman’s eggs are removed, fertilized with sperm outside the body, and then inserted into the uterus. Now a commonplace procedure, IVF was developed in the 1970s by British medical researchers Patrick Steptoe and Robert Edwards and was subject to much criticism before Brown’s birth. Who was the first woman conceived through IVF to give birth naturally to a baby of her own? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Svetlana Savitskaya Becomes the First Woman to Perform a Spacewalk (1984)


This Day in History:
Svetlana Savitskaya Becomes the First Woman to Perform a Spacewalk (1984)

Savitskaya is a former Soviet female aviator and cosmonaut who flew aboard Soyuz T-7 in 1982, becoming the second woman in space some 19 years after Valentina Tereshkova. She logged nearly 20 days in space during her career, including three and a half hours spent outside the Salyut 7 space station in 1984, when she became the first woman to perform a spacewalk. Before becoming a cosmonaut, she was a test and sport pilot and a parachutist. What world records did she set? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Virginia Woolf


Quote of the Day:
Virginia Woolf

The man who is aware of himself is henceforward independent; and he is never bored, and life is only too short, and he is steeped through and through with a profound yet temperate happiness. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Tian


Article of the Day:
Tian

Tian is one of the oldest Chinese terms for the cosmos and the supreme power over humans and lesser gods in indigenous Chinese religion. As a god, Tian is an impersonal power, in contrast to the supreme ruler Shangdi, with whom Tian is nevertheless closely identified. Scholars have long debated whether Tian rewarded and punished human actions or whether events merely followed Tian’s order and principles. The word Tian has how many meanings? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: inopportune moment


Idiom of the Day:
inopportune moment

An unfortunate or inconvenient moment in time. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: eschew


Word of the Day:
eschew

Definition: (verb) Avoid and stay away from deliberately; stay clear of.

Synonyms: shun

Usage: Unlike many Hollywood starlets, she eschews publicity and does her best to avoid being photographed in public.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

The Different Types Of Yoga And Their Classifications Explained | Astro Maverick


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The Different Types Of Yoga And Their Classifications Explained

Yoga can be classified in various different types each having a distinct name derived from their particular features. It has been seen that the beginners who are new to Yoga tends to get confused by all the terminologies and unable to decide which type of Yoga to choose. But it should always be kept in mind that irrespective of the type, all forms of Yoga are based upon few core principles which remains same.

The difference mainly is based upon which aspect the emphasis is being given in any particular Yoga type.

The basic principles of Yoga revolves around alignment of body parts in various poses, following a particular breathing pattern and focusing the mind away from external distractions. Some of the broad classifications of Yoga has been explained in the later part of this article.

With the emerging popularity of Yoga, numerous fitness organizations all over the world has started promoting and marketing their Yoga programs putting some of their own marketing twists in it. This makes it all more confusing and difficult to understand and choose. Especially when they tend to market new methods and new benefits in exchange of boat load of money.

But be aware of the fact that most of these companies are selling you hypes. So if you feel your finances are limited, there is absolutely nothing to worry. There is no dire necessity of courses and classes. You just need to gather information on various poses and internet is a classic source of this information. Remember, Yoga is an ancient art and has always been performed with simplicity through ages.

Although if we start discussing about the various forms of Yoga in details, it can potentially become a huge document. Which is far beyond the scope of this small article. So let’s touch upon the main characteristics of the various types which will help understand the classification.

Ashtanga Yoga:

The word Ashtanga or Astanga means “having eight limbs” in Sansrit. The ancient Yogic sage Patanjali first developed Ashtanga Yoga.

In modern days, it has become a very popular choice.This Yoga is based on the principle of executing a series of successive poses, and synchronising the breathing pattern with it. Ashtanga Yoga does involve quite a high level of physical activity and thus can take some time to master.

But if you practice this form of Yoga, beyond doubt it will help you shade extra weight and become slim and strong at the same time.

Ananda Yoga:

Ananda Yoga is actually a form of Yoga which has been sub branched from Hatha Yoga by Yogi Kriyananda, who is a direct disciple of Indian spiritual guru Paramahansa Yogananda.

There is less emphasis on physically demanding postures in this form of Yoga. Principle focus is to relax the body and mind through gentler poses combined controlled breathing. An initiation to deeper meditation is a greater objective of Ananda Yoga.

Hatha Yoga:

In Sanskrit the word Hath means “force” and it is most prevalent form of Yoga all over the world.

Hatha Yoga lies high emphasis on physical exercises along with controlling the mind to shield it from distractions. Chances are that you have seen Hatha Yoga images at multiple places including Yoga related TV programs and DVD covers. The principle is to perform a continuous series of movements to attain different poses in succession along with controlled breathing. The entire needs to be done in a relaxing manner with always taking care of the slow breathing pattern. It is not allowed to hasten through the sequence of moves and follow the process.

If you practice Hatha Yoga religiously, it will be help you gain clarity and self awareness.

Bikram Yoga:

This form of Yoga, as the name suggests have been synthesized from Hatha Yoga sequences by an Indian Yoga expert Bikram Choudhury.

Bikram Yoga needs to be done in heated up atmosphere. The room where the practice will take place need to have a temperature ranging from 95 -105 degree Fahrenheit. The heat is said to make the body more tolerant to injuries and give the muscles a level of flexibility. Also it has been claimed that it helps in detoxification.

How true is that? Well, no clear answers, because, that claim is yet to be proved scientifically.

But nonetheless, this form of Yoga has gained popularity among masses. But Bikram Yoga can be a costly affair due to its commercialized nature since special rooms and arrangements are needed in addition to professional supervision. So make an informed decision if you want to opt to opt for Bikram Yoga.

Yoga has branched out to multiple other types like Vinayasa Yoga, Sivananda Yoga, Iyengar Yoga and many others. But the most popular and vastly followed were mentioned above. Do not forget to research appropriately depending upon your own unique needs before starting with a particular form of Yoga. As mentioned above Internet is an unending repository of knowledge.

The bottom line is still that the basic principles are more or less same irrespective of the forms of Yoga. What is important is to get started and be regular and persistent in the practice. So, do not overthink, get started with your choice of Yoga poses and be assured that you will soon be able to reap several health benefits from it.

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Watch “Rachmaninov/Respighi: 5 Études-tableaux (P. 160) (1930)” on YouTube


Watch “George Enescu: Rapsodia Română nr. 1 în La major şi Rapsodia Română nr. 2 în Re major” on YouTube


Yoga Poses: Sunbird Pose


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Yoga Poses: Sunbird Pose

Yoga Poses: Sunbird Pose

Yoga Poses: WARRIOR I (VIRABHADRASANA I)


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Yoga Poses: WARRIOR I (VIRABHADRASANA I)

Yoga Poses: WARRIOR I (VIRABHADRASANA I)

Yoga poses: Warrior II (VIRABHADRASANA II)


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Yoga poses: Warrior II

Yoga poses: Warrior II (VIRABHADRASANA II)

Facilitated Stretching


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Bandha Yoga Scientific Keys to Unlock the Practice of Yoga

Scientific Keys

Facilitated Stretching (PNF) for Yoga
(From Yoga Mat Companion Book 2, Anatomy for Hip Openers and Forward Bends)

You can use a technique called facilitated stretching or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) to lengthen muscles in yoga. This utilizes a spinal cord reflex arc and is an example of combining modern Western science with the ancient art of Hatha Yoga. The two go together beautifully. Stretching applies tension to the muscle and its tendon. There is a nerve receptor (the Golgi tendon organ) that is located at the muscle-tendon junction. This receptor senses tension and relays a signal to the spinal cord. The spinal cord then signals the stretching muscle to relax. This reflex arc acts as a protective circuit breaker to prevent the tendon from tearing at its attachment to the bone. Because all skeletal muscles have Golgi tendon organs, this powerful technique can be applied to gain length and dissolve blockages throughout the body in yoga poses. Use it with caution and care.

golgi tendon organ, spinal cord reflex arc

Facilitated stretching involves contracting a muscle that you are lengthening. This increases the tension at the muscle-tendon junction and recruits more Golgi tendon organs than does stretching a muscle alone. Facilitated stretching causes the spinal cord to signal the muscle to relax, in essence, creating “slack” in the muscle. You can then take up the slack to move deeper into the pose. For example, in Paschimottanasana, slightly bend the knees and squeeze the trunk against the thighs. Then gently press the heels into the mat as if you are trying to flex the knees further. This engages the hamstrings and stimulates the Golgi tendon organs at the muscle-tendon junction. Hold this steady contraction for five to eight breaths before releasing it. This produces relaxation and increased length in the hamstrings. Then contract the quadriceps to straighten the knees and take up the slack created by the reflex arc. This has the added effect of producing reciprocal inhibition, which further relaxes the hamstrings into the stretch.
Stretching the hamstrings in paschimottanasana.
Stretching the erector spinae in paschimottanasana. Follow the same steps in this pose with the quadratus lumborum and erector spinae. First, bend forward to stretch these back muscles. Hold the stretch by bending the arms, and then attempt to arch the back. This increases tension at the muscle-tendon junction of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum, stimulates the Golgi tendon organs, and ultimately relaxes these muscles. Hold the arch of the back for five to eight smooth breaths. Then engage the abdominals and use the arms to draw yourself deeper into the pose, taking advantage of the new length created by the reflex arc. Activating the abdominals also produces reciprocal inhibition of the back muscles, relaxing them into the stretch.

Go slowly with facilitated stretching. Allow about 48 hours of recovery time before re-applying PNF to any given muscle group. It is not necessary to use strong muscular contractions to experience the benefits of these techniques. Start with gentle force and learn to moderate the contraction, “dialing” it in. Use similar care as you gradually release the action of the muscles. Remember that improvement comes from a balance between the conscious work on the poses and the unconscious work that takes place between practice sessions. The unconscious mind forms new and more efficient brain circuitry during this “in-between” time.

Namasté,

Ray and Chris

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Bandha Yoga Scientific Keys to Unlock the Practice of Yoga

Scientific Keys

Facilitated Stretching (PNF) for Yoga
(From Yoga Mat Companion Book 2, Anatomy for Hip Openers and Forward Bends)

You can use a technique called facilitated stretching or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) to lengthen muscles in yoga. This utilizes a spinal cord reflex arc and is an example of combining modern Western science with the ancient art of Hatha Yoga. The two go together beautifully. Stretching applies tension to the muscle and its tendon. There is a nerve receptor (the Golgi tendon organ) that is located at the muscle-tendon junction. This receptor senses tension and relays a signal to the spinal cord. The spinal cord then signals the stretching muscle to relax. This reflex arc acts as a protective circuit breaker to prevent the tendon from tearing at its attachment to the bone. Because all skeletal muscles have Golgi tendon organs, this powerful technique can be applied to gain length and dissolve blockages throughout the body in yoga poses. Use it with caution and care.

golgi tendon organ, spinal cord reflex arc

Facilitated stretching involves contracting a muscle that you are lengthening. This increases the tension at the muscle-tendon junction and recruits more Golgi tendon organs than does stretching a muscle alone. Facilitated stretching causes the spinal cord to signal the muscle to relax, in essence, creating “slack” in the muscle. You can then take up the slack to move deeper into the pose. For example, in Paschimottanasana, slightly bend the knees and squeeze the trunk against the thighs. Then gently press the heels into the mat as if you are trying to flex the knees further. This engages the hamstrings and stimulates the Golgi tendon organs at the muscle-tendon junction. Hold this steady contraction for five to eight breaths before releasing it. This produces relaxation and increased length in the hamstrings. Then contract the quadriceps to straighten the knees and take up the slack created by the reflex arc. This has the added effect of producing reciprocal inhibition, which further relaxes the hamstrings into the stretch.
Stretching the hamstrings in paschimottanasana.
Stretching the erector spinae in paschimottanasana. Follow the same steps in this pose with the quadratus lumborum and erector spinae. First, bend forward to stretch these back muscles. Hold the stretch by bending the arms, and then attempt to arch the back. This increases tension at the muscle-tendon junction of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum, stimulates the Golgi tendon organs, and ultimately relaxes these muscles. Hold the arch of the back for five to eight smooth breaths. Then engage the abdominals and use the arms to draw yourself deeper into the pose, taking advantage of the new length created by the reflex arc. Activating the abdominalsalso produces reciprocal inhibition of the back muscles, relaxing them into the stretch.

Go slowly with facilitated stretching. Allow about 48 hours of recovery time before re-applying PNF to any given muscle group. It is not necessary to use strong muscular contractions to experience the benefits of these techniques. Start with gentle force and learn to moderate the contraction, “dialing” it in. Use similar care as you gradually release the action of the muscles. Remember that improvement comes from a balance between the conscious work on the poses and the unconscious work that takes place between practice sessions. The unconscious mind forms new and more efficient brain circuitry during this “in-between” time.

Namasté,

Ray and Chris

Learn more about anatomy and yoga by subscribing to our Newsletter.

Enter your email address:

Stumble

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ShareThis Copy and Paste

Purchase Our Books FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Blogger homeaboutfree stuffreviewsscientific keysworkshopsguaranteeaffiliatecontact Scientific Keys Facilitated Stretching (PNF) for Yoga (From Yoga Mat Companion Book 2, Anatomy for Hip Openers and Forward Bends) You can use a technique called facilitated stretching or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) to lengthen muscles in yoga. This utilizes a spinal cord reflex arc and is an example of combining modern Western science with the ancient art of Hatha Yoga. The two go together beautifully. Stretching applies tension to the muscle and its tendon. There is a nerve receptor (the Golgi tendon organ) that is located at the muscle-tendon junction. This receptor senses tension and relays a signal to the spinal cord. The spinal cord then signals the stretching muscle to relax. This reflex arc acts as a protective circuit breaker to prevent the tendon from tearing at its attachment to the bone. Because all skeletal muscles have Golgi tendon organs, this powerful technique can be applied to gain length and dissolve blockages throughout the body in yoga poses. Use it with caution and care. Facilitated stretching involves contracting a muscle that you are lengthening. This increases the tension at the muscle-tendon junction and recruits more Golgi tendon organs than does stretching a muscle alone. Facilitated stretching causes the spinal cord to signal the muscle to relax, in essence, creating “slack” in the muscle. You can then take up the slack to move deeper into the pose. For example, in Paschimottanasana, slightly bend the knees and squeeze the trunk against the thighs. Then gently press the heels into the mat as if you are trying to flex the knees further. This engages the hamstrings and stimulates the Golgi tendon organs at the muscle-tendon junction. Hold this steady contraction for five to eight breaths before releasing it. This produces relaxation and increased length in the hamstrings. Then contract the quadriceps to straighten the knees and take up the slack created by the reflex arc. This has the added effect of producing reciprocal inhibition, which further relaxes the hamstrings into the stretch. Follow the same steps in this pose with the quadratus lumborum and erector spinae. First, bend forward to stretch these back muscles. Hold the stretch by bending the arms, and then attempt to arch the back. This increases tension at the muscle-tendon junction of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum, stimulates the Golgi tendon organs, and ultimately relaxes these muscles. Hold the arch of the back for five to eight smooth breaths. Then engage the abdominals and use the arms to draw yourself deeper into the pose, taking advantage of the new length created by the reflex arc. Activating the abdominals also produces reciprocal inhibition of the back muscles, relaxing them into the stretch. Go slowly with facilitated stretching. Allow about 48 hours of recovery time before re-applying PNF to any given muscle group. It is not necessary to use strong muscular contractions to experience the benefits of these techniques. Start with gentle force and learn to moderate the contraction, “dialing” it in. Use similar care as you gradually release the action of the muscles. Remember that improvement comes from a balance between the conscious work on the poses and the unconscious work that takes place between practice sessions. The unconscious mind forms new and more efficient brain circuitry during this “in-between” time. Namasté, Ray and Chris Learn more about anatomy and yoga by subscribing to our Newsletter. Enter your email address: Stumble Like this page? Share it! Anatomic Yoga TM Disclaimer: Always, in your particular case, consult your health care provider and obtain full medical clearance before practicing yoga or any other exercise program. Yoga must always be practiced under the direct supervision of a qualified instructor. Practicing under the direct supervision and guidance of a qualified instructor may reduce the risk of injuries. Not all yoga poses are suitable for all persons. Practicing under the direct supervision and guidance of a qualified instructor, in addition to the direction of your health care provider, can also help determine what poses are suitable for your particular case. The information provided in this blog, website, books, and other materials is strictly for reference only and is not in any manner a substitute for medical advice or direct guidance of a qualified yoga instructor. The author, illustrators, editors, publishers and distributors assume no responsibility or liability for any injuries or losses that may result from practicing yoga or any other exercise program. The author, editors, illustrators, publishers and distributors all make no representations or warranties with regards to the completeness or accuracy of information on this website, any linked websites, books, DVDs, or other products represented herein. © 2006 Raymond A. Long MD. All rights reserved. Featuring illustrations by Chris Macivor. Site by Chris Macivor. Privacy Privacy. Disclaimer. Purchase Our Books FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Blogger homeaboutfree stuffreviewsscientific keysworkshopsguaranteeaffiliatecontact Scientific Keys Facilitated Stretching (PNF) for Yoga (From Yoga Mat Companion Book 2, Anatomy for Hip Openers and Forward Bends) You can use a technique called facilitated stretching or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) to lengthen muscles in yoga. This utilizes a spinal cord reflex arc and is an example of combining modern Western science with the ancient art of Hatha Yoga. The two go together beautifully. Stretching applies tension to the muscle and its tendon. There is a nerve receptor (the Golgi tendon organ) that is located at the muscle-tendon junction. This receptor senses tension and relays a signal to the spinal cord. The spinal cord then signals the stretching muscle to relax. This reflex arc acts as a protective circuit breaker to prevent the tendon from tearing at its attachment to the bone. Because all skeletal muscles have Golgi tendon organs, this powerful technique can be applied to gain length and dissolve blockages throughout the body in yoga poses. Use it with caution and care. Facilitated stretching involves contracting a muscle that you are lengthening. This increases the tension at the muscle-tendon junction and recruits more Golgi tendon organs than does stretching a muscle alone. Facilitated stretching causes the spinal cord to signal the muscle to relax, in essence, creating “slack” in the muscle. You can then take up the slack to move deeper into the pose. For example, in Paschimottanasana, slightly bend the knees and squeeze the trunk against the thighs. Then gently press the heels into the mat as if you are trying to flex the knees further. This engages the hamstrings and stimulates the Golgi tendon organs at the muscle-tendon junction. Hold this steady contraction for five to eight breaths before releasing it. This produces relaxation and increased length in the hamstrings. Then contract the quadriceps to straighten the knees and take up the slack created by the reflex arc. This has the added effect of producing reciprocal inhibition, which further relaxes the hamstrings into the stretch. Follow the same steps in this pose with the quadratus lumborum and erector spinae. First, bend forward to stretch these back muscles. Hold the stretch by bending the arms, and then attempt to arch the back. This increases tension at the muscle-tendon junction of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum, stimulates the Golgi tendon organs, and ultimately relaxes these muscles. Hold the arch of the back for five to eight smooth breaths. Then engage the abdominals and use the arms to draw yourself deeper into the pose, taking advantage of the new length created by the reflex arc. Activating the abdominals also produces reciprocal inhibition of the back muscles, relaxing them into the stretch. Go slowly with facilitated stretching. Allow about 48 hours of recovery time before re-applying PNF to any given muscle group. It is not necessary to use strong muscular contractions to experience the benefits of these techniques. Start with gentle force and learn to moderate the contraction, “dialing” it in. Use similar care as you gradually release the action of the muscles. Remember that improvement comes from a balance between the conscious work on the poses and the unconscious work that takes place between practice sessions. The unconscious mind forms new and more efficient brain circuitry during this “in-between” time. Namasté, Ray and Chris Learn more about anatomy and yoga by subscribing to our Newsletter. Enter your email address: Stumble Like this page? Share it! Anatomic Yoga TM Disclaimer: Always, in your particular case, consult your health care provider and obtain full medical clearance before practicing yoga or any other exercise program. Yoga must always be practiced under the direct supervision of a qualified instructor. Practicing under the direct supervision and guidance of a qualified instructor may reduce the risk of injuries. Not all yoga poses are suitable for all persons. Practicing under the direct supervision and guidance of a qualified instructor, in addition to the direction of your health care provider, can also help determine what poses are suitable for your particular case. The information provided in this blog, website, books, and other materials is strictly for reference only and is not in any manner a substitute for medical advice or direct guidance of a qualified yoga instructor. The author, illustrators, editors, publishers and distributors assume no responsibility or liability for any injuries or losses that may result from practicing yoga or any other exercise program. The author, editors, illustrators, publishers and distributors all make no representations or warranties with regards to the completeness or accuracy of information on this website, any linked websites, books, DVDs, or other products represented herein. © 2006 Raymond A. Long MD. All rights reserved. Featuring illustrations by Chris Macivor. Site by Chris Macivor. Privacy Privacy. Disclaimer. ShareThis Copy and Paste

Horoscope ♉: 07/24/2019


Horoscope ♉:
07/24/2019

Your focus will center on your emotions today, Taurus, although being centered in itself will be quite a challenge. You may feel like a yo-yo in someone else’s hand. Don’t fall prey to victimization. Stand up for yourself even if it means that others get upset. You’re responsible for your feelings and no one else’s.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: World Santa Claus Congress


Today’s Holiday:
World Santa Claus Congress

The World Santa Claus Congress is held every July at the Bakken amusement park in Klampenborg, Denmark. The three-day event typically brings together more than 100 Santa Clauses from more than a dozen countries, including Japan and Venezuela, discussing such subjects as how to walk like, laugh like, and exude the generous spirit of Santa Claus. They dance around a Christmas tree and enjoy a traditional Danish Christmas feast of roast pork, cabbage and rice pudding. By tradition, the Santas also travel by antique fire engines and buses to a nearby beach for an annual dip in the sea. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (1900)


Today’s Birthday:
Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (1900)

Zelda Sayre was an aspiring writer when she married F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1920. A glamorous and witty couple, they lived an extravagant life in New York City that F. Scott unsuccessfully attempted to support with his writing. They eventually moved to Europe, where they became part of a celebrated circle of American expatriates known as the Lost Generation. After 1930, Zelda was intermittently confined to sanatoriums for schizophrenia but still managed to publish short stories and what novel? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Hiram Bingham III Locates Machu Picchu (1911)


This Day in History:
Hiram Bingham III Locates Machu Picchu (1911)

Bingham was an American archaeologist who explored the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, which he incorrectly identified as the “lost city” of Vilcabamba, bringing them to the attention of the outside world for the first time. Ironically, he was also the first modern explorer to reach Espiritu Pampa, found 60 mi (110 km) east of Machu Picchu, a site now widely recognized as the actual remains of Vilcabamba. A Yale University lecturer, Bingham may have been the inspiration for what fictional character? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Ambrose Bierce


Quote of the Day:
Ambrose Bierce

Clairvoyant, n.: A person, commonly a woman, who has the power of seeing that which is invisible to her patron, namely, that he is a blockhead. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Torcs


Article of the Day:
Torcs

A torc is a large, usually rigid, collar, necklace, or armband typically made of twisted metal. Its name, which means “to twist” in Latin, is derived from this design. A sign of nobility, torcs are made of bronze, gold, and other materials and were worn by cultures of the European Iron Age, such as the Scythians, Thracians, and Celts. Most torcs are open-ended at the front, although many seem to have been designed for near-permanent wear. What ancient sculpture features a figure wearing a torc? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: the Fourth Estate


Idiom of the Day:
the Fourth Estate

The people and organizations that report the news, or news journalism as a whole, regarded as having palpable but unofficial political influence. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: overwrought


Word of the Day:
overwrought

Definition: (adjective) Deeply agitated especially from emotion.

Synonyms: distraught

Usage: Now that the horror of absolute solitude was upon them, her overwrought nerves gave way, and the reaction came.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

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