Category Archives: Arts

make music part of your life series: Alexander Glazunov – Concert Waltz Nr. 2


Alexander Glazunov – Concert Waltz Nr. 2

historic musical bits: BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No.7 ‘Archduke’ | E.Gilels, L.Kogan, M.Rostropovich | 1956


BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No.7 ‘Archduke’ | E.Gilels, L.Kogan, M.Rostropovich | 1956

Make music part of your life series: Romanian Rhapsody George Enescu


Romanian Rhapsody George Enescu

historic musical bits: Beethoven Egmont Overture Bernstein Vienna Philharmonic


Beethoven Egmont Overture Bernstein Vienna Philharmonic

Richard Wagner: Parsifal Overture


Parsifal Overture

Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Danses Symphoniques


Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Danses Symphoniques

Brahms – Violin Sonata No 1 in G Mag op. 78


Brahms – Violin Sonata No 1 in G Mag op. 78

make music part of your life series: Johann Strauss II – Morgenblätter – Walzer, Op. 279


Johann Strauss II – Morgenblätter – Walzer, Op. 279

great compositions/performances: Yuja Wang plays Gershwin : Piano Concerto in F (1925)


Yuja Wang plays Gershwin : Piano Concerto in F (1925)

great compositions/performances: Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385 (Haffner)


Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385  (Haffner)

make music part of your life series: Johannes Brahms – Clarinet Sonata In E Flat Major Op. 120 No. 2


Johannes Brahms – Clarinet Sonata In E Flat Major Op. 120 No. 2

historic musical bits: Tchaikovsky Variations on a Rococo Theme (Rostropovich/Kondrashin)


Tchaikovsky Variations on a Rococo Theme (Rostropovich/Kondrashin)

historic musical bits: Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)


Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)

Sokolov – Bach-Brahms Chaconne for the left hand alone


Sokolov – Bach-Brahms Chaconne for the left hand alone.wmv

great compositions/performances: Rachmaninov – Concerto 1 – Pletnev


Rachmaninov – Concerto 1 – Pletnev

 

make music part of your life series: Willem van Twillert plays, J.S. Bach, Bist du bei mir (BWV 508), Hinsz-organ, Leens


Willem van Twillert plays, J.S. Bach, Bist du bei mir [BWV 508], Hinsz-organ, Leens [NL]

historic musical bits: Igor Stravinsky – Pastorale, pour violon solo et bois


Igor Stravinsky – Pastorale, pour violon solo et bois

historic musical bits: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan

today’s birthday: Inigo Jones (1573)


Inigo Jones (1573)

Jones was one of England’s first great architects. After studying in Italy, he brought Renaissance architecture to England. His best known buildings are the Queen’s House at Greenwich, London, and the Banqueting House at Whitehall, which is often considered his greatest achievement. For his design of Covent Garden, London’s first square, Jones is credited with the introduction of town planning in England. Jones was also involved in stage design for theater and is credited with what innovations? More… Discuss

Stairway to Heaven live (Rodrigo y Gabriela)


Stairway to Heaven live (Rodrigo y Gabriela)

Antony singing If It Be Your Will (sometimes , people find their voice, and once in a while they recognize genius)


Antony singing If It Be Your Will (poem and song by the genius of Leonard Cohen )


Bird on a wire-Perla Batalla_ Special_Features “I’m Your Man”

Va amintesc: Din Muzica Popoarelor: Irish & Celtic Music Collection 1


Irish & Celtic Music Collection 1

great compositions/performances: Ennio Morricone – Cinema Paradiso (In Concerto – Venezia 10.11.07)


Ennio Morricone – Cinema Paradiso (In Concerto – Venezia 10.11.07)

2,441,426

great compositions/performances: Dvorák – Symphony No 8 in G major, Op 88 – Krivine


Dvorák – Symphony No 8 in G major, Op 88 – Krivine

great compositions/performances: ,Claude Debussy – Nocturnes


Claude Debussy – Nocturnes

great compositions/performances: Glazunov “Symphony No 7″ USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony OrchestraGennadi Rozhdestvensky


Glazunov “Symphony No 7″ Gennadi Rozhdestvensky

today’s birthday: Frida Kahlo (1907)


Frida Kahlo (1907)

Kahlo, a Mexican artist noted for her self-portraits, taught herself to paint while recovering from a severe bus accident that crippled her as a teen and required her to undergo some 35 operations. Drawing on her personal experiences, her works often starkly portray pain and the harsh lives of women. Though once known only as the wife of famous Mexican artist Diego Rivera, she eventually eclipsed his fame. Of her 143 paintings, how many are self-portraits? More… Discuss


Schumann Kinderszenen op. 15 Radu Lupu

Published on Oct 18, 2013

Robert Schumann Kinderszenen, op. 15
Radu Lupu , January 1993

Kinderszenen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood”), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen.[7]

Parts/Movements

  1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen (Of Foreign Lands and Peoples),  G major
  2. Curiose Geschichte (A Curious Story),  D major
  3. Hasche-Mann (Blind Man’s Buff), B minor
  4. Bittendes Kind (Pleading Child), D major
  5. Glückes genug (Quite Happy), D major
  6. Wichtige Bebebenheit (An Important Event), A major
  7. Träumerei (Dreaming), F major
  8. Am Camin (At the Fireside), F major
  9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd (Knight of the Hobby-Horse), C major
  10. Fast zu ernst (Almost too Serious), G-sharp minor
  11. Fürchtenmachen (Frightening), E minor
  12. Kind im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep), E minor
  13. Ffrom Der Dichter spricht (The Poet Speaks), G major

Description by Blair Johnston  (ALL MUSIC)

The 13 pieces that constitute Robert Schumann‘s Kinderszenen for piano (Scenes from Childhood), Op. 15 (1838) showcase their creator’s musical imagination at the peak of its poetic clarity. As a result, the Kinderszenen have long been staples of the repertoire as utterly charming yet substantial miniatures, the sort of compact keyboard essays in which Schumann‘s genius found full expression. Kinderszenen was one of the projects Schumann worked on during the spring of 1838 to get through a difficult period of separation from his fiancée, Clara Wieck, who was on tour as a pianist and whose father objected to the idea of her marriage to the composer. In March of that year, Schumann wrote to Clara, “I have been waiting for your letter and have in the meantime filled several books with pieces…. You once said to me that I often seemed like a child, and I suddenly got inspired and knocked off around 30 quaint little pieces…. I selected several and titled them Kinderszenen. You will enjoy them, though you will need to forget that you are a virtuoso when you play them.” The Kinderszenen are a touching tribute to the eternal, universal memories and feelings of childhood from a nostalgic adult perspective; unlike a number of Schumann‘s collections of piano character pieces (e.g. Album for the Young, Op. 68), the Kinderszenen are not intended to be played by children. Schumann claimed that the picturesque titles attached to the pieces were added as an afterthought in order to provide subtle suggestions to the player, a model Debussy followed decades later in his Preludes. Almost all of the Kinderszenen are miniature ternary (ABA) forms. Scene No. 1, “Von fremden Ländern und Menschen” (Of Foreign Lands and People), opens with a lovely melody whose basic motivic substance, by appearing in several vague guises throughout many of the other pieces, serves as a general unifying element. The seventh Scene, “Träumerei” (Reverie), is easily the most famous piece in the set; its charming melody and quieting power have recommended it to generations of concert pianists who wish to calm audiences after a long series of rousing encores. The Kinderszenen contain many delicate musical touches; Scene No. 4, “Bittendes Kind” (Pleading Child), for example, is harmonically resolved only when an unseen force (a parent?) gives in and grant the child’s wish at the beginning of No. 5, “Glückes genug” (Quite Happy). In the final piece, “Der Dichter spricht” (The Poet Speaks), Schumann removes himself just a bit from the indulgent reverie to formulate a narrator’s omniscient view of the child. Quietly, gently, the many moods and feelings that Schumann touched upon over the course of this remarkable 20-minute work are lovingly recalled, and the composition concludes, contentedly, in the same key of G major in which it began.

Lafayette’s Hermione, by George-B: HAPPY JULY 4!


Lafayette's Hermione,  by George-, B Copyright 2105 (no Getty's you can't claim this...It's mine!)

Lafayette’s Hermione, by George-, B Copyright 2105 (no Getty’s you can’t claim this…It’s mine!)

Lafayette’s Hermione,  by George-B (copyright 2015)

Great compositions/performances: ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major


ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major

Great compositions/performances: Antonin Dvorak , String Quintet No. 3, In E Flat Major, Op 97, by Dvorak Quartet, with Josef Kodousesk, viola


Henry David Thoreau — ‘A lake is a landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. … ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden.

Antonin Dvorak,String Quintet No.3, In E Flat Major, Op 97(It is a Viola Quitet)

Antonin Dvorak, : The Wood Dove, Op. 110, B. 198 , great compositions/performances, (Fritz Lehmann · Symphony Orchestra of Radio Berlin)


The Wood Dove, Op. 110, B. 198

great compositions/performances: Schubert – String Quartet No. 13 in A minor, D. 804 (Pražák Quartet )


Schubert – String Quartet No. 13 in A minor, D. 804

great compositions/performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (BBC Proms 2012)


Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Proms 2012)

greaat compositions/performances: Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)


Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)

today’s birthday: Lena Horne (1917)


Lena Horne (1917)

An iconic American singer and actress, Horne began dancing at Harlem’s Cotton Club as a teen and, with the help of her stunning voice and good looks, was soon singing with popular bands. She went on to record and perform extensively and appeared in a number of musicals and films, including Stormy Weather, whose title song became her signature. Her one-woman show, Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music, was hailed as her masterpiece. Why was Horne blacklisted in the 1950s? More… Discuss


Saint Peter’s tomb

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 
The floor above Saint Peter’s tomb (see text)

 
St. Peter’s baldachin, by Bernini, in the modern St. Peter’s Basilica. St. Peter’s tomb lies directly below this structure.

Saint Peter’s tomb is a site under St. Peter’s Basilica that includes several graves and a structure said by Vatican authorities to have been built to memorialize the location of St. Peter’s grave. St. Peter’s tomb is near the west end of a complex of mausoleums that date between about AD 130 and AD 300.[1] The complex was partially torn down and filled with earth to provide a foundation for the building of the first St. Peter’s Basilica during the reign of Constantine I in about AD 330. Though many bones have been found at the site of the 2nd-century shrine, as the result of two campaigns of archaeological excavation, Pope Pius XII stated in December 1950 that none could be confirmed to be Saint Peter’s with absolute certainty.[2] However, following the discovery of further bones and an inscription, on June 26, 1968 Pope Paul VI announced that the relics of St. Peter had been identified.

The grave claimed by the Church to be that of St. Peter lies at the foot of the aedicula beneath the floor. The remains of four individuals and several farm animals were found in this grave.[3] In 1953, after the initial archeological efforts had been completed, another set of bones were found that were said to have been removed without the archeologists’ knowledge from a niche (loculus) in the north side of a wall (the graffiti wall) that abuts the red wall on the right of the aedicula. Subsequent testing indicated that these were the bones of a 60-70-year-old man.[4] Margherita Guarducci argued that these were the remains of St. Peter and that they had been moved into a niche in the graffiti wall from the grave under the aedicula “at the time of Constantine, after the peace of the church” (313).[5] Antonio Ferrua, the archaeologist who headed the excavation that uncovered what is known as the St. Peter’s Tomb, said that he wasn’t convinced that the bones that were found were those of St. Peter.[6]

The upper image shows the area of the lower floor of St. Peter’s Basilica that lies above the site of St. Peter’s tomb. A portion of the aedicula that was part of St. Peter’s tomb rose above level of this floor and was made into the Niche of the Pallium[7] which can be seen in the center of the image.

Death of Peter at Vatican Hill

 

The earliest reference to Peter’s death is in a letter of Clement, bishop of Rome, to the Corinthians. (1 Clement, (a.k.a. Letter to the Corinthians), written c. 96 AD. The historian Eusebius, a contemporary of Constantine, wrote that St. Peter “came to Rome, and was crucified with his head downwards,” attributing this information to the much earlier theologian Origen, who died c. 254 AD.[8] St. Peter’s martyrdom is traditionally depicted in religious iconography as crucifixion with his head pointed downward.

Peter’s place and manner of death are also mentioned by Tertullian (c. 160-220) in Scorpiace,[9] where the death is said to take place during the Christian persecutions by Nero. Tacitus (56-117) describes the persecution of Christians in his Annals, though he does not specifically mention Peter.[10] “They were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt.” Furthermore, Tertullian says these events took place in the imperial gardens near the Circus of Nero. No other area would have been available for public persecutions after the Great Fire of Rome destroyed the Circus Maximus and most of the rest of the city in the year 64 AD.

This account is supported by other sources. In the The Passion of Peter and Paul, dating to the fifth century, the crucifixion of Peter is recounted. While the stories themselves are apocryphal, they were based on earlier material, helpful for topographical reasons. It reads, “Holy men … took down his body secretly and put it under the terebinth tree near the Naumachia, in the place which is called the Vatican.”[11] The place called Naumachia would be an artificial lake within the Circus of Nero where naval battles were reenacted for an audience. The place called Vatican was at the time a hill next to the complex and also next to the Tiber River, featuring a cemetery of both Christian and pagan tombs.

Tracing the original tombs

Dionysius of Corinth mentions the burial place of Peter as Rome when he wrote to the Church of Rome in the time of the Pope Soter (died 174), thanking the Romans for their financial help. “You have thus by such an admonition bound together the planting of Peter and of Paul at Rome and Corinth. For both of them planted and likewise taught us in our Corinth. And they taught together in like manner in Italy, and suffered martyrdom at the same time.”[12]

 
Fourth century glass mosaic of St. Peter, located at the Catacombs of Saint Thecla.

Catholic tradition holds that the bereaved Christians followed their usual custom in burying him as near as possible to the scene of his suffering. According to Catholic lore, he was laid in ground that belonged to Christian proprietors, by the side of a well-known road leading out of the city, the Via Cornelia (site of a known pagan and Christian cemetery) on the hill called Vaticanus. The actual tomb was an underground vault, approached from the road by a descending staircase, and the body reposed in a sarcophagus of stone in the center of this vault.[11]

The Book of Popes mentions that Pope Anacletus built a “sepulchral monument” over the underground tomb of St. Peter shortly after his death.[13] This was a small chamber or oratory over the tomb, where three or four persons could kneel and pray over the grave. The pagan Roman Emperor, Julian the Apostate, mentions in 363 A.D. in his work Three Books Against the Galileans that the tomb of St. Peter was a place of worship, albeit secretly.[14]

There is evidence of the existence of the tomb (trophoea, i.e., trophies, as signs or memorials of victory) at the beginning of the 3rd century, in the words of the presbyter Caius refuting the Montanist traditions of a certain Proclus: “But I can show the trophies of the Apostles. For if you will go to the Vatican, or to the Ostian way, you will find the trophies of those who laid the foundations of this church.”[12]

make music part of your life series: Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12


Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

historic musical bits: Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture


Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture

make music part of your life series: Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 (“Spring”)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BS_rG_XZ0Y%5B/emebed%5D

Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 [complete] (Spring)

today’s birthday: Peter Paul Rubens (1577)


Peter Paul Rubens (1577)

Rubens was a prolific 17th-century Flemish Baroque painter whose exuberant style emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. Known for his altarpieces, portraits, and landscapes, Rubens ran a large studio in Antwerp where he produced more than 2,000 paintings by supervising an enormous workshop of skilled apprentices. Also a diplomat, Rubens was knighted by both Philip IV of Spain and Charles I of England. Aspects of Rubens’s paintings gave rise to the term “Rubenesque,” which means what? More… Discuss

Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30 , Great compositions/perfoemances


Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major


Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

Porcelain


Porcelain

Porcelain is a white, hard, nonporous pottery which is resonant when struck. It was first made by the Chinese to withstand the great heat generated in certain parts of their kilns. The two natural substances used were kaolin and a feldspar mineral called petuntse that forms a glassy cement. In Europe porcelain was first commercially produced in the early 1700s. Most of the European porcelain is soft paste and is not as strong as the Chinese hard-paste porcelain. What is bone china? More… Discuss

Ocean’s Kingdom – Paul McCartney


Ocean’s Kingdom – Paul McCartney

historic musical bits: Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

THE BEST OF ARCANGELO CORELLI CONCERTO GROSSO, OP. 6


THE BEST OF ARCANGELO CORELLI CONCERTO GROSSO,
OP. 6