Daily Archives: November 14, 2019

Horoscope♉: 11/14/2019


Horoscope♉:
11/14/2019

The source of your frustration may be people who seem to be sensitive and honest yet act abrasively and speak aggressively. Try not to be fooled by those who continuously offer one image while delivering another. Keep your guard up. Don’t waste your time giving people more chances than they deserve.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: St. Leopold’s Day


Today’s Holiday:
St. Leopold’s Day

St. Leopold (1073-1136), the patron saint of Austria, was buried in the abbey he had established in Klosterneuburg, Lower Austria. His feast day is observed there with the ceremony known as Fasselrutschen, or the Slide of the Great Cask, in the abbey’s wine cellar. Participants climb the narrow staircase that leads to the top of the cask and then slide down its smooth surface to a padded platform at its base. The faster the trip down, according to tradition, the better luck the person will have in the coming year. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Felix Frankfurter (1882)


Today’s Birthday:
Felix Frankfurter (1882)

Frankfurter was a US Supreme Court justice and presidential adviser. He served as secretary of war under President William H. Taft, advised President Woodrow Wilson at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, and advised President Franklin D. Roosevelt on many New Deal programs. In 1939, Roosevelt named him to the Supreme Court, where he served until 1962. In 1920, Frankfurter helped found the American Civil Liberties Union and argued in favor of what infamous pair of defendants? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Cornerstone of Jefferson Memorial Is Laid (1939)


This Day in History:
Cornerstone of Jefferson Memorial Is Laid (1939)

The construction of the Jefferson Memorial on the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC, was authorized by Congress in 1934. In 1939, US President Franklin Roosevelt presided over a ceremony during which the cornerstone of the monument was laid. Completed and dedicated in 1943, the white marble building, designed by John Russell Pope, is a circular structure with a domed ceiling, surrounded by 26 columns. Inside is a bronze statue of Jefferson. Why was a temporary plaster statue initially erected there? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Kate Wiggin


Quote of the Day:
Kate Wiggin

Having learned the trick of beating and loving and suffering, the poor faithful heart persisted, although it lived on memories and carried on its sentimental operations mostly in secret. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Head and Shoulders Above the Crowd


Article of the Day:
Head and Shoulders Above the Crowd

In the Spanish region of Catalonia, one tradition stands above all others: the building of castells—human towers. Traditionally built during festivals, these multi-tiered structures can contain as many as 10 levels, each composed of people linked together in a circle. This dangerous activity requires teamwork and planning. A tower is only considered complete once the final casteller has climbed to the top and extended one hand with four fingers raised in a gesture symbolizing what? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: Freudian slip


Idiom of the Day:
Freudian slip

Any inadvertent verbal or written mistake that reveals, or can be construed as revealing, an unconscious or repressed intention, belief, thought, attitude, etc. Named for the Sigmund Freud, considered the founding father of psychoanalysis, whose work largely focused on the unconscious and repressed elements of the human psyche. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: dramatist


Word of the Day:
dramatist

Definition: (noun) Someone who writes plays.

Synonyms: playwright

Usage: My goal as a dramatist is to have my plays live on long after I am gone.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Felix Mendelssohn


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Mendelssohn?wprov=sfla1

Felix Mendelssohn

This article is about the German musician. For other people with the same surname, see Mendelssohn (surname). For other uses, see Mendelssohn (disambiguation).

Stretching to the heart

Portrait of Mendelssohn by the English miniaturist James Warren Childe, 1839

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy[n 1] (3 February 1809 – 4 November 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn,[n 2] was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romanticperiod. Mendelssohn’s compositions include symphonies, concertos, pianomusic and chamber music. His best-known works include his overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the oratorioElijah, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. The melody for the Christmas carol “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” is also his. Mendelssohn’s Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions.
A grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Felix Mendelssohn was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was brought up without religion until the age of seven, when he was baptised as a Reformed Christian. Felix was recognised early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his talent.
Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatory,[n 3] which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the Romantic era.

Life

Childhood

Felix Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas

Felix Mendelssohn was born on 3 February 1809, in Hamburg, at the time an independent city-state,[n 4] in the same house where, a year later, the dedicatee and first performer of his Violin Concerto, Ferdinand David, would be born.[4] Mendelssohn’s father, the banker Abraham Mendelssohn, was the son of the German Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, whose family was prominent in the German Jewish community.[5] Until his baptism at age seven, Mendelssohn was brought up largely without religion.[6] His mother, Lea Salomon, was a member of the Itzig family and a sister of Jakob Salomon Bartholdy.[7] Mendelssohn was the second of four children; his older sister Fanny also displayed exceptional and precocious musical talent.[8]
The family moved to Berlin in 1811, leaving Hamburg in disguise in fear of French reprisal for the Mendelssohn bank’s role in breaking Napoleon’s Continental System blockade.[9]Abraham and Lea Mendelssohn sought to give their children – Fanny, Felix, Paul and Rebecka – the best education possible. Fanny became a pianist well known in Berlin musical circles as a composer; originally Abraham had thought that she, rather than Felix, would be the more musical. But it was not considered proper, by either Abraham or Felix, for a woman to pursue a career in music, so she remained an active but non-professional musician.[10] Abraham was initially disinclined to allow Felix to follow a musical career until it became clear that he was seriously dedicated.[11]
Mendelssohn grew up in an intellectual environment. Frequent visitors to the salon organised by his parents at their home in Berlin included artists, musicians and scientists, among them Wilhelm and Alexander von Humboldt, and the mathematician Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (whom Mendelssohn’s sister Rebecka would later marry).[12] The musician Sarah Rothenburg has written of the household that “Europe came to their living room”.[13]

Surname

Abraham Mendelssohn renounced the Jewish religion prior to Felix’s birth; he and his wife decided not to have Felix circumcised, in contravention of the Jewish tradition.[14] Felix and his siblings were first brought up without religious education, and were baptisedby a Reformed Church minister in 1816,[15] at which time Felix was given the additional names Jakob Ludwig. Abraham and his wife Lea were baptised in 1822, and formally adopted the surname Mendelssohn Bartholdy (which they had used since 1812) for themselves and for their children.[6] The name Bartholdy was added at the suggestion of Lea’s brother, Jakob Salomon Bartholdy, who had inherited a property of this name in Luisenstadt and adopted it as his own surname.[16] In an 1829 letter to Felix, Abraham explained that adopting the Bartholdy name was meant to demonstrate a decisive break with the traditions of his father Moses: “There can no more be a Christian Mendelssohn than there can be a Jewish Confucius”. (Letter to Felix of 8 July 1829).[17] On embarking on his musical career, Felix did not entirely drop the name Mendelssohn as Abraham had requested, but in deference to his father signed his letters and had his visiting cards printed using the form ‘Mendelssohn Bartholdy’.[18] In 1829, his sister Fanny wrote to him of “Bartholdy […] this name that we all dislike”.[19]

Career

Musical education

Mendelssohn began taking piano lessons from his mother when he was six, and at seven was tutored by Marie Bigot in Paris.[20] Later in Berlin, all four Mendelssohn children studied piano with Ludwig Berger, who was himself a former student of Muzio Clementi.[21] From at least May 1819 Mendelssohn (initially with his sister Fanny) studied counterpoint and composition with Carl Friedrich Zelterin Berlin.[22] This was an important influence on his future career. Zelter had almost certainly been recommended as a teacher by his aunt Sarah Levy, who had been a pupil of W. F. Bach and a patron of C. P. E. Bach. Sarah Levy displayed some talent as a keyboard player, and often played with Zelter’s orchestra at the Berliner Singakademie; she and the Mendelssohn family were among its leading patrons. Sarah had formed an important collection of Bach family manuscripts which she bequeathed to the Singakademie; Zelter, whose tastes in music were conservative, was also an admirer of the Bach tradition.[23] This undoubtedly played a significant part in forming Felix Mendelssohn’s musical tastes, as his works reflect this study of Baroqueand early classical music. His fuguesand chorales especially reflect a tonal clarity and use of counterpoint reminiscent of Johann Sebastian Bach, whose music influenced him deeply.[24]

Early maturity

First page of the manuscriptof Mendelssohn’s Octet (1825) (now in the US Library of Congress)

Mendelssohn probably made his first public concert appearance at the age of nine, when he participated in a chamber music concert accompanying a horn duo.[25] He was a prolific composer from an early age. As an adolescent, his works were often performed at home with a private orchestra for the associates of his wealthy parents amongst the intellectual elite of Berlin.[26] Between the ages of 12 and 14, Mendelssohn wrote 12 string symphonies for such concerts, and a number of chamber works.[27] His first work, a piano quartet, was published when he was 13. It was probably Abraham Mendelssohn who procured the publication of this quartet by the house of Schlesinger.[28] In 1824 the 15-year-old wrote his first symphonyfor full orchestra (in C minor, Op. 11).[29]
At age 16 Mendelssohn wrote his String Octet in E-flat major, a work which has been regarded as “mark[ing] the beginning of his maturity as a composer.”[30] This Octet and his Overture to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which he wrote a year later in 1826, are the best-known of his early works. (Later, in 1843, he also wrote incidental music for the play, including the famous “Wedding March”.) The Overture is perhaps the earliest example of a concert overture – that is, a piece not written deliberately to accompany a staged performance but to evoke a literary theme in performance on a concert platform; this was a genre which became a popular form in musical Romanticism.[31]
In 1824 Mendelssohn studied under the composer and piano virtuoso Ignaz Moscheles, who confessed in his diaries[32] that he had little to teach him. Moscheles and Mendelssohn became close colleagues and lifelong friends. The year 1827 saw the premiere – and sole performance in his lifetime – of Mendelssohn’s opera Die Hochzeit des Camacho. The failure of this production left him disinclined to venture into the genre again.[33]
Besides music, Mendelssohn’s education included art, literature, languages, and philosophy. He had a particular interest in classical literature[34] and translated Terence’s Andria for his tutor Heyse in 1825; Heyse was impressed and had it published in 1826 as a work of “his pupil, F****” [i.e. “Felix” (asterisks as provided in original text)].[35][n 5] This translation also qualified Mendelssohn to study at the Humboldt University of Berlin, where from 1826 to 1829 he attended lectures on aesthetics by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, on history by Eduard Gans.

Henry and June


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_%2526_June&ved=2ahUKEwilpafhzurlAhUzJzQIHVGgB2cQFjAXegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw2bFcuAeOD6bmD1bZv8thBt

Henry & June

This article is about the film based upon the book by Anaïs Nin. For other uses, see Henry and June (disambiguation).

Henry & June is a 1990 American biographical drama film directed by Philip Kaufman, and starring Fred Ward, Uma Thurman, and Maria de Medeiros. It is loosely based on Anaïs Nin’s French book of the same name, and tells the story of Nin’s relationship with Henry Miller and his wife, June.

Henry & June

Theatrical release poster

Directed byPhilip KaufmanProduced byPeter KaufmanWritten by

Philip KaufmanRose Kaufman

Starring

Fred WardUma ThurmanMaria de MedeirosRichard E. GrantKevin Spacey

CinematographyPhilippe RousselotEdited by

Dede AllenVivien Hillgrove GilliamWilliam S. Scharf

Production
company

Walrus & Associates

Distributed byUniversal Pictures

Release date

October 5, 1990

Running time

136 minutes[1]CountryUnited StatesLanguageEnglishBox office$23.5 million[2]

The film was nominated for Best Cinematography at the 63rd Academy Awards. It is one of three NC-17 films to receive Oscar nominations; the other films are Wild at Heart (1990) and Requiem for a Dream(2000).[3][4][5]

Plot synopsis

In 1931 in Paris, France, Anaïs Nin is in a stable relationship with her husband Hugo, but longs for more out of life. When Nin first meets Henry Miller, he is working on his first novel. Nin is drawn to Miller and his wife June, as well as their bohemian lifestyle. Nin becomes involved in the couple’s tormented relationship, having an affair with Miller and also pursuing June. Ultimately, Nin helps Miller to publish his novel, Tropic of Cancer, but catalyzes the Millers’ separation, while she returns to Hugo.

Cast

Fred Ward as Henry MillerUma Thurman as June MillerMaria de Medeiros as Anaïs NinRichard E. Grant as HugoKevin Spacey as Richard OsbornJean-Philippe Écoffey as Eduardo Sanchez (credit spelled as Ecoffey)Maurice Escargot (Gary Oldman) as PopArtus de Penguern as BrassaïLiz Hasse as JeanBrigitte Lahaie as Henry’s prostituteFéodor Atkine as Francisco Miralles Arnau

Soundtrack

The soundtrack was arranged by Mark Adler, consisting of period popular songs.

Jean Lenoir, “Parlez-moi d’amour” (Lucienne Boyer)Claude Debussy, Six épigraphes antiques: Pour l’égyptienne (Ensemble Musical de Paris)Francis Poulenc, “Les chemins de l’amour” (Ransom Wilson and Christopher O’Riley)Debussy, Petite Suite: “Ballet” (Aloys and Alfons Kontarsky)Harry Warren, “I Found a Million Dollar Baby” (Bing Crosby)Erik Satie, “Gnossienne No. 3” (Pascal Rogé)Satie, “Je te veux” (Jean-Pierre Armengaud)Debussy, “Sonata for Violin and Piano” (first movement) (Kyung-wha Chung and Radu Lupu)Frédéric Chopin, Nocturne No. 1 in C Major [sic] (Paul Crossley)Georges Auric, “Sous les toits de Paris” (Rene Nazels)Jacques Larmanjat, lyrics by Francis Carco, “Le doux caboulot” (Annie Fratellini)Debussy, “La plus que lente” (Josef Suk)”Je m’ennuie” (Mark Adler)”Coralia” (Mark Adler)Irving Mills, “St. James Infirmary Blues” (Mark Adler)Francisco Tárrega, “Gran Vals” (Francisco Tárrega)Joaquin Nin-Culmell, “Basque Song” (Joaquin Nin-Culmell)Vincent Scotto, lyrics by George Koger and H. Vama, “J’ai deux amours” (Josephine Baker)

Rating

Reception

See alsoEdit

Nudity in film

References

External links

Watch “Daniel Guichard – Les ballons rouges (Serge Lama)” on YouTube



Je n’ai pas eu de ballon rouge
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
Dans ces provinces où rien ne bouge
Tous mes ballons étaient crevés
Je n’ai pas eu de vrai vacances
Seul, face à face avec la mer
Quand le cœur rythme la cadence
Des mouettes qui nagent dans l’air

J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Je n’ai jamais joué aux billes
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
J’étais cloué dans ma famille
Comme un martyr à son bûcher
Je n’ai pas eu de promenade
Seul, face à face avec le vent
Je lisais le Marquis de Sade
Et j’aimais déjà les divans
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Les fées n’étaient pas du voyage
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
Elles vivaient de leurs avantages
Elles étaient toutes syndiquées
Je n’ai pas vu dans les étoiles
Le carrosse de Cendrillon
La mienne avait une robe sale
Mais elle n’avait pas de chaussons
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Pourtant j’avais déjà la chance
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
De ne pas attacher d’importance
A ce que les autres pensaient
Et je n’ai pas vu dans l’Histoire
Quelque guerrier ou quelque roi
Assoiffé de règne ou de gloire
Qui soit plus orgueilleux que moi
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
Mais j’ai fait ce que j’ai voulu
Translate to English

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Serge Lama / Yves Gilbert
Les ballons rouges lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Watch “Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake – The Kirov Ballet” on YouTube


Swan Lake

This article is about the ballet. For other uses, see Swan Lake (disambiguation).

Swan Lake (Russian: Лебеди́ное о́зеро, romanized: Lebedínoye ózero), Op. 20, is a ballet composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1875–76. Despite its initial failure, it is now one of the most popular of all ballets.
The scenario, initially in two acts, was fashioned from Russian and German folk tales[a] and tells the story of Odette, a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer’s curse. The choreographer of the original production was Julius Reisinger(Václav Reisinger). The ballet was premiered by the Bolshoi Ballet on 4 March [O.S. 20 February] 1877[1][2] at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. Although it is presented in many different versions, most ballet companies base their stagings both choreographically and musically on the 1895 revival of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, first staged for the Imperial Ballet on 15 January 1895, at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg. For this revival, Tchaikovsky’s score was revised by the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatre’s chief conductor and composer Riccardo Drigo.[3]

History

Learn more

This section needs additional citations for verification.

Design by F. Gaanen for the décor of act 2, Moscow 1877

Origins of the ballet

There is no evidence to prove who wrote the original libretto, or where the idea for the plot came from. Russian and German folk tales have been proposed as possible sources, including “The White Duck” and “The Stolen Veil” by Johann Karl August Musäus, but both those tales differ significantly from the ballet.[4]
One theory is that the original choreographer, Julius Reisinger, who was a Bohemian (and therefore likely to be familiar with The Stolen Veil), created the story. Another theory is that it was written by Vladimir Petrovich Begichev, director of the Moscow Imperial Theatres at the time, possibly with Vasily Geltser, danseurof the Moscow Imperial Bolshoi Theatre (a surviving copy of the libretto bears his name). Since the first published libretto does not correspond with Tchaikovsky’s music in many places, one theory is that the first published version was written by a journalist after viewing initial rehearsals (new opera and ballet productions were always reported in the newspapers, along with their respective scenarios).
Some contemporaries of Tchaikovsky recalled the composer taking great interest in the life story of Bavarian King Ludwig II, whose life had supposedly been marked by the sign of Swan and could have been the prototype of the dreamer Prince Siegfried.[5] However, Ludwig’s death happened 10 years after the first performance of the ballet.
Begichev commissioned the score of Swan Lake from Tchaikovsky in May 1875 for 800 rubles. Tchaikovsky worked with only a basic outline from Julius Reisinger of the requirements for each dance.[6] However, unlike the instructions for the scores of The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, no written instruction is known to have survived.

Tchaikovsky’s influences

From around the time of the turn of the 19th century until the beginning of the 1890s, scores for ballets were almost always written by composers known as “specialists,” who were highly skilled at scoring the light, decorative, melodious, and rhythmically clear music that was at that time in vogue for ballet. Tchaikovsky studied the music of “specialists” such as the Italian Cesare Pugni and the Austrian Ludwig Minkus, before setting to work on Swan Lake.
Tchaikovsky had a rather negative opinion of the “specialist” ballet music until he studied it in detail, being impressed by the nearly limitless variety of infectious melodies their scores contained. Tchaikovsky most admired the ballet music of such composers as Léo Delibes, Adolphe Adam, and later, Riccardo Drigo. He would later write to his protégé, the composer Sergei Taneyev, “I listened to the Delibes ballet Sylvia … what charm, what elegance, what wealth of melody, rhythm, and harmony. I was ashamed, for if I had known of this music then, I would not have written Swan Lake.” Tchaikovsky most admired Adam’s 1844 score for Giselle, which used the Leitmotiftechnique: associating certain themes with certain characters or moods, a technique he would use in Swan Lake, and later, The Sleeping Beauty.
Tchaikovsky drew on previous compositions for his Swan Lake score. According to two of Tchaikovsky’s relatives – his nephew Yuri Lvovich Davydov and his niece Anna Meck-Davydova – the composer had earlier created a little ballet called The Lake of the Swans at their home in 1871. This ballet included the famous Leitmotif, the Swan’s Theme or Song of the Swans. He also made use of material from The Voyevoda, an opera he had abandoned in 1868. The Grand adage (a.k.a. the Love Duet) from the second scene of Swan Lake was fashioned from an aria from that opera, as was the Valse des fiancéesfrom the third scene. Another number which included a theme from The Voyevoda was the Entr’acte of the fourth scene.
By April 1876 the score was complete, and rehearsals began. Soon Reisinger began setting certain numbers aside that he dubbed “undanceable.” Reisinger even began choreographing dances to other composers’ music, but Tchaikovsky protested and his pieces were reinstated. Although the two artists were required to collaborate, each seemed to prefer working as independently of the other as possible.[7]

Composition process

Tchaikovsky’s excitement with Swan Lake is evident from the speed with which he composed: commissioned in the spring of 1875, the piece was created within one year. His letters to Sergei Taneyev from August 1875 indicate, however, that it was not only his excitement that compelled him to create it so quickly but his wish to finish it as soon as possible, so as to allow him to start on an opera. Respectively, he created scores of the first three numbers of the ballet, then the orchestration in the fall and winter, and was still struggling with the instrumentation in the spring. By April 1876, the work was complete. Tchaikovsky’s mention of a draft suggests the presence of some sort of abstract but no such draft has ever been seen. Tchaikovsky wrote various letters to friends expressing his longstanding desire to work with this type of music, and his excitement concerning his current stimulating, albeit laborious task.[8]

Performance history

Adelaide Giuri as Odette and Mikhail Mordkin as Prince Siegfried in Aleksandr Gorsky’s staging of the Petipa/Ivanov Swan Lake for the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow, 1901. A young Vera Karalli is seen kneeling.

Moscow première (world première)

Date: 4 March (OS 20 February) 1877

Place: Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow

Balletmaster: Julius Reisinger

Conductor: Stepan Ryabov

Scene Designers: Karl Valts (acts 2 & 4), Ivan Shangin (act 1), Karl Groppius (act 3)

St. Petersburg première

Date: 27 January 1895

Place: Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg

Balletmaster: Marius Petipa (acts 1 & 3), Lev Ivanov (acts 2 & 4)

Conductor: Riccardo Drigo

Scene Designers: Ivan Andreyev, Mikhail Bocharov, Henrich Levogt

Costume Designer: Yevgeni Ponomaryov[9]

Other notable productions

1880 and 1882, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Joseph Hansenafter Reisinger, conductor and designers as in première

1901, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Aleksandr Gorsky, conducted by Andrey Arends, scenes by Aleksandr Golovin (act 1), Konstantin Korovin (acts 2 & 4), N. Klodt (act 3)

1911, London, Ballets Russes, Sergei Diaghilev production, choreography by Michel Fokineafter Petipa–Ivanov, scenes by Golovin and Korovin

Original interpreters
RoleMoscow 1877Moscow 1880St. Petersburg 1895[9]Moscow 1901London 1911QueensopranoOlga NikolayevaGiuseppina CecchettiSiegfriedtenorVictor GillertAlfred BekefiPavel GerdtMikhail MordkinVaslav NijinskyBennoSergey NikitinAleksandr OblakovWolfgangWilhelm WannerGillertOdettePelageya KarpakovaYevdokiya KalmїkovaPierina LegnaniAdelaide GiuriMathilde KschessinskaVon RothbartSergey SokolovAleksey BulgakovK. KubakinOdilesopranoPierina LegnaniMathilde Kschessinska

Original production of 1877

The première on Friday, 4 March 1877, was given as a benefit performance for the ballerina Pelageya Karpakova (also known as Polina Karpakova), who performed the role of Odette, with première danseur Victor Gillert as Prince Siegfried. Karpakova may also have danced the part Odile, although it is believed the ballet originally called for two different dancers. It is now common practice for the same ballerina to dance both Odette and Odile.
The Russian ballerina Anna Sobeshchanskaya was originally cast as Odette, but was replaced when a governing official in Moscow complained about her, claiming she had accepted jewelry from him, only to then marry a fellow danseur and sell the pieces for cash.
The première was not well-received. Though there were a few critics who recognised the virtues of the score, most considered it to be far too complicated for ballet. It was labelled, “too noisy, too ‘Wagnerian’ and too symphonic.”[10] The critics also thought Reisinger’s choreography was “unimaginative and altogether unmemorable.”[10] The German origins of the story were “treated with suspicion while the tale itself was regarded as ‘stupid’ with unpronounceable surnames for its characters.”[10] Karpakova was a secondary soloist and “not particularly convincing.”[10]

The poverty of the production, meaning the décor and costumes, the absence of outstanding performers, the Balletmaster’s weakness of imagination, and, finally, the orchestra … all of this together permitted (Tchaikovsky) with good reason to cast the blame for the failure on others.

— Modest Tchaikovsky, brother of the composer

Yet the fact remains (and is too often omitted in accounts of this initial production) that this staging survived for six years with a total of 41 performances – many more than several other ballets from the repertoire of this theatre.[11]

Tchaikovsky pas de deux 1877

Anna Sobeshchanskaya [ru] as Odette in Julius Reisinger’s original production

Pierina Legnani as Odette (1895)

During the late 1880s and early 1890s, Petipa and Vsevolozhsky discussed with Tchaikovsky the possibility of reviving Swan Lake. However, Tchaikovsky died on 6 November 1893, just when plans to revive Swan Lake were beginning to come to fruition. It remains uncertain whether Tchaikovsky was prepared to revise the music for this revival. Whatever the case, as a result of Tchaikovsky’s death, Drigo was forced to revise the score himself, after receiving approval from Tchaikovsky’s younger brother, Modest. There are major differencesbetween Drigo’s and Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake score. Today, it is Riccardo Drigo’s revision of Tchaikovsky’s score, and not Tchaikovsky’s original score of 1877, that most ballet companies use.

Pavel Gerdt as Prince Siegfried (Mariinsky Theatre, 1895)

In February 1894, two memorial concerts planned by Vsevolozhsky were given in honor of Tchaikovsky. The production included the second act of Swan Lake, choreographed by Lev Ivanov, Second Balletmaster to the Imperial Ballet. Ivanov’s choreography for the memorial concert was unanimously hailed as wonderful.

The revival of Swan Lake was planned for Pierina Legnani‘s benefit performance in the 1894–1895 season. The death of Tsar Alexander III on 1 November 1894 and the ensuing period of official mourning brought all ballet performances and rehearsals to a close for some time, and as a result all efforts could be concentrated on the pre-production of the full revival of Swan Lake. Ivanov and Petipa collaborated on the production, with Ivanov retaining his dances for the second act while choreographing the fourth, with Petipa staging the first and third acts.

Modest Tchaikovsky was called upon to make changes to the ballet’s libretto, including the character of Odette changing from a fairy swan-maiden into a cursed mortal woman, the ballet’s villain changing from Odette’s stepmother to the magician von Rothbart, and the ballet’s finale: instead of the lovers simply drowning at the hand of Odette’s stepmother as in the original 1877 scenario, Odette commits suicide by drowning herself, with Prince Siegfried choosing to die as well, rather than live without her, and soon the lovers’ spirits are reunited in an apotheosis.[13] Aside from the revision of the libretto the ballet was changed from four acts to three—with act 2 becoming act 1, scene 2.

All was ready by the beginning of 1895 and the ballet had its première on Friday, 27 January. Pierina Legnani danced Odette/Odile, with Pavel Gerdtas Prince Siegfried, Alexei Bulgakov as Rothbart, and Alexander Oblakov as Benno. Most of the reviews in the St. Petersburg newspapers were positive.

Unlike the première of The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake did not dominate the repertory of the Mariinsky Theatre in its first season. It was given only sixteen performances between the première and the 1895–1896 season, and was not performed at all in 1897. Even more surprising, the ballet was performed only four times in 1898 and 1899. The ballet belonged solely to Legnani until she left St. Petersburg for her native Italy in 1901. After her departure, the ballet was taken over by Mathilde Kschessinskaya, who was as much celebrated in the rôle as was her Italian predecessor.

Later productions

Watch “Henry & June / Je M’Ennuie” on YouTube


“>Marlene Dietrich: Moi, Je M’Ennuie Lyrics

De ce que fut mon enfance
Je n’ai plus de souvenir
C’est peut-être que la chance
Ne m’offrit pas de plaisir
Et chaque jour qui se lève
Ne m’apporte aucun espoir
Je n’ai même pas de rêves
Quand luit l’étoile du soir

Moi je m’ennuie
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Je n’y peux rien
Le plaisir passe
Il me dépasse
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien
Partout je traîne
Comme une chaîne
Ma lourde peine
Sans autre bien
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Moi, je m’ennuie

Par de longs vagabondages
J’ai voulu griser mon cœur
Et souvent sur mon passage
J’ai vu naître des malheurs
Sur chaque nouvelle route
À l’amour j’ai du mentir
Et, le soir, lorsque j’écoute
La plainte du vent mourir

Moi j’ m’ennuie
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Je n’y peux rien
Le plaisir passe
Il me dépasse
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien
Partout je traîne
Comme une chaîne
Ma lourde peine
Sans autre bien
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Moi, je m’ennuie

Haiku: Blue skies at sunset (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)


Haiku: Blue skies at sunset (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Blue skies at sunset

Proceed starry nights throughout,

Sunny days to come.

ESL: PREPOSITIONS IN ENGLISH (AT, IN, ON)


ESL: PREPOSITIONS IN ENGLISH (AT, IN, ON)

ESL: PREPOSITIONS IN ENGLISH (AT, IN, ON)

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