Daily Archives: November 9, 2019

Horoscope♉: 11/09/2019


Horoscope♉:
11/09/2019

Don’t let other people’s arguments get in the way of your truth. Don’t doubt yourself. Stop worrying. Don’t be disgruntled if you aren’t fitting in with whatever is going on around you. This indicates that you may need to take another route. If you don’t like the music being played, start your own band. You have everything in your power to make it happen.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: St. Martin’s Eve (Estonia)


Today’s Holiday:
St. Martin’s Eve (Estonia)

Traditionally, children in Estonia go from door to door at dusk on St. Martin’s Eve in much the same way that American children trick-or-treat on Halloween. If they are not welcomed into the house and given treats, they retaliate by singing rude and uncomplimentary songs. Usually they’re ushered into the kitchen, where such delicacies as apples, nuts, cookies, and raisin bread are handed out. Turnips are another prized gift, as is viljandi kama, a kind of meal composed of grains and dried vegetables mixed with sour milk, sugar, and cream that is regarded as a special treat. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Richard Burton (1925)


Today’s Birthday:
Richard Burton (1925)

Richard Jenkins, better known by his stage name Richard Burton, was a dark, introspective actor who specialized in portraying conflicted men. His tempestuous marriage to Elizabeth Taylor led to an acting partnership that vaulted Burton to the top rank of stardom. Together they made 11 films, including Cleopatra and The Taming of the Shrew. Burton and Taylor were married twice, and their real-life marriage was popularly likened to the fictional marriage they portrayed in what film? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Hope Diamond Donated to the Smithsonian Institution (1958)


This Day in History:
Hope Diamond Donated to the Smithsonian Institution (1958)

The Hope diamond is one of the largest blue diamonds known. Discovered in India, the original 115-carat stone was sold to King Louis XIV in the 1660s and remained part of the French crown jewels until a theft in 1792. In 1830, London banker Thomas Hope purchased a 45.5-carat diamond, now believed to have been cut from the stolen French jewel. After changing hands many times, the Hope diamond was eventually donated to the Smithsonian by jeweler Harry Winston. Why do some think the gem is cursed? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Francis Bacon


Quote of the Day:
Francis Bacon

God…doth hang the greatest weights upon the smallest wires. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: The Sphinx


Article of the Day:
The Sphinx

The sphinx was a mythical beast of ancient Egypt, usually represented in sculpture in a recumbent position with the head of a man and the body of a lion. The most famous of these is the Great Sphinx at Giza, built around 2500 BCE and considered by the ancients as one of the Seven Wonders of the World. In Greek mythology, a sphinx poses a version of this famous riddle to Oedipus: “What walks on four feet in the morning, on two at noon, and on three in the evening?” What is the answer? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: first port of call


Idiom of the Day:
first port of call

The first place where one stops to visit, accomplish something, or begin a process. Taken from nautical terminology, referring to the first port that a seafaring vessel calls in to at the beginning of a voyage. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: blather


Word of the Day:
blather

Definition: (verb) To talk foolishly.

Synonyms: smatter, babble

Usage: Patrick, oblivious to his sister’s visible disinterest, continued to blather about the woes of his fantasy baseball team.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Watch “Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 6, (Full version)” on YouTube


Published on Mar 30, 2017

I (0:00)

II (10:56)

in (24:10)

W (29:21)

v (32:22)

Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 6, (Full version) I. Happy Arrival 0:00

It. By the Brook 10:56

III.

V. Shepherd’s Song 32:22

Conducted by Frans Briiggen (Orchestra of the 18th Century) I’m happy for you all. Thank you for watching this nice symphony. Beethoven’s 6th Symphony (Pastoral) A Love of Nature The Pastoral Symphony is a charming masterpiece which both paints a picture of nature and describes man’s feelings towards it. Beethoven‘s great love of nature, the delight in strolling through the countryside in Vienna, the fact that he always found his equilibrium in the heart of nature, all these inspired him to create his sixth symphony. Beethoven’s 6th Symphony is filled with colorful sounds, simple folk tunes. nice development, and a feeling of calm beauty. It contains meaningful emotional aspect which reflects mankind’s feelings towards the natural world. Beethoven began sketching out his 6th symphony in 1802 and finished it in 1808. ‘How happy I am to be able to walk among the shrubs. the trees, the woods, the grass and the rocks! For the woods, the trees and the rocks give man the resonance he needs.‘ Beethoven said in the summer of 1808. The premiere of the 6th Symphony was probably the grandest musical event in Beethoven’s life. It was a massive conceit packed with lndelible moments of brand new Beethoven music! This programmatic endeavor is clearly expressed through the suggestive title of the symphony, as well as through the titles of each movement. When Beethoven found refuge in the midst of nature, he jotted down themes inspired by the trill of birds, the trickling of creeks or the rustle of leaves. In a notebook from 1803 was found an outline of a river’s trickling with the additional note: ‘The greater the river, the more grave the tone.’-Beethoven spread out the sympho-y into five movements and gave each movement a little subtitle explaining what it was about. I. ‘Happy Arrival’ (Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the country) The Pastoral symphony opens with warmth and calm, setting the scene as we arrive in the countryside. This has a programmatic indication. In this movement, we find a genuine popular sonority through the choice of instruments neatly weaved together. [Allegro ma non troppo]

II. ‘By the Brook’ (T he natural scene of the stream) This slow movement is a beautiful depiction of the delicate nature of… nature itself. It is a wonderful scene of nature with exceptionally musical themes in the pure pastoral air. You can almost breathe the fresh country air! It is more of a description of sensations rather than images. Towards the end, we find the onomatopoeic sounds of birds. [Andante molto mosso]

III. ‘Merrymaking’ (Joyful gathering of countryfolk) Now we turn our attention to the loud, jolly peasants who live in the countryside. Here we see them celebrate with a joyful dance. Of course. these are simple folks, so the music itself is simple, but very energetic. [Allegro]

IV. ‘ThunderStorm’ (Heavy rumblings of natural forces) 29.21 With no pause between the previous movement and this movement, there is a dramatic surprise, hinting at trouble ahead. Yes, a storm is brewing! Beethoven inserts fantastic lightning crashes and a whirl of wind. He renders the stages of the storm as it unravels on the horizon and moves closer more and more threatening.

The instruments with grave chords cellos and double basses through their sounds announce the storm, then the staccato sounds of the violins render the falling raindrops, and through the timpani and the flutes we sense the thunder and lightning. Then comes the rainbow. Above all these images, we feel the tense disposition that captures man facing the realities of nature. There is an urgent sense of human fear since humanity is powerless against the forces of nature. When the storm is over, all living creatures come to the surface, taking their place in the natural cycle. This is rendered by a choral of flutes which come as a sunray. [Allegro]

V. ‘Shepherd‘s Song’ (Expression of thanks when the storm is over) As the storm fades away, all the animals emerge, and there‘s a general feeling of relief. Sunshine reappears, and everyone’s mind is relaxed aqain. This is
the song of gratitude towards nature. It is a calm movement, full of mind is relaxed again. This is the song of gratitude towards nature. It is a calm movement, full of grace. It starts out quiet, but quickly gets faster and happier. The music is fairly simple. but this makes Its emotions of gratitude endearing. [Allegretto]

Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony, through its simplicity. is just sincere and natural.

‘IV. Allegro (Storm and tempest) (extract)’ by Roger Norrington

ESL: SHAPES


ESL: SHAPES

ESL: SHAPES

https://pin.it/w64injammrz6rv

ESL: HOUSEHOLD ITEMS


ESL: HOUSEHOLD ITEMS

ESL: HOUSEHOLD ITEMS

https://pin.it/p3aytlwhfb6bev

ESL: SENTENCE STARTERS


ESL: SENTENCE STARTERS

ESL: SENTENCE STARTERS

https://pin.it/hwm7ic26scigcd

ESL: WHAT’S IN A LIVING ROOM


ESL: WHAT'S IN A LIVING ROOM

ESL: WHAT’S IN A LIVING ROOM

https://pin.it/36hpzj3fvk7wby

Watch “Sinnerman (Nina Simone) – Thomas Crown” on YouTube


ESL: KITCHEN UTENSILS


ESL: KITCHEN UTENSILS

ESL: KITCHEN UTENSILS

https://pin.it/vst2wuwmrnoscl

ESL: KITCHEN VERBS


ESL: KITCHEN VERBS

ESL: KITCHEN VERBS

https://pin.it/bwbhmyhuhxdsmx

ESL: CONTAINERS


ESL: CONTAINERS

ESL: CONTAINERS

https://pin.it/pjmfpbn42xzqif

ESL: MATHEMATICS SYMBOLS


ESL: MATHEMATICS SYMBOLS

ESL: MATHEMATICS SYMBOLS

https://pin.it/t4g6g4pi3sror5

ESL: MEASURE WORDS


ESL: MEASURE WORDS

ESL: MEASURE WORDS

https://pin.it/72u6yu4i5yyb26