Daily Archives: January 12, 2020

Haiku: Few dead leaves and sticks (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)


Haiku: Few dead leaves and sticks (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Few dead leaves and sticks make

live ikebana in vase…

No need to water.

Haiku: Few dead leaves and sticks (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Haiku: Few dead leaves and sticks (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Horoscope♉: 01/12/2020


Horoscope♉:
01/12/2020

Reflections on your recent success and good fortune with regard to career matters are likely to have you feeling strong, optimistic, and enthusiastic for the future, Taurus. Creative projects are going very well, as are relationships with the opposite sex. This should be a very gratifying day for you, full of warm and loving contact with those closest to you, and signs of continued progress. Enjoy your day, and treat yourself to an evening out.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: Silvesterklausen (Old Silvester Day)


Today’s Holiday:
Silvesterklausen (Old Silvester Day)

The custom known as Silvesterklausen in the town of Urnäsch, Appenzell Outer Rhoden, Switzerland, is performed both on December 31, New Silvester Day (St. Sylvester’s Day), and on January 13, or Old Silvester Day (reflecting the change from the Julian, or Old Style, calendar to the Gregorian, or New Style, calendar in 1582). The men of the village, wearing masks, costumes, and heavy harnesses with bells, traditionally walk in groups from house to house singing wordless yodels. The friends and neighbors who receive them offer them a drink before they move on to the next house. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Antoinette Bourignon (1616)


Today’s Birthday:
Antoinette Bourignon (1616)

Bourignon was a Flemish Christian mystic. After spending a short time in a convent and as head of an orphanage, she gathered a fanatical following at Amsterdam, believing herself divinely directed to restore the pure spirit of the Gospel. Moving from place to place, she took her printing press with her and disseminated her teachings. Her mystical ideas found particular favor in Scotland, where Bourignianism was declared a heresy. Why did Bourignon flee her home in 1636? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: First Successful Escape from an Aircraft Using the Ejection Seat (1942)


This Day in History:
First Successful Escape from an Aircraft Using the Ejection Seat (1942)

Ejection seats are used in aircraft to quickly propel occupants out in an emergency. Today, they are fired by an explosive charge, but the first ejection seats were powered by compressed air. One of the first aircrafts to be fitted with such a system was the German Heinkel He 280 prototype jet fighter. While testing the He 280 during WWII, pilot Helmut Schenk became the first person to use an ejection seat to make an emergency escape from an aircraft. What went wrong during his test flight? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: George Eliot


Quote of the Day:
George Eliot

All the learnin’ my father ever paid for was a bit o’ birch at one end and the alphabet at th’ other. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland


Article of the Day:
Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland

Percy was an English aristocrat who inherited his title from his father when he was in his early 20s. Under James I, Percy was imprisoned in the Tower of London for suspicion of involvement in the Gunpowder Plot, which was undertaken in part by his relative Thomas Percy. While in prison, he made the acquaintance of Sir Walter Raleigh, who was also confined there, and earned the sobriquet “The Wizard Earl” for his scientific experiments. What luxurious amenities did Percy have while imprisoned? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: grand total


Idiom of the Day:
grand total

The final amount after adding several different numbers or sums. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: regnant


Word of the Day:
regnant

Definition: (adjective) Exercising power or authority.

Synonyms: reigning, ruling

Usage: She became queen regnant upon the death of her father and soon gained a reputation for being a firm but fair ruler.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Watch “Alfred Hitchcock – Masters of Cinema (Complete Interview in 1972)” on YouTube


Watch “Willie Nelson Remember Me ( I’m the One Who Loved You ♥ )” on YouTube


Watch “Our House” on YouTube (Our House Song by Crosby, Stills & Nash and Nash & Young)


Our House
Song by Crosby, Stills & Nash and Nash & Young

Following


  1. I’ll light the fire
    You put the flowers in the vase that you bought today
    Staring at the fire for hours and hours while I listen to you
    Play your love songs all night long for me, only for me

    Come to me now and rest your head for just five minutes, everything is good
    Such a cozy room, the windows are illuminated by the
    Sunshine through them, fiery gems for you, only for you

    Our house is a very, very, very fine house with two cats in the yard
    Life used to be so hard
    Now everything is easy ’cause of you
    And our la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la

    Our house is a very, very, very fine house with two cats in the yard
    Life used to be so hard
    Now everything is easy ’cause of you
    And our

    I’ll light the fire while you place the flowers in the vase that you bought today

    Source: LyricFind


    Songwriters: Graham Nash

    Our House lyrics © Spirit Music Group

Golden interpretations: Watch “Valentina Lisitsa plays Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2” on YouTube


List of compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Ludwig_van_Beethoven?wprov=sfla1


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List of compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven

Title page of Beethoven’s Symphonies from the Gesamtausgabe

The compositions of Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) consist of 722 works[1] written over forty-five years, from his earliest work in 1782 (variations for piano on a march by Ernst Christoph Dressler) when he was only twelve years old and still in Bonn, till his last work just before his death in Vienna in 1827. Beethoven composed in all the main genres of classical music, including symphonies, concertos, string quartets, piano sonatas and one opera. His works range from requiring a solo performer to needing a large orchestra and chorus to perform.

Beethoven straddled both the classical and romantic periods, working in genres associated with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his teacher Joseph Haydn such as the piano concerto, string quartet and symphony, while on the other hand providing a precursor to Romantic composers such as Hector Berliozand Franz Liszt with programmatic works such as his Pastoral Symphonyand Piano Sonata “Les Adieux[2]. Beethoven’s work is typically divided into three periods. The “Early” period where Beethoven composed in the “Viennese” style. The “Middle” or “Heroic” period where his work is characterised by struggle and heroism, such as in the EroicaSymphony, the Appassionata Sonataand in his sole opera Fidelio. Beethoven’s “Late” period is marked by intense, personal expression and an emotional and intellectual profundity. Although his output dropped drastically in his later years this period saw the composition of masterpieces such as the Late Quartets, the Final Five Piano Sonatas, the Diabelli Variations, the Missa Solemnis and his Ninth Symphony[3].

Beethoven’s works are classified by both genre and various numbering systems[4]. The most well known numbering system for Beethoven’s works is that by opus number, assigned by Beethoven’s publishers during his lifetime. Only 172 of Beethoven’s works have opus numbers, divided among 138 opus numbers. Many works that were unpublished or else published without opus numbers have been assigned either “WoO” (Werke ohne Opuszahl—works without opus number), Hess or Biamonti numbers. For example, the short piano piece “Für Elise“, is more fully known as the “Bagatelle in A minor, WoO 59 (‘Für Elise’)”. Some works are also commonly referred to by their nicknames, such as the Kreutzer Violin Sonata, or the ArchdukePiano Trio.

As well as these numbering systems, works are also often identified by their number within their genre. For example, the 14th string quartet, published as Opus 131, may be referenced either as “String Quartet No. 14” or “the Opus 131 String Quartet“. The listings include all of these relevant identifiers. While other catalogues of Beethoven’s worksexist, the numbers here represent the most commonly used.

List of works by genreEdit

Beethoven, caricatured by J. P. Lyser

Beethoven’s works are published in several editions, the first of these was Ludwig van Beethovens Werke: Vollständige kritisch durchgesehene überall berechtigte Ausgabe published between 1862 and 1865 with a supplemental volume in 1888 by Breitkopf & Härtel, commonly known as the “Beethoven Gesamtausgabe” [GA]. While this was a landmark achievement at the time, the limitations of this edition soon became apparent. Between 1959 and 1971 Willy Hess prepared a supplemental edition, Beethoven: Sämtliche Werke: Supplemente zur Gesamtausgabe, [HS] containing works that were not in the Gesamtausgabe.

Since 1961 the Beethoven Archive has been publishing a new scholarly–critical Complete Edition of Beethoven’s works, Beethoven: Werke: neue Ausgabe sämtlicher Werke[5][NA]. However, only 42 of the projected 56 volumes have been published so far.[6] As this edition has not been published in full there are works without an NA designation.

Legend for publications – p: parts s: full score vs: vocal score

Orchestral musicEdit

Beethoven wrote nine symphonies, nine concertos, and a variety of other orchestral music, ranging from overtures and incidental music for theatrical productions to other miscellaneous “occasional” works, written for a particular occasion. Of the concertos, seven are widely known (one violin concerto, five piano concertos, and one triple concerto for violin, piano, and cello); the other two are an early piano concerto (WoO 4) and an arrangement of the Violin Concerto for piano and orchestra (Opus 61a).

SymphoniesEdit

No.[7] Title, key Composition, first performance Publication Dedication, remarks GA NA
Op. 21 Symphony No. 1, C 1799–1800; 2 April 1800 p: Leipzig 1801 Baron Gottfried van Swieten i/1 i/1[6]
Op. 36 Symphony No. 2, D 1801–2; 5 April 1803 p: Vienna, 1804; for piano, violin, cello: Vienna, 1805 Prince Karl von Lichnowsky i/2 i/1[6]
Op. 55 Symphony No. 3(“Eroica”), E 1803; 7 April 1805[8] p: Vienna, 1806 Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz i/3 i/2[6]
Op. 60 Symphony No. 4, B 1806; March 1807 p: Vienna, 1808 Count Franz von Oppersdorff i/4 i/2[6]
Op. 67 Symphony No. 5, C 1807–8;[9] 22 Dec 1808 p: Leipzig, 1809 Prince Lobkowitz and Count Andreas Razumovsky i/5 i/3[6]
Op. 68 Symphony No. 6(“Pastoral”), F 1808; 22 Dec 1808 p: Leipzig, 1809 Prince Lobkowitz and Count Rasumovsky i/6 i/3[6]
Op. 92 Symphony No. 7, A 1811–12; 8 Dec 1813 s, p: Vienna, 1816 Count Moritz von Fries; i/7
Op. 93 Symphony No. 8, F 1812; 27 Feb 1814 s, p: Vienna, 1817 shortened version of end of 1st movt, HS iv i/8
Op. 125 Symphony No. 9(“Choral”), D 1822–24; 7 May 1824 s, p: Mainz, 1826 Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia i/9 i/5[6]

Beethoven is believed to have intended to write a Tenth Symphony in the last year of his life; a performing version of possible sketches was assembled by Barry Cooper.[10]

ConcertosEdit

No. Title, key Composition, first performance Publication Dedication, remarks GA NA
WoO 4 Piano Concerto No. 0, E 1784 s: GA survives only in pf score (with orch cues in solo part) xxv/310 iii/5[6]
WoO 5 Violin Concerto, fragment, C 1790–92 Vienna, 1879 part of 1st movt only; 1st edn ded. Gerhard von Breuning HS iii
Hess 12 Oboe Concerto, lost, F ?1792–3 sent to Bonn from Vienna in late 1793; a few sketches survive
Op. 19 Piano Concerto No. 2, B begun c1788, rev. 1794–5, 1798; 29 March 1795 p: Leipzig, 1801 Carl Nicklas von Nickelsberg; score frag. rejected from early version, HS iii ix/66 iii/2[6]
cadenza for first movement 1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
Op. 15 Piano Concerto No. 1, C 1795, rev. 1800; 18 Dec 1795 p: Vienna, 1801 Princess Barbara Odescalchi (née Countess von Keglevics) ix/65 iii/2[6]
3 cadenzas for first movement 1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
Op. 37 Piano Concerto No. 3, c ?1800–03; 5 April 1803 p: Vienna, 1804 Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia ix/67 iii/2[6]
cadenza for first movement 1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
Op. 56 Triple Concerto for violin, cello, and piano, C 1804–7; May 1808 p: Vienna, 1807 Prince Lobkowitz ix/70 iii/1[6]
Op. 58 Piano Concerto No. 4, G 1804–6/7; 22 Dec 1808 p: Vienna, 1808 Archduke Rudolph of Austria ix/68 iii/3[6]
2 cadenzas for first movement, cadenza for finale ?1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
cadenza for first movement, 2 cadenzas for finale (Hess 81, 82, 83) ?1809 NA HSx vii/7[6]
Op. 61 Violin Concerto, D 1806; 23 Dec 1806 p: Vienna, 1808; London, 1810 Stephan von Breuning iv/29; HSx iii/4[6]
Op. 61a Beethoven’s arrangement of Opus 61 for piano, D 1807 p: Vienna, 1808; London, 1810 Julie von Breuning ix/73 (solo part) iii/5[6][6]
Cadenza for first movement, cadenza for finale ?1809 GA ix/70a vii/7

Best interpretations: Watch “Pathétique,Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13,”,Valentina Lisitsa,SHEET MUSIC” on YouTube



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Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (/ˈlʊdvɪɡ vænˈbt(h)vən/ (About this soundlisten)

listen)listen); German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːthoːfn̩] (About this sound

listen
); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composerand pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the classical and romantic eras in classical music, he is considered to be one of the greatest composers of all time.

Ludwig van Beethoven

Portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820

Beethoven, 1820

Born
Baptised 17 December 1770[1]
Died 26 March 1827 (aged 56)

Works

List of compositions
Signature
Signature written in ink in a flowing script

Beethoven was born in Bonn, the capital of the Electorate of Cologne, and part of the Holy Roman Empire. He displayed his musical talents at an early age and was vigorously taught by his father Johann van Beethoven, and was later taught by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe. At age 21, he moved to Vienna and studied composition with Joseph Haydn. Beethoven then gained a reputation as a virtuoso pianist, and was soon courted by Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky for compositions, which resulted in Opus 1 in 1795.

The piece was a great critical and commercial success, and was followed by Symphony No. 1 in 1800. This composition was distinguished for its frequent use of sforzandi, as well as sudden shifts in tonal centers that were uncommon for traditional symphonic form, and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments.[2] In 1801, he also gained notoriety for his six String Quartetsand for the ballet The Creatures of Prometheus. During this period, his hearing began to deteriorate, but he continued to conduct, premiering his third and fifth symphonies in 1804 and 1808, respectively. His condition worsened to almost complete deafness by 1811, and he then gave up performing and appearing in public.

During this period of self exile, Beethoven composed many of his most admired works; his seventhsymphony premiered in 1813, with its second movement, Allegretto, achieving widespread critical acclaim.[3] He composed the piece Missa Solemnis for a number of years until it premiered 1824, which preceded his ninth symphony, with the latter gaining fame for being among the first examples of a choral symphony.[4] In 1826, his fourteenth String Quartet was noted for having seven linked movements played without a break, and is considered the final major piece performed before his death a year later.

His career is conventionally divided into early, middle, and late periods; the “early” period is typically seen to last until 1802, the “middle” period from 1802 to 1812, and the “late” period from 1812 to his death in 1827. During his life, he composed nine symphonies; five piano concertos; one violin concerto; thirty-two piano sonatas; sixteen string quartets; two masses; and the opera Fidelio. Other works, like Für Elise, were discovered after his death, and are also considered historical musical achievements. Beethoven’s legacy is characterized for his innovative compositions, namely through the combinations of vocals and instruments, and also for widening the scope of sonata, symphony, concerto, and quartet,[5] while he is also noted for his troublesome relationship with his contemporaries.

Life and career

Background and early life

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