Category Archives: BOOKS

quotation: Agatha Christie


It is a curious thought, but it is only when you see people looking ridiculous that you realize just how much you love them.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

today’s birthday: René Descartes (1596)


René Descartes (1596)

René Descartes was a French mathematician, scientist, and philosopher who is considered the father of modern philosophy. Aiming to apply the rigor of mathematics to all fields of human knowledge, Descartes discards the authoritarian system of the scholastics and begins with universal doubt. His methodology was a major influence in the transition from medieval science and philosophy to the modern era. What is thought to be the meaning of his most famous statement, “Cogito ergo sum”? More… Discuss

quotation: If you would grow great and stately, You must try to walk sedately. Robert Louis Stevenson


If you would grow great and stately,

You must try to walk sedately.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

quotation: One man’s ways may be as good as another’s, but we all like our own best. Jane Austen


One man’s waysmay be as good as another’s, but we all like our own best.Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

today’s holiday: Teachers’ Day in the Czech Republic (birthday of Jan Amos Komensky)


Teachers’ Day in the Czech Republic

March 28 is the birthday of Jan Amos Komensky (or John Comenius; 1592-1670), a noted educational reformer and theologian in the former Czechoslovakia. Komensky was the first person to write an illustrated textbook for children, used for teaching Latin words; he was also a proponent of compulsory education. It has been traditional for children to honor him on Teachers’ Day, or Komensky Day, by bringing flowers and gifts to their teachers. The day is also observed with lectures, music, and educational activities. More… Discuss

happy birthday Gorky — “The Devil” a LibriVox audiobooks


Maxim Gorky — The Devil {audiobook}

today’s birthday: Maxim Gorky (1868)


Maxim Gorky (1868)

Maxim Gorky was the pseudonym of Aleksey Maximovich Pyeshkov, a Russian writer considered the father of Soviet literature and the founder of the doctrine of socialist realism. Gorky’s works include Mother, which became the prototype of the revolutionary novel, and his final, unfinished work—often considered his masterpiece—The Life of Klim Samgin, a panoramic, four-volume novel of Russian social conditions from 1880 to 1917. Who carried Gorky’s casket at his funeral? More… Discuss

quotation: The more thou stir it, the worse it will be. Miguel de Cervantes


The more thou stir it, the worse it will be.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

quotation: Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. Jane Austen


Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn – The Gulag Archipelago – AudioBook – Part 1-7 playlist


Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn – The Gulag Archipelago – AudioBook – Part 1-7 playlist

Gulag


Gulag

The Gulag was a system of forced-labor prison camps in the USSR, from the Russian acronym for the Main Directorate of Corrective Labor Camps, a department of the Soviet secret police. It was first established under Lenin during the early Bolshevik years and ultimately included 476 camp complexes. The system reached its peak after 1928 under Stalin, who used it to maintain the Soviet state by keeping its populace in a state of terror. Whose book publicized the gulag system to the Western world? More… Discuss

quotation: Man’s worst ill is stubbornness of heart. Sophocle


Man’s worst ill is stubbornness of heart.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

quotation: The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt. Rene Descartes


The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt.

Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Discuss

quotation: Sir Walter Scott


There is a vulgar incredulity, which in historical matters, as well as in those of religion, finds it easier to doubt than to examine.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) Discuss

quotation: Samuel Taylor Coleridge


And the Devil did grin, for his darling sin is pride that apes humility.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

quotation: The pen is the tongue of the mind. Miguel de Cervantes


The pen is the tongue of the mind.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

 

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quotation: H.G. Wells


There’s nothing wrong in suffering, if you suffer for a purpose. Our revolution didn’t abolish danger or death. It simply made danger and death worthwhile.

H.G. Wells (1866-1946) Discuss

quotation: A picture is an intermediate something between a thought and a thing. Samuel Taylor Coleridge


A picture is an intermediate something between a thought and a thing.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

quotation: Edith Wharton


In spite of illness, in spite even of the archenemy sorrow, one can remain alive long past the usual date of disintegration if one is unafraid of change, insatiable in intellectual curiosity, interested in big things, and happy in small ways.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

Archie Comics


Archie Comics

Archie Comics is an American comic-book publisher that started out as MLJ Comics in 1939. Its early titles featured generic superheroes that were innovative but failed to find popularity. In 1941, a teenage humor strip called Archie became a hit with the emerging youth culture, prompting the name change to Archie Comics. The comic varies with regard to character details and settings, but Archie is perpetually mired in a love triangle with Betty and Veronica. What is Archie’s full name? More… Discuss

quotation: We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be. Jane Austen


We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

Seamus Heaney


Seamus Heaney

Heaney is an Irish poet, writer, and lecturer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. His carefully crafted poetry has been praised for its powerful imagery, meaningful content, musical phrasing, and compelling rhythms. Focused on “the local,” he often writes about the disappearing world of unspoiled rural Ireland and hints at the sectarian violence of the north where he was born. In 1999, he published a highly regarded verse translation of what epic poem? More… Discuss

quotation: As covetousness is the root of all evil, so poverty is, I believe, the worst of all snares. Daniel Defoe


As covetousness is the root of all evil, so poverty is, I believe, the worst of all snares.

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) Discuss

quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


In the multitude of middle-aged men who go about their vocations in a daily course determined for them much in the same way as the tie of their cravats, there is always a good number who once meant to shape their own deeds and alter the world a little.George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

today’s birthday: Jack Kerouac (1922)


Jack Kerouac (1922)

Considered the father of the Beat movement, Jack Kerouac was an American novelist whose semiautobiographical, “spontaneous prose” reflects a frenetic, restless pursuit of new sensation and experience and a disdain for the conventional measures of economic and social success. His best known works are The Subterraneans, The Dharma Bums, and On the Road, which is widely considered the testament of the Beat Generation. Why was Kerouac arrested in connection with a 1944 murder? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Torquato Tasso (1544)


Torquato Tasso (1544)

Tasso, an Italian poet, was one of the foremost writers of the Renaissance as well as one of its tragic figures. After penning many popular works, Tasso became psychologically unstable and was intermittently confined to a hospital in his later life. He is best known for writing Gerusalemme liberata—Jerusalem Delivered—an epic of chivalric exploits during the First Crusade. Considered his masterpiece, it has influenced countless poets. Why, then, did Tasso heavily revise it? More… Discuss

quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.


Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

Related Articles:
“Waldo” Audiobook at EUZICASA

quotation: William Shakespeare


To me, fair friend, you never can be old
For as you were when first your eye I eyed,
Such seems your beauty still.William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Quotation: Be good and you will be lonesome. Mark Twain


Quotation 

Be good and you will be lonesome.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

quotation: “Death is the only physician,…”, George Eliot


Death is the only physician, the shadow of his valley the only journeying that will cure us of age and the gathering fatigue of years.George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same. Ralph Waldo Emerson


Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

MORE

Cultural Museum of Mosul


Cultural Museum of Mosul

THE DHAMMAPADA – FULL AudioBook | Buddhism – Teachings of The Buddha (“Hatred ceases by love”)


THE DHAMMAPADA – FULL AudioBook | Buddhism – Teachings of The Buddha

The Dhammapada by Unknown, Translated by F. Max Mueller – FULL AudioBook – The Dhammapada is is a Buddhist scripture, containing 423 verses in 26 categories. According to tradition, these are verses spoken by the Buddha on various occasions, most of which deal with ethics. It is is considered one of the most important pieces of Theravada literature. Despite this, the Dhammapada is read by many Mahayana Buddhists and remains a very popular text across all schools of Buddhism. (Summary from Wikipedia.org)

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- READ along by clicking (CC) for Closed Caption Transcript!

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Chapter listing and length:

01 — Chapters 1-4 — 00:14:36
Read by: Roger Turnau

02 — Chapters 5-8 — 00:10:52
Read by: Måns Broo

03 — Chapters 9-14 — 00:19:16
Read by: Chris Masterson

04 — Chapters 15-18 — 00:13:30
Read by: Chris Masterson

05 — Chapters 19-22 — 00:17:01
Read by: Denny Sayers

06 — Chapters 23-25 — 00:16:44
Read by: Roger Turnau

07 — Chapter 26 — 00:10:35
Read by: Scott

Total running time: 1:42:34

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History Of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Vol. 1, by Gaston Maspero, Audiobook

History of Human Society – Civilizations: The_Encyclopedia_of_Ancient Civilizations_Arthur_Cotterell


The_Encyclopedia_of_Ancient Civilizations_Arthur_Cotterell

The_Encyclopedia_of_Ancient Civilizations_Arthur_Cotterell (click to enlarge)


quotation: Faith, n.: Belief without evidence in what is told by one who speaks without knowledge, of things without parallel. Ambrose Bierce


Faith, n.: Belief without evidence in what is told by one who speaks without knowledge, of things without parallel.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

article: Incunabula


Incunabula

Incunabula are “books of the cradle days” of printing, or books printed in the 15th century. The known incunabula represent about 40,000 editions. The books include products of more than 1,000 presses, including such famous printers as Gutenberg, Caxton, and Aldus Manutius, and give evidence as to the development of typography in its formative period. These books were generally large quarto size, bound in calf over boards of wood, and decorated with borders. What are some famous incunabula? More… Discuss

quotation: A good principle not rightly understood may prove as hurtful as a bad. John Milton


A good principle not rightly understood may prove as hurtful as a bad.

John Milton (1608-1674) Discuss

The Great Gatsby


The Great Gatsby

Written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, an American novelist of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby is today considered standard reading in high school courses on American literature. It tells the story of a bootlegger whose obsessive dream of wealth and lost love is destroyed by a corrupt reality. Cynical yet poignant, the novel is a devastating portrait of the so-called American Dream, which measures success and love in terms of money. What other titles did Fitzgerald consider for this novel? More… Discuss


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Christianity_in_China
 
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Lin (林).
Lin Yutang
Linyutang.jpg

Lin Yutang, photographed by
Carl Van Vechten, 1939
 
Traditional Chinese 林語堂
 
Simplified Chinese 林语堂

Lin Yutang (Chinese: 林语堂; pinyin: Lín Yǔtáng; October 10, 1895 – March 26, 1976) was a Chinese writer, translator, linguist and inventor. His informal but polished style in both Chinese and English made him one of the most influential writers of his generation, and his compilations and translations of classic Chinese texts into English were bestsellers in the West.

Youth

Lin was born in the town of Banzai, Pinghe, Zhangzhou, Fujian. This mountainous region made a deep impression on his consciousness, and thereafter he would constantly consider himself a child of the mountains (in one of his books he commented that his idea of hell was a city apartment). His father was a Christian minister. His journey of faith from Christianity to Taoism and Buddhism, and back to Christianity in his later life was recorded in his book From Pagan to Christian (1959).

Academic career and Shanghai intellectual world

Lin studied for his bachelor’s degree at Saint John’s University in Shanghai, then received a half-scholarship to continue study for a doctoral degree at Harvard University. He later wrote that in the Widener Library he first found himself and first came alive, but he never saw a Harvard-Yale game.[1] He left Harvard early however, moving to work with the Chinese Labor Corps in France and eventually to Germany, where he completed his requirements for a doctoral degree in Chinese philology at the University of Leipzig. From 1923 to 1926 he taught English literature at Peking University.

Enthusiastic about the success of the Northern Expedition, he briefly served in the new Nationalist government, but soon turned to teaching and writing. He found himself in the wake of the New Culture Movement which criticized China’s tradition as feudal and harmful. Instead of accepting this charge, however, Lin immersed himself in the Confucian texts and literary culture which his Christian upbringing and English language education had denied him. His magazine Lun Yu (Analects) attracted essays and readership, and Lin maintained friendship and debate with Hu Shi, Lu Xun, key figures in the Shanghai literary scene of the 1930s. He was a key figure in introducing the Western concept of humor, which he felt China had lacked. In 1933, however, Lu Xun attacked the journal Analects for being apolitical and dismissed Lin’s elegant xiaopin wen 小品文, or small essay as “bric a brac for the bourgeoisie.”.[2]

Lin’s writings in Chinese were critical of the Nationalist government, to the point that he feared for his life. Many of his essays from this time were later collected in With Love and Irony (1940). In 1933, he met Pearl Buck in Shanghai, and she introduced him and his writings to her publisher, Richard Walsh, head of John Day publishers, who published Lin’s works for many years.[3]

Lin’s relation with Christianity changed over the years. His father, of course, was a second generation Christian, but at Tsinghua, Lin asked himself what it meant to be a Christian in China. Being a Christian meant acceptance of Western science and progress, but Lin became angry that being a Christian also meant losing touch with China’s culture and his own personal identity. On his return from study abroad, Lin renewed his respect for his father, yet he plunged into study of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, and did not identify himself as Christian.[4]

Career after leaving China

After 1935 Lin lived mainly in the United States, where he became known as a “wise and witty” popularizer of Chinese philosophy and way of life. Lin’s first best sellers were My Country and My People (simplified Chinese: 吾国与吾民; traditional Chinese: 吾國與吾民) (1935) and The Importance of Living (simplified Chinese: 生活的艺术; traditional Chinese: 生活的藝術) (1937), written in English in a charming style. Others include Between Tears and Laughter (啼笑皆非) (1943), The Importance of Understanding (1960, a book of translated Chinese literary passages and short pieces), The Chinese Theory of Art (1967). The novels Moment in Peking (simplified Chinese: 京华烟云; traditional Chinese: 京華煙雲) (1939), A Leaf in the Storm (1940), and The Vermilion Gate (simplified Chinese: 朱门; traditional Chinese: 朱門) (1953) were well received epics of China in turmoil, while Chinatown Family (1948) presented the lives of Chinese Americans in New York. Partly to avoid controversial contemporary issues, Lin in 1947 published The Gay Genius: The Life and Times of Su Tungpo, which presented the struggle between Su Dongpo and Wang Anshi as parallel to the struggle between Chinese liberals and totalitarian communists.

Lin’s political writings in English sold fewer copies than his cultural works and were more controversial. Between Tears and Laughter (1943) broke with the genial tone of his earlier English writings to criticize Western racism and imperialism. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Lin traveled in China and wrote favorably of the war effort and Chiang Kai-shek in Vigil of a Nation (1944). American China Hands such as Edgar Snow criticized these works.[5]

Mechanics had been a long time avocation. Since Chinese is a character-based rather than an alphabet-based language, with many thousands of separate characters, it was difficult to employ modern printing technologies. Many doubted that a Chinese typewriter could be invented. Lin, however, worked on this problem for decades and eventually came up with a workable typewriter which was brought to market in the middle of the war with Japan. The Mingkwai “Clear and Quick” Chinese-language typewriter played a pivotal role in the Cold War Machine Translation research.[6] Lin also invented and patented several lesser inventions, such as a toothbrush which dispensed toothpaste.

In the mid-1950s, he served briefly and unhappily as president (or chancellor) of the Nanyang University which was newly created in Singapore specifically for Chinese studies as parallel to the English-oriented University of Singapore. He did not, however, choose to continue in that role when the faculty resisted his plans for structural reform and Nanyang (South Seas) University became a focus of the struggle for control of Singapore between the Communist-directed left and the liberal, social democratic right. He felt he was too old for the conflict.

After he returned to New York in the late 1950s, Lin renewed his interest in Christianity. His wife was a devout believer, and Lin admired her serenity and humility. After attending services with her at the Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church for several months, he joined the church and announced his return to the faith.[4] His 1959 book From Pagan to Christian explained this move, which many of his readers found surprising.

With his facility for both Chinese and English idiom, Lin presided over the compilation of an outstanding Chinese-English dictionary, Lin Yutang’s Chinese-English Dictionary of Modern Usage (simplified Chinese: 林语堂当代汉英词典; traditional Chinese: 林語堂當代漢英詞典) (1972), which contains a massive English index to definitions of Chinese terms. The work was undertaken at the newly founded Chinese University of Hong Kong.

His many works represent an attempt to bridge the cultural gap between the East and the West. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1940 and 1950.[7]

Dr. Lin was buried at his home in Yangmingshan, Taipei, Taiwan. His home has been turned into a museum, which is operated by Taipei-based Soochow University. The town of Lin’s birth, Banzai, has also preserved the original Lin home and turned it into a museum.

Lin’s reputation and scholarship on Lin

Although his major books have remained in print, Lin is a thinker whose place in modern Chinese intellectual history has been overlooked until recently.[8] Lin themed conventions have been organized in Taiwan and Lin’s native Fujian, and in December 2011, the International Conference on the Cross-cultural Legacy of Lin Yutang in China and America was held at City University of Hong Kong, with professional and private scholars from mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Malaysia, the United States, Germany and Slovakia. The organizer of the conference was Dr. Qian Suoqiao, whose book, Liberal Cosmopolitan: Lin Yutang and Middling Chinese Modernity (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2010) was the first (and still only) full length academic study of Lin in any language.[9] Jing Tsu’s Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010) gives a detailed account of Lin Yutang’s typewriter and its role in the context of late 19th century script reform, Chinese national language reform in the early twentieth century, and the fascinating story of his typewriting keyboard and Machine Translation research during the Cold War.

Family

His wife, Liao TsuiFeng (廖翠鳳), was an author, who, along with her daughter Lin Hsiang Ju, wrote three cookery books which popularized Chinese cuisine in the English speaking world. Dr. Lin wrote introductions which explained the historical background and relevance for American life.

His first daughter Adet Lin (林鳳如; also known as Lin Rusi 林如斯) (1923–1971) was an author who also used the pseudonym Tan Yun.

His second daughter Lin TaiYi (林太乙) (1926–2003) was also known as Anor Lin in her earliest writing, and had the Chinese name 玉如. She was an author and the general editor of Chinese Reader’s Digest from 1965 until her retirement in 1988. She also wrote a biography of her father in Chinese (林語堂傳), which shows some signs of her father’s literary flair.

His third daughter Lin HsiangJu (林相如) (1931-), was referred to as MeiMei in childhood. She was co-author of cookbooks with her mother, and was a biochemist at Queen Mary hospital in Hong Kong.

The daughters all had names containing the character 如 (Ju): Adet 鳳如, Anor 玉如, and HsiangJu 相如.

Works in Chinese or published in China to 1935

(courtesy Lin Yutang House [3])

  • (1928) Jian Fu Collection (Shangha: Bei Hsin Book Company)
  • (1930) Letters of a Chinese Amazon and Wartime Essays (Shanghai: Kaiming
  • (1930) Kaiming English Books (Three Volumes) (Shanghai: Kaiming)
  • (1930) English Literature Reader (Two Volumes) (Shanghai: Kaiming)
  • (1930) Kaiming English Grammar (Two Volumes) (Shanghai: Kaiming)
  • (1931) Reading in Modern Journalistic Prose (Shanghai: Oriental Book)
  • (1933) A Collection of Essays on Linguistics (Shanghai: Kaiming Book)
  • (1934) Da Huang Ji (Shanghai: Living)
  • (1934) My Words First Volume (Sing Su Ji) (Shanghai Times)
  • (1935) Kaiming English Materials (Three Volumes) co-written by Lin Yutang and Lin you-ho (Shanghai: Oriental Book Co.)
  • (1935) The Little Critic: Essays Satires and Sketches on China First Series: 1930-1932 (Shanghai: Oriental Book Co.)
  • (1935) The Little Critic: Essays Satires and Sketches on China Second Series: 1933-1935 (Shanghai: Oriental Book Co.)
  • (1935) Confucius Saw Nancy and Essays about Nothing (Shanghai: Oriental)
  • (1936) My Words Second Volume (Pi Jing Ji) (Shanghai Times)

Works in English

  • (1935) My Country and My People, Reynal & Hitchcock, Inc., (A John Day Book)
  • (1936) A History of the Press and Public Opinion in China, Kelly and Walsh
  • (1937) The Importance of Living, Reynal & Hitchcock, Inc., (A John Day Book)
  • (1938) The Wisdom of Confucius, Random House, The Modern Library
  • (1939) Moment in Peking, The John Day Book Company
  • (1940) With Love & Irony, A John Day Book Company
  • (1941) A Leaf in the Storm, A John Day Book Company
  • (1942) The Wisdom of China and India, Random House
  • (1943) Between Tears & Laughter, A John Day Book Company
  • (1944) The Vigil of a Nation, A John Day Book Company
  • (1945) Between Tears and Laughter, written during World War II, as a bitter plea for the west to change its perspective of the world order. Published in London by Dorothy Crisp & Co Ltd.
  • (1947) The Gay Genius: The Life and Times of Su Tungpo, A John Day Book Company
  • (1948) Chinatown Family, A John Day Book Company
  • (1948) The Wisdom of Laotse, Random House
  • (1950) On the Wisdom of America, A John Day Book Company
  • (1951) Widow, Nun and Courtesan: Three Novelettes From the Chinese Translated and Adapted by Lin Yutang, A John Day Book Company
  • (1952) Famous Chinese Short Stories, retold by Lin Yutang, The John Day Book Company, reprinted 1952, Washington Square Press
  • (1953) The Vermilion Gate, A John Day Book Company
  • (1955) Looking Beyond, Prentice Hall (Published in England as The Unexpected island, Heinemann)
  • (1957) Lady Wu, World Publishing Company
  • (1958) The Secret Name, Farrar, Straus and Cudahy
  • (1959) The Chinese Way of Life, World Publishing Company
  • (1959) From Pagan to Christian, World Publishing Company
  • (1960) Imperial Peking: Seven Centuries of China, Crown Publishers
  • (1960) The Importance of Understanding, World Publishing Company
  • (1961) The Red Peony, World Publishing Company
  • (1962) The Pleasure of a Nonconformist, World Publishing Company
  • (1963) Juniper Loa, World Publishing Company
  • (1964) The Flight of Innocents, G. P. Putnam’s Sons
  • (1973) Chinese-English Dictionary of Modern Usage, Hong Kong Chinese University

quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson Walden by Henry David Thoreau (Full Audiobook)


The days…come and go like muffled and veiled figures sent from a distant friendly party, but they say nothing, and if we do not use the gifts they bring, they carry them as silently away.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

Walden by Henry David Thoreau (Full Audiobook)

today’s image: Mark Twain -The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – published on February 18, 1885



The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was published on February 18, 1885, and became one of the writer’s most famous works. Samuel Clemens, born in 1835, first used the pseudonym of Mark Twain when he wrote a humorous travel account in 1863. Books such as Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer made Mark Twain a popular American author because people could relate to his stories of boyhood adventures colored with social commentary. As a satirical, critical voice of the United States, Twain continued to write and lecture across the country and the world. Mark Twain died in 1910.

Image: Library of Congress

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.uLZdCO1M.dpuf

quotation: Frances Hodgson Burnett


Fate alone saw the meaning of the web it wove, the might of it, and its place in the making of a world’s history.

Frances Hodgson Burnett (1849-1924) Discuss

today’s birthday: Richard Ford, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist


Richard Ford, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
This article is about the American author. For other people, see Richard Ford (disambiguation).
Richard Ford
Richard Ford at Göteborg Book Fair 2013 01.jpg

American writer Richard Ford at the Göteborg Book Fair 2013
Born February 16, 1944 (age 70)
Jackson, Mississippi
Occupation novelist, short story writer
Nationality United States
Period 1976–present
Genre Literary fiction
Literary movement Dirty realism

Richard Ford (born February 16, 1944) is an American novelist and short story writer. His best-known works are the novel The Sportswriter and its sequels, Independence Day and The Lay of the Land, and the short story collection Rock Springs, which contains several widely anthologized stories.      read more

 

today’s image: Alice Lee Roosevelt


Alice Lee Roosevelt

Alice Lee Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt’s irrepressible eldest daughter, married Congressman Nicholas Longworth of Ohio in an elaborate White House ceremony on February 17, 1906. Heedless of social convention, Alice’s behavior routinely shocked her family and friends. Once the president, when confronted with another of Alice’s escapades, remarked, ‘I can do one of two things, I can run the country or control Alice. I cannot do both.’ Nevertheless, the world public was captivated with the first daughter, who seemed to embody the ideal Gay Nineties woman. In spite of its promising beginning, Alice’s 25-year marriage to Longworth was not a happy one, but Alice reigned as the grande dame of Washington, D.C. society for another 50 years. This photo was taken on March 24, 1902.

Photo: Library of Congress

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.QjHzCPzg.dpuf

quotation: Lewis Carroll


How queer everything is to-day! And yesterday things went on just as usual. I wonder if I’ve been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I’m not the same, the next question is, “Who in the world am I?” Ah, that’s the great puzzle!Lewis Carroll (1832-1898) Discuss

Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis


Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis

 

Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis


Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis

quotation: Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself. Leo Tolstoy


Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) Discuss