Daily Archives: February 18, 2020

Horoscope♉: 02/18/2020


Horoscope♉:
02/18/2020

Books and movies may inspire you to get involved in artistic activities. Your aesthetic sense is very high today, Taurus, and you may be drawing your inspiration from the higher realms. You might want to stroll through an art gallery or museum and try to sense the feelings of those from the past. A warm and loving letter or phone call could come from a romantic partner, elevating your mood even more. It’s a very emotionally gratifying day.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: Anniversary of the Bombing of Darwin


Today’s Holiday:
Anniversary of the Bombing of Darwin

On February 19, 1942, Japanese bomber and fighter planes conducted a devastating air raid on the town of Darwin, the capital city of Australia’s Northern Territory. As a tribute to honor the dead and those who defended Darwin, an annual commemoration is held in Bicentennial Park by the Cenotaph, a monument to those slain in World War I. At 9:58 a.m., the exact time the attack began, an air raid siren sounds. During some observances, Australian regiments will reenact the attack: ground units fire their guns, and fighter planes perform fly-bys over the memorial site. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Amy Tan (1952)


Today’s Birthday:
Amy Tan (1952)

Born in Oakland, California, to Chinese immigrants, Tan is an award-winning author whose novels focus on the lives of Asian-Americans and the complexities of intergenerational relationships, particularly those of mothers and daughters. Her best-selling novel The Joy Luck Club was based on the tragic experiences of her mother, who had years earlier fled an abusive marriage, though it meant leaving her three daughters behind in Shanghai. When did Tan finally meet her half-sisters? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Thomas Edison Patents the Phonograph (1878)


This Day in History:
Thomas Edison Patents the Phonograph (1878)

Though his formal schooling was limited to just three months of instruction before he was ten years old, Edison was one of the most prolific inventors of his time. His work in improving telegraph technology—particularly his discovery of a method for recording telegraph messages—led Edison to suspect he could do similar things with sound. Within months, the first working model of his phonograph was ready. Why, according to Edison, was he “taken aback” when his invention worked on the first try? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Virginia Woolf


Quote of the Day:
Virginia Woolf

It seems as if an age of genius must be succeeded by an age of endeavor; riot and extravagance by cleanliness and hard work. More…
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Article of the Day: Lechuguilla Cave


Article of the Day:
Lechuguilla Cave

Long thought to be an insignificant, smallish cave near the famous Carlsbad Caverns, Lechuguilla Cave is now recognized as the deepest limestone cave in the US and the world’s fifth longest cave. It was only in 1986 that cavers digging through rubble at the floor of the cave discovered its expansive network of more than 120 miles (193 km) of passages. The cave is famous for its rare geological beauty, featuring gypsum chandeliers, hydromagnesite balloons, helictites, soda straws, and what else? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: Hallmark moment


Idiom of the Day:
Hallmark moment

A particularly poignant, memorable, or emotionally touching moment or event, i.e., one that would be suitable as a greeting card. A reference to the Hallmark brand of greeting cards. Sometimes used ironically or satirically. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: infirmity


Word of the Day:
infirmity

Definition: (noun) The state of being weak in health or body (especially from old age).

Synonyms: debility, feebleness, frailty, valetudinarianism

Usage: We all knew it was infirmity, not indifference, that kept Grandma Jane from attending my graduation.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

QUOTE: “If you tell a big enough lie…” (Adolf Hitler)


QUOTE:

QUOTE: “If you tell a big enough lie…” (Adolf Hitler)

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ESL: IRREGULAR VERBS


ESL: IRREGULAR VERBS

ESL: IRREGULAR VERBS

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ESL: 16 TENSES


ESL: 16 TENSES

ESL: 16 TENSES

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Watch “Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)” on YouTube


Symphony No. 1 (Schubert)

Symphony by Franz Schubert


The Symphony No. 1 in D major, D 82, was composed by Franz Schubert in 1813, when he was just 16 years old. Despite his youth, his first symphony is an impressive piece of orchestral music for both its time and size. The first movement opens with a stately Adagio introduction, reminiscent of Joseph Haydn‘s 104th symphony in its format. The short Adagio sets off a lively Allegro vivace.

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between D4 and A5 (as sounded) for most of the first and fourth movements. In the fourth movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D6, in a repeated fashion. Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

The standard four movement work runs about 26 minutes.

  1. Adagio Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in G major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro
  4. Allegro vivace

ESL: BASIC GRAMMAR FUNCTIONS


ESL: BASIC GRAMMAR FUNCTIONS

ESL: BASIC GRAMMAR FUNCTIONS

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ESL: LET’S COMMUNICATE


ESL: LET'S COMMUNICATE

ESL: LET’S COMMUNICATE

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Recognize the talking monkey?


Recognize the talking monkey?

Recognize the talking monkey?

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ESL: HOW TO ANSWER A QUESTION…


ESL: HOW TO ANSWER A QUESTION...

ESL: HOW TO ANSWER A QUESTION…

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Watch “a-ha – Take On Me (Live From MTV Unplugged)” on YouTube




  1. We’re talking away
    Though I don’t know what I’m to say
    I’ll say it anyway
    Today’s another day to find you
    Shying away
    I’ll be coming for your love, OK?

    Take on me (take on me)
    Take me on (take on me)
    I’ll be gone
    In a day or two

    So needless to say
    I’m odds and ends
    But I’ll be stumbling away
    Slowly learning that life is ok
    Say after me
    It’s no better to be safe than sorry

    Take on me (take on me)
    Take me on (take on me)
    I’ll be gone
    In a day or two

    Oh, things that you say
    Is it a life or just to play my worries away
    You’re all the things I’ve got to remember
    You’re shying away
    I’ll be coming for you anyway

    Take on me
    Take me on
    I’ll be gone
    In a day
    (Take on me)
    Take me on (take on me)
    I’ll be gone (take on me)
    (Take on me)

    Source: LyricFind


    Songwriters: Pal Waaktaar / Morten Harket / Magne Furuholmen

    Take On Me lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Quote: “If that fuck*n bastard wins, we’re all…” (Hilarious Clint-on)


Quote: “If that fuck*n bastard wins, we’re all…” (Hilarious Clint-on)

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ESL: TIPS FOR POLITE AND DIPLOMATIC LANGUAGE


ESL: TIPS FOR POLITE AND DIPLOMATIC LANGUAGE

ESL: TIPS FOR POLITE AND DIPLOMATIC LANGUAGE

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Watch “Active Child – Cruel World” on YouTube



I dedicate my life to something richer
And all the things that come ’cause thats no price at all
And I know you’ll be there
And I want you to know I care because

Keep your head up, hold your head up
Even though it’s a cruel world
Count your blessings, you won’t need them
When you’re gone, its a cruel world
You can’t see it, you can’t see it
Even though it’s a cruel world
We’re thrown into this life, no raft, no savior
Masked in self contempt and wrapped in cotton cloth
And its just like a prayer
The way you showed me you care to be there and because
Keep your head up, hold your head up
Even though it’s a cruel world
Count your blessings, you won’t need them
When you’re gone, its a cruel world
You can’t see it, you can’t see it
Even though it’s a cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Keep your head up, hold your head up
Even though it’s a cruel world
Count your blessings, you won’t need them
When you’re gone, its a cruel world
You can’t see it, you can’t see it
Even though it’s a cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Cruel world
Source: Musixmatch


Songwriters: Patrick Grossi
Cruel World lyrics © Sun Rooms Recordings

Watch “Franz Schubert – Symphony No.7 in D-major, D.708a (1820/21)” on YouTube


Symphony No. 7 (Schubert)

Symphony by Franz Schubert


Symphony No. 7 is the name given to a four-movement symphony in E major (D 729) drafted by Franz Schubert in August 1821. Although the work (which comprises about 1350 bars) is structurally complete, Schubert only orchestrated the slow introduction and the first 110 bars of the first movement. The rest of the work is, however, continued on 14-stave score pages as a melodic line with occasional basses or counterpoints, giving clues as to changes in orchestral texture.

For the Great C major Symphony, see Symphony No. 9 (Schubert).

Schubert seems to have laid the symphony aside in order to work on his opera Alfonso und Estrella, and never returned to it. The manuscript was given by Schubert’s brother Ferdinand to Felix Mendelssohn and was subsequently acquired by Sir George Grove, who bequeathed it to the Royal College of Music in London. There are at least three completions: by John Francis Barnett (1881), Felix Weingartner (1934) and Brian Newbould (1980). The work is now generally accepted to be Schubert’s Seventh Symphony, an appellation which some scholars had preferred to leave for the chimerical ‘Gastein Symphony’ that was long believed to have been written and lost in 1824.

Instrumentation

This symphony is scored for an even larger orchestral force than Schubert’s eighth and ninth symphonies. The score calls for double woodwinds, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings.

Movements

Schubert/Weingartner Symphony No. 7 in E major
  1. Adagio ma non troppo – Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Scherzo: Allegro deciso
  4. Allegro vivace
Schubert/Newbould Symphony No. 7 in E major
  1. Adagio – Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Scherzo: Allegro
  4. Allegro giusto

(The true marking is ffz rather than fz, but that is not available in LilyPond as implemented on Wikipedia.)

References

Notes
More information: Tap to expand
Sources

Further reading