Category Archives: ARTISTS AND ARTS – Music

Watch “Bettye Swann Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye” on YouTube



Kiss me each morning for a million years
Hold me each evening by your side
Tell me you love me for a million years
Then if it don’t work out
Then if it don’t work out
Then you can tell me goodbye
Sweeten my coffee with a morning kiss
Soften my dreams with your sigh
After you’ve loved me for a million years
Then if it don’t work out
Then if it don’t work out
Then you can tell me goodbye
If you must go I won’t grieve
If you just wait a life-time before you leave
If you must go I won’t say “no”
Just so we can say that we tried
Tell me you love me for a million years
Then if it don’t work out
Then if it don’t work out
Then you can tell me goodbye

Watch “Fred Neil – A Little Bit Of Rain” on YouTube



If I should leave you
Try to remember the good times
Warm days filled with sunshine
And just a little bit of rain
And just a little bit of rain

And if you look back
Try to forget all the bad times
Lonely blue and sad times
And just a little bit of rain
And just a little bit of rain
And if I look back
I’ll remember all the good times
Warm days filled with sunshine
And just a little bit of rain
And just a little bit of rain
If I should leave you
Try to remember all the good times
Warm days filled with sunshine
And just a little bit of rain
And just a little bit of rain
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Fred Neil
Little Bit of Rain lyrics © BMG Rights Management US, LLC

Watch “The Animals – House of the Rising Sun (1964) + clip compilation 55 YEARS & counting” on YouTube


The Animals Lyrics

“The House Of The Rising Sun”

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
And God, I know I’m one

My mother was a tailor
She sewed my new blue jeans
My father was a gamblin’ man
Down in New Orleans

Now the only thing a gambler needs
Is a suitcase and a trunk
And the only time he’s satisfied
Is when he’s on a drunk

[Organ Solo]

Oh mother, tell your children
Not to do what I have done
Spend your lives in sin and misery
In the House of the Rising Sun

Well, I got one foot on the platform
The other foot on the train
I’m goin’ back to New Orleans
To wear that ball and chain

Well, there is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
And God, I know I’m one

Thanks to Allegra Muilenburg, Chase, Das Pamjunk, Zach Southard for correcting these lyrics.
Writer(s): Alan Price
The song is a traditional folk song. The Animals recorded the most successful commercial version. It became their signature song, a number one in UK, United States and France charts and often described as the “first folk rock hit”.
The “rising sun” has been a symbol for brothels in British and American ballads. In the traditional folk version of the song, the main character is either a prostitute or a prisoner. The Animals changed it to a gambler to make their version more radio-friendly.
It is not known whether or not the house described in the lyrics was an actual or a fictitious place. There is a B&B in New Orleans called the House of the Rising Sun, decorated in brothel style. The owners are fans of the song, but there is no connection with the original place.

Watch “*FULL VERSION* TEOTFW – Walking All Day – Graham Coxon” on YouTube


Walking All Day

This song is a part of the soundtrack for Netflix’s 2018 series The End Of The F***ing World. It… read more »

WALKING ALL DAY LYRICS

[Verse 1]
Walkin’ all day with my mouth on fire, tryin’ to get talkin’ to you
Walkin’ all day with my mouth on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Tryin’ to get talkin’ to you
Walkin’ all day with my feet on fire, tryin’ to get closer to you
Walkin’ all day with my feet on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Tryin’ to get closer to you
Walkin’ all day with my mind on fire, I can’t stop thinking of you
Walkin’ all day with my mind on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
I can’t stop thinkin’ of you

[Verse 2]
Walkin’ all day with my hands on fire, wanna get to touch you
Walkin’ all day with my hands on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Wanna get to touch you
Walkin’ all day with my heart on fire, falling in love with you
Walkin’ all day with my heart on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Falling in love with you

[Outro]
Murder me
Make me happy
Talk to me
It’s so crappy
Ignore me
I’m being sappy, over me
What’s this power?
Gonna tell you once more

Watch “Voilà – Françoise Hardy (1967)” on YouTube



  1. Voilà, je regarde les autres
    Pourtant, je ne leur trouve rien
    C’est comme ça
    Voilà, je vais avec les autres
    Le temps passe plus mal que bien
    C’est comme ça,
    Et toi, que fais-tu, es-tu content de tout?
    Je suis là, devant toi, toujours la même
    Oh! Pourquoi est-ce encore toi que j’aime
    Que j’aime, que j’aime, que j’aime?
    Tu es là, devant moi, toujours le même
    Oh! Pourquoi ne puis-je pas te dire
    Je t’aime, je t’aime, je t’aime?
    Voilà, je m’en retourne aux autres
    Qui m’aiment et que je n’aime pas
    C’est comme ça,
    Et toi, va retrouver cette autre
    Tu l’aimes ou c’est ce que tu crois
    C’est comme ça
    Voilà, on n’a rien, rien de plus à se dire
    Je suis là, devant toi, toujours la même
    Tu le vois, c’est encore toi que j’aime
    Que j’aime, que j’aime, que j’aime
    Tu t’en vas et plus rien ne vaut la peine
    Oh! Pourquoi ne puis-je pas crier:
    Je t’aime, je t’aime, je t’aime?
    Translate to English
    Source: Musixmatch


    Songwriters: Francoise Hardy

Watch “Oscar Peterson Piano Lesson” on YouTube


Watch “Glenn Gould – Beethoven, Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major op.73 “Emperor” – Part 2 (OFFICIAL)” on YouTube


Watch “Leonard Cohen – Sound Of Silence” on YouTube



Hello darkness, my old friend
I’ve come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains
Within the sound of silence
In restless dreams I walked alone
Narrow streets of cobblestone
‘Neath the halo of a street lamp
I turned my collar to the cold and damp
When my eyes were stabbed by the flash of a neon light
That split the night
And touched the sound of silence

And in the naked light I saw
Ten thousand people, maybe more
People talking without speaking
People hearing without listening
People writing songs that voices never share
And no one dare
Disturb the sound of silence
“Fools” said I, “You do not know
Silence like a cancer grows
Hear my words that I might teach you
Take my arms that I might reach you”
But my words like silent raindrops fell
And echoed
In the wells of silence
And the people bowed and prayed
To the neon god they made
And the sign flashed out its warning
In the words that it was forming
And the sign said, “The words of the prophets
Are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls”
And whisper’d in the sounds of silence
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Paul Simon
The Sound of Silence lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Watch “Leonard Cohen’s Prince Of Asturias Speech – No Overdubbing” on YouTube


Watch “Leonard Cohen – The Gypsy’s Wife – Natalie Wood (HQ) + lyrics” on YouTube



And where, where, where is my Gypsy wife tonight
I’ve heard all the wild reports, they can’t be right
But whose head is this she’s dancing with on the threshing floor
whose darkness deepens in her arms a little more
And where, where is my Gypsy wife tonight?
Where, where is my Gypsy wife tonight?

Ah the silver knives are flashing in the tired old cafe
A ghost climbs on the table in a bridal negligee
She says, “My body is the light, my body is the way”
I raise my arm against it all and I catch the bride’s bouquet
And where, where is my Gypsy wife tonight?
Too early for the rainbow, too early for the dove
These are the final days, this is the darkness, this is the flood
And there is no man or woman who can’t be touched
But you who come between them will be judged
And where, where is my Gypsy wife tonight?
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Leonard Cohen
The Gypsy’s Wife lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Watch “The Thompson Fields by Maria Schneider” on YouTube


Watch “Leonard Cohen on Preparing for Death | The New Yorker” on YouTube


Watch “Leonard Cohen Chelsea Hotel #2 Live” on YouTube




I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
You were talking so brave and so sweet
Giving me head on the unmade bed
While the limousines wait in the street
Those were the reasons and that was New York
We were running for the money and the flesh
And that was called love for the workers in song
Probably still is for those of them left

Ah but you got away, didn’t you babe
You just turned your back on the crowd
You got away, I never once heard you say
I need you, I don’t need you
I need you, I don’t need you
And all of that jiving around
I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
You were famous, your heart was a legend
You told me again you preferred handsome men
But for me you would make an exception
And clenching your fist for the ones like us
Who are oppressed by the figures of beauty
You fixed yourself, you said, “Well never mind,
We are ugly but we have the music”
And you got away, didn’t you babe,
You just turned your back on the crowd
You got away, I never once heard you say,
I need you, I don’t need you
I need you, I don’t need you
And all of that jiving around
I don’t mean to suggest that I loved you the best
I can’t keep track of each fallen robin
I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
That’s all, I don’t even think of you that often
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Leonard Cohen
Chelsea Hotel #2 lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management
I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
You were talking so brave and so sweet
Giving me head on the unmade bed
While the limousines wait in the street
Those were the reasons and that was New York
We were running for the money and the flesh
And that was called love for the workers in song
Probably still is for those of them left

Ah but you got away, didn’t you babe
You just turned your back on the crowd
You got away, I never once heard you say
I need you, I don’t need you
I need you, I don’t need you
And all of that jiving around

I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
You were famous, your heart was a legend
You told me again you preferred handsome men
But for me you would make an exception
And clenching your fist for the ones like us
Who are oppressed by the figures of beauty
You fixed yourself, you said, “Well never mind,
We are ugly but we have the music”

And you got away, didn’t you babe,
You just turned your back on the crowd
You got away, I never once heard you say,
I need you, I don’t need you
I need you, I don’t need you
And all of that jiving around

I don’t mean to suggest that I loved you the best
I can’t keep track of each fallen robin
I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
That’s all, I don’t even think of you that often

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Leonard Cohen
Chelsea Hotel #2 lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, BMG Rights Management

Watch “Leonard Cohen – 11 – Tonight Will Be Fine (Berlin 1974) [with lyrics]” on YouTube



Sometimes I find I get to thinking of the past.
We swore to each other then that our love would surely last.
You kept right on loving, I went on a fast,
Now I am too thin and your love is too vast.
But I know from your eyes
And I know from your smile
That tonight will be fine,
Will be fine, will be fine, will be fine
For a while.

I choose the rooms that I live in with care,
The windows are small and the walls almost bare,
There’s only one bed and there’s only one prayer;
I listen all night for your step on the stair.
But I know from your eyes
And I know from your smile
That tonight will be fine,
Will be fine, will be fine, will be fine
For a while.
Oh sometimes I see her undressing for me,
She’s the soft naked lady love meant her to be
And she’s moving her body so brave and so free.
If I’ve got to remember that’s a fine memory.
And I know from her eyes
And I know from her smile
That tonight will be fine,
Will be fine, will be fine, will be fine
For a while.
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Leonard Cohen
Tonight Will Be Fine lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Watch “Gordon Lightfoot – Sundown (Lyrics)” on YouTube



I can see her lyin’ back in her satin dress
In a room where ya do what ya don’t confess
Sundown you better take care
If I find you beenn creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown ya better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs

She’s been lookin’ like a queen in a sailor’s dream
And she don’t always say what she really means
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
I can picture every move that a man could make
Getting lost in her lovin’ is your first mistake
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again
I can see her lookin’ fast in her faded jeans
She’s a hard lovin’ woman, got me feelin’ mean
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Gordon Lightfoot
Sundown lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc

Watch “Classical Music for Brain Power – Bach” on YouTube


Watch “Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3 – Sir Neville Marriner, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra” on YouTube


Ancient Airs and Dances

Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composerOttorino Respighi, freely transcribed from original pieces for lute. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 1 (1917)Edit

Ancient Airs, Suite No. 1

  1. Balletto, “Il Conte Orlando”
  2. Gagliarda

  3. Villanella

  4. Passo mezzo e mascherada

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Suite No. 1 P 109 was composed in 1917. It was based on Renaissance lute pieces by Simone Molinaro, Vincenzo Galilei (father of Galileo Galilei) and additional anonymous composers.

Balletto: “Il Conte Orlando” (Simone Molinaro, 1599)

Gagliarda (Vincenzo Galilei, 1550s)

Villanella (anonymous, end of 16th century)

Passo mezzo e mascherada (anonymous, end of 16th century)

The orchestration calls for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in F, trumpet in D, harp, harpsichord and strings.

Suite No. 2 (1923)Edit

Suite No. 2, P 138 was composed in 1923. It was based on pieces for lute, archlute, and viol by Fabritio Caroso, Jean-Baptiste Besard, Bernardo Gianoncelli, and an anonymous composer. It also includes an aria attributed to Marin Mersenne.

Laura soave: balletto con gagliarda, saltarello e canario (Fabritio Caroso)

Danza rustica (Jean-Baptiste Besard)

Campanae parisienses (anonymous) & Aria (attributed to Marin Mersenne)

Bergamasca (Bernardo Gianoncelli, 1650)

The orchestration calls for an average-sized orchestra of 3 flutes (3rd doubling piccolo), 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets in A/B♭, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in D (doubling 2 horns in E/F), 2 trumpets in A/D (doubling trumpet in C), 3 trombones, 3 timpani, celesta, harpsichord 4-hands, harp and strings.

Suite No. 3 (1932)Edit

Suite No. 3, P 172 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. (A note by the composer in the printed score states that the work may also be performed by a string quartet, completely omitting the double-bass part.) It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for Baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana(Fine sec. XVI) – Andantino)

Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec. XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)

Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana(Fine sec. XVI) – Andantino)

Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)

Piano reductionsEdit

The Ancient Airs and Dances first two suites were freely transcribed by the composer for piano (2 and 4 hands).

RecordingsEdit

There have been many recordings of the suites in their entirety, and individually, with Suite No. 3 most frequently appearing alone. Recordings include:

Philharmonia Hungarica, Antal Dorati (Mercury)

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa (DG)

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Sir Neville Marriner (EMI)

Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, Jesús López-Cobos (Telarc)

Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Hugh Wolff (Teldec)

Australian Chamber Orchestra, Christopher Lyndon-Gee (Omega)

Sinfonia 21, Richard Hickox(Chandos)

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra (1 & 3 only) (DG)

Rome Symphony Orchestra, Francesco La Vecchia

Suite No. 3 onlyEdit

Berliner Philharmoniker, Herbert von Karajan (DG)

I Musici

I Solisti Italiani

Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Sir Neville Marriner (Philips)

English String Orchestra, William Boughton (Nimbus)

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

Antiche danze et arie per liuto, Suite No.1, Antiche danze et arie per liuto, Suite No.2, Antiche danze et arie per liuto, Suite No.3: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP)

Last edited 4 days ago by Ira Leviton

RELATED ARTICLES

Ottorino Respighi

Italian composer, musicologist and conductor

Jean-Baptiste Besard

French composer

Julia Sutton (dance historian)

American dance historian

Watch “Beethoven/Liszt: Symphony Op.68 No.6 “Pastoral” – Glenn Gould” on YouTube


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List of symphonies with names

While most symphonies have a number, many symphonies are known by their (nick)name.

This article lists symphonies that are numbered and have an additional nickname, and symphonies that are primarily known by their name and/or key. Also various compositions that contain “symphony” or “sinfonia” in their name are included, whether or not strictly speaking they adhere to the format of a classical symphony.

Sinfonia concertante is a different genre, and works of that genre are not included here, unless for those named works that are usually known as a symphony.

Composer No. Key Original name Translation Date Additional information
Alkan C minor–E-flat minor Symphonie pour piano seul Symphony for solo piano 1857 Numbers 4–7 of Douze Études dans tous les tons mineurs, Op. 39, for solo piano
Andriessen Symfonie voor losse snaren Symphony for Open Strings 1978
Atterberg 3 Västkustbilder West-Coast Images
Atterberg 4 Sinfonia piccola Little Symphony
Atterberg 5 Sinfonia funèbre Funereal Symphony
Atterberg 6 Dollar symphony
Atterberg 7 Sinfonia romantica Romantic Symphony
Atterberg 9 Sinfonia visionaria Visionary Symphony
Beethoven 3 E-flat major Eroica Heroic 1803–1804 Op. 55. Premiered 1805
see also List of works by Beethoven#Symphonies
Beethoven 5 C minor Schicksalssinfonie Fate Symphony 1804–1808 Op. 67. Premiered 1808
Beethoven 6 F major Pastorale Pastoral 1804–1808 Op. 68. Premiered 1808
Beethoven Siegessinfonie
Wellingtons Sieg oder die Schlacht bei Vittoria
Battle Symphony
Wellington’s Victory, or, the Battle of Vitoria
1813 Op. 91. Premiered 1813
for panharmoniconcommissioned by instrument’s inventor, later arranged for orchestra
Beethoven 9 D minor Choral 1817–1824 Op. 125. Premiered 1824
Bentoiu 6 Culori Colours 1985 Op. 28
Bentoiu 7 Volume Volumes 1986 Op. 29
Bentoiu 8 Imagini Images 1987 Op. 30
Berlioz Symphonie fantastique
Berlioz Harold en Italie Harold in Italy
Berlioz Roméo et Juliette Romeo and Juliet
Berlioz Grande symphonie funèbre et triomphale Funereal and Triumphal Symphony
Bernstein 1 Jeremiah
Bernstein 2 The Age of Anxiety
Bernstein 3 Kaddish
Berwald 1 Sérieuse Serious Symphony
Berwald 2 Capricieuse Capricious Symphony
Berwald 3 Singulière Singular Symphony
Berwald 4 Naïve
Bizet Roma Rome Symphony
Bliss A Colour Symphony
Borodin 2 Богатырская Симфония Symphony of Heroes nickname first used by Vladimir Stasov
Brahms 1 Beethoven’s Tenth nickname first used by Hans von Bülow
Brahms 3 suggested to be called “Heroic”, name rejected by Brahms
Brian 1 Gothic
Brian 2 Man in his Cosmic Loneliness
Brian 4 Das Siegeslied The Song of Victory
Brian 5 Wine of Summer
Brian 6 Sinfonia Tragica Tragic Symphony
Brian 22 Symphonia Brevis Short Symphony
Britten Simple Symphony
Britten Sinfonia da Requiem Requiem Symphony
Britten Spring Symphony
Britten Cello Symphony 1963 full title: Symphony for Cello and Orchestra
Op. 68. Premiered 1964
Brown The Northern Journey
Bruckner 00 00 student work written prior to No. 1
Bruckner 0 Nullte written after No. 1 and before No. 2
Bruckner 2 Symphony of Pauses
Bruckner 3 Wagner Symphony
Bruckner 4 Romantic
Bruckner 8 Apocalyptic the name is not used anymore
Chávez 1 Sinfonía de Antígona Symphony of Antigone
Chávez 2 Sinfonía india Indian Symphony
Chávez 4 Sinfonía romántica Romantic Symphony
Chávez Caballos de vapor: sinfonía de baile Horse Power: Dance Symphony 1926–1932
Chávez Llamadas: sinfonía proletaria Calls [to Arms]: Proletarian Symphony 1934
Clementi 3

Felix Mendelssohn


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Mendelssohn?wprov=sfla1

Felix Mendelssohn

This article is about the German musician. For other people with the same surname, see Mendelssohn (surname). For other uses, see Mendelssohn (disambiguation).

Stretching to the heart

Portrait of Mendelssohn by the English miniaturist James Warren Childe, 1839

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy[n 1] (3 February 1809 – 4 November 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn,[n 2] was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romanticperiod. Mendelssohn’s compositions include symphonies, concertos, pianomusic and chamber music. His best-known works include his overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the oratorioElijah, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. The melody for the Christmas carol “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” is also his. Mendelssohn’s Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions.
A grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Felix Mendelssohn was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was brought up without religion until the age of seven, when he was baptised as a Reformed Christian. Felix was recognised early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his talent.
Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatory,[n 3] which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the Romantic era.

Life

Childhood

Felix Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas

Felix Mendelssohn was born on 3 February 1809, in Hamburg, at the time an independent city-state,[n 4] in the same house where, a year later, the dedicatee and first performer of his Violin Concerto, Ferdinand David, would be born.[4] Mendelssohn’s father, the banker Abraham Mendelssohn, was the son of the German Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, whose family was prominent in the German Jewish community.[5] Until his baptism at age seven, Mendelssohn was brought up largely without religion.[6] His mother, Lea Salomon, was a member of the Itzig family and a sister of Jakob Salomon Bartholdy.[7] Mendelssohn was the second of four children; his older sister Fanny also displayed exceptional and precocious musical talent.[8]
The family moved to Berlin in 1811, leaving Hamburg in disguise in fear of French reprisal for the Mendelssohn bank’s role in breaking Napoleon’s Continental System blockade.[9]Abraham and Lea Mendelssohn sought to give their children – Fanny, Felix, Paul and Rebecka – the best education possible. Fanny became a pianist well known in Berlin musical circles as a composer; originally Abraham had thought that she, rather than Felix, would be the more musical. But it was not considered proper, by either Abraham or Felix, for a woman to pursue a career in music, so she remained an active but non-professional musician.[10] Abraham was initially disinclined to allow Felix to follow a musical career until it became clear that he was seriously dedicated.[11]
Mendelssohn grew up in an intellectual environment. Frequent visitors to the salon organised by his parents at their home in Berlin included artists, musicians and scientists, among them Wilhelm and Alexander von Humboldt, and the mathematician Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (whom Mendelssohn’s sister Rebecka would later marry).[12] The musician Sarah Rothenburg has written of the household that “Europe came to their living room”.[13]

Surname

Abraham Mendelssohn renounced the Jewish religion prior to Felix’s birth; he and his wife decided not to have Felix circumcised, in contravention of the Jewish tradition.[14] Felix and his siblings were first brought up without religious education, and were baptisedby a Reformed Church minister in 1816,[15] at which time Felix was given the additional names Jakob Ludwig. Abraham and his wife Lea were baptised in 1822, and formally adopted the surname Mendelssohn Bartholdy (which they had used since 1812) for themselves and for their children.[6] The name Bartholdy was added at the suggestion of Lea’s brother, Jakob Salomon Bartholdy, who had inherited a property of this name in Luisenstadt and adopted it as his own surname.[16] In an 1829 letter to Felix, Abraham explained that adopting the Bartholdy name was meant to demonstrate a decisive break with the traditions of his father Moses: “There can no more be a Christian Mendelssohn than there can be a Jewish Confucius”. (Letter to Felix of 8 July 1829).[17] On embarking on his musical career, Felix did not entirely drop the name Mendelssohn as Abraham had requested, but in deference to his father signed his letters and had his visiting cards printed using the form ‘Mendelssohn Bartholdy’.[18] In 1829, his sister Fanny wrote to him of “Bartholdy […] this name that we all dislike”.[19]

Career

Musical education

Mendelssohn began taking piano lessons from his mother when he was six, and at seven was tutored by Marie Bigot in Paris.[20] Later in Berlin, all four Mendelssohn children studied piano with Ludwig Berger, who was himself a former student of Muzio Clementi.[21] From at least May 1819 Mendelssohn (initially with his sister Fanny) studied counterpoint and composition with Carl Friedrich Zelterin Berlin.[22] This was an important influence on his future career. Zelter had almost certainly been recommended as a teacher by his aunt Sarah Levy, who had been a pupil of W. F. Bach and a patron of C. P. E. Bach. Sarah Levy displayed some talent as a keyboard player, and often played with Zelter’s orchestra at the Berliner Singakademie; she and the Mendelssohn family were among its leading patrons. Sarah had formed an important collection of Bach family manuscripts which she bequeathed to the Singakademie; Zelter, whose tastes in music were conservative, was also an admirer of the Bach tradition.[23] This undoubtedly played a significant part in forming Felix Mendelssohn’s musical tastes, as his works reflect this study of Baroqueand early classical music. His fuguesand chorales especially reflect a tonal clarity and use of counterpoint reminiscent of Johann Sebastian Bach, whose music influenced him deeply.[24]

Early maturity

First page of the manuscriptof Mendelssohn’s Octet (1825) (now in the US Library of Congress)

Mendelssohn probably made his first public concert appearance at the age of nine, when he participated in a chamber music concert accompanying a horn duo.[25] He was a prolific composer from an early age. As an adolescent, his works were often performed at home with a private orchestra for the associates of his wealthy parents amongst the intellectual elite of Berlin.[26] Between the ages of 12 and 14, Mendelssohn wrote 12 string symphonies for such concerts, and a number of chamber works.[27] His first work, a piano quartet, was published when he was 13. It was probably Abraham Mendelssohn who procured the publication of this quartet by the house of Schlesinger.[28] In 1824 the 15-year-old wrote his first symphonyfor full orchestra (in C minor, Op. 11).[29]
At age 16 Mendelssohn wrote his String Octet in E-flat major, a work which has been regarded as “mark[ing] the beginning of his maturity as a composer.”[30] This Octet and his Overture to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which he wrote a year later in 1826, are the best-known of his early works. (Later, in 1843, he also wrote incidental music for the play, including the famous “Wedding March”.) The Overture is perhaps the earliest example of a concert overture – that is, a piece not written deliberately to accompany a staged performance but to evoke a literary theme in performance on a concert platform; this was a genre which became a popular form in musical Romanticism.[31]
In 1824 Mendelssohn studied under the composer and piano virtuoso Ignaz Moscheles, who confessed in his diaries[32] that he had little to teach him. Moscheles and Mendelssohn became close colleagues and lifelong friends. The year 1827 saw the premiere – and sole performance in his lifetime – of Mendelssohn’s opera Die Hochzeit des Camacho. The failure of this production left him disinclined to venture into the genre again.[33]
Besides music, Mendelssohn’s education included art, literature, languages, and philosophy. He had a particular interest in classical literature[34] and translated Terence’s Andria for his tutor Heyse in 1825; Heyse was impressed and had it published in 1826 as a work of “his pupil, F****” [i.e. “Felix” (asterisks as provided in original text)].[35][n 5] This translation also qualified Mendelssohn to study at the Humboldt University of Berlin, where from 1826 to 1829 he attended lectures on aesthetics by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, on history by Eduard Gans.

Henry and June


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_%2526_June&ved=2ahUKEwilpafhzurlAhUzJzQIHVGgB2cQFjAXegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw2bFcuAeOD6bmD1bZv8thBt

Henry & June

This article is about the film based upon the book by Anaïs Nin. For other uses, see Henry and June (disambiguation).

Henry & June is a 1990 American biographical drama film directed by Philip Kaufman, and starring Fred Ward, Uma Thurman, and Maria de Medeiros. It is loosely based on Anaïs Nin’s French book of the same name, and tells the story of Nin’s relationship with Henry Miller and his wife, June.

Henry & June

Theatrical release poster

Directed byPhilip KaufmanProduced byPeter KaufmanWritten by

Philip KaufmanRose Kaufman

Starring

Fred WardUma ThurmanMaria de MedeirosRichard E. GrantKevin Spacey

CinematographyPhilippe RousselotEdited by

Dede AllenVivien Hillgrove GilliamWilliam S. Scharf

Production
company

Walrus & Associates

Distributed byUniversal Pictures

Release date

October 5, 1990

Running time

136 minutes[1]CountryUnited StatesLanguageEnglishBox office$23.5 million[2]

The film was nominated for Best Cinematography at the 63rd Academy Awards. It is one of three NC-17 films to receive Oscar nominations; the other films are Wild at Heart (1990) and Requiem for a Dream(2000).[3][4][5]

Plot synopsis

In 1931 in Paris, France, Anaïs Nin is in a stable relationship with her husband Hugo, but longs for more out of life. When Nin first meets Henry Miller, he is working on his first novel. Nin is drawn to Miller and his wife June, as well as their bohemian lifestyle. Nin becomes involved in the couple’s tormented relationship, having an affair with Miller and also pursuing June. Ultimately, Nin helps Miller to publish his novel, Tropic of Cancer, but catalyzes the Millers’ separation, while she returns to Hugo.

Cast

Fred Ward as Henry MillerUma Thurman as June MillerMaria de Medeiros as Anaïs NinRichard E. Grant as HugoKevin Spacey as Richard OsbornJean-Philippe Écoffey as Eduardo Sanchez (credit spelled as Ecoffey)Maurice Escargot (Gary Oldman) as PopArtus de Penguern as BrassaïLiz Hasse as JeanBrigitte Lahaie as Henry’s prostituteFéodor Atkine as Francisco Miralles Arnau

Soundtrack

The soundtrack was arranged by Mark Adler, consisting of period popular songs.

Jean Lenoir, “Parlez-moi d’amour” (Lucienne Boyer)Claude Debussy, Six épigraphes antiques: Pour l’égyptienne (Ensemble Musical de Paris)Francis Poulenc, “Les chemins de l’amour” (Ransom Wilson and Christopher O’Riley)Debussy, Petite Suite: “Ballet” (Aloys and Alfons Kontarsky)Harry Warren, “I Found a Million Dollar Baby” (Bing Crosby)Erik Satie, “Gnossienne No. 3” (Pascal Rogé)Satie, “Je te veux” (Jean-Pierre Armengaud)Debussy, “Sonata for Violin and Piano” (first movement) (Kyung-wha Chung and Radu Lupu)Frédéric Chopin, Nocturne No. 1 in C Major [sic] (Paul Crossley)Georges Auric, “Sous les toits de Paris” (Rene Nazels)Jacques Larmanjat, lyrics by Francis Carco, “Le doux caboulot” (Annie Fratellini)Debussy, “La plus que lente” (Josef Suk)”Je m’ennuie” (Mark Adler)”Coralia” (Mark Adler)Irving Mills, “St. James Infirmary Blues” (Mark Adler)Francisco Tárrega, “Gran Vals” (Francisco Tárrega)Joaquin Nin-Culmell, “Basque Song” (Joaquin Nin-Culmell)Vincent Scotto, lyrics by George Koger and H. Vama, “J’ai deux amours” (Josephine Baker)

Rating

Reception

See alsoEdit

Nudity in film

References

External links

Watch “Daniel Guichard – Les ballons rouges (Serge Lama)” on YouTube



Je n’ai pas eu de ballon rouge
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
Dans ces provinces où rien ne bouge
Tous mes ballons étaient crevés
Je n’ai pas eu de vrai vacances
Seul, face à face avec la mer
Quand le cœur rythme la cadence
Des mouettes qui nagent dans l’air

J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Je n’ai jamais joué aux billes
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
J’étais cloué dans ma famille
Comme un martyr à son bûcher
Je n’ai pas eu de promenade
Seul, face à face avec le vent
Je lisais le Marquis de Sade
Et j’aimais déjà les divans
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Les fées n’étaient pas du voyage
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
Elles vivaient de leurs avantages
Elles étaient toutes syndiquées
Je n’ai pas vu dans les étoiles
Le carrosse de Cendrillon
La mienne avait une robe sale
Mais elle n’avait pas de chaussons
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Pourtant j’avais déjà la chance
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
De ne pas attacher d’importance
A ce que les autres pensaient
Et je n’ai pas vu dans l’Histoire
Quelque guerrier ou quelque roi
Assoiffé de règne ou de gloire
Qui soit plus orgueilleux que moi
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
Mais j’ai fait ce que j’ai voulu
Translate to English

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Serge Lama / Yves Gilbert
Les ballons rouges lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Watch “Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake – The Kirov Ballet” on YouTube


Swan Lake

This article is about the ballet. For other uses, see Swan Lake (disambiguation).

Swan Lake (Russian: Лебеди́ное о́зеро, romanized: Lebedínoye ózero), Op. 20, is a ballet composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1875–76. Despite its initial failure, it is now one of the most popular of all ballets.
The scenario, initially in two acts, was fashioned from Russian and German folk tales[a] and tells the story of Odette, a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer’s curse. The choreographer of the original production was Julius Reisinger(Václav Reisinger). The ballet was premiered by the Bolshoi Ballet on 4 March [O.S. 20 February] 1877[1][2] at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. Although it is presented in many different versions, most ballet companies base their stagings both choreographically and musically on the 1895 revival of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, first staged for the Imperial Ballet on 15 January 1895, at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg. For this revival, Tchaikovsky’s score was revised by the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatre’s chief conductor and composer Riccardo Drigo.[3]

History

Learn more

This section needs additional citations for verification.

Design by F. Gaanen for the décor of act 2, Moscow 1877

Origins of the ballet

There is no evidence to prove who wrote the original libretto, or where the idea for the plot came from. Russian and German folk tales have been proposed as possible sources, including “The White Duck” and “The Stolen Veil” by Johann Karl August Musäus, but both those tales differ significantly from the ballet.[4]
One theory is that the original choreographer, Julius Reisinger, who was a Bohemian (and therefore likely to be familiar with The Stolen Veil), created the story. Another theory is that it was written by Vladimir Petrovich Begichev, director of the Moscow Imperial Theatres at the time, possibly with Vasily Geltser, danseurof the Moscow Imperial Bolshoi Theatre (a surviving copy of the libretto bears his name). Since the first published libretto does not correspond with Tchaikovsky’s music in many places, one theory is that the first published version was written by a journalist after viewing initial rehearsals (new opera and ballet productions were always reported in the newspapers, along with their respective scenarios).
Some contemporaries of Tchaikovsky recalled the composer taking great interest in the life story of Bavarian King Ludwig II, whose life had supposedly been marked by the sign of Swan and could have been the prototype of the dreamer Prince Siegfried.[5] However, Ludwig’s death happened 10 years after the first performance of the ballet.
Begichev commissioned the score of Swan Lake from Tchaikovsky in May 1875 for 800 rubles. Tchaikovsky worked with only a basic outline from Julius Reisinger of the requirements for each dance.[6] However, unlike the instructions for the scores of The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, no written instruction is known to have survived.

Tchaikovsky’s influences

From around the time of the turn of the 19th century until the beginning of the 1890s, scores for ballets were almost always written by composers known as “specialists,” who were highly skilled at scoring the light, decorative, melodious, and rhythmically clear music that was at that time in vogue for ballet. Tchaikovsky studied the music of “specialists” such as the Italian Cesare Pugni and the Austrian Ludwig Minkus, before setting to work on Swan Lake.
Tchaikovsky had a rather negative opinion of the “specialist” ballet music until he studied it in detail, being impressed by the nearly limitless variety of infectious melodies their scores contained. Tchaikovsky most admired the ballet music of such composers as Léo Delibes, Adolphe Adam, and later, Riccardo Drigo. He would later write to his protégé, the composer Sergei Taneyev, “I listened to the Delibes ballet Sylvia … what charm, what elegance, what wealth of melody, rhythm, and harmony. I was ashamed, for if I had known of this music then, I would not have written Swan Lake.” Tchaikovsky most admired Adam’s 1844 score for Giselle, which used the Leitmotiftechnique: associating certain themes with certain characters or moods, a technique he would use in Swan Lake, and later, The Sleeping Beauty.
Tchaikovsky drew on previous compositions for his Swan Lake score. According to two of Tchaikovsky’s relatives – his nephew Yuri Lvovich Davydov and his niece Anna Meck-Davydova – the composer had earlier created a little ballet called The Lake of the Swans at their home in 1871. This ballet included the famous Leitmotif, the Swan’s Theme or Song of the Swans. He also made use of material from The Voyevoda, an opera he had abandoned in 1868. The Grand adage (a.k.a. the Love Duet) from the second scene of Swan Lake was fashioned from an aria from that opera, as was the Valse des fiancéesfrom the third scene. Another number which included a theme from The Voyevoda was the Entr’acte of the fourth scene.
By April 1876 the score was complete, and rehearsals began. Soon Reisinger began setting certain numbers aside that he dubbed “undanceable.” Reisinger even began choreographing dances to other composers’ music, but Tchaikovsky protested and his pieces were reinstated. Although the two artists were required to collaborate, each seemed to prefer working as independently of the other as possible.[7]

Composition process

Tchaikovsky’s excitement with Swan Lake is evident from the speed with which he composed: commissioned in the spring of 1875, the piece was created within one year. His letters to Sergei Taneyev from August 1875 indicate, however, that it was not only his excitement that compelled him to create it so quickly but his wish to finish it as soon as possible, so as to allow him to start on an opera. Respectively, he created scores of the first three numbers of the ballet, then the orchestration in the fall and winter, and was still struggling with the instrumentation in the spring. By April 1876, the work was complete. Tchaikovsky’s mention of a draft suggests the presence of some sort of abstract but no such draft has ever been seen. Tchaikovsky wrote various letters to friends expressing his longstanding desire to work with this type of music, and his excitement concerning his current stimulating, albeit laborious task.[8]

Performance history

Adelaide Giuri as Odette and Mikhail Mordkin as Prince Siegfried in Aleksandr Gorsky’s staging of the Petipa/Ivanov Swan Lake for the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow, 1901. A young Vera Karalli is seen kneeling.

Moscow première (world première)

Date: 4 March (OS 20 February) 1877

Place: Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow

Balletmaster: Julius Reisinger

Conductor: Stepan Ryabov

Scene Designers: Karl Valts (acts 2 & 4), Ivan Shangin (act 1), Karl Groppius (act 3)

St. Petersburg première

Date: 27 January 1895

Place: Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg

Balletmaster: Marius Petipa (acts 1 & 3), Lev Ivanov (acts 2 & 4)

Conductor: Riccardo Drigo

Scene Designers: Ivan Andreyev, Mikhail Bocharov, Henrich Levogt

Costume Designer: Yevgeni Ponomaryov[9]

Other notable productions

1880 and 1882, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Joseph Hansenafter Reisinger, conductor and designers as in première

1901, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Aleksandr Gorsky, conducted by Andrey Arends, scenes by Aleksandr Golovin (act 1), Konstantin Korovin (acts 2 & 4), N. Klodt (act 3)

1911, London, Ballets Russes, Sergei Diaghilev production, choreography by Michel Fokineafter Petipa–Ivanov, scenes by Golovin and Korovin

Original interpreters
RoleMoscow 1877Moscow 1880St. Petersburg 1895[9]Moscow 1901London 1911QueensopranoOlga NikolayevaGiuseppina CecchettiSiegfriedtenorVictor GillertAlfred BekefiPavel GerdtMikhail MordkinVaslav NijinskyBennoSergey NikitinAleksandr OblakovWolfgangWilhelm WannerGillertOdettePelageya KarpakovaYevdokiya KalmїkovaPierina LegnaniAdelaide GiuriMathilde KschessinskaVon RothbartSergey SokolovAleksey BulgakovK. KubakinOdilesopranoPierina LegnaniMathilde Kschessinska

Original production of 1877

The première on Friday, 4 March 1877, was given as a benefit performance for the ballerina Pelageya Karpakova (also known as Polina Karpakova), who performed the role of Odette, with première danseur Victor Gillert as Prince Siegfried. Karpakova may also have danced the part Odile, although it is believed the ballet originally called for two different dancers. It is now common practice for the same ballerina to dance both Odette and Odile.
The Russian ballerina Anna Sobeshchanskaya was originally cast as Odette, but was replaced when a governing official in Moscow complained about her, claiming she had accepted jewelry from him, only to then marry a fellow danseur and sell the pieces for cash.
The première was not well-received. Though there were a few critics who recognised the virtues of the score, most considered it to be far too complicated for ballet. It was labelled, “too noisy, too ‘Wagnerian’ and too symphonic.”[10] The critics also thought Reisinger’s choreography was “unimaginative and altogether unmemorable.”[10] The German origins of the story were “treated with suspicion while the tale itself was regarded as ‘stupid’ with unpronounceable surnames for its characters.”[10] Karpakova was a secondary soloist and “not particularly convincing.”[10]

The poverty of the production, meaning the décor and costumes, the absence of outstanding performers, the Balletmaster’s weakness of imagination, and, finally, the orchestra … all of this together permitted (Tchaikovsky) with good reason to cast the blame for the failure on others.

— Modest Tchaikovsky, brother of the composer

Yet the fact remains (and is too often omitted in accounts of this initial production) that this staging survived for six years with a total of 41 performances – many more than several other ballets from the repertoire of this theatre.[11]

Tchaikovsky pas de deux 1877

Anna Sobeshchanskaya [ru] as Odette in Julius Reisinger’s original production

Pierina Legnani as Odette (1895)

During the late 1880s and early 1890s, Petipa and Vsevolozhsky discussed with Tchaikovsky the possibility of reviving Swan Lake. However, Tchaikovsky died on 6 November 1893, just when plans to revive Swan Lake were beginning to come to fruition. It remains uncertain whether Tchaikovsky was prepared to revise the music for this revival. Whatever the case, as a result of Tchaikovsky’s death, Drigo was forced to revise the score himself, after receiving approval from Tchaikovsky’s younger brother, Modest. There are major differencesbetween Drigo’s and Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake score. Today, it is Riccardo Drigo’s revision of Tchaikovsky’s score, and not Tchaikovsky’s original score of 1877, that most ballet companies use.

Pavel Gerdt as Prince Siegfried (Mariinsky Theatre, 1895)

In February 1894, two memorial concerts planned by Vsevolozhsky were given in honor of Tchaikovsky. The production included the second act of Swan Lake, choreographed by Lev Ivanov, Second Balletmaster to the Imperial Ballet. Ivanov’s choreography for the memorial concert was unanimously hailed as wonderful.

The revival of Swan Lake was planned for Pierina Legnani‘s benefit performance in the 1894–1895 season. The death of Tsar Alexander III on 1 November 1894 and the ensuing period of official mourning brought all ballet performances and rehearsals to a close for some time, and as a result all efforts could be concentrated on the pre-production of the full revival of Swan Lake. Ivanov and Petipa collaborated on the production, with Ivanov retaining his dances for the second act while choreographing the fourth, with Petipa staging the first and third acts.

Modest Tchaikovsky was called upon to make changes to the ballet’s libretto, including the character of Odette changing from a fairy swan-maiden into a cursed mortal woman, the ballet’s villain changing from Odette’s stepmother to the magician von Rothbart, and the ballet’s finale: instead of the lovers simply drowning at the hand of Odette’s stepmother as in the original 1877 scenario, Odette commits suicide by drowning herself, with Prince Siegfried choosing to die as well, rather than live without her, and soon the lovers’ spirits are reunited in an apotheosis.[13] Aside from the revision of the libretto the ballet was changed from four acts to three—with act 2 becoming act 1, scene 2.

All was ready by the beginning of 1895 and the ballet had its première on Friday, 27 January. Pierina Legnani danced Odette/Odile, with Pavel Gerdtas Prince Siegfried, Alexei Bulgakov as Rothbart, and Alexander Oblakov as Benno. Most of the reviews in the St. Petersburg newspapers were positive.

Unlike the première of The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake did not dominate the repertory of the Mariinsky Theatre in its first season. It was given only sixteen performances between the première and the 1895–1896 season, and was not performed at all in 1897. Even more surprising, the ballet was performed only four times in 1898 and 1899. The ballet belonged solely to Legnani until she left St. Petersburg for her native Italy in 1901. After her departure, the ballet was taken over by Mathilde Kschessinskaya, who was as much celebrated in the rôle as was her Italian predecessor.

Later productions

Watch “Henry & June / Je M’Ennuie” on YouTube


“>Marlene Dietrich: Moi, Je M’Ennuie Lyrics

De ce que fut mon enfance
Je n’ai plus de souvenir
C’est peut-être que la chance
Ne m’offrit pas de plaisir
Et chaque jour qui se lève
Ne m’apporte aucun espoir
Je n’ai même pas de rêves
Quand luit l’étoile du soir

Moi je m’ennuie
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Je n’y peux rien
Le plaisir passe
Il me dépasse
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien
Partout je traîne
Comme une chaîne
Ma lourde peine
Sans autre bien
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Moi, je m’ennuie

Par de longs vagabondages
J’ai voulu griser mon cœur
Et souvent sur mon passage
J’ai vu naître des malheurs
Sur chaque nouvelle route
À l’amour j’ai du mentir
Et, le soir, lorsque j’écoute
La plainte du vent mourir

Moi j’ m’ennuie
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Je n’y peux rien
Le plaisir passe
Il me dépasse
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien
Partout je traîne
Comme une chaîne
Ma lourde peine
Sans autre bien
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Moi, je m’ennuie

Watch “Dvorak – String Quintet No 3 In E flat Major, Opus 97, B 180 “American”” on YouTube


Watch “Khachaturian – Adagio from Spartacus” on YouTube


Watch “Mahler: Adagietto Symphony 5 – Karajan*” on YouTube


From Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No.5%28Mahler%29?wprov=sfla1

Symphony No. 5 by Gustav Mahlerwas composed in 1901 and 1902, mostly during the summer months at Mahler’s holiday cottage at Maiernigg. Among its most distinctive features are the trumpet solo that opens the work with a rhythmic motif similar to the opening of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, the horn solos in the third movement and the frequently performed Adagietto.
Symphony No. 5by Gustav Mahler

Gustav Mahler in 1907

Composed1901 – 1902:MaierniggPublished

1904 Edition Peters

1905 Edition Peters

1964 Eulenberg

2001 Edition Peters (critical edition)

Movements5PremiereDate18 October 1904LocationGürzenich [de], CologneConductorGustav MahlerPerformersGürzenich Orchestra Cologne
The musical canvas and emotional scope of the work, which lasts over an hour, are huge. The symphony is sometimes described as being in the key of C♯ minor since the first movement is in this key (the finale, however, is in D major).[1] Mahler objected to the label: “From the order of the movements (where the usual first movement now comes second) it is difficult to speak of a key for the ‘whole Symphony’, and to avoid misunderstandings the key should best be omitted.”[2]

Composition history

Mahler’s composing cottage in Maiernigg

Mahler wrote his fifth symphony during the summers of 1901 and 1902. In February 1901 Mahler had suffered a sudden major hemorrhageand his doctor later told him that he had come within an hour of bleeding to death. The composer spent quite a while recuperating. He moved into his own lakeside villa in the southern Austrian province of Carinthia in June 1901. Mahler was delighted with his newfound status as the owner of a grand villa. According to friends, he could hardly believe how far he had come from his humble beginnings. He was director of the Vienna Court Opera and the principal conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic. His own music was also starting to be successful. Later in 1901 he met Alma Schindler and by the time he returned to his summer villa in summer 1902, they were married and she was expecting their first child.
Symphonies Nos. 5, 6 and 7, which all belong to this period, have much in common and are markedly different from the first four, which all have strong links to vocal music. The middle symphonies, by contrast, are pure orchestral works and are, by Mahler’s standards, taut and lean.
Counterpoint also becomes a more important element in Mahler’s music from Symphony No. 5 onwards. The ability to write good counterpoint was highly cherished by Baroquecomposers and Johann Sebastian Bach is generally regarded as the greatest composer of contrapuntal music. Bach played an important part in Mahler’s musical life at this time. He subscribed to the edition of Bach’s collected works that was being published at the turn of the century, and later conducted and arranged works by Bach for performance. Mahler’s renewed interest in counterpoint can best be heard in the second, third and fifth movements of this symphony.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for large orchestra, consisting of the following:
Woodwinds
4 flutes (all doubling piccolos)3 oboes (3rd doubling cor anglais)3 B♭ and A clarinets (3rd doubling D clarinet and bass clarinet)3 bassoons (3rd doubling contrabassoon)
Brass
6 horns (solo horn in movement 3)4 trumpets3 trombonestuba
Percussion
4 timpanibass drumsnare drum (used only in movement 1)cymbalstrianglewhip (used only in movement 3)tam-tamglockenspiel
Strings
harp1st violins2nd violinsviolascellosdouble basses

Revisions of the score

The score appeared first in print in 1904 at Peters, Leipzig. A second “New Edition”, incorporating revisions that Mahler made in 1904, appeared in 1905. Final revisions made by Mahler in 1911 (by which time he had completed his 9th Symphony) did not appear until 1964 (ed. Ratz), when the score was republished in the Complete Edition of Mahler’s works. In 2001, Edition Peters published a further revised edition (ed. Reinhold Kubik) as part of the New Complete Critical Edition. This edition is the most accurate edition available so far.[according to whom?] Previous editions have now gone out of print.

Structure

The symphony is generally regarded as the most conventional symphony that he had yet written, but from such an unconventional composer it still had many peculiarities. It almost has a four movement structure, as the first two can easily be viewed as essentially a whole. The symphony also ends with a rondo, in the classical style. Some peculiarities are the funeral march that opens the piece and the Adagietto for harp and strings that contrasts with the complex orchestration of the other movements.
A performance of the symphony lasts around 70 minutes.
The work is in five movements, though Mahler grouped the movements into bigger parts:
Part I1. Trauermarsch (Funeral march). In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt (At a measured pace. Strict. Like a funeral procession.) C♯ minor2. Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter Vehemenz (Moving stormily, with the greatest vehemence) A minorPart II3. Scherzo. Kräftig, nicht zu schnell (Strong and not too fast) D majorPart III

  1. Adagietto. Sehr langsam (Very slow) F major5. Rondo-Finale. Allegro – Allegro giocoso. Frisch (Fresh) D major

Part I

  1. TrauermarschEdit

The trumpet solo at the opening of the first movement

is followed by a somber, funeral march (the primary theme).

The march is twice interrupted by a calmer secondary theme.

  1. Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter VehemenzEdit

The best pianist of our generation, YouTube generation: Valentina Lisitsa


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valentina_Lisitsa

Valentina Lisitsa

Valentina Lisitsa (Ukrainian: Валенти́на Євге́нівна Лиси́ця, romanized: Valentýna Jevhénivna Lysýcja, IPA: [wɐlenˈtɪnɐ jeu̯ˈɦɛn⁽ʲ⁾iu̯nɐ lɪˈsɪtsʲɐ]; Russian: Валентина Евгеньевна Лисица, romanized: Valentina Evgen’evna Lisica, IPA: [vɐlʲɪnˈtʲinə jɪvˈɡʲenʲɪvnə lʲɪˈsʲitsə]; born 25 March 1973) is a Ukrainian-American[1] pianist. She previously resided in North Carolinabefore moving to Canada, and then to France.[2][3]

Valentina Lisitsa

Background informationBorn25 March 1973(age 46)
Kiev, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet UnionGenresClassicalOccupation(s)Classical pianistInstrumentsPianoYears active1977-presentWebsitevalentinalisitsa.com
Lisitsa is among the most frequently viewed pianists on YouTube – particularly her renderings of Romantic Era virtuoso piano composers, including Franz Liszt, Frédéric Chopin and Sergei Rachmaninoff.[4][5] Lisitsa independently launched her career on social media, without initially signing with a tour promoter or record company.[4][5]

Life and career

Lisitsa was born in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1973. Her mother, also named Valentina, is a seamstress and her father, Evgeny, was an engineer.[4] Her older brother Eugene died in 2009.[6][4]
She started playing the piano at the age of three, performing her first solo recital at the age of four.[7] She is of Russian and Polish descent.[8]
Despite her early aptitude for music, her dream at that point was to become a professional chess player.[9]Lisitsa attended the Lysenko music school and, later, the Kiev Conservatory,[10] where she and her future husband, Alexei Kuznetsoff, studied under Dr. Ludmilla Tsvierko.[11]When Lisitsa met Kuznetsoff, she began to take music more seriously.[12] In 1991, they won the first prize in The Murray Dranoff Two Piano Competition in Miami, Florida.[10][13]That same year, they moved to the United States to further their careers as concert pianists.[4] In 1992 the couple married.[4] Their New York debut was at the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center in 1995.[11]

Lisitsa posted her first YouTube video in 2007. Her set of Chopin etudes reached the number-one slot on Amazon’s list of classical video recordings, and became the most-viewed online collection of Chopin etudes on YouTube.[14][15]

To advance her career, in 2010 Lisitsa and her husband put their life savings into recording a CD of Rachmaninoff concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra.[4] In the spring of 2012, before her Royal Albert Hall debut, Lisitsa signed with Decca Records, who later released her Rachmaninoff CD set.[4] By mid-2012 she had logged nearly 50 million views of her YouTube videos.[5]
Lisitsa has performed in various venues around the world, including Carnegie Hall, David Geffen Hall, Benaroya Hall, Musikverein and the Royal Albert Hall. She is well known for her online recitals and practicing streams. She has also collaborated with violinist Hilary Hahn at various recital engagements.[10]

Controversy

Lisitsa has received criticism for her opposition to the Ukrainian government and support of pro-Russian separatists since the 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine and the ensuing armed conflict.[16] In April 2015, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra cancelled concerts with Lisitsa, citing her “provocative” online remarks on her Twitter account; the orchestra initially did not specify which tweets or other commentary it believed crossed a line.[17][18] Later, on 8 April 2015, the CEO of Toronto Symphony, Jeff Melanson provided a PDF document of seven pages listing the most “offensive” tweets. Melanson alleged that the document would “help people understand why we made this decision, and understand as well how this is not a free speech issue, but rather an issue of someone practicing very intolerant and offensive expression through Twitter.”[19]
In response, the Toronto Star criticized the orchestra’s decision in an editorial, noting that, “Lisitsa was not invited to Toronto to discuss her provocative political views. She was scheduled to play the piano. And second, banning a musician for expressing “opinions that some believe to be offensive” shows an utter failure to grasp the concept of free speech.”[20] Lisitsa said that the orchestra threatened her if she spoke about the cancellation.[21]
According to Paul Grod, then president of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress: “Ms. Lisitsa has been engaged in a long campaign on social media belittling, insulting and disparaging the people of Ukraine as they face direct military aggression at the hands of the Russian Federation”. Grod elaborated that “Most disturbing are Ms. Lisitsa’s false allegations that the government of Ukraine is “Nazi”, and stating that the Government of Ukraine is setting up ‘filtration camps.'” The New Jersey-based Ukrainian Weekly has described her postings as “anti-Ukraine hate speech.”[8][17] In response she commented that “satire and hyperbole [are] the best literary tools to combat the lies”.[8][17]

DiscographyEdit

Lisitsa has recorded six CDs for Audiofon Records, including three solo CDs and two discs of duets with her husband Alexei Kuznetsoff; a Gold CD for CiscoMusic label with cellist DeRosa; a duet recital on VAI label with violinist Ida Haendel; and DVDs of Frédéric Chopin’s 24 Études and Schubert-Liszt Schwanengesang.[22]
Her recording of the four sonatas for violin and piano by composer Charles Ives, made with Hilary Hahn, was released in October 2011 on Deutsche Grammophon label. Her album Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall (based on her debut performance at that venue 19 June 2012) was released 2 July 2012.
Lisitsa has reproduced several compositions by various artists, including Sergei Rachmaninoff, Franz Liszt, Frédéric Chopin and Ludwig van Beethoven. Decca Records released her complete album of Rachmaninoff concertos in October 2012.[23] An album of Liszt works was released in October 2013 on Decca label in 2 formats – CD and 12″ LP which was cut unedited from analog tape. An even more recent album comprises a number of works of the composer and pianist Philip Glass.[24] As of July 2019, her latest release on Decca records is a 10CD set titled Tchaikovsky: The Complete Solo Piano Works.

ReferencesEdit

^ Everett-Green, Robert (7 December 2012). “Valentina Lisitsa: Playing the odds – by way of Rachmaninoff”. The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Retrieved 8 April 2015.

^ “Valentina Lisitsa and Alexei Kuznetsoff”. Southern Arts Federation. Retrieved 12 July2009.

^

Watch “Mussorgsky – Pictures at an Exhibition” Berliner Philarmoniker orchestra, conductor Herbert on Karayan on YouTube


Pictures at an Exhibition

This article is about the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky and its orchestral arrangements. For other uses, see Pictures at an Exhibition (disambiguation).

Mussorgsky in 1874

Pictures at an Exhibition (Russian: Картинки с выставки – Воспоминание о Викторе Гартмане, romanized: Kartínki s výstavki – Vospominániye o Víktore Gártmane, lit. ‘Pictures from an Exhibition – A Remembrance of Viktor Hartmann’, French: Tableaux d’une exposition) is a suite of ten pieces (plus a recurring, varied Promenade) composed for piano by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky in 1874.

The suite is Mussorgsky’s most famous piano composition, and has become a showpiece for virtuosopianists. It has become further known through various orchestrations and arrangements produced by other musicians and composers, with Maurice Ravel’s 1922 version for full symphony orchestra being by far the most recorded and performed.

Composition history

Viktor Hartmann (1834–1873)

It was probably in 1868 that Mussorgsky first met artist, architect, and designer Viktor Hartmann, not long after the latter’s return to Russia from abroad. Both men were devoted to the cause of an intrinsically Russian art and quickly became friends. They likely met in the home of the influential critic Vladimir Stasov, who followed both of their careers with interest. According to Stasov’s testimony, in 1868, Hartmann gave Mussorgsky two of the pictures that later formed the basis of Pictures at an Exhibition.[1] In 1870, Mussorgsky dedicated the second song (“In the Corner”) of the cycle The Nursery to Hartmann. Stasov remarked that Hartmann loved Mussorgsky’s compositions, and particularly liked the “Scene by the Fountain” in his opera Boris Godunov. Mussorgsky abandoned the scene in his original 1869 version, but at the requests of Stasov and Hartmann, he reworked it for Act 3 in his revision of 1872.[2]

The years 1873–74 are associated with the staging of Boris Godunov, the zenith of Mussorgsky’s career as a composer—at least from the standpoint of public acclaim. Mussorgsky’s distant relative, friend, and roommate during this period, Arseniy Golenishchev-Kutuzov, describing the January 1874 premiere of the opera, remarked: “During the winter, there were, I think, nine performances, and each time the theatre was sold out, each time the public tumultuously called for Mussorgsky.”[3] The composer’s triumph was overshadowed, however, by the critical drubbing he received in the press. Other circumstances conspired to dampen Mussorgsky’s spirits. The disintegration of The Mighty Handful and their failure to understand his artistic goals contributed to the isolation he experienced as an outsider in Saint Petersburg’s musical establishment. Golenishchev-Kutuzov wrote: “[The Mighty Handful’s] banner was held by Mussorgsky alone; all the other members had left it and pursued his own path …”[4]

Hartmann’s sudden death on 4 August 1873 from an aneurysm shook Mussorgsky along with others in Russia’s art world. The loss of the artist, aged only 39, plunged the composer into deep despair. Stasov helped to organize a memorial exhibition of over 400 Hartmann works in the Imperial Academy of Artsin Saint Petersburg in February and March 1874. Mussorgsky lent to the exhibition the two pictures Hartmann had given him, and viewed the show in person. Later in June, two-thirds of the way through composing his song cycle, Sunless, Mussorgsky was inspired to compose Pictures at an Exhibition, quickly completing the score in three weeks (2–22 June 1874).[5] In a letter to Stasov (see photo), probably written on 12 June 1874, he describes his progress:

Mussorgsky’s letter to Stasov, written while composing Pictures

My dear généralissime, Hartmann is boiling as Boris boiled—sounds and ideas hung in the air, I am gulping and overeating, and can barely manage to scribble them on paper. I am writing the 4th No.—the transitions are good (on the ‘promenade’). I want to work more quickly and steadily. My physiognomy can be seen in the interludes. So far I think it’s well turned …[6]

The music depicts his tour of the exhibition, with each of the ten numbers of the suite serving as a musical illustration of an individual work by Hartmann.[7]

Five days after finishing the composition, he wrote on the title page of the manuscript a tribute to Vladimir Stasov, to whom the work is dedicated. One month later, he added an indication that he intended to have it published.[8]

Golenishchev-Kutuzov gives the following (perhaps biased)[9] account of the work’s reception among Mussorgsky’s friends and colleagues and an explanation for his failure to follow through on his plans to publish it:

Soon, with the composition of the musical illustrations for Pictures from an Exhibition by the architect Hartmann, he reached the acme of that musical radicalism, to whose ‘new shores’ and to whose ‘unfathomed depths’ the admirers of his ‘Peepshows’ and ‘Savishnas’ had pushed him so diligently. In music for these illustrations, as Mussorgsky called them, he represented [chicks], children, Baba Yaga in her wooden house on chicken legs, catacombs, gates, and even rattling carts. All this was not done jokingly, but ‘seriously’.

There was no end to the enthusiasm shown by his devotees; but many of Mussorgsky’s friends, on the other hand, and especially the comrade composers, were seriously puzzled and, listening to the ‘novelty,’ shook their heads in bewilderment. Naturally, Mussorgsky noticed their bewilderment and seemed to feel that he ‘had gone too far.’ He set the illustrations aside without even trying to publish them. Mussorgsky devoted himself exclusively to Khovanshchina.[10]

In August, Mussorgsky completed the last two songs of Sunless and then resumed work on Khovanshchina, composing the prelude to Act 1 (“Dawn on the Moscow River”) in September.

Publication historyEdit

Cover of first edition

As with most of Mussorgsky’s works, Pictures at an Exhibition has a complicated publication history. Although composed very rapidly, during June 1874, the work did not appear in print until 1886, five years after the composer’s death, when an edition by the composer’s friend and colleague Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakovwas published. This edition, however, was not a completely accurate representation of Mussorgsky’s score but presented a revised text that contained a number of errors and misreadings.

Only in 1931, marking the 50th anniversary of the composer’s death, was Pictures at an Exhibition published in a scholarly edition in agreement with his manuscript, to be included in Volume 8 of Pavel Lamm’s M. P. Mussorgsky: Complete Collected Works (1939).

In 1940, the Italian composer Luigi Dallapiccola published an important critical edition of Mussorgsky’s work with extensive commentary.

Mussorgsky’s hand-written manuscript was published in facsimile in 1975.

YearEditorPublisherNotes1886Nikolay Rimsky-KorsakovV. Bessel and Co., Saint PetersburgRevised edition [1]1931Pavel LammMuzgiz, MoscowRestoration of the composer’s score [2]1975—Muzïka, MoscowFacsimile of the composer’s manuscript

Hartmann’s pictures

Viktor Hartmann

Mussorgsky based his musical material on drawings and watercolours by Hartmann produced mostly during the artist’s travels abroad. Locales include Italy, France, Poland, Russia, and Ukraine. Today most of the pictures from the Hartmann exhibition are lost, making it impossible to be sure in many cases which Hartmann works Mussorgsky had in mind.

Arts critic Alfred Frankenstein gave an account of Hartmann, with reproductions of his pictures, in the article “Victor Hartmann and Modeste Mussorgsky” in The Musical Quarterly(July 1939).[11] Frankenstein claimed to have identified seven pictures by catalogue number, corresponding to:

“Tuileries” (now lost)”Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks””Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuÿle” (Frankenstein suggested two separate portraits, still extant, as the basis for “Two Jews: Rich and Poor”)”Catacombs””The Hut on Hen’s Legs””The Bogatyr Gates”

The surviving works that can be shown with certainty to have been used by Mussorgsky in assembling his suite, along with their titles, are as follows:[12]

MovementTitleTitle (English)Picture5. Ballet of the Unhatched ChicksЭскизы театральных костюмов к балету “Трильби”Sketches of theatre costumes for the ballet Trilby 6. “Samuel” Goldenberg and “Schmuÿle”Еврей в меховой шапке. СандомирJew in a fur cap. Sandomierz Сандомирский [еврей]Sandomierz [Jew] 8. Catacombs (Roman Tomb)Парижские катакомбы (с фигурами В. А. Гартмана, В. А. Кенеля и проводника, держащего фонарь)Paris Catacombs(with the figures of V. A. Hartmann, V. A. Kenel, and a guide holding a lantern) 9. The Hut on Hen’s Legs (Baba Yaga)Избушка Бабы-Яги на курьих ножках. Часы в русском стилеThe hut of Baba-Yaga on hen’s legs. Clock in the Russian style 10. The Bogatyr Gates (In the Capital in Kiev)Проект городских ворот в Киеве. Главный фасадProject for city gates in Kiev. Main façade

Note: Mussorgsky owned the two pictures that together inspired No. 6, the so-called “Two Jews”. The title of No. 6b, as provided by the Soviet editors of his letters, is Сандомирский [еврей] (Sandomirskiy [yevrey] or Sandomierz [Jew]). The bracketed word yevrey (lit. “Hebrew”) is the sanitized form of the actual word in the title, very likely the derogatory epithet жид (zhid or yid).[13]

MovementsEdit

Vladimir Stasov’s program, identified below,[14] and the six known extant pictures suggest the ten pieces that make up the suite correspond to eleven pictures by Hartmann, with “Samuel Goldenberg und Schmuÿle” accounting for two. The five Promenades are not numbered with the ten pictures and consist in the composer’s manuscript of two titled movements and three untitled interludes appended to the 1st, 2nd, and 4th pictures (see Pavel Lamm’s 1931 edition [3]).

Mussorgsky links the suite’s movements in a way that depicts the viewer’s own progress through the exhibition. Two Promenade movements stand as portals to the suite’s main sections. Their regular pace and irregular meter depicts the act of walking. Three untitled interludes present shorter statements of this theme, varying the mood, colour, and key in each to suggest reflection on a work just seen or anticipation of a new work glimpsed. A turn is taken in the work at the “Catacombae” when the Promenade theme stops functioning as merely a linking device and becomes, in “Cum mortuis”, an integral element of the movement itself. The theme reaches its apotheosis in the suite’s finale, “The Bogatyr Gates”.

The first two movements of the suite—one grand, one grotesque—find mirrored counterparts, and apotheoses, at the end. The suite traces a journey that begins at an art exhibition, but the line between observer and observed vanishes at the Catacombs when the journey takes on a different character.

The table below shows the order of movements.

No.Title in scoreEnglish translationKeyMeterTempoPromenadeB♭major5
4,

Watch “Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on theme of Paganini, op. 43 – Valentina Lisitsa, piano” on YouTube


Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini

Paganini’s theme

Play (help·info)

The Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43, (Russian: Рапсодия на тему Паганини, Rapsodiya na temu Paganini) is a concertante work written by Sergei Rachmaninoff. It is written for solo piano and symphony orchestra, closely resembling a piano concerto, albeit in a single movement. The work was written at his summer home, the Villa Senar in Switzerland, according to the score, from July 3 to August 18, 1934. Rachmaninoff himself, a noted interpreter of his own works, played the solo piano part at the piece’s premiere at the Lyric Opera House in Baltimore, Maryland, on November 7, 1934 with the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Leopold Stokowski. Rachmaninoff, Stokowski, and the Philadelphia Orchestra made the first recording, on December 24, 1934, at RCA Victor’s Trinity Church Studio in Camden, New Jersey.

Instrumentation

Continue reading

Watch “Rachmaninov/Respighi: 5 Études-tableaux (P. 160) (1930)” on YouTube


Sergei Rachmaninoff in 1921

Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff[a](English: /rɑːxˈmɑːnəˌnɔːf, -ˌnɒf, rɑːk-/rahkh-MAH-nə-nawf, -⁠nof, rahk-;[3]Russian: Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов[b], tr. Sergei Vasilyevich Rahmaninov, IPA: [sʲɪrˈɡʲej vɐˈsʲilʲjɪvʲɪt͡ɕ rɐxˈmanʲɪnəf]; 1 April [O.S. 20 March] 1873 – 28 March 1943[c][d]) was a Russian composer, virtuosopianist, and conductor of the late Romantic period. Some of his compositions are staples in the classical music repertoire.
Born into a musical family, Rachmaninoff took up the piano at the age of four. He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory in 1892, having already composed several piano and orchestral pieces. In 1897, following the negative critical reaction to his Symphony No. 1, Rachmaninoff entered a four-year depression and composed little until successful therapy allowed him to complete his enthusiastically received Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1901. For the next sixteen years, Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, relocated to Dresden, Germany, and toured the United States for the first time.
Following the Russian Revolution, Rachmaninoff and his family left Russia; in 1918, they settled in the United States, first in New York City. With his main source of income coming from piano and conducting performances, demanding tour schedules led to a reduction in his time for composition; between 1918 and 1943, he completed just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. By 1942, his failing health led to his relocation to Beverly Hills, California. One month before his death from advanced melanoma, Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship.

Continue reading

Watch “Rachmaninov: The Isle of the Dead, Symphonic poem Op. 29 – Andrew Davis” on YouTube, painting Isle of the Dead, by Arnold Böecklin


FROM WIKIPEDIA

Isle of the De (Rchmaninoff)

A black and white reproduction of Isle of the Dead by Arnold Böcklin was the inspiration for the piece.

Isle of the Dead (Russian: Остров мёртвых), Op. 29, is a symphonic poem composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff, written in the key of A minor. He concluded the composition while staying in Dresden in 1908.[1] It is considered a classic example of Russian late-Romanticism of the beginning of the 20th century.

The piece was inspired by a black and white reproduction of Arnold Böcklin‘s painting, Isle of the Dead, which Rachmaninoff saw in Paris in 1907. Rachmaninoff was disappointed by the original painting when he later saw it, saying, “If I had seen first the original, I, probably, would have not written my Isle of the Dead. I like it in black and white.”[2]

The music begins by suggesting the sound of the oars as they meet the waters on the way to the Isle of the Dead. The slowly heaving and sinking music could also be interpreted as waves. Rachmaninoff uses a recurring figure in 5/8 time to depict what may be the rowing of the oarsman or the movement of the water, and as in several other of his works, quotes the Dies Irae plainchant, an allusion to death. In contrast to the theme of death, the 5/8 time also depicts breathing, creating a holistic reflection on how life and death are intertwined.

In 1929, Rachmaninoff conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in a recording of the music for the Victor Talking Machine Company, which was purchased by RCA that same year and became known as RCA Victor. This recording was made in the Academy of Music in Philadelphia, using one microphone, and was later reissued on LP and CD by RCA Victor.

References

  1. ^ Wehrmeyer (2006:51)
  2. ^ Tarasti, Eero (2012). Semiotics of Classical Music: How Mozart, Brahms and Wagner Talk to Us. Berlin/Boston: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co., KG. p. 385. ISBN .

BibliographyEdit

External links

Watch “Immortal Music: Schubert Piano Quintet D667/The Trout/Jacqueline du Pré, Barenboim, Perlman, Pinchas” on YouTube


From WIKIMEDIA

Trout Quintet

The Trout Quintet (Forellenquintett) is the popular name for the Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667, by Franz Schubert. The piano quintet was composed in 1819,[1] when he was 22 years old; it was not published, however, until 1829, a year after his death.[2]

Rather than the usual piano quintet lineup of piano and string quartet, the Trout Quintet is written for piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass. The composer Johann Nepomuk Hummel had rearranged his own Septet for the same instrumentation,[3]and the Trout was actually written for a group of musicians coming together to play Hummel’s work.

Nickname

The piece is known as the Troutbecause the fourth movement is a set of variations on Schubert’s earlier LiedDie Forelle” (“The Trout”). The quintet was written for Sylvester Paumgartner, of Steyr in Upper Austria, a wealthy music patron and amateur cellist, who also suggested that Schubert include a set of variations on the Lied.[1] Sets of variations on melodies from his Lieder are found in four other works by Schubert: the Death and the Maiden Quartet, the “Trockne Blumen” Variations for Flute and Piano (D. 802), the Wanderer Fantasy, and the Fantasia for Violin and Piano in C major (D. 934, on “Sei mir gegrüßt”).

Music

The quintet consists of five movements:

The rising sextuplet figure from the song’s accompaniment is used as a unifying motif throughout the quintet, and related figures appear in four out of the five movements – all but the Scherzo. As in the song, the figure is usually introduced by the piano, ascending.[1]

I. Allegro vivace

The first movement is in sonata form. As is commonplace in works of the Classical genre, the exposition shifts from tonic to dominant; however, Schubert’s harmonic language is innovative, incorporating many mediants and submediants. This is evident from almost the beginning of the piece: after stating the tonic for ten bars, the harmony shifts abruptly into F major (the flatted submediant) in the eleventh bar.

The development section starts with a similar abrupt shift, from E major (at the end of the exposition) to C major. Harmonic movement is slow at first, but becomes quicker; towards the return of the first theme, the harmony modulates in ascending half tones.

The recapitulation begins in the subdominant, making any modulatorychanges in the transition to the second theme unnecessary, a frequent phenomenon in early sonata form movements written by Schubert.[1] It differs from the exposition only in omitting the opening bars and another short section, before the closing theme.

II. Andante

This movement is composed of two symmetrical sections, the second being a transposed version of the first, except for some differences of modulation which allow the movement to end in the same key in which it began. Tonal layout (with some intermediate keys of lower structural significance omitted) as follows:

III. Scherzo: Presto

This movement also contains mediant tonalities, such as the ending of the first section of the Scherzo proper, which is in C major, the flattened mediant, or the relative major of the parallel minor (A minor).

IV. Andantino – Allegretto

The fourth movement is a theme and variations on Schubert’s Lied Die Forelle“. As typical of some other variation movements by Schubert (in contrast to Beethoven’s style),[4] the variations do not transform the original theme into new thematic material; rather, they concentrate on melodic decoration and changes of mood. In each of the first few variations, the main theme is played by a different instrument or group. In the fifth variation, Schubert begins in the flat submediant (B major), and creates a series of modulations eventually leading back to the movement’s main key, at the beginning of the final sixth variation.

A similar process is heard in three of Schubert’s later compositions: the Octet in F major, D. 803 (fourth movement); the Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (second movement); and the Impromptu in B major, D. 935 No. 3. The concluding variation is similar to the original Lied, sharing the same characteristic accompaniment in the piano.

V. Allegro giust

The Finale is in two symmetrical sections, like the second movement. However, the movement differs from the second movement in the absence of unusual chromaticism, and in the second section being an exact transposition of the first (except for some changes of octave register). A repeat sign is written for the first section: if one adheres meticulously to the score, the movement consists of three lengthy, almost identical repeats of the same musical material. Performers sometimes choose to omit the repeat of the first section when playing.

Although this movement lacks the chromaticism of the second movement, its own harmonic design is also innovative: the first section ends in D major, the subdominant. This is contradictory to the aesthetics of the Classical musical style, in which the first major harmonic event in a musical piece or movement, is the shift from tonic to dominant (or, more rarely, to mediant or submediant – but never to the subdominant).[5][6]

Musical significance

Compared to other major chamber works by Schubert, such as the last three string quartets and the string quintet, the Trout Quintet is a leisurely work, characterized by lower structural coherence, especially in its outer movements and the Andante. These movements contain unusually long repetitions of previously stated material, sometimes transposed, with little or no structural reworking, aimed at generating an overall unified dramatic design (“mechanical” in Martin Chusid’s words[1]).

The importance of the piece stems mainly from its use of an original and innovative harmonic language, rich in mediants and chromaticism, and from its timbral characteristics. The Trout Quintet has a unique sonority among chamber works for piano and strings, due mainly to the piano part, which for substantial sections of the piece concentrates on the highest register of the instrument, with both hands playing the same melodic line an octave apart (having been freed to do so by the inclusion of both cello and bass in the ensemble). Such writing also occurs in other chamber works by Schubert, such as the piano trios, but to a much lesser extent,[1][3] and is characteristic of Schubert’s works for piano four-hands,[3] one of his most personal musical genres. Such timbral writing may have influenced the works of Romantic composers such as Frédéric Chopin, who admired Schubert’s music for piano four-hands.[7]

The quintet forms the basis of Christopher Nupen‘s 1969 film The Trout, in which Itzhak Perlman, Pinchas Zukerman, Jacqueline du Pré, Daniel Barenboim and Zubin Mehtaperform it at Queen Elizabeth Hall in London.[8]

Other Uses

The song, in MIDI format, is used on modern Samsung washers and dryers to indicate that the wash or dry cycle is complete. [9]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Chusid, Martin (April 1997). “Schubert’s chamber music: before and after Beethoven”. In Christopher H. Gibbs (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Schubert. Cambridge Companions to Music. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 174–192. ISBN 978-0-521-48424-4.
  2. ^ Gibbs, Christopher H. (April 1997). “German reception: Schubert’s ‘journey to immortality“. In Christopher H. Gibbs (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Schubert. Cambridge Companions to Music. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 241–253. ISBN 978-0-521-48424-4.
  3. ^

Watch “Sinnerman (Nina Simone) – Thomas Crown” on YouTube


Watch “Dolly Parton – Coat Of Many Colors” on YouTube


Back through the years
I go wonderin’ once again
Back to the seasons of my youth
I recall a box of rags that someone gave us
And how my momma put the rags to use
There were rags of many colors
Every piece was small
And I didn’t have a coat
And it was way down in the fall
Momma sewed the rags together
Sewin’ every piece with love
She made my coat of many colors
That I was so proud of

As she sewed, she told a story
From the Bible, she had read
About a coat of many colors
Joseph wore and then she said
Perhaps this coat will bring you
Good luck and happiness
And I just couldn’t wait to wear it
And momma blessed it with a kiss
My coat of many colors
That my momma made for me
Made only from rags
But I wore it so proudly
Although we had no money
I was rich as I could be
In my coat of many colors
My momma made for me
So with patches on my britches
And holes in both my shoes
In my coat of many colors
I hurried off to school
Just to find the others laughing
And making fun of me
In my coat of many colors
My momma made for me
And oh, I couldn’t understand it
For I felt I was rich
And I told ’em of the love
My momma sewed in every stitch
And I told ’em all the story
Momma told me while she sewed
And how my coat of many colors
Was worth more than all their clothes
But they didn’t understand it
And I tried to make them see
That one is only poor
Only if they choose to be
Now I know we had no money
But I was rich as I could be
In my coat of many colors
My momma made for me
Made just for me
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Dolly Parton
Coat of Many Colors lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Mr. Tambourine Man (Live at the Newport Folk Festival. 1964)” on YouTube


Mr. Tambourine Man
Song by Bob Dylan

Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Though I know that evening’s empire has returned into sand
Vanished from my hand
Left me blindly here to stand but still not sleeping
My weariness amazes me, I’m branded on my feet
I have no one to meet
And the ancient empty street’s too dead for dreaming
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Take me on a trip upon your magic swirling ship
My senses have been stripped
My hands can’t feel to grip
My toes too numb to step
Wait only for my boot heels to be wandering
I’m ready to go anywhere, I’m ready for to fade
Into my own parade
Cast your dancing spell my way, I promise to go under it
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Though you might hear laughing, spinning, swinging madly across the sun
It’s not aimed at anyone
It’s just escaping on the run
And but for the sky there are no fences facing
And if you hear vague traces of skipping reels of rhyme
To your tambourine in time
It’s just a ragged clown behind
I wouldn’t pay it any mind
It’s just a shadow you’re seeing that he’s chasing
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
And take me disappearing through the smoke rings of my mind
Down the foggy ruins of time
Far past the frozen leaves
The haunted frightened trees
Out to the windy beach
Far from the twisted reach of crazy sorrow
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
With one hand waving free
Silhouetted by the sea
Circled by the circus sands
With all memory and fate
Driven deep beneath the waves
Let me forget about today until tomorrow
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Bob Dylan
Mr. Tambourine Man lyrics © Audiam, Inc

Watch “El Condor Pasa ” If I Could ” | Guitar and Pan Flute” on YouTube


I’d rather be a sparrow than a snail
Yes I would, if I could, I surely would
I’d rather be a hammer than a nail
Yes I would, if I only could, I surely would

Away, I’d rather sail away
Like a swan that’s here and gone
A man gets tied up to the ground
He gives the world its saddest sound
Its saddest sound
I’d rather be a forest than a street
Yes I would, if I could, I surely would
I’d rather feel the earth beneath my feet
Yes I would, if I only could, I surely would
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Paul Simon / Jorge Milchberg / Daniel Alomia Robles
El Condor Pasa (If I Could) lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Watch “Samuel Barber – Adagio for Strings” on YouTube


Samuel Barber

Samuel Barber, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944

Samuel Osmond Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century; music critic Donal Henahan stated, “Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim.”[1]

His Adagio for Strings (1936) has earned a permanent place in the concert repertory of orchestras. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music twice: for his opera Vanessa(1956–57) and for the Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1962). Also widely performed is his Knoxville: Summer of 1915 (1947), a setting for soprano and orchestra of a prose text by James Agee. At the time of Barber’s death, nearly all of his compositions had been recorded.[1]

BiographyEdit

Early yearsEdit

Childhood home of Samuel Barber in West Chester, Pennsylvania

Barber was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, the son of Marguerite McLeod (née Beatty) and Samuel Le Roy Barber.[2] He was born into a comfortable, educated, social, and distinguished American family. His father was a physician; his mother was a pianist of English-Scottish-Irish (British) descent whose family had lived in the United States since the time of the American Revolutionary War.[3] His maternal aunt, Louise Homer, was a leading contralto at the Metropolitan Opera; his uncle, Sidney Homer, was a composer of American art songs. Louise Homer is known to have influenced Barber’s interest in voice. Through his aunt, Barber was introduced to many great singers and songs.

At a very early age, Barber became profoundly interested in music, and it was apparent that he had great musical talent and ability. He began studying the piano at the age of six and at age seven composed his first work, Sadness, a 23-measure solo piano piece in C minor.[1] Despite Barber’s interest in music, his family wanted him to become a typical extroverted, athletic American boy. This meant, in particular, they encouraged his playing football. However, Barber was in no way a typical boy, and at the age of nine he wrote to his mother:[4]

Dear Mother: I have written this to tell you my worrying secret. Now don’t cry when you read it because it is neither yours nor my fault. I suppose I will have to tell it now without any nonsense. To begin with I was not meant to be an athlet [sic]. I was meant to be a composer, and will be I’m sure. I’ll ask you one more thing.—Don’t ask me to try to forget this unpleasant thing and go play football.—Please—Sometimes I’ve been worrying about this so much that it makes me mad (not very).[5]

Barber attempted to write his first opera, entitled The Rose Tree, at the age of 10. At the age of 12, he became an organist at a local church. When he was 14, he enrolled in and subsequently graduated from West Chester High School (now West Chester Henderson High School), later composing the school’s alma mater.[6][failed verification] Also at the age of 14, he entered the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where he studied piano with Isabelle Vengerova, composition with Rosario Scalero[citation needed] and George Frederick Boyle,[7] and voice with Emilio de Gogorza.[1] He began composing seriously in his late teenage years. Around the same time, he met fellow Curtis schoolmate Gian Carlo Menotti, who became his partner in life as well as in their shared profession. At the Curtis Institute, Barber was a triple prodigy in composition, voice, and piano. He soon became a favorite of the conservatory’s founder, Mary Louise Curtis Bok. It was through Mrs. Bok that Barber was introduced to his lifelong publishers, the Schirmer family. At the age of 18, Barber won the Joseph H. Bearns Prize from Columbia University for his violin sonata (now lost or destroyed by the composer).[1]

Middle yearsEdit

From his early to late twenties, Barber wrote a flurry of successful compositions, launching him into the spotlight of the classical music world. His first orchestral work, an overtureto The School for Scandal, was composed in 1931 when he was 21 years old. It premiered successfully two years later in a performance given by the Philadelphia Orchestra under the direction of conductor Alexander Smallens.[1] Many of his compositions were commissioned or first performed by such noted artists as Vladimir Horowitz, Eleanor Steber, Raya Garbousova, John Browning, Leontyne Price, Pierre Bernac, Francis Poulenc, and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. In 1935, at the age of 25, he was awarded the American Prix de Rome; he also received a Pulitzer traveling scholarship, which allowed him to study abroad in 1935–1936. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1946.[1]

In 1938, when Barber was 28, his Adagio for Strings was performed by the NBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Arturo Toscanini, along with his first Essay for Orchestra. The Adagio had been arranged from the slow movement of Barber’s String Quartet, Op. 11. Toscanini had rarely performed music by American composers before (an exception was Howard Hanson‘s Second Symphony,which he conducted in 1933).[8] At the end of the first rehearsal of the piece, Toscanini remarked, “Semplice e bella” (simple and beautiful).

In 1942, after the US entered World War II, Barber joined the Army Air Corps; there, he was commissioned to write his Second Symphony, a work he later suppressed. Composed in 1943, the symphony was originally titled Symphony Dedicated to the Air Forcesand was premiered in early 1944 by Serge Koussevitsky and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Barber revised the symphony in 1947 and it was subsequently published by G. Schirmer in 1950[9] and recorded the following year by the New Symphony Orchestra of London, conducted by Barber himself.[10]

According to some sources, Barber destroyed the score in 1964.[11] Hans Heinsheimer was an eyewitness, and reported that he accompanied Barber to the publisher’s office where they collected all the music from the library, and Barber “tore up all these beautifully and expensively copied materials with his own hands”.[12]Doubt has been cast on this story, however, on grounds that Heinsheimer, as an executive at G. Schirmer, would have been unlikely to have allowed Barber into the Schirmer offices to watch him “rip apart the music that his company had invested money in publishing”.[13] The score was later reconstructed from the instrumental parts,[14] and released in a Vox Box “Stradivari Classics” recording by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra conducted by Andrew Schenck in 1988.[15]

In 1943, Barber and Menotti purchased a house in suburban Mount Kisco, New York, north of Manhattan.[16]

Barber won the Pulitzer Prize twice: in 1958 for his first opera Vanessa, and in 1963 for his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra.[17]

Later yearsEdit

Barber spent many years in isolation after the harsh rejection of his third opera Antony and Cleopatra. The opera was written for and premiered at the opening of the new Metropolitan Opera House on September 16, 1966. After this setback, Barber continued to write music until he was almost 70 years old. The Third Essay for orchestra (1978) was his last major work. He suffered from depression and alcoholism during these years.[18]

Barber died of cancer on January 23, 1981, at his 907 Fifth Avenue apartment in Manhattan at the age of 70.[19] The funeral was held at the First Presbyterian Church in New York three days later. He was buried in Oaklands Cemetery in his hometown of West Chester, Pennsylvania.[20]

Achievements and awardsEdit

Barber received numerous awards and prizes, including the Rome Prize (the American version of the Prix de Rome), two Pulitzers, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1961.[21]

Barber was awarded the Edward MacDowell Medal in 1980 by the MacDowell Colony for outstanding contribution to the arts.[22][23]

In addition to composing, Barber was active in organizations that sought to help musicians and promote music. He was president of the International Music Council of UNESCO. He worked to bring attention to and ameliorate adverse conditions facing musicians and musical organizations worldwide.[24] He was one of the first American composers to visit Russia (then part of the Soviet Union). Barber was also influential in the successful campaign by composers against ASCAP, the goal of which was to increase royalties paid to composers.

MusicEdit

OrchestralEdit

Through the success of his Overture to The School for Scandal (1931), Music for a Scene from Shelley (1933), Adagio for Strings (1936), (First)

Watch “Erik Satie – Gnossienne No.1” on YouTube


Erik Satie (1891), by Ramon Casas

The Gnossiennes (French pronunciation: [ɡnosjεn]) are several piano compositions written by the French composer Erik Satie in the late 19th century. The works are for the most part in free time (lacking time signatures or bar divisions) and highly experimental with form, rhythm and chordal structure. The form as well as the term was invented by Satie.

Etymology

Satie’s coining of the word gnossiennewas one of the rare occasions when a composer used a new term to indicate a new “type” of composition. Satie used many novel names for his compositions (vexations, croquis et agaceries and so on). Ogive, for example, is the name of an architectural element which was used by Satie as the name for a composition, the Ogives. Gnossienne, however, was a word that did not exist before Satie used it as a title for a composition. The word appears to derive from gnosis. Satie was involved in gnostic sects and movements at the time that he began to compose the Gnossiennes. However, some published versions claim that the word derives from Cretan “knossos” or “gnossus”; this interpretation supports the theory linking the Gnossiennes to the myth of Theseus, Ariadne and the Minotaur. Several archeological sites relating to that theme were famously excavated around the time that Satie composed the Gnossiennes.
It is possible that Satie may have drawn inspiration for the title of these compositions from a passage in John Dryden’s 1697 translation of the Aeneid, in which it is thought the word first appeared:

Let us the land which Heav’n appoints, explore;
Appease the winds, and seek the Gnossian shore.[1]

Characteristics

The Gnossiennes were composed by Satie in the decade following the composition of the Sarabandes (1887) and the Trois Gymnopédies (1888). Like these Sarabandes and Gymnopédies, the Gnossiennes are often considered dances. It is not certain that this qualification comes from Satie himself – the sarabandeand the Gymnopaedia were at least historically known as dances.
The musical vocabulary of the Gnossiennes is a continuation of that of the Gymnopédies (a development that had started with the 1886 Ogivesand the Sarabandes) later leading to more harmonic experimentation in compositions like the Danses gothiques (1893). These series of compositions are all at the core of Satie’s characteristic late 19th century style, and in this sense differ from his early salon compositions (like the 1885 “Waltz” compositions published in 1887), his turn-of-the-century cabaret songs (Je te veux), and his post-Schola Cantorum piano solo compositions, starting with the Préludes flasques in 1912.

Trois Gnossiennes

Gnossienne No. 1

Performed 16 November 2010

Gnossienne No. 2

Performed 16 November 2010

Gnossienne No. 3

Performed 16 November 2010

Problems playing these files? See media help.
These Three Gnossiennes were composed around 1890 and first published in 1893. A revision prior to publication in 1893 is not unlikely; the 2nd Gnossienne may even have been composed in that year (it has “April 1893” as date on the manuscript). The piano solo versions of the first three Gnossiennes are without time signatures or bar lines, which is known as free time.
These Gnossiennes were first published in Le Figaro musical No. 24 of September 1893 (Gnossiennes Nos. 1 and 3, the last one of these then still “No. 2”) and in Le Cœur No. 6–7 of September–October 1893 (Gnossienne No. 2 printed as facsimile, then numbered “No. 6”).
The first grouped publication, numbered as known henceforth, followed in 1913. By this time Satie had indicated 1890 as composition date for all three. The first Gnossiennewas dedicated to Alexis Roland-Manuel in the 1913 reprint. The 1893 facsimile print of the 2nd Gnossiennecontained a dedication to Antoine de La Rochefoucauld, not repeated in the 1913 print. This de La Rochefoucauld had been a co-founder of Joséphin Péladan’s Ordre de la Rose-Croix Catholique et Esthetique du Temple et du Graal in 1891. By the second publication of the first set of three Gnossiennes, Satie had broken already for a long time with all Rosicruciantype of endeavours.
Also with respect to the tempo these Gnossiennes follow the Gymnopédiesline: slow tempos, respectively Lent(French for Lento/slow), avec étonnement (“with astonishment”), and again Lent.
A sketch containing only two incomplete bars, dated around 1890, shows Satie beginning to orchestrate the 3rd Gnossienne.
The first and third Gnossiennes share a similar chordal structures, rhythm and share reference to each other’s thematic material.

Gnossiennes Nos. 4–7

Gnossienne No. 4

Performed 16 November 2010

Gnossienne No. 5

Performed 16 November 2010

Gnossienne No. 6

Performed 16 November 2010

Gnossienne No. 7

Performed 16 November 2010

Problems playing these files? See media help.
The Gnossiennes Nos. 4–6 were published only in 1968, long after Satie’s death. None of these appear to have been numbered, not even titledas “Gnossienne” by Satie himself. The sequence of these three Gnossiennesin the 1968 publication by Robert Cabydoes not correspond with the chronological order of composition. It is extremely unlikely that Satie would have seen these compositions as three members of a single set.

Gnossienne No. 4

Lent. Composition date on the manuscript: 22 January 1891.
A facsimile of the four manuscript pages of this composition can be seen on this page of Nicolas Fogwall’sSatie website.
Composed tonally in D minor even though its key signature is empty, the piece features a bass line centred on its minor key, sounding D, A, D, F, A, D, F, D, A, F, D, A, D. The bass part then transposes into a C minor chord I ostinato, following the pattern C, G, C, E♭, G, C, E♭, C, G, E♭, C, G, C. Section B, usually considered a very inspired section, uses semiquavers to contrast the minor melody of Section A.

Gnossienne No. 5

Modéré (French for Moderato). Dated 8 July 1889, this was probably Satie’s first composition after the 1888 Gymnopédies: in any case it predates all other known Gnossiennes(including the three published in 1893). The work is somewhat uncharacteristic of the other Gnossiennes not only in its upbeat style, rhythms and less exotic chordal structures but also in its use of time signatures and bar divisions.

Gnossienne No. 6

Avec conviction et avec une tristesse rigoureuse (“with conviction and with a rigorous sadness”). Composed nearly 8 years after the first, in January 1897.

Le Fils des étoiles – Trois morceaux en forme de poireEdit

The Le Fils des étoiles (“The son of the stars”) incidental music (composed 1891) contains a Gnossienne in the first act. For this one the naming as “Gnossienne” is definitely by Satie (as apparent from the correspondence with his publisher). As a result of that, this music is sometimes known as the 7th Gnossienne. That part of the Le Fils des étoiles music was re-used as Manière de commencement (“A way to begin”), the first of the seven movements of the Trois morceaux en forme de poire (“Three pieces in the shape of a pear”).

^ Dryden, John, The Works of Virgil: Containing his Pastorals, Georgics, and Aeneis. London: Jacob Tonson, 1697. Book III, line 153.

Coppens, Claude, program notes to the integral execution of Satie’s Piano work (Ghent, De Rode Pomp, 1–2 December 1995).

Watch “Lady Diana – Candle in the wind (Goodbye Englands rose) – Elton John – Lyrics in text” on YouTube


Goodbye Norma Jean
Though I never knew you at all
You had the grace to hold yourself
While those around you crawled
They crawled out of the woodwork
And they whispered into your brain
They set you on the treadmill
And they made you change your name

And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Loneliness was tough
The toughest role you ever played
Hollywood created a superstar
And pain was the price you paid
Even when you died
Oh the press still hounded you
All the papers had to say
Was that Marilyn was found in the nude
And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Goodbye Norma Jean
Though I never knew you at all
You had the grace to hold yourself
While those around you crawled
Goodbye Norma Jean
From the young man in the twenty second row
Who sees you as something more than sexual
More than just our Marilyn Monroe
And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Elton John / Bernie Taupin
Candle in the Wind lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, BMG Rights Management

Watch “Our House Crosby Stills Nash & Young” on YouTube


I’ll light the fire
You put the flowers in the vase that you bought today
Staring at the fire for hours and hours while I listen to you
Play your love songs all night long for me, only for me

Come to me now and rest your head for just five minutes, everything is good
Such a cozy room, the windows are illuminated by the
Sunshine through them, fiery gems for you, only for you
Our house is a very, very, very fine house with two cats in the yard
Life used to be so hard
Now everything is easy ’cause of you
And our la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la, la
Our house is a very, very, very fine house with two cats in the yard
Life used to be so hard
Now everything is easy ’cause of you
And our
I’ll light the fire while you place the flowers in the vase that you bought today
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Graham Nash
Our House lyrics © Spirit Music Group

Watch “Elton John – Rocket Man (with lyrics)” on YouTube


She packed my bags last night pre-flight
Zero hour nine AM
And I’m gonna be high as a kite by then
I miss the earth so much I miss my wife
It’s lonely out in space
On such a timeless flight

And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone
Mars ain’t the kind of place to raise your kids
In fact it’s cold as hell
And there’s no one there to raise them if you did
And all this science I don’t understand
It’s just my job five days a week
A rocket man, a rocket man
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
‘Till touch down brings me round again to find
I’m not the man they think I am at home
Oh no no no I’m a rocket man
Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
And I think it’s gonna be a long long time
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Elton John / Bernie Taupin
Rocket Man lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Watch “Complete Beethoven Piano Sonatas – Claudio Arrau” on YouTube


Watch “Jim James – State Of The Art (A.E.I.O.U.)” on YouTube



Daylight come
Daylight go
How far will it reach?
Ain’t nobody know
And when the dawn breaks
The cradle will fall
And down come baby
Cradle and all
Now I know you need the dark
Just as much as the sun
But you signin’ on forever
When you ink it in blood

A.E.I.O.U.
E.I.O.U.
A.E.I.O.U.
I, I use my state of the art
Technology
Supposed to make for better living
Are we better human beings?
We’ve got our wires all crossed
The tubes are all tied
And I’m straining to remember
Just what it means to be alive
A life worth living
Now you can feel it in your chest
Buildin’ like little birds
Just building up the nest
And you build it up strong
And you fill it up with love
And you pray for good rain
All from the lord above
A.E.I.O.U.
E.I.O.U.
A.E.I.
I use my state of the art
Technology
Now don’t you forget it
It ain’t using me
‘Cause when the power’s goes out
I got over me
‘Cause the power’s goin’ out
I think the power’s goin’ out
I mean it, the power’s goin’ out
I really mean it the powers goin’ out
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: James Edward Olliges Jr.
State of the Art (A.E.I.O.U.) lyrics © Words & Music A Div Of Big Deal Music LLC

Watch “Schubert: Complete String Quartets” on YouTube


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category%3AString_quartets_by_Franz_Schubert

Category:String quartets by Franz Schubert

Watch “Keith Jarrett & Chick Corea – Play MORZART #12” on YouTube


Watch “JOHN COLTRANE , STAN GETZ Autumn in New York” on YouTube


Watch “The Doors – Riders On The Storm (ORIGINAL!) – driving with Jim” on YouTube


The Doors Lyrics

“Riders On The Storm”

Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Into this house we’re born
Into this world we’re thrown
Like a dog without a bone
An actor out on loan
Riders on the storm

There’s a killer on the road
His brain is squirmin’ like a toad
Take a long holiday
Let your children play
If you give this man a ride
Sweet family will die
Killer on the road, yeah

Girl, you gotta love your man
Girl, you gotta love your man
Take him by the hand
Make him understand
The world on you depends
Our life will never end
Gotta love your man, yeah

Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Into this house we’re born
Into this world we’re thrown
Like a dog without a bone
An actor out on loan.
Riders on the storm

Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm

Watch “The Doors The End” on YouTube


“The End”

This is the end
Beautiful friend
This is the end
My only friend

The end
Of our elaborate plans
The end
Of everything that stands
The end
No safety or surprise
The end
I’ll never look into your eyes
Again

Can you picture what will be
So limitless and free
Desperately in need of some stranger’s hand
In a desperate land

Lost in a Roman wilderness of pain
And all the children are insane
All the children are insane
Waiting for the summer rain, yeah

There’s danger on the edge of town
Ride the king’s highway, baby
Weird scenes inside the gold mine
Ride the highway west, baby

Ride the snake, ride the snake
To the lake
The ancient lake
Baby

The snake is long, seven miles
Ride the snake
He’s old
And his skin is cold

The west is the best
The west is the best
Get here, and we’ll do the rest

The blue bus is callin’ us
The blue bus is callin’ us
Driver, where you taking us

The killer awoke before dawn, he put his boots on
He took a face from the ancient gallery
And he walked on down the hall
He went into the room where his sister lived, and…then he
Paid a visit to his brother, and then he
He walked on down the hall, and
And he came to a door…and he looked inside
“Father?” “Yes, son.” “I want to kill you.”
“Mother, I want to…”

C’mon babe

C’mon baby, take a chance with us
C’mon baby, take a chance with us
C’mon baby, take a chance with us
And meet me at the back of the blue bus
Doin’ a blue rock
On a blue bus
Doin’ a blue rock
C’mon, yeah

Fuck, fuck-ah, yeah
Fuck
Fuck
Fuck, fuck
Fuck, fuck, fuck, yeah
C’mon, yeah, c’mon, yeah
Fuck me, baby, fuck yeah
Fuck, fuck, fuck, yeah!
Fuck, yeah! C’mon, baby
Fuck me, baby, fuck, fuck, yeah
Whoa, whoa, yeah, fuck, baby
C’mon, yeah, huh, huh, huh, huh, yeah
All right

Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill

This is the end
Beautiful friend
This is the end
My only friend, the end

It hurts to set you free
But you’ll never follow me
The end of laughter and soft lies
The end of nights we tried to die

This is the end

Watch “Jacques Brel – Les vieux (Olympia 1966)” on YouTube



Les vieux
Song by Jacques Brel
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