Category Archives: Arts

great compositions/performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (BBC Proms 2012)


Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Proms 2012)

greaat compositions/performances: Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)


Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)

today’s birthday: Lena Horne (1917)


Lena Horne (1917)

An iconic American singer and actress, Horne began dancing at Harlem’s Cotton Club as a teen and, with the help of her stunning voice and good looks, was soon singing with popular bands. She went on to record and perform extensively and appeared in a number of musicals and films, including Stormy Weather, whose title song became her signature. Her one-woman show, Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music, was hailed as her masterpiece. Why was Horne blacklisted in the 1950s? More… Discuss


Saint Peter’s tomb

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 
The floor above Saint Peter’s tomb (see text)

 
St. Peter’s baldachin, by Bernini, in the modern St. Peter’s Basilica. St. Peter’s tomb lies directly below this structure.

Saint Peter’s tomb is a site under St. Peter’s Basilica that includes several graves and a structure said by Vatican authorities to have been built to memorialize the location of St. Peter’s grave. St. Peter’s tomb is near the west end of a complex of mausoleums that date between about AD 130 and AD 300.[1] The complex was partially torn down and filled with earth to provide a foundation for the building of the first St. Peter’s Basilica during the reign of Constantine I in about AD 330. Though many bones have been found at the site of the 2nd-century shrine, as the result of two campaigns of archaeological excavation, Pope Pius XII stated in December 1950 that none could be confirmed to be Saint Peter’s with absolute certainty.[2] However, following the discovery of further bones and an inscription, on June 26, 1968 Pope Paul VI announced that the relics of St. Peter had been identified.

The grave claimed by the Church to be that of St. Peter lies at the foot of the aedicula beneath the floor. The remains of four individuals and several farm animals were found in this grave.[3] In 1953, after the initial archeological efforts had been completed, another set of bones were found that were said to have been removed without the archeologists’ knowledge from a niche (loculus) in the north side of a wall (the graffiti wall) that abuts the red wall on the right of the aedicula. Subsequent testing indicated that these were the bones of a 60-70-year-old man.[4] Margherita Guarducci argued that these were the remains of St. Peter and that they had been moved into a niche in the graffiti wall from the grave under the aedicula “at the time of Constantine, after the peace of the church” (313).[5] Antonio Ferrua, the archaeologist who headed the excavation that uncovered what is known as the St. Peter’s Tomb, said that he wasn’t convinced that the bones that were found were those of St. Peter.[6]

The upper image shows the area of the lower floor of St. Peter’s Basilica that lies above the site of St. Peter’s tomb. A portion of the aedicula that was part of St. Peter’s tomb rose above level of this floor and was made into the Niche of the Pallium[7] which can be seen in the center of the image.

Death of Peter at Vatican Hill

 

The earliest reference to Peter’s death is in a letter of Clement, bishop of Rome, to the Corinthians. (1 Clement, (a.k.a. Letter to the Corinthians), written c. 96 AD. The historian Eusebius, a contemporary of Constantine, wrote that St. Peter “came to Rome, and was crucified with his head downwards,” attributing this information to the much earlier theologian Origen, who died c. 254 AD.[8] St. Peter’s martyrdom is traditionally depicted in religious iconography as crucifixion with his head pointed downward.

Peter’s place and manner of death are also mentioned by Tertullian (c. 160-220) in Scorpiace,[9] where the death is said to take place during the Christian persecutions by Nero. Tacitus (56-117) describes the persecution of Christians in his Annals, though he does not specifically mention Peter.[10] “They were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt.” Furthermore, Tertullian says these events took place in the imperial gardens near the Circus of Nero. No other area would have been available for public persecutions after the Great Fire of Rome destroyed the Circus Maximus and most of the rest of the city in the year 64 AD.

This account is supported by other sources. In the The Passion of Peter and Paul, dating to the fifth century, the crucifixion of Peter is recounted. While the stories themselves are apocryphal, they were based on earlier material, helpful for topographical reasons. It reads, “Holy men … took down his body secretly and put it under the terebinth tree near the Naumachia, in the place which is called the Vatican.”[11] The place called Naumachia would be an artificial lake within the Circus of Nero where naval battles were reenacted for an audience. The place called Vatican was at the time a hill next to the complex and also next to the Tiber River, featuring a cemetery of both Christian and pagan tombs.

Tracing the original tombs

Dionysius of Corinth mentions the burial place of Peter as Rome when he wrote to the Church of Rome in the time of the Pope Soter (died 174), thanking the Romans for their financial help. “You have thus by such an admonition bound together the planting of Peter and of Paul at Rome and Corinth. For both of them planted and likewise taught us in our Corinth. And they taught together in like manner in Italy, and suffered martyrdom at the same time.”[12]

 
Fourth century glass mosaic of St. Peter, located at the Catacombs of Saint Thecla.

Catholic tradition holds that the bereaved Christians followed their usual custom in burying him as near as possible to the scene of his suffering. According to Catholic lore, he was laid in ground that belonged to Christian proprietors, by the side of a well-known road leading out of the city, the Via Cornelia (site of a known pagan and Christian cemetery) on the hill called Vaticanus. The actual tomb was an underground vault, approached from the road by a descending staircase, and the body reposed in a sarcophagus of stone in the center of this vault.[11]

The Book of Popes mentions that Pope Anacletus built a “sepulchral monument” over the underground tomb of St. Peter shortly after his death.[13] This was a small chamber or oratory over the tomb, where three or four persons could kneel and pray over the grave. The pagan Roman Emperor, Julian the Apostate, mentions in 363 A.D. in his work Three Books Against the Galileans that the tomb of St. Peter was a place of worship, albeit secretly.[14]

There is evidence of the existence of the tomb (trophoea, i.e., trophies, as signs or memorials of victory) at the beginning of the 3rd century, in the words of the presbyter Caius refuting the Montanist traditions of a certain Proclus: “But I can show the trophies of the Apostles. For if you will go to the Vatican, or to the Ostian way, you will find the trophies of those who laid the foundations of this church.”[12]

make music part of your life series: Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12


Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

historic musical bits: Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture


Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture

make music part of your life series: Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 (“Spring”)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BS_rG_XZ0Y%5B/emebed%5D

Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 [complete] (Spring)

today’s birthday: Peter Paul Rubens (1577)


Peter Paul Rubens (1577)

Rubens was a prolific 17th-century Flemish Baroque painter whose exuberant style emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. Known for his altarpieces, portraits, and landscapes, Rubens ran a large studio in Antwerp where he produced more than 2,000 paintings by supervising an enormous workshop of skilled apprentices. Also a diplomat, Rubens was knighted by both Philip IV of Spain and Charles I of England. Aspects of Rubens’s paintings gave rise to the term “Rubenesque,” which means what? More… Discuss

Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30 , Great compositions/perfoemances


Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major


Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

Porcelain


Porcelain

Porcelain is a white, hard, nonporous pottery which is resonant when struck. It was first made by the Chinese to withstand the great heat generated in certain parts of their kilns. The two natural substances used were kaolin and a feldspar mineral called petuntse that forms a glassy cement. In Europe porcelain was first commercially produced in the early 1700s. Most of the European porcelain is soft paste and is not as strong as the Chinese hard-paste porcelain. What is bone china? More… Discuss

Ocean’s Kingdom – Paul McCartney


Ocean’s Kingdom – Paul McCartney

historic musical bits: Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

THE BEST OF ARCANGELO CORELLI CONCERTO GROSSO, OP. 6


THE BEST OF ARCANGELO CORELLI CONCERTO GROSSO,
OP. 6

great compositions/performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

great compsitions/performances: L. Boccherini Sinfonia in re minore op 12 n 4 “La casa del diavolo”


L. Boccherini Sinfonia in re minore op 12 n 4 “La casa del diavolo”

historic musical bits: Abbado conducts Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major ‘Classical’, Op. 25


Abbado conducts Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major ‘Classical’, Op. 25

make music part of your life series: Serge Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf. Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.


Serge Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf. Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

Route 66


Route 66

Also known as the “The Main Street of America,” Route 66 was established in 1926 and ran from Chicago, Illinois, in a south-westerly direction to Los Angeles, California, for a total of 2,448 miles (3,939 km). It was a major path of the migrants who went west, especially during the 1930s, and it supported the economies of the communities through which it passed. More direct routes and increasingly sophisticated engineering techniques led to its being decommissioned in what year? More… Discuss

Make music part of your life series: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, L. 86 Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra , Max Pommer


Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, L. 86

Published on Apr 4, 2015

Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, L. 86 · Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra · Claude Debussy · Max Pommer

℗ 2013 Cobra Entertainment LLC

Released on: 2013-12-31

great compositions/performances: Martha Argerich – Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3


Martha Argerich – Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3

historic musical bits: Granados, Intermezzo from Goyescas – Jacqueline du Pré


Granados, Intermezzo from Goyescas – Jacqueline du Pré

historic musical bits: Oistrakh plays Sarasa”Adiós montañas mías”te Zortzico op.39


Oistrakh plays Sarasa”Adiós montañas mías”te Zortzico op.39

historic musical bits: Andrés Segovia: Guitar Concerto N°1, Op.99 – Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco


Andrés Segovia: Guitar Concerto N°1, Op.99 – Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco

great compositions/performances: ,Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218


Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218

make music part of your llife series: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet – Fantasy Overture


great compositions/performances: Richard Wagner Overture from the Flying Dutchman (The Met Orchestra James Levine conducting)


Richard Wagner Overture from the Flying Dutchman

make music part of your life series: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy String Quartet No. 6 in F minor, Op. 80


great compositions/performances: Mahler: Pianokwartet in a kl.t. / Piano quartet in a minor


Mahler: Pianokwartet in a kl.t. / Piano quartet in a minor

Mendelssohn: Four Pieces for String Quartet, Op.81 – 2. Scherzo


 

Published on Nov 8, 2014

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America

Mendelssohn: Four Pieces for String Quartet, Op.81 – 2. Scherzo · Emerson String Quartet

℗ 2005 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Composer: Mendelssohn

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great compositions/performances: Prokofiev – Symphony No.1 Opus 25 “Classical” (Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Valery Gergiev)


Prokofiev – Symphony No.1 Opus 25 “Classical” (Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Valery Gergiev)

Published on May 1, 2015

Recorded on 15 April 2012 at the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory.

Symphony Orchestra of the Mariinsky Theatre, St Petersburg / Valery Gergiev – musical director

Sergei Prokofiev – Symphony No.1 Opus 25 “Classical” (15’)
0:35 I. Allegro
5:20 II. Larghetto
9:35 III. Gavotta (Non troppo allegro)
11:17 IV. Finale (Molto vivace)

The Easter Festival is an internationally renowned event among classical music lovers, traditionally opened in Moscow on Easter Sunday. Each year the Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra and its musical director Valery Gergiev travel across Russia – for the past 10 years now!
In 2012 we were given an exceptional musical gift: the Mariinsky Theatre Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Valery Gergiev performed the complete cycle of Sergei Prokofiev’s symphonies and piano concerti – a composer with whom Maestro Gergiev and the orchestra seem particularly in tune.

 

great compositions/performances: ,Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances / Danses Norvégiennes


Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances / Danses Norvégiennes

Today’s Birthdays in Music Wednesday, June 3rd 2015


Today’s Birthdays in Music

Birthdays in Music for Wednesday 3rd June 2015

Birthdays 1 – 57 of 57

1657 – Manuel de Egues, composer
1660Johannes Schenck, Dutch born composer, born in Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Baptism date)
1738 – Johann Christoph Oley, composer
1746 – James Hook, composer
1750 – Frederic Thieme, composer
1773 – Michael Gottard Fischer, composer
1801 – Frantisek Jan Skroup, composer
1819 – Thomas Ball, US, sculptor/painter/singer
1828 – Jean Alexander Ferdinand Poise, composer
1828 – Jose Inzenga y Castellanos, composer
1829 – Alfonse Charles Renaud de Vilback, composer
1832 – Alexander Charles Lecocq, composer
1841 – Eduardo Caudella, composer
1844 – Emile Paladilhe, composer
1867 – Bela Anton Szabados, composer
1868 – Lvar Henning Mankell, composer
1887 – Emil Axman, composer
1888 – Tom Brown, American musician (d. 1958)
1897 – Memphis Minnie, rocker
1904 – Jan Peerce, [Jacob Pincus Perelmuth], tenor (NY Met Opera), born in NYC, New York
1906 – Josephine Baker, American dancer/Parisian night club owner (Folies-Bergere) in St. Louis, Missouri (d. 1975)
1907 – Antonio Emmanvilovich Spadavecchia, composer
1922 – Ivan Patachich, composer
1924 – Jimmy Rogers, Ruleville, Mississippi, Blues musician (Muddy Waters’ Band), (d. 1997)
1926 – Carlos Veerhoff, composer
1926 – Janez Maticic, composer
1927 – Boots Randolph, Paducah KY, saxophonist (Yakety Sax)
1930 – Dakota Staton, American jazz singer (d. 2007)
1931 – Francoise Arnoul, actress/composer (French Cancan, Jacko & Lise)
1932 – Dakota Staton, [Rabia Aliyah], US jazz singer (In the Night)
1935 – Ted Curson [Theodore], Jazz Trumpeter, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (d. 2012)
1939 – David Frederick Stock, composer
1942 – Anita Harris, singer/actress (Follow that Camel)
1942 – Curtis Mayfield, rock vocalist (Freddie’s Dead, Superfly), born in Chicago, Illinois
1943 – Mike Dennis, rocker (Dovells)
1944 – Michael Clarke, rock drummer (Byrds-Turn! Turn! Turn!), born in NYC, New York
1946 – Eddie Holman, rocker
1946 – Ian Hunter, England, rocker (Mott the Hoople-All the Young Dudes)
1947 – Mickey Finn, British guitarist and percussionist (T. Rex) (d. 2003)
1949 – Stephen Ruppenthal, composer
1950 – Suzi Quatro[cchio], singer (Stumblin’)/actress (Happy Days), born in Detroit, Michigan
1951 – Deniece Williams, [Chandler], IN, singer (Love Wouldn’t Let Me Wait)
1954 – Dan Hill, rocker (Sometimes When We Touch)
1956 – Danny Wilde, rocker (Rembrandts)
1964 – Kerry King, American musician (Slayer)
1964 – Doro Pesch, German singer
1965 – Mike Gordon, American musician
1965 – Jeff Blumenkrantz, American composer and actor
1968 – Samantha Sprackling, Nigerian singer
1969 – Hiroyuki Takami, Japanese musician
1970 – Esther Hart, Dutch singer
1970 – Julie Masse, French Canadian singer
1970 – Peter Tägtgren, Swedish musician (Hypocrisy) and producer

Singer Kelly JonesSinger Kelly Jones (1974)

1974 – Kelly Jones, Welsh singer (Stereophonics)
1976 – Yuri Ruley, American drummer
1978 – Lyfe Jennings, R&B singer and song-writer
1987 – Lalaine, American actress and singer

historic musical bits: David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli


David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli

great compositions/performances: Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano: Gabriele Tomasello, piano.


Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano

Historic musical bits: Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic


 Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

Haiku-Crickets, poetic thought by George-B (the Smudge and Other Poems Page)


Haiku-Crickets, poetic thought by George-B
(the Smudge and Other Poems Page)

I respect crickets

A many enemy they have:

lesser one is better.

– George-B ©

VISIT:   the Smudge and Other Poems Page HERE

NEW AT EUZICASA: Widget: Access The Public Catalogue Foundation (while at it: Please check out some of the 100+ widgets located on the sidebar of my site: Have fun!)


Have your say: please help us improve Your Paintings by filling in our quick and easy survey

Access The Public Cataloggue Foundation:  Your Paintings

Music for the soul: J. S. Bach: Cantata Nº 208, ‘Sheep May Safely Graze’, BWV 208


J. S. Bach: Cantata Nº 208, ‘Sheep May Safely Graze’, BWV 208

make music part of your life: Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane


Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane

**********************************************************************

 

 
Khachaturian in 1971

signature written in ink in a flowing script

Aram Il’yich Khachaturian (/ˈærəm ˌkɑːəˈtʊəriən/;[1] Russian: Арам Ильич Хачатурян; Armenian: Արամ Խաչատրյան, Aram Xačatryan;[A] Armenian pronunciation: [ɑˈɾɑm χɑt͡ʃʰɑt(ə)ɾˈjɑn]; 6 June 1903 – 1 May 1978) was a Soviet Armenian composer and conductor. He is considered one of the leading Soviet composers.[2][3]

Born and raised in Tbilisi, the multicultural capital of Georgia, Khachaturian moved to Moscow in 1921 following the Sovietization of the Caucasus. Without prior music training, he enrolled in the Gnessin Musical Institute, subsequently studying at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Nikolai Myaskovsky, among others. His first major work, the Piano Concerto (1936), popularized his name within and outside the Soviet Union. It was followed by the Violin Concerto (1940) and the Cello Concerto (1946). His other significant compositions include the Masquerade Suite (1941), the Anthem of the Armenian SSR (1944), three symphonies (1935, 1943, 1947), and around 25 film scores. Khachaturian is best known for his ballet music—Gayane (1942) and Spartacus (1954). His most popular piece, the “Sabre Dance” from Gayane, has been used extensively in popular culture and has been covered by a number of musicians worldwide.[4] His style is “characterized by colorful harmonies, captivating rhythms, virtuosity, improvisations, and sensuous melodies.”[5]

During most of his career, Khachaturian was approved by the Soviet government and held several high posts in the Union of Soviet Composers from the late 1930s, although he joined the Communist Party only in 1943. Along with Sergei Prokofiev and Dmitri Shostakovich, he was officially denounced as a “formalist” and his music dubbed “anti-people” in 1948, but was restored later that year. After 1950 he taught at the Gnessin Institute and the Moscow Conservatory, and turned to conducting. He traveled to Europe, Latin America and the United States with concerts of his own works. In 1957 Khachaturian became the Secretary of Union of Soviet Composers, a position he held until his death.

Khachaturian was the most renowned Armenian composer of the 20th century[6] and the author of the first Armenian ballet music, symphony, concerto, and film score.[B] While following the established musical traditions of Russia, he broadly used Armenian and to lesser extent, Caucasian, Eastern & Central European, and Middle Eastern peoples’ folk music in his works. He is highly regarded in Armenia, where he is considered a “national treasure”.[7]

Denunciation and restoration (1948)

 
Khachaturian in 1964

In mid-December 1947, the Department for Agitation and Propaganda (better known as Agitprop) submitted to Andrei Zhdanov, the secretary of the Communist Party’s Central Committee, a document on the “shortcomings” in the development of Soviet music. On 10–13 January 1948, a conference was held at the Kremlin in the presence of seventy musicians, composers, conductors and others who were confronted by Zhdanov:[35]

We will consider that if these comrades [Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Myaskovsky, Khachaturian, Kabalevsky and Shebalin] namely who are the principal and leading figures of the formalist direction in music. And that direction is fundamentally incorrect.

Thus, Khachaturian and other leading composers were denounced by the Communist Party as followers of the alleged formalism[10] (i.e. “[a type of] music that was considered too advanced or difficult for the masses to enjoy”)[3] and their music was dubbed “anti-people”.[36] It was the Symphonic Poem (1947), later titled the Third Symphony, that officially earned Khachaturian the wrath of the Party.[35][37] Ironically, he wrote the work as a tribute to the 30th anniversary of the October Revolution.[38] He stated: “I wanted to write the kind of composition in which the public would feel my unwritten program without an announcement. I wanted this work to express the Soviet people’s joy and pride in their great and mighty country.”[39]

Musicologist Blair Johnston believes that his “music contained few, if any, of the objectionable traits found in the music of some of his more adventuresome colleagues. In retrospect, it was most likely Khachaturian’s administrative role in the Union [of Soviet Composers], perceived by the government as a bastion of politically incorrect music, and not his music as such, which earned him a place on the black list of 1948.”[40] In March 1948,[20] Khachaturian “made a very full and humble apology for his artistic “errors” following the Zhdanov decree; his musical style, however, underwent no changes.”[40] He was sent to Armenia as a “punishment”,[10] and continued to be censured.[20] By December 1948,[20] he was “restored to favor later that year when he was praised for his film biography of Lenin”—Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (ru).[16]

great compositions/performances: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101


Antonín DvořákHumoresque No. 7, Op. 101

Edvard Grieg – Lyric Pieces Op. 65 No. 6 – Wedding Day at Troldhaugen Pianist: Gerhard Oppitz


Group photograph showing Edvard Grieg, Percy G...

Group photograph showing Edvard Grieg, Percy Grainger, Nina Grieg and Julius Rontgen, at Grieg’s home, Troldhaugen, in July 1907 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

historic musical bits: Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21/ London Symphony Orchestra André Previn, conductor Classical Vault 2 Classical Vault 2


Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21

Hector Berlioz – Waverly Overture Op.1 (1828)


 

Hector Berlioz – Waverly Overture Op.1 (1828)

 

today’s birthday: Carl Larsson (1853)


Trapphall i Nationalmuseum i Stockholm med &qu...

Trapphall i Nationalmuseum i Stockholm med “Midvinterblot” av Carl Larsson. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Carl Larsson (1853)

Larsson was a popular and imaginative Swedish illustrator and painter whose watercolors, particularly of his family and home, became popular worldwide. He is perhaps best known, however, for his last monumental work, Midvinterblot, or “Midwinter Sacrifice,” a large oil painting depicting a scene from Norse mythology. Considered Sweden’s most debated painting, it was commissioned by the National Museum in Stockholm but was rejected by the board upon its completion. Where does it now hang? More… Discuss

The Nutcracker


]

The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker, a celebrated ballet by Tchaikovsky, tells the story of a young girl whose Christmas gift of a nutcracker turns into a prince and leads her to a magical land. In 1954, George Balanchine choreographed and premiered his New York City Ballet version, which was later made into a feature film. Mikhail Baryshnikov choreographed another enormously popular version for the American Ballet Theatre. What novel instrument did Tchaikovsky use in the Nutcracker score? More… Discuss
[embedhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1nzCDUNf-0[/embed]

The Nutcracker Suite (Full Album) – Tchaikovsky

Published on Oct 27, 2014

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Song titles for Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker in order:
1. Op. 71 – 2. March 0:00
2. Op. 71 – 4. Dance 2:47
3. Op. 71 – 5. Scene & The Grandfather Dance
4. Op. 71 – 6. Scene
5. Op. 71 – 7. Scene
6. Op. 71 – 8. Scene
7. Op. 71 – 12. Arabian Dance, “Coffee”
8. Op. 71 – 13. Waltz Of The Flowers
9. Op. 71 – 14. Pas De Deux
10. Op. 71 – 15. Closing Waltz & Grand Finale

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22


Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22

historic musical bits: Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


 

Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952