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Description

For the patrons and staff at a dusty roadside diner, the day begins as usual, but when the phones go out and a sweet old lady goes on the attack, it’s a harbinger of the terror to come. As the horrifying nature of the situation sinks in, help arrives in the form of the archangel Michael (Paul Bettany), who tells a pregnant waitress that her unborn baby is humanity’s last hope, and he will do anything to protect it.

Release date: January 22, 2010 (USA)
Director: Scott Stewart
Box office: 67.9 million USD
Budget: 26 million USD

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Watch “Love Is Blue (1968 original version) – PAUL MAURIAT” on YouTube


Watch “Love Is Blue (1968 original version) – PAUL MAURIAT” on YouTube


  1. Blue, blue, my world is blue

    Blue is my world now I’m without you

    Gray, gray, my life is gray

    Cold is my heart since you went away

    Red, red, my eyes are red

    Crying for you alone in my bed

    Green, green, my jealous heart

    I doubted you and now we’re apart

    When we met how the bright sun shone

    Then love died, now the rainbow is gone

    Black, black, the nights I’ve known

    Longing for you so lost and alone

    Source: Musixmatch

    Songwriters: POPP ANDRE CHARLES JEAN / LEMAIRE PIERRE LOUIS / BLACKBURN BRYAN ANDRE

    Love Is Blue lyrics © Sony/ATV Tunes LLC, Warner Chappell Music France, Radio Tele Music Gmbh, Intersong Tutti Editions Music, Radio Tele Music, S D R M, Radio-tele-music Gmbh, INTERSONG-USA, INC., INTERSONG U S A INC, EDITIONS MUSICALES TUTTI INTERSONG SARL, CROMA MUSIC CO., INC. % MCCG, RADMUS PUBLISHING INC, THE MUSIC GOES ROUND B.V. DBA RADMUS PUBLISHING, INC.

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Now the Swan it floated on the English river
Ah the Rose of High Romance it opened wide
A sun tanned woman yearned me through the summer
And the judges watched us from the other side

I told my mother “Mother I must leave you
Preserve my room but do not shed a tear
Should rumour of a shabby ending reach you
It was half my fault and half the atmosphere”

But the Rose I sickened with a scarlet fever
And the Swan I tempted with a sense of shame
She said at last I was her finest lover
And if she withered I would be to blame

The judges said you missed it by a fraction
Rise up and brace your troops for the attack
Ah the dreamers ride against the men of action
Oh see the men of action falling back

But I lingered on her thighs a fatal moment
I kissed her lips as though I thirsted still
My falsity had stung me like a hornet
The poison sank and it paralyzed my will

I could not move to warn all the younger soldiers
That they had been deserted from above
So on battlefields from here to Barcelona
I’m listed with the enemies of love

And long ago she said “I must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that Rose and wind the Swan”

So daily I renew my idle duty
I touch her here and there, I know my place
I kiss her open mouth and I praise her beauty
And people call me traitor to my face

GeorgeB

General Comment:

Well I guess, it is fundamentally positive, and for a long time I just amaze myself at the beauty of the methaphore, the idea of the world as a stage, as the scene of a quest, in which the spectators are the judges as well, then I heard Leonard Cohen’s explaantion of the line of thought that made him write the poem. It goes like this:

“It was called “The traitor”. It was about the feeling that we have of betraying some mission that we were mandated to fulfill, and being unable to fulfill it, and then coming to understand that the real mandate was not to fulfill it, and that the deeper courage was to stand guiltless in the predicament in which you found yourself”.

It talks about the unvoidable predicament of failure from without, and the only right posture when one’s faced with a situation in which one cannot but fail: standing guiltless, in the predicament in which you find yourself. I think that is positive: not blaming yourself for outcomes of which you could not fully control.

Rating: +1

No Replies

12 Years AgoWinters

General Comment:

  1. It seems to be about a man settling for someone who is not right for him rather than what his heart desires. He becomes an enemy of love, The Men of Action Falling back is the man too weak to take action and leave, following his heart. He has a relationship of physical love but not real love. He is a traitor to himself.

Rating: 0

No Replies

11 Years Agobhoover247

General Comment:

The rose is the womans genitals, the swan would be his. The line “run some wire through the rose and wind the swan” would be the woman asking him to have sex with her. He daily performs his “idle duty” but he doesn’t love her. He has become an “enemy of love” for betraying his true love.

Rating: 0

1 Reply

9 Years AgoRJSoftware

General Comment:

Damb, aint any Cohen song remotley happy?

Rating: 0

No Replies

9 Years AgoStrangerinme

General Comment:

And long ago she said “I must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that Rose and wind the Swan”

God what a punishment ( the cruelty of the victim is almost far more than of the criminal)
He betrayed her , she doesn’t love him no more but she keeps her body for him to have sex with while her soul is somewhere else …

Rating: 0

No Replies

6 Years AgoJohnnyBee

My Interpretation:

What the Traitor has betrayed is the ideal of love. His ‘scarlet fever’ is lust, but when it is satisfied by ‘lingering on her thighs’, the Traitor is shamed. He recognises that other young men go off to battle without high ideals and they too become ‘the enemies of love’.
Lovely metaphors – great Leonard Cohen.

Rating: 0

No Replies

4 Months Agoalerique

General Comment:

Please, note parallels with famous ‘O Rose Thou Art Sick’ by William Blake, with specific reference to Englishness to remove further doubts. This is widened reinterpretation of the famous poem from the worm’s point of view.

O Rose thou art sick.
The invisible worm,
That flies in the night
In the howling storm:

Has found out thy bed
Of crimson joy:
And his dark secret love
Does thy life destroy.

Rating: 0

Watch “Fischer/Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64/Myung Whun Chung/Festival de Saint Denis.” on YouTube


Violin Concerto (Mendelssohn
Felix Mendelssohn’s Violin Concertoin E minor, Op. 64, is his last large orchestral work. It forms an important part of the violin repertoire and is one of the most popular and most frequently performed violin concertosin history.[1][2][3] A typical performance lasts just under half an hour.
Violin Concertoby Felix Mendelssohn

Mendelssohn in 1846

KeyE minorCatalogueOp. 64Year1844PeriodRomanticGenreConcertoComposed1838–1844Movements3ScoringViolin and orchestraPremiereDate13 March 1845LocationLeipzig
Mendelssohn originally proposed the idea of the violin concerto to Ferdinand David, a close friend and then concertmaster of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. Although conceived in 1838, the work took another six years to complete and was not premiered until 1845. During this time, Mendelssohn maintained a regular correspondence with David, who gave him many suggestions. The work itself was one of the foremost violin concertos of the Romantic era and was influential on many other composers.

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Watch “Cab Calloway – “St James Infirmary Blues” (Extended Betty Boop Snow White Version)” on YouTube


Watch “Mocedades Tomame o dejame” on YouTube



Tómame o déjame
Pero no me pidas que te crea más
Cuando llegas tarde a casa

No tienes porque inventar
Pues tu ropa huele a leña de otro hogar
Tómame o déjame
Si no estoy despierta, déjame soñar
No me beses en la frente
Sabes que te oí llegar
Y tu beso sabe a culpabilidad
Tú me admiras porque callo y miro al cielo
Porque no me ves llorar
Y te sientes cada día más pequeño
Y esquivas mi mirada en tu mirar
Tómame o déjame
Ni te espío ni te quito libertad
Pero si dejas el nido
Si me vas a abandonar
Házlo antes de que empiece a clarear
Tu me admiras porque callo y miro al cielo
Porque no me ves llorar
Y te sentes cada dia mas pequeño
Y ezquibas mi mirada y tu mirar
Tómame o déjame
Y si vuelves trae contigo la verdad
Trae erguida la mirada
Trae contigo mi rival
Si es mejor que yo podré entonces llorar
Translate to English

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Juan Carlos Calderon Lopez De Arroyabe
Tomame O Dejame lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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Watch “Hugh Laurie – Saint James Infirmary (Let Them Talk, A Celebration of New Orleans Blues)” on YouTube


It was down by old Joe’s barroom, on the corner of the square
They were serving drinks as usual, and the usual crowd was there
On my left stood Big Joe McKennedy, and his eyes were bloodshot red
And he turned his face to the people, these were the very words he said
I was down to St. James infirmary, I saw my baby there
She was stretched out on a long white table,
So sweet, cool and so fair
Let her go, let her go, God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this whole wide world over
Never find a sweeter man as me
When I die please bury me in my high top Stetson hat
Put a twenty dollar gold piece on my watch chain
The gang’ll know I died standing pat
Let her go, let her go God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this wide world over
Never find a sweeter man as me
I want six crapshooters to be my pallbearers
Three pretty women to sing a song
Stick a jazz band on my hearse wagon
Raise hell as I stroll along
Let her go Let her go
God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this whole wide
World over
She’ll never find a sweeter
Man as me
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Joe Primrose / Irving Mills
St. James Infirmary lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, Downtown Music Publishing, Spirit Music Group, BMG Rights

St. James Infirmary Blues

“St. James Infirmary” on tenor sax

St. James Infirmary Blues” is an American jazz song of uncertain origin. Louis Armstrong made the song famous in his 1928 recording on which Don Redman was credited as composer; later releases gave the name Joe Primrose, a pseudonym of Irving Mills. The melody is 8 bars long, unlike songs in the classic blues genre, where there are 12 bars. It is in a minor key, and has a 4/4 time signature, but has also been played in 3/4.

Authorship and historyEdit

“St. James Infirmary Blues”, sometimes known as “Gambler’s Blues”, is often regarded as an American folk song of anonymous origin. Moore and Baxter published a version of “Gambler’s Blues” in 1925.[1]In 1927, Carl Sandburg published a book called The American Songbagwhich contained lyrics for two versions of a song called “Those Gambler’s Blues”.[2] However, the song “St. James Infirmary Blues” is sometimes credited to the songwriter Joe Primrose (a pseudonym for Irving Mills), who held copyrights for several versions of the song, registering the first in 1929. He claimed the rights to this specific title and won a case in the U.S. Supreme Court on this basis, the defendants having failed to produce the documentary evidence required by the court that the song had been known by that name for some years.[1]

“St. James Infirmary Blues” is sometimes said to be based on an eighteenth-century traditional folk song called “The Unfortunate Rake” (also known as “The Unfortunate Lad” or “The Young Man Cut Down in His Prime”) about a soldier who uses his money on prostitutes and then dies of venereal disease. But the familiar recorded versions (such as Armstrong’s) bear little relation to the older traditional song. The earliest known form of this song was called “The Buck’s Elegy” and is set in Covent Garden, London.[3]

According to Robert W. Harwood, A. L. Lloyd was the first person to connect “St. James Infirmary” with “The Unfortunate Lad/Rake”.[1]:36 Harwood refers to a five-page article by Lloyd in the January 1947 issue of the English music magazine Keynote.[4] In 1956, Lloyd published a revised version of this article in Sing magazine.[5] In both articles Lloyd refers to an English broadside song entitled “The Unfortunate Lad”, commenting that the song is sometimes known as “The Unfortunate Rake”. No date or source for the latter title is given. The opening line of this version of the song refers to the “lock hospital”, not to an institution named St James. The term “lock hospital” was the name of an institution in Southwark, London, where lepers were isolated and treated. The lock in Southwark was used for those suffering from venereal diseases. The longer term came into use as a generic term for a hospital treating venereal diseases. Its first recorded use is 1770.

Lloyd claims that a song collected by Cecil Sharp in the Appalachians in 1918 which contains the words “St James Hospital” is the parent song and that it looks like an elder relative of “The Dying Cowboy”. The opening of that song, as quoted by Lloyd, is:

As I went down by St James Hospital one morning,
So early one morning, it was early one day,
I found my son, my own son,
Wrapped up in white linen, as cold as the clay.

He also claims that this Appalachian version derives in turn from the version published by Such in London in the 1850s which refers to a lock hospital. The opening verse of this song, entitled “The Unfortunate Lad”, is:

As I was walking down by the Lock Hospital,
As I was walking one morning of late,
Who did I spy but my own dear comrade,
Wrapp’d up in flannel, so hard was his fate.

Lloyd’s articles comment on the jazz hit “St. James Infirmary Blues”. The first article asserts that “the song is, or was before it became corrupted, a narrative ballad. Such ballads are rare in Negro song…So doubts are raised about whether ‘St. James Infirmary’ began life as a Negro song”.[4]:10 The second article includes the following comment on the song: “Most versions of ‘Infirmary’ include a number of stanzas from other songs, grafted on to the main stem – a confusion especially common with songs current among Negroes. The curious switchover from the actual death of the girl to the hypothetical death of the gambler creates some ambiguity too”.[5]:19 Lloyd points out that in some early variants of “The Unfortunate Rake” the sex of the victim of venereal disease was female. “We realise that the confusion in the ‘Infirmary’, where the dead person is a woman but the funeral is ordered for a man, is surely due to the fact that the original ballad was commonly recorded in a form in which the sexes were reversed, so singers were often in two minds whether they were singing of a rakish man or a bad girl”.[5]:21

Lloyd’s second article is cited as a reference by Kenneth Goldstein in his liner notes for a 1960 Folkways LP called The Unfortunate Rake. These liner notes are often used as a source for the history of “St. James Infirmary Blues”. One example is an article by Rob Walker.[6] The liner notes raise the question of whether St. James’ Hospital was a real place and, if so, where it was. Goldstein claimed in the notes that “St. James” refers to London’s St. James Hospital, a religious foundation for the treatment of leprosy. His references list an article by Kenneth Lodewick. That article states, giving no reference or source for the idea, that the phrase “St. James Hospital” refers to a hospital of that name in London.[7]There is some difficulty in this because the hospital in question closed in 1532 when Henry VIIIacquired the land to build St James’s Palace.[8]

Another possibility suggested by Higginbotham on the basis of his claim that the song “St. James Infirmary” dates at least from the early nineteenth century, is the Infirmary section of the St James Workhousewhich the St. James Parish opened in 1725 on Poland Street, Piccadilly, and which continued well into the nineteenth century.[9] This St. James Infirmary was contemporaneous with the estimated advent of the song “The Unfortunate Lad”, but it is not the London Lock Hospital. Another difficulty is that, out of the early versions of the song mentioned in the references given by Goldstein, only the one collected by Cecil Sharp in the Appalachians in 1918, and one found in Canada in the 1920s, make use of the phrase “St. James”.

The liner notes link the Rake to an early fragment called “My Jewel, My Joy”, stating that it was heard in Dublin. The same statement appears in the Lodewick article referenced in those notes[7] The notes given in the source cited for this fragment, a collection of songs collected by William Forde and published by P. W. Joyce, state that the song was heard in Cork, not Dublin.[10]

The version of the “Unfortunate Rake” on the LP of that name is sung by Lloyd, of whom it has been said that he “sometimes modified lyrics or melodies to make the songs more palatable for contemporary listeners”,[1]:38 and its first verse is as follows:

As I was a-walking down by St. James Hospital,
I was a-walking down by there one day.
What should I spy but one of my comrades
All wrapped up in a flannel though warm was the day.[a]

The liner notes[11] state that Lloyd is singing a nineteenth century broadside version, but do not specify which. The Lloyd article cited in the references given in the liner notes,[5]refers to a version published by Such and to no other version. The title and words sung by Lloyd are not those of the Such broadside[12] which has no reference to St. James and is not called “The Unfortunate Rake”. Lloyd recorded a slightly different version in 1966, this time calling the song “St James Hospital”.[13] In 1967, his book Folk Song in England was published.[14] This includes some comment on the song, claims without any supporting references or information that a Czech version pre-dates the British ones, repeats the confusion between Dublin and Cork as the place where the “My Jewel My Joy” fragment had been heard, and includes an unattributed quotation of two verses that differ from the versions sung by Lloyd.

Variations typically feature a narrator telling the story of a young man “cut down in his prime” (occasionally, a young woman “cut down in her prime”) as a result of morally questionable behaviour. For example, when the song moved to America, gambling and alcohol became common causes of the youth’s death.[15]

There are numerous versions of the song throughout the English-speaking world. For example, it evolved into other American standards such as “The Streets of Laredo“.[16]

The song, “Dyin’ Crapshooter’s Blues”, has sometimes been described as a descendant of “The Unfortunate Rake”, and thus related to “St. James Infirmary Blues”. This song was issued as a record four times in 1927, and attributed to pianist, arranger, and band-leader Porter Grainger.[17] Blind Willie McTell recorded a version of the former for John Lomax in 1940 and claimed to have begun writing the song around 1929.

Gottlieb considered whether there were Jewish American influences through the use of the Ukrainian Dorian mode, but only found hints of this in a version published by Siegmeister and Downes.[18] He also suggests that there may have been Jewish influences on the rendition by Cab Calloway.[18]:211 A melody very similar to the Armstrong version can be found in an instrumental composition entitled “Charleston Cabin”, which was recorded by Whitey Kaufman’s Original Pennsylvania Serenaders in 1924 (three years before the earliest recording of “Gambler’s Blues”).[1]:39

As with many folk songs, there is much variation in the lyric from one version to another. These are the first two stanzas as sung by Louis Armstrong on a 1928 Odeon Records release:

I went down to St. James Infirmary,
Saw my baby there,
Stretched out on a long white table,
So cold, so sweet, so fair.

Let her go, let her go, God bless her,
Wherever she may be,
She can look this wide world over,
But she’ll never find a sweet man like me.

Some of the versions, such as the one published as “Gambler’s Blues” and attributed to Carl Moore and Phil Baxter, frame the story with an initial stanza or stanzas in which a separate narrator goes down to a saloon known as “Joe’s barroom” and encounters a customer who then relates the incident about the woman in the infirmary. Later verses commonly include the speaker’s request to be buried according to certain instructions, which vary according to the version.[19]

Other versionsEdit

Koko the clown (a rotoscopedCab Calloway) performing the song in the 1933 Betty Boopanimation Snow White

The song was first recorded (as “Gambler’s Blues”) in 1927 by Fess Williams and his Royal Flush Orchestra with credits given to Moore and Baxter.[1]:150This version mentions an infirmary but not by name. The song was popular during the jazz era, and by 1930 at least eighteen different versions had been released.[1]:30 The Duke Ellington Orchestra recorded the song using pseudonyms such as “The Ten Black Berries”, “The Harlem Hot Chocolates”, and “The Jungle Band”,[1]:19 while Cab Callowayperformed a version in the 1933 Betty Boop animated film Snow White, providing vocals and dance moves for Koko the clown.[20]

In 1961, Bobby “Blue” Bland released a version of “Saint James Infirmary” on the flip side of his No. 2 R&B hit “Don’t Cry No More” and included it in his album Two Steps from the Blues.[21][22]In 1967 the French-American singer Joe Dassin recorded the song. In 1968, Don Partridge released a version on his self-named album, as did Eric Burdon and the Animals on their album Every One of Us.[23]Dock Boggs recorded a version of the song entitled “Old Joe’s Barroom” (1965)[24]

The song was often performed by cabaret surrealists The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo in South California; the band’s vocalist and songwriter, Danny Elfman, often cited Cab Calloway as his inspiration in his youth. The White Stripes covered the song on their self-titled debut album, and Jack White says he and fellow band member, Meg White, were introduced to the song from a Betty Boop cartoon.[25] In 1981, Bob Dylan adapted the song when he wrote and recorded “Blind Willie McTell”. The song was written for his 1983 release, Infidels, but was not released until The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991 (Columbia, 1991).[26] In 2012, Trombone Shortyand Booker T. Jones performed an instrumental version as the opening number of the “Red, White, and Blues” concert at the White House.[27]

See alsoEdit

Watch “Comme d’habitude Claude François” on YouTube


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Je me lève
Et je te bouscule
Tu ne te réveilles pas
Comme d’habitude
Sur toi je remonte le drap
J’ai peur que tu aies froid
Comme d’habitude
Ma main caresse tes cheveux
Presque malgré moi
Comme d’habitude
Mais toi tu me tournes le dos
Comme d’habitude
Alors je m’habille très vite
Je sors de la chambre
Comme d’habitude
Tout seul je bois mon café
Je suis en retard
Comme d’habitude
Sans bruit je quitte la maison
Tout est gris dehors
Comme d’habitude
J’ai froid, je relève mon col
Comme d’habitude
Comme d’habitude
Toute la journée
Je vais jouer à faire semblant
Comme d’habitude
Je vais sourire
Comme d’habitude
Je vais même rire
Comme d’habitude
Enfin je vais vivre
Comme d’habitude
Et puis le jour s’en ira
Moi je reviendrai
Comme d’habitude
Tu seras sortie
Et pas encore rentrée
Comme d’habitude
Tout seul j’irai me coucher
Dans ce grand lit froid
Comme d’habitude
Mes larmes, je les cacherai
Comme d’habitude
Comme d’habitude
Même la nuit
Je vais jouer à faire semblant
Comme d’habitude
Tu rentreras
Comme d’habitude
Je t’attendrai
Comme d’habitude
Tu me souriras
Comme d’habitude
Comme d’habitude
Tu te déshabilleras
Comme d’habitude
Tu te coucheras
Comme d’habitude
On s’embrassera
Comme d’habitude

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Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Gilles Thibaut / Claude François / Jacques Revaux

Comme D’Habitude lyrics © Warner Chappell Music France, Jeune Musique Editions

Watch “MY WAY (Frank Sinatra) LYRICS” on YouTube


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“My Way” lyrics

Frank Sinatra Lyrics

Play “My Way”

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“My Way”

And now, the end is near
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I’ll say it clear
I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain
I’ve lived a life that’s full
I traveled each and every highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

Regrets, I’ve had a few
But then again, too few to mention
I did what I had to do and saw it through without exemption
I planned each charted course, each careful step along the byway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

Yes, there were times, I’m sure you knew
When I bit off more than I could chew
But through it all, when there was doubt
I ate it up and spit it out
I faced it all and I stood tall and did it my way

I’ve loved, I’ve laughed and cried
I’ve had my fill, my share of losing
And now, as tears subside, I find it all so amusing
To think I did all that
And may I say, not in a shy way
Oh, no, oh, no, not me, I did it my way

For what is a man, what has he got?
If not himself, then he has naught
To say the things he truly feels and not the words of one who kneels
The record shows I took the blows and did it my way

[instrumental]

Yes, it was my way

Thanks to James Worman for correcting these lyrics.

Listen to music like Frank Sinatra

live near Downey

Writer(s): Paul Anka, Claude François
Paul Anka wrote the lyrics for this song based on a French song called “Comme d’habitude”, recorded by Claude Francois in 1967. Anka heard it in France and wrote “My Way” when he returned to New York. He gave it to Frank Sinatra, who recorded it on the 30th of December 1968.
Despite being the signature song for Frank Sinatra, he didn’t like it actually, and said in his later years about it as “a Paul Anka pop hit which became a kind of national anthem”.
In the UK, this song entered the charts six times between 1970-1971 becoming the song with the longest stay on the chart.
Elvis Presley performed “My Way” live in the end of his career. His live version of it was released as a single after his death in 1977.
The Sex Pistols recorded a Punk version of this track in 1979. Their version was used during

https://youtu.be/GME3fMeK5ts

Je me lèveEt je te bouscule
Tu ne te réveilles pas
  1. Comme d’habitude
    Sur toi je remonte le drap
    J’ai peur que tu aies froid
    Comme d’habitude
    Ma main caresse tes cheveux
    Presque malgré moi
    Comme d’habitude
    Mais toi tu me tournes le dos
    Comme d’habitude
    Alors je m’habille très vite
    Je sors de la chambre
    Comme d’habitude
    Tout seul je bois mon café
    Je suis en retard
    Comme d’habitude
    Sans bruit je quitte la maison
    Tout est gris dehors
    Comme d’habitude
    J’ai froid, je relève mon col
    Comme d’habitude
    Comme d’habitude
    Toute la journée
    Je vais jouer à faire semblant
    Comme d’habitude
    Je vais sourire
    Comme d’habitude
    Je vais même rire
    Comme d’habitude
    Enfin je vais vivre
    Comme d’habitude
    Et puis le jour s’en ira
    Moi je reviendrai
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu seras sortie
    Et pas encore rentrée
    Comme d’habitude
    Tout seul j’irai me coucher
    Dans ce grand lit froid
    Comme d’habitude
    Mes larmes, je les cacherai
    Comme d’habitude
    Comme d’habitude
    Même la nuit
    Je vais jouer à faire semblant
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu rentreras
    Comme d’habitude
    Je t’attendrai
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu me souriras
    Comme d’habitude
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu te déshabilleras
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu te coucheras
    Comme d’habitude
    On s’embrassera
    Comme d’habitude
    Translate to English
    Source: LyricFind
    Songwriters: Gilles Thibaut / Claude François / Jacques Revaux
    Comme D’Habitude lyrics © Warner Chappell Music France, Jeune Musique Editions

Watch “Strangers In The Night – Frank Sinatra (LYRICS/LETRA) [60s]” on YouTube


Frank Sinatra Lyrics

Listen to music like Frank Sinatra

live near Downey

“Something”

Something in the way she moves
Attracts me like no other lover
Something in the way that she woos me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

Somewhere in her smile she knows
I don’t need no other lover
Something in her style that shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

You’re asking me will my love grow
Well, I don’t know, no, I don’t know
You stick around, Jack, it might show
I don’t know, no, I don’t know

Something in the way she knows
All I gotta do is just think of her
Something in the things that she shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

[instrumental]

You’re asking me will my love grow
I don’t know, no, I don’t know
But you hang around, Jack, it might show
I don’t know, no, I don’t know

Something in the way she knows me
And all I gotta do is just think of her
Something in those things that she shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

Mm, mm, mm, mm, mm, mm

I don’t plan to leave her now

Thank You: to all followers of euzicasa! I promise all and each and everyone of you a great time while visiting this website!


Thank You: to all followers of euzicasa! I promise all and each and everyone of you a great time while  visiting this website!

Thank You: to all followers of euzicasa! I promise all and each and everyone of you a great time while visiting this website!

Watch “You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me – Dusty Springfield (Original Soundtrack with Lyrics♪)” on YouTube



When I said I needed you
You said you would always stay
It wasn’t me who changed but you and now you’ve gone away
Don’t you see that now you’ve gone
And I’m left here on my own
That I have to follow you and beg you to come home

You don’t have to say you love me just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever I will understand
Believe me, believe me I can’t help but love you
But believe me I’ll never tie you down
Left alone with just a memory
Life seems dead and quite unreal
All that’s left is loneliness there’s nothing left to feel
You don’t have to say you love me just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever
I will understand believe me, believe me
You don’t have to say you love me just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever
I will understand, believe me, believe me
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Giuseppe Donaggio / Simon Napier-Bell / Vito Pallavicini / Vicki Heather Wickham
You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me lyrics © Downtown Music Publishing

Watch “Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb (1963 / 1964) Full Movie” on YouTube


Watch “Execution Scene From The Long Ships (1964)” on YouTube


Watch “The Vikings 1958.. Best Scene Ever!!” on YouTube


Watch “Brenda Lee – All Alone Am I (1963) [HQ]” on YouTube



All alone am I ever since your goodbye
All alone with just a beat of my heart
People all around but I don’t hear a sound
Just the lonely beating of my heart

No use in holding other hands
For I’d be holding only emptiness
No use in kissing other lips
For I’d be thinking just of your caress
All alone am I ever since your goodbye
All alone with just a beat of my heart
People all around but I don’t hear a sound
Just the lonely beating of my heart
No other voice can say the words
My heart must hear to ever sing again
The words you used to whisper low
No other love can ever bring again
All alone am I ever since your goodbye
All alone with just a beat of my heart
People all around but I don’t hear a sound
Just the lonely beating of my heart
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Manos Hadjidakis / Arthur Altman / Ioannis Ioannidis
All Alone Am I lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, A.E.P.I.

Watch “Brenda Lee – The end of the world(1963)” on YouTube



Why does the sun go on shining?
Why does the sea rush to shore?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
‘Cause you don’t love me anymore

Why do the birds go on singing?
Why do the stars glow above?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
It ended when I lost your love
I wake up in the morning and I wonder
Why everything’s the same as it was
I can’t understand, no, I can’t understand
How life goes on the way it does
Why does my heart go on beating?
Why do these eyes of mine cry?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
It ended when you said goodbye
Why does my heart go on beating?
Why do these eyes of mine cry?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
It ended when you said goodbye
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Peter Mcnulty-Connolly / Marcus Mybe / Louie St. Louis / Kurtis Deshaun Williams / Michael Angelo
The End of the World lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Watch “Monty Python Communist Quiz sketch” on YouTube


Watch “The Old Man and the Sea – Short, Animation” on YouTube


Watch “The Pearl by John Steinbeck (Full Movie)” on YouTube