Category Archives: FILM

quotation: Agatha Christie


Who is there who has not felt a sudden startled pang at reliving an old experience or feeling an old emotion?

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

Gotham City: DC Comics’ Batman character


 

Gotham City

Gotham City is a fictional city that is best known as the home of DC Comics’ Batman character. Gotham is known to be architecturally modeled after New York City, but with exaggerated elements and styles. Gotham also sometimes serves as a nickname for New York, and was first popularized as such by the author Washington Irving. What is Arkham Asylum? More… Discuss

Published on Apr 4, 2015

Cartoon Movie Batman works desperately to find a bomb planted by the Joker while Amanda Waller hires her newly formed Suicide Squad to break into Arkham Asylum to recover vital information stolen by the Riddler.
Best Cartoon Movies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IE_eF…

 

Darkrooms


Darkrooms

A darkroom is a workspace for the processing of light-sensitive materials. Darkrooms have been used for black and white photography since the late 19th century, but their popularity has waned with the introduction of color, Polaroid, and digital photography. The most familiar black and white processes involve developing the image, stopping the development, fixing the image, then washing and drying it. Why is it safe to use red or amber lighting in a darkroom? More… Discuss

The Murders in the Rue Morgue (FULL Audiobook)


The Murders in the Rue Morgue (FULL Audiobook)

today’s birthday: Harold Lloyd (1893)


Harold Lloyd (1893)

Famous for his comic portrayals of a wistful innocent with horn-rimmed glasses who blunders in and out of hair-raising situations, American movie actor Harold Lloyd was the most popular film comedian of the 1920s. He appeared in over 500 films, including many shorts, spanning both the silent and sound eras. Noted for his use of physical danger as a source of comedy, he performed his own stunts, famously hanging from the hands of a clock far above the street in an iconic scene from what film? More… Discuss

ARMENIAN GENOCIDE history


ARMENIAN GENOCIDE history

today’s picture: The Little Tramp



The Little Tramp

Producer, director, composer and silent movie comedian Charlie Chaplin was born in London on April 16, 1889, into a family of music hall performers. Visiting America with a touring company in 1913, Chaplin was cast in his first film, “Making a Living”. Although historians are not certain when the ‘little tramp’ was created, Chaplin remains most readily identified with that beloved character. This photo, showing Chaplin with child star Jackie Coogan, is from the sentimental 1921 film “The Kid”. Chaplin died in Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland, on December 25, 1977.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.N2uNhh7X.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: Public Kinetoscope Parlor Opens in New York (1894)


Public Kinetoscope Parlor Opens in New York (1894)

The kinetoscope is an early motion picture exhibition device that creates the illusion of movement by conveying a filmstrip of sequential images over a light source with a high-speed shutter. The first public kinetoscope parlor was opened in New York City in 1894 and introduced the basic approach that would become the standard for all cinematic projection before the advent of video. The venue had 10 machines, each showing a different short movie. How much did it cost to view all 10 films? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Tom Clancy (1947)


Tom Clancy (1947)

Before beginning his writing career, American novelist Tom Clancy worked as an insurance agent. His first novel was the hit The Hunt for Red October, one of the defining works of the “techno-thriller” genre—suspenseful narratives in which military technology and espionage play a prominent part. He has 17 other bestsellers to his name, including Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger, the latter the bestselling novel of the 1980s. What are some of his nonfiction titles? More… Discuss

Suite from ‘Dances With Wolves’ – John Barry , great compositions/ soundtracks


Suite from ‘Dances With Wolves’ – John Barry

Pablo Neruda – Always (…’I am not jealous of what came before me.’…)


Pablo Neruda – Always

I am not jealous
of what came before me.
Come with a man
on your shoulders,
come with a hundred men in your hair,
come with a thousand men between your breasts and your feet,
come like a river
full of drowned men
which flows down to the wild sea,
to the eternal surf, to Time!

Bring them all
to where I am waiting for you;
we shall always be alone,
we shall always be you and I
alone on earth
to start our life!
********************************************

today’s birthday: Marlon Brando (1924)


Marlon Brando (1924)

Regarded as the greatest actor of his generation and one of the most influential actors of all time, Marlon Brando was known for his naturalistic performances. He achieved fame on Broadway in A Streetcar Named Desire, later starring in the film version. Considered the foremost practitioner of the New York Actors Studio style of “method” acting, Brando earned Academy Awards for his roles in On the Waterfront and The Godfather. Why did he refuse the latter award? More… Discuss

From NPR News: Here Comes ‘The X-Files,’ Back For More Mulder, More Scully, And Mor


Here Comes ‘The X-Files,’ Back For More Mulder, More Scully, And More http://n.pr/1NbuXHm

Posted from WordPress for Android

Gulag


Gulag

The Gulag was a system of forced-labor prison camps in the USSR, from the Russian acronym for the Main Directorate of Corrective Labor Camps, a department of the Soviet secret police. It was first established under Lenin during the early Bolshevik years and ultimately included 476 camp complexes. The system reached its peak after 1928 under Stalin, who used it to maintain the Soviet state by keeping its populace in a state of terror. Whose book publicized the gulag system to the Western world? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Who Shot J.R.? (1980) (remember Dallas?)


Who Shot J.R.? (1980)

The 1980 season finale of the popular prime-time soap opera Dallas ended with the show’s central character—J.R. Ewing, a greedy, scheming oil baron—being shot by an unknown assailant. The cliffhanger left viewers wondering for months whether he would survive and which of his many enemies had pulled the trigger. The episode that revealed the culprit became one of the highest rated television shows in history, drawing an estimated 83 million viewers. So, who shot J.R.? More… Discuss

TUNISIA ATTACK – Islamic state group claims responsibility for Tunis museum attack


TUNISIA ATTACK – Islamic state group claims responsibility for Tunis museum attack

Historic Musical Bits: Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Bernstein , great compositions/performances


Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Bernstein

today’s birthday: Jerry Lewis (1926)


Jerry Lewis (1926)

Lewis, an entertainer known for his slapstick comedy, became popular in the 1940s through his partnership with Dean Martin. They performed together in nightclubs as well as 17 films before parting ways in 1956. Lewis then went on to direct and star in The Nutty Professor and many other movies. He left filmmaking in the 1970s to focus on supporting and fundraising for the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Who was responsible for reuniting Martin and Lewis during a 1976 MDA telethon? More… Discuss

Blue, White and Green (Nature’s Music)


Blue, White and Green

White clouds, blue skies, all seen through the green branches of the trees, with a background of running breeze through the fresh, green leafage…If we are lucky enough we can just let it fill us with the miracle of nature we take for granted every moment because:
There is nothing to replace it, nothing to act as its surrogate, nothing in waiting, after all this natural creation is destroyed.
Respect and preserve nature, find its meaning keep it clean, as you would your garden…It is your garden!

This insignificant video was taken under a tree along the trail at Turnbull Canyon, yesterday. Enjoy!
This is my personal video: As such it cannot be used by any for profit organization, including any TV station in the USA, or Abroad (this selection does not appear anywhere in the long list…)

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev) Joseph Aknin Joseph Aknin


P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

today’s birthday: Chuck Norris (1940) (Chuck Norris vs. Bruce Lee in “The Way of the Dragon”)


Chuck Norris (1940)

Carlos “Chuck” Norris is an American martial artist and action star best known for his titular role on the television series Walker, Texas Ranger. After serving in the US Air Force, Norris became a martial arts champion and an actor, starring in many action films. In 2005, Norris became the subject of an Internet phenomenon known as “Chuck Norris Facts,” which document fictional, often absurdly heroic feats and characteristics about him. Which “fact” is reportedly Norris’s favorite? More… Discuss

Bruce Lee Vs Chuck Norris (Way of the Dragon) Climactic Fight to Death

 

Lenka – Blue Skies


Lenka – Blue Skies

Article: The Addams Family (who doesn’t recall the tune…)


The Addams Family

The Addams Family Theme song

The Addams Family is a group of eccentric characters representing a satirical inversion of the ideal American nuclear family. A creation of American cartoonist Charles Addams, the group first appeared in a comic strip in The New Yorker, and has since been featured in TV shows, movies, and video games. In Charles Addams’ original cartoons, the characters were not named. When the TV show was developed, Addams was asked to contribute names. All his suggestions were used except for what? More… Discuss

China’s version of ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ is going viral— msnbc (@msnbc)


Glazunov: Symphony No. 7 in F major ‘Pastorale’, Op. 77 (Anissimov, Moscow Symphony Orchestra)


Glazunov: Symphony No. 7 in F major ‘Pastorale’, Op. 77 (Anissimov, Moscow Symphony Orchestra)


Cardinal Luis Tagle to Pope Francis

from EUZICASA: Henry and June Movie: soundtrack playlist: 17 videos


Lucienne Boyer – Parlez-Moi D’Amour [1930]

Cultural Museum of Mosul


Cultural Museum of Mosul

THE BEST ANCIENT EGYPT DOCUMENTARY (MUST SEE !!!): Kudos to Egypt for Fighting for its rightful place among the civilized nations of the Earth including the fight for revenge its kidnapped and slaughtered citizens by ISIS


THE BEST ANCIENT EGYPT DOCUMENTARY (MUST SEE !!!)

Zorro


Zorro

Zorro, Spanish for “fox,” is a fictional character created by Johnston McCulley. The masked swordsman made his first appearance in The Curse of Capistrano, serialized in a pulp magazine in 1919. Zorro’s true identity is Don Diego de la Vega, a nobleman who lives in Spanish-era California and disguises himself in a mask to protect the common people from tyrannical officials. It has been noted that Zorro was actually one of the original inspirations for what comic strip action heroes? More… Discuss

this pressed: BBC News – Manannán Mac Lir: Games of Thrones sculptor’s statue found


Manannán Mac Lir: Games of Thrones sculptor’s statue found

23 February 2015 Last updated at 18:36 GMT

A 6 ft sculpture of a Celtic sea god that was stolen from Binevenagh mountain, near Limavady, in County Londonderry has been recovered by soldiers on a training exercise.

Manannán Mac Lir, which is made out of fibre glass and stainless steel, was stolen last month.

BBC News NI’s Keiron Tourish reports.

Online campaign for statue’s return

Religious link to statue theft probe

22 January 2015

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via BBC News – Manannán Mac Lir: Games of Thrones sculptor’s statue found.

The Great Gatsby


The Great Gatsby

Written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, an American novelist of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby is today considered standard reading in high school courses on American literature. It tells the story of a bootlegger whose obsessive dream of wealth and lost love is destroyed by a corrupt reality. Cynical yet poignant, the novel is a devastating portrait of the so-called American Dream, which measures success and love in terms of money. What other titles did Fitzgerald consider for this novel? More… Discuss

Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis


Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis

 

Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis


Noam Chomsky on the rise of Islamic State & the Ukraine crisis

Noam Chomsky in conversation with Jonathan Freedland


Noam Chomsky in conversation with Jonathan Freedland

Historic musical moments: Death and Transfiguration (Tod und Verklärung, Op. 24) : Richard Strauss , great compositions/performances


Historic Musical Moments:  Death and Transfiguration (Tod und Verklärung, Op. 24) : Richard Strauss

How to meditate for beginners at home (www.ishakriya.com for FULL guided meditation technique)


How to meditate for beginners at home (www.ishakriya.com for FULL guided meditation technique)

Guided Meditation (Shavasana) – Deep Relaxation


Guided Meditation (Shavasana) – Deep Relaxation

*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati


*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati


Documentary | The Boy With Divine Powers – History Channel – National Geographic

Nigel Farage: Stop playing wargames with Putin


Nigel Farage: Stop playing wargames with Putin

EU faces Greek democracy in great euro poker game – UKIP Leader Nigel Farage


EU faces Greek democracy in great euro poker game – UKIP Leader Nigel Farage

Education: Dare to listen: Leo Tolstoy — Anna Karenina {audiobook – in 5 parts}


D octor Who: “the fat just walks away” Myth and all myths of loosing fat effortlessly: consumer beware!


Doctor Who – Season 4 – Episode 1 – “Partners in Crime” – Trailer [HD]

Dust Bowl The Dust Bowl – The Plow That Broke The Plains (1936) Documentary. News Core re-score. History.


Dust Bowl


The Dust Bowl – The Plow That Broke The Plains (1936) Documentary. News Core re-score. History.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


For other uses, see Dust Bowl (disambiguation).

 
A farmer and his two sons during a dust storm in Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936, Photo: Arthur Rothstein

The Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the US and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought and a failure to apply dryland farming methods to prevent wind erosion (the Aeolian processes) caused the phenomenon. The drought came in three waves, 1934, 1936, and 1939–40, but some regions of the High Plains experienced drought conditions for as many as eight years.[1] With insufficient understanding of the ecology of the Plains, farmers had conducted extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains during the previous decade; this had displaced the native, deep-rooted grasses that normally trapped soil and moisture even during periods of drought and high winds. The rapid mechanization of farm equipment, especially small gasoline tractors, and widespread use of the combine harvester contributed to farmers’ decisions to convert arid grassland (much of which received no more than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year) to cultivated cropland.[citation needed]

During the drought of the 1930s, the unanchored soil turned to dust, which the prevailing winds blew away in huge clouds that sometimes blackened the sky. These choking billows of dust – named “black blizzards” or “black rollers” – traveled cross country, reaching as far as such East Coast cities as New York City and Washington, D.C. On the Plains, they often reduced visibility to 1 metre (3.3 ft) or less. Associated Press reporter Robert E. Geiger happened to be in Boise City, Oklahoma to witness the “Black Sunday” black blizzards of April 14, 1935; Edward Stanley, Kansas City news editor of the Associated Press coined the term “Dust Bowl” while rewriting Geiger’s news story.[2][3]

The drought and erosion of the Dust Bowl affected 100,000,000 acres (400,000 km2) that centered on the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma and touched adjacent sections of New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas.[4]

The Dust Bowl forced tens of thousands of families to abandon their farms. Many of these families, who were often known as “Okies” because so many of them came from Oklahoma, migrated to California and other states to find that the Great Depression had rendered economic conditions there little better than those they had left. Author John Steinbeck wrote Of Mice and Men (1937) and The Grapes of Wrath (1939) about migrant workers and farm families displaced by the Dust Bowl.

 

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History (Tuesday, February 10, 2015)


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 10

1258   Huegu, a Mongol leader, seizes Baghdad, bringing and end to the Abbasid caliphate.
1620   Supporters of Marie de Medici, the queen mother, who has been exiled to Blois, are defeated by the king’s troops at Ponts de Ce, France.
1763   The Treaty of Paris ends the French-Indian War. France gives up all her territories in the New World except New Orleans and a few scattered islands.
1799   Napoleon Bonaparte leaves Cairo, Egypt, for Syria, at the head of 13,000 men.
1814   Napoleon personally directs lightning strikes against enemy columns advancing toward Paris, beginning with a victory over the Russians at Champaubert.
1840   Queen Victoria marries Prince Albert.
1846   Led by religious leader Brigham Young, the first Mormons begin a long westward exodus from Nauvoo, Il., to Utah.
1863   P.T. Barnum’s star midgets, Tom Thumb and Lavinia Warren, are married.
1904   Russia and Japan declare war on each other.
1915   President Wilson blasts the British for using the U.S. flag on merchant ships to deceive the Germans.
1939   Japanese occupy island of Hainan in French Indochina.
1941   London severs diplomatic relations with Romania.
1941   Iceland is attacked by German planes.
1942   The war halts civilian car production at Ford.
1945   B-29s hit the Tokyo area.
1955   Bell Aircraft displays a fixed-wing vertical takeoff plane.
1960   Adolph Coors, the beer brewer, is kidnapped in Golden, Colo.
1966   Protester David Miller is convicted of burning his draft card.
1979   The Metropolitan Museum announces the first major theft in 110-year history, $150,000 Greek marble head.
1986   The largest Mafia trial in history, with 474 defendants, opens in Palermo, Italy.
Born on February 10
1890  

Boris Pasternak, Russian novelist and poet (Dr. Zhivago).  (Listen to Doctor Zhivago, by Boris Pastenak on euzicasa! just click on the shortcut above!)

1893   Jimmy Durante, American comedian and film actor.
1894   Harold MacMillan, British prime minister (1957-1963).
1897   John F. Enders, virologist.
1898   Bertolt Brecht, German poet and dramatist (The Threepenny Opera).
1901   Stella Adler, actress and teacher.
1902   Walter Brattain, physicist, one of the inventors of the transistor.
1910   Dominique Georges Pire, Belgian cleric and educator.
1914   Larry Adler, harmonica virtuoso.
1920   Alex Comfort, English physician and author (Joy of Sex).
1927   (Mary Violet) Leontyne Price, opera singer.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.9xy5kPzI.dpuf

Education – Audiobooks – (Dare to listen): Boris Pasternak Doctor Zhivago


today’s Image: Jules Verne (Image ArtToday)



Jules Verne

French author Jules Verne, born on February 8, 1828, is considered the father of science fiction. Many of his 19th-century works forecast amazing scientific feats–feats that were actually carried out in the 20th century–with uncanny accuracy. Verne’s 1865 book From the Earth to the Moon told the story of a space ship that is launched from Florida to the moon and that returns to Earth by landing in the ocean. An illustration from the original version of the book is shown above. Something of a scientist and traveler himself, Verne’s 1870 work about a submarine, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and Around the World in Eighty Days also foretold technological advances that seemed fantastic at the time. Jules Verne died in 1905.

Image ArtToday

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.lnUNkvGi.dpuf

CHOPPED LAMB WITH ONIONS AND SHEEP BUTTER – Neacsu Marius


CHOPPED LAMB WITH ONIONS AND SHEEP BUTTER

quotation: Louisa May Alcott


Let my name stand among those who are willing to bear ridicule and reproach for the truth’s sake, and so earn some right to rejoice when the victory is won.

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) Discuss