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You’re gonna love it: List of nuclear whistleblowers


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List of nuclear whistleblowers

Wikimedia list article


There have been a number of nuclear whistleblowers, often nuclear engineers, who have identified safety concerns about nuclear power and nuclear weapons production. In 1976 Gregory Minor, Richard Hubbard and Dale Bridenbaugh “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants in the United States, and Fukushima in Japan. George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. Other nuclear power whistleblowers include Arnold Gundersen and David Lochbaum.

2000 candles in memory of the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, at a commemoration 25 years after the nuclear accident, as well as for the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011.

Karen Silkwood

The first prominent nuclear whistleblower was Karen Silkwood, who worked as a chemical technician at a Kerr-McGee nuclear fuel plant. Silkwood became an activist in the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union in order to protest health and safety issues. In 1974, she testified to the United States Atomic Energy Commission about her concerns. A few months later she died in a car crash under mysterious conditions on the way to a meeting with a New York Times reporter and a national union leader. The 1983 film Silkwood is an account of this story.

The “GE Three”

On 2 February 1976, Gregory C. Minor, Richard B. Hubbard, and Dale G. Bridenbaugh (known as the GE Three) “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants, and their action has been called “an exemplary instance of whistleblowing“.

The three engineers gained the attention of journalists and their disclosures about the threats of nuclear power had a significant impact. They timed their statements to coincide with their resignations from responsible positions in General Electric‘s nuclear energy division, and later established themselves as consultants on the nuclear power industry for state governments, federal agencies, and overseas governments. The consulting firm they formed, MHB Technical Associates, was technical advisor for the movie, “The China Syndrome.” The three engineers participated in Congressional hearings which their disclosures precipitated.

Browns Ferry Unit 1 under construction

Browns Ferry nuclear power plant construction began in 1966. It was located in Alabama and in 1967 it earned a federal construction permit. The plant received new design standards which call for “physical separation of electrical cables.” There was an issue with the instructions on how to accomplish this so the AEC inspector F.U. Bower requested that the AEC elaborate; however, there was no response from the organization and installation went on. Still, no instructions were issued after five failed inspections in 1970. The lack of cable separation instructions led to the sacrifice of safety coolant systems in two of the units in order to improve one with severe safety violation. The ignorance of the AEC led to the fire that occurred on 22 March 1975, that almost led to a radiation leak. The substance separating the wires caught fire when tests to find air leaks with a candle ignited it thus resulting in damage to the control systems. With damage to the control systems, the cooling system that keeps the units from leaking radiation did not work properly. Somehow the situation was avoided and the units were put out of service. Throughout the occurrence of these events Bridenbaugh had been discussing his reservations on the safety at the plant in vain and in 1976 a year later Bridenbaugh, Hubbard and Minor resigned.

Crystal River 3 and Lou Putney

Lou Putney came on the scene of the Crystal River 3 plant after receiving a call from a plant engineer. The engineer claimed that the managers hired engineers based on “good ol’ boy mentality.” The plant had experience numerous shut downs since 1978. Along with this concern, the engineer was not confident that the manager possessed the qualifications to be a manager. Although the engineer pursued nothing further with his complaint, it prompted Putney to purchase shares of stock in the company that would allow him to file “shareholder resolutions.” Putney had looked into the nuclear reactors that were built of an unsafe material for emergency cooling procedures. The NRC had placed Crystal River on the top 14 worst reactors list because of this. So, the shares were purchased in 1981, which is when Putney filed his first shareholder resolution requesting the plant be shut down. This tradition was upheld by Putney for seven years until he was required to purchase more stock in order to continue filing resolutions. Over the course of sixteen years, Putney filed a total of fourteen shareholder resolutions. All of these resolutions were ignored and were met with offers to buy out his shares so he could no longer file the resolutions. The plant was officially decommissioned in September 2009.

Ronald Goldstein

Ronald J. Goldstein was a supervisor employed by EBASCO, which was a major contractor for the construction of the South Texas plants. In the summer of 1985, Goldstein identified safety problems to SAFETEAM, an internal compliance program established by EBASCO and Houston Lighting, including noncompliance with safety procedures, the failure to issue safety compliance reports, and quality control violations affecting the safety of the plant.

SAFETEAM was promoted as an independent safe haven for employees to voice their safety concerns. The two companies did not inform their employees that they did not believe complaints reported to SAFETEAM had any legal protection. After he filed his report to SAFETEAM, Goldstein was fired. Subsequently, Golstein filed suit under federal nuclear whistleblower statutes.

The U.S. Department of Labor ruled that his submissions to SAFETEAM were protected and his dismissal was invalid, a finding upheld by Labor Secretary Lynn Martin. The ruling was appealed and overturned by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled that private programs offered no protection to whistleblowers. After Goldstein lost his case, Congress amended the federal nuclear whistleblower law to provide protection reports made to internal systems and prevent retaliation against whistleblowers.

Fernald Nuclear Incidents

Aerial view of Fernald Feed Materials Production Center
Uranium components fabricated at Fernald

The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center was built in Crosby Township, Ohio in 1951, and decommissioned in 1989. Fernald processed uranium trioxide and uranium tetrafluoride, among other radioactive materials, to produce the uranium fuel cores for nuclear weapons. It was shrouded in suspicion with many manager changes and the people of the town ill-informed of the purpose of the plant. The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center also conducted an evaluation of how much material was contaminated by Radium. Using 138 pieces of the CR-39 film assays, they were able to determine that people working in the area where K-65 silos ( Underground chamber used to store missiles) had lower levels of exposure of materials contaminated by Radon than the Q-11 silos between the period of 1952-1988 Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology.Throughout 1951-1995 the plant had numerous scandals including faking numbers for contamination and disregarding evidence of ground water pollution. Among the citizens affected by the pollution was Mrs. Lisa Crawford who took action. Crawford and other residents filed a lawsuit in 1985 and became president of the organization FRESH (Fernald Residents for Environmental Safety and Health). A lawsuit was then filed once again against Fernald by former employees several years later in 1990. After several years of being heavily advised not to blow the whistle, the workers earned themselves a $15 million settlement and lifelong medical monitoring. In 1992, FERMCO was hired to construct a cleanup plan for the plant and in 1996, around accusations of wasteful spending, the cleanup of ground water and soil was completed.

Mordechai Vanunu

Mordechai Vanunu 2009

Mordechai Vanunu blew the whistle on the nuclear plant in Dimona, Israel in an interview with The Sunday Times that was published on 5 October 1986. According to Vanunu, this plant had been producing nuclear weapons for 10 to 20 years. It is estimated that there may be around 200 nuclear weapons in possession of Israel’s nuclear weapons program. Vanunu demonstrated his knowledge to Frank Barnaby and John Steinbach and they confirmed the credibility of his story. Frank Barnaby wrote in his Declaration of Frank Barnaby in the Matter of Mordechai Vanunu that Vanunu had the bare minimum knowledge of nuclear physics that a technician should have and accurately described the makeup of the nuclear plant in Dimona. Having served in full his 18 years prison term, ruled in closed door trial, including 11 years in solitary Vanunu has been further in and out of jail after. In 2007, sentenced to six months for violating terms of his parole, and in May 2010, again to three months for having met foreigners in violation of his release terms from jail.

Vanunu is ethnic Mizrahi Jew, born in Marrakesh Morocco, having emigrated to Israel, following its independence in 1948, like did many of the North African Jewish community did. Amnesty International issued a press release on 2 July 2007, stating that “The organisation considers Mordechai Vanunu to be a prisoner of conscience and calls for his immediate and unconditional release.”[6] Vanunu has been characterized internationally as a whistleblower[7][8] and by Israel as a traitor. Despite the whistle blown towards the operation of the nuclear weapons program in Israel, the Israeli government denied the existence of all allegations.Mordechai Vanunu is known as Israel`s Nuclear Whistleblower.

Arnold Gundersen

In 1990 Arnold Gundersen discovered radioactive material in an accounting safe at Nuclear Energy Services in Danbury, Connecticut, the consulting firm where he held a $120,000-a-year job as senior vice-president. Three weeks after he notified the company president of what he believed to be radiation safety violations, Gundersen was fired. According to The New York Times, for three years, Gundersen “was awakened by harassing phone calls in the middle of the night” and he “became concerned about his family’s safety”. Gundersen believes he was blacklisted, harassed and fired for doing what he thought was right.

The New York Times reports that Gundersen’s case is not uncommon, especially in the nuclear industry. Even though nuclear workers are encouraged to report potential safety hazards, those who do risk demotion and dismissal. Instead of correcting the problems, whistleblowers say, industry management and government agencies attack them as the cause of the problem. Driven out of their jobs and shunned by neighbors and co-workers, whistleblowers often turn to each other for support.

The Whistleblower Support Fund is an organization that has compiled resources for whistleblowers to access if they are considering whistleblowing. It was founded by Donald Ray Soeken, who has counseled whistleblowers for 35 years. In addition, a social network to connect whistleblowers to other whistleblowers will be implemented. It will be a private discussion where whistleblowers can safely seek support.

David Lochbaum

In the early 1990s, nuclear engineer David Lochbaum and a colleague, Don Prevatte, identified a safety problem in a plant where they were working, but were ignored when they raised the issue with the plant manager, the utility and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). After bringing their concerns to Congress, the problem was corrected not just at the original nuclear plant but at plants across the country.

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown was the whistleblower on the Thermo-Lag scandal, as well as on silicone foam firestop issues in the US and Canada, exposing the fact that fireproofing of wiring between control rooms and reactors did not function as intended and exposing bounding and combustibility issues with organic firestops.

George Galatis

George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer and whistleblower who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. The unsafe procedures meant that spent fuel rod pools at Unit 1 had the potential to boil, possibly releasing radioactive steam throughout the plant. Galatis eventually took his concerns to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to find that they had “known about the unsafe procedures for years”. As a result of going to the NRC, Galatis experienced “subtle forms of harassment, retaliation, and intimidation”.

Rainer Moormann

Rainer Moormann in 2004

Rainer Moormann is a German chemist and nuclear power whistleblower. Since 1976 he has been working at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, doing research on safety problems with pebble bed reactors, fusion power and spallation neutron sources. In 2008 Moormann published a critical paper on the safety of pebble bed reactors, which raised attention among specialists in the field, and managed to distribute it via the media, facing considerable opposition. For doing this despite the occupational disadvantages he had to accept as a consequence, Moormann was awarded the whistleblower award of the Federation of German Scientists (VDW) and of the German section of the International Association of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms (IALANA).

Setsuo Fujiwara

Setsuo Fujiwara, who used to design reactors, said he clashed with supervisors over an inspection audit he conducted in March 2009 at the Tomari nuclear plant in Japan. Fujiwara refused to approve a routine test by the plant’s operator, Hokkaido Electric Power, saying the test was flawed. A week later, he was summoned by his supervisor, who ordered him to correct his written report to indicate that the test had been done properly. After Fujiwara refused, his employment contract was not renewed. “They told me my job was just to approve reactors, not to raise doubts about them”, said Fujiwara, 62, who is now suing the nuclear safety organization to get rehired. In a written response to questions from The New York Times, the agency said it could not comment while the court case was under way. Along with the lawsuit Mr. Fujiwara filed against the agency he used to work for, he had gone to the Tokyo District Court to further write several complaints about how the JNES ( Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization) failed to follow the UN laws concerning how to properly inspect nuclear energy reactors. Mr. Fujiwara also submitted several documents and emails that dealt with how the reactor inspections were improperly handled by JNES even though JNES denies all allegations. [42]

Walter Tamosaitis

The Hanford site resulted in a number of whistleblowers during the efforts to clean the site up. Walter Tamosaitis blew the whistle on the Energy Department’s plan for waste treatment at the Hanford site in 2011. Tamosaitis’s concern was the possibility of explosive hydrogen gas being built up inside tanks that the company was to store the harmful chemical sludge they were trying to put into hibernation for its chemical life. Shortly after this Tamosaitis was demoted and two years later, fired which triggered his lawsuit for wrongful termination. A $4.1 million settlement was offered to Tamosaitis from AECOM on 12 August 2015. Tamosaitis has since been reinstated.

Donna Busche blew the whistle resulting in her 2013 lawsuit with claims that the URS “retaliated against her. She was head of nuclear safety and a URS employee around the time when she expressed her concerns.

Gary Brunson reported 34 safety and engineering violations after quitting in 2012. Brunson was federal engineering chief before he quit.

Shelly Doss earned “$20,000 in emotional distress and $10,000 in callous disregard of her rights” as well as reinstatement in 2014. Doss was an environmental specialist at the time of her firing in 2011 working for Washington River Protection Solutions.

Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins

In 2012, Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins publicly accused the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of downplaying flood risks for nuclear plants which are sited on waterways downstream from large reservoirs and dams. They are engineers with over 20 years of combined government and military service who work for the NRC. Other nuclear safety advocates have supported their complaints.

ist of nuclear whistleblowers

Wikimedia list article


There have been a number of nuclear whistleblowers, often nuclear engineers, who have identified safety concerns about nuclear power and nuclear weapons production. In 1976 Gregory Minor, Richard Hubbard and Dale Bridenbaugh “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants in the United States, and Fukushima in Japan. George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. Other nuclear power whistleblowers include Arnold Gundersen and David Lochbaum.

2000 candles in memory of the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, at a commemoration 25 years after the nuclear accident, as well as for the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011.

Karen Silkwood

The first prominent nuclear whistleblower was Karen Silkwood, who worked as a chemical technician at a Kerr-McGee nuclear fuel plant. Silkwood became an activist in the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union in order to protest health and safety issues. In 1974, she testified to the United States Atomic Energy Commission about her concerns. A few months later she died in a car crash under mysterious conditions on the way to a meeting with a New York Times reporter and a national union leader. The 1983 film Silkwood is an account of this story.

The “GE Three”

On 2 February 1976, Gregory C. Minor, Richard B. Hubbard, and Dale G. Bridenbaugh (known as the GE Three) “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants, and their action has been called “an exemplary instance of whistleblowing“.

The three engineers gained the attention of journalists and their disclosures about the threats of nuclear power had a significant impact. They timed their statements to coincide with their resignations from responsible positions in General Electric‘s nuclear energy division, and later established themselves as consultants on the nuclear power industry for state governments, federal agencies, and overseas governments. The consulting firm they formed, MHB Technical Associates, was technical advisor for the movie, “The China Syndrome.” The three engineers participated in Congressional hearings which their disclosures precipitated.

Browns Ferry Unit 1 under construction

Browns Ferry nuclear power plant construction began in 1966. It was located in Alabama and in 1967 it earned a federal construction permit. The plant received new design standards which call for “physical separation of electrical cables.” There was an issue with the instructions on how to accomplish this so the AEC inspector F.U. Bower requested that the AEC elaborate; however, there was no response from the organization and installation went on. Still, no instructions were issued after five failed inspections in 1970. The lack of cable separation instructions led to the sacrifice of safety coolant systems in two of the units in order to improve one with severe safety violation. The ignorance of the AEC led to the fire that occurred on 22 March 1975, that almost led to a radiation leak. The substance separating the wires caught fire when tests to find air leaks with a candle ignited it thus resulting in damage to the control systems. With damage to the control systems, the cooling system that keeps the units from leaking radiation did not work properly. Somehow the situation was avoided and the units were put out of service. Throughout the occurrence of these events Bridenbaugh had been discussing his reservations on the safety at the plant in vain and in 1976 a year later Bridenbaugh, Hubbard and Minor resigned.

Crystal River 3 and Lou Putney

Lou Putney came on the scene of the Crystal River 3 plant after receiving a call from a plant engineer. The engineer claimed that the managers hired engineers based on “good ol’ boy mentality.” The plant had experience numerous shut downs since 1978. Along with this concern, the engineer was not confident that the manager possessed the qualifications to be a manager. Although the engineer pursued nothing further with his complaint, it prompted Putney to purchase shares of stock in the company that would allow him to file “shareholder resolutions.” Putney had looked into the nuclear reactors that were built of an unsafe material for emergency cooling procedures. The NRC had placed Crystal River on the top 14 worst reactors list because of this. So, the shares were purchased in 1981, which is when Putney filed his first shareholder resolution requesting the plant be shut down. This tradition was upheld by Putney for seven years until he was required to purchase more stock in order to continue filing resolutions. Over the course of sixteen years, Putney filed a total of fourteen shareholder resolutions. All of these resolutions were ignored and were met with offers to buy out his shares so he could no longer file the resolutions. The plant was officially decommissioned in September 2009.

Ronald Goldstein

Ronald J. Goldstein was a supervisor employed by EBASCO, which was a major contractor for the construction of the South Texas plants. In the summer of 1985, Goldstein identified safety problems to SAFETEAM, an internal compliance program established by EBASCO and Houston Lighting, including noncompliance with safety procedures, the failure to issue safety compliance reports, and quality control violations affecting the safety of the plant.

SAFETEAM was promoted as an independent safe haven for employees to voice their safety concerns. The two companies did not inform their employees that they did not believe complaints reported to SAFETEAM had any legal protection. After he filed his report to SAFETEAM, Goldstein was fired. Subsequently, Golstein filed suit under federal nuclear whistleblower statutes.

The U.S. Department of Labor ruled that his submissions to SAFETEAM were protected and his dismissal was invalid, a finding upheld by Labor Secretary Lynn Martin. The ruling was appealed and overturned by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled that private programs offered no protection to whistleblowers. After Goldstein lost his case, Congress amended the federal nuclear whistleblower law to provide protection reports made to internal systems and prevent retaliation against whistleblowers.

Fernald Nuclear Incidents

Aerial view of Fernald Feed Materials Production Center
Uranium components fabricated at Fernald

The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center was built in Crosby Township, Ohio in 1951, and decommissioned in 1989. Fernald processed uranium trioxide and uranium tetrafluoride, among other radioactive materials, to produce the uranium fuel cores for nuclear weapons. It was shrouded in suspicion with many manager changes and the people of the town ill-informed of the purpose of the plant. The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center also conducted an evaluation of how much material was contaminated by Radium. Using 138 pieces of the CR-39 film assays, they were able to determine that people working in the area where K-65 silos ( Underground chamber used to store missiles) had lower levels of exposure of materials contaminated by Radon than the Q-11 silos between the period of 1952-1988 Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology.Throughout 1951-1995 the plant had numerous scandals including faking numbers for contamination and disregarding evidence of ground water pollution. Among the citizens affected by the pollution was Mrs. Lisa Crawford who took action. Crawford and other residents filed a lawsuit in 1985 and became president of the organization FRESH (Fernald Residents for Environmental Safety and Health). A lawsuit was then filed once again against Fernald by former employees several years later in 1990. After several years of being heavily advised not to blow the whistle, the workers earned themselves a $15 million settlement and lifelong medical monitoring. In 1992, FERMCO was hired to construct a cleanup plan for the plant and in 1996, around accusations of wasteful spending, the cleanup of ground water and soil was completed.

Mordechai Vanunu

Mordechai Vanunu 2009

Mordechai Vanunu blew the whistle on the nuclear plant in Dimona, Israel in an interview with The Sunday Times that was published on 5 October 1986. According to Vanunu, this plant had been producing nuclear weapons for 10 to 20 years. It is estimated that there may be around 200 nuclear weapons in possession of Israel’s nuclear weapons program. Vanunu demonstrated his knowledge to Frank Barnaby and John Steinbach and they confirmed the credibility of his story. Frank Barnaby wrote in his Declaration of Frank Barnaby in the Matter of Mordechai Vanunu that Vanunu had the bare minimum knowledge of nuclear physics that a technician should have and accurately described the makeup of the nuclear plant in Dimona. Having served in full his 18 years prison term, ruled in closed door trial, including 11 years in solitary Vanunu has been further in and out of jail after. In 2007, sentenced to six months for violating terms of his parole, and in May 2010, again to three months for having met foreigners in violation of his release terms from jail.

Vanunu is ethnic Mizrahi Jew, born in Marrakesh Morocco, having emigrated to Israel, following its independence in 1948, like did many of the North African Jewish community did. Amnesty International issued a press release on 2 July 2007, stating that “The organisation considers Mordechai Vanunu to be a prisoner of conscience and calls for his immediate and unconditional release.”[6] Vanunu has been characterized internationally as a whistleblower[7][8] and by Israel as a traitor. Despite the whistle blown towards the operation of the nuclear weapons program in Israel, the Israeli government denied the existence of all allegations.Mordechai Vanunu is known as Israel`s Nuclear Whistleblower.

Arnold Gundersen

In 1990 Arnold Gundersen discovered radioactive material in an accounting safe at Nuclear Energy Services in Danbury, Connecticut, the consulting firm where he held a $120,000-a-year job as senior vice-president. Three weeks after he notified the company president of what he believed to be radiation safety violations, Gundersen was fired. According to The New York Times, for three years, Gundersen “was awakened by harassing phone calls in the middle of the night” and he “became concerned about his family’s safety”. Gundersen believes he was blacklisted, harassed and fired for doing what he thought was right.

The New York Times reports that Gundersen’s case is not uncommon, especially in the nuclear industry. Even though nuclear workers are encouraged to report potential safety hazards, those who do risk demotion and dismissal. Instead of correcting the problems, whistleblowers say, industry management and government agencies attack them as the cause of the problem. Driven out of their jobs and shunned by neighbors and co-workers, whistleblowers often turn to each other for support.

The Whistleblower Support Fund is an organization that has compiled resources for whistleblowers to access if they are considering whistleblowing. It was founded by Donald Ray Soeken, who has counseled whistleblowers for 35 years. In addition, a social network to connect whistleblowers to other whistleblowers will be implemented. It will be a private discussion where whistleblowers can safely seek support.

David Lochbaum

In the early 1990s, nuclear engineer David Lochbaum and a colleague, Don Prevatte, identified a safety problem in a plant where they were working, but were ignored when they raised the issue with the plant manager, the utility and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). After bringing their concerns to Congress, the problem was corrected not just at the original nuclear plant but at plants across the country.

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown was the whistleblower on the Thermo-Lag scandal, as well as on silicone foam firestop issues in the US and Canada, exposing the fact that fireproofing of wiring between control rooms and reactors did not function as intended and exposing bounding and combustibility issues with organic firestops.

George Galatis

George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer and whistleblower who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. The unsafe procedures meant that spent fuel rod pools at Unit 1 had the potential to boil, possibly releasing radioactive steam throughout the plant. Galatis eventually took his concerns to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to find that they had “known about the unsafe procedures for years”. As a result of going to the NRC, Galatis experienced “subtle forms of harassment, retaliation, and intimidation”.

Rainer Moormann

Rainer Moormann in 2004

Rainer Moormann is a German chemist and nuclear power whistleblower. Since 1976 he has been working at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, doing research on safety problems with pebble bed reactors, fusion power and spallation neutron sources. In 2008 Moormann published a critical paper on the safety of pebble bed reactors, which raised attention among specialists in the field, and managed to distribute it via the media, facing considerable opposition. For doing this despite the occupational disadvantages he had to accept as a consequence, Moormann was awarded the whistleblower award of the Federation of German Scientists (VDW) and of the German section of the International Association of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms (IALANA).

Setsuo Fujiwara

Setsuo Fujiwara, who used to design reactors, said he clashed with supervisors over an inspection audit he conducted in March 2009 at the Tomari nuclear plant in Japan. Fujiwara refused to approve a routine test by the plant’s operator, Hokkaido Electric Power, saying the test was flawed. A week later, he was summoned by his supervisor, who ordered him to correct his written report to indicate that the test had been done properly. After Fujiwara refused, his employment contract was not renewed. “They told me my job was just to approve reactors, not to raise doubts about them”, said Fujiwara, 62, who is now suing the nuclear safety organization to get rehired. In a written response to questions from The New York Times, the agency said it could not comment while the court case was under way. Along with the lawsuit Mr. Fujiwara filed against the agency he used to work for, he had gone to the Tokyo District Court to further write several complaints about how the JNES ( Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization) failed to follow the UN laws concerning how to properly inspect nuclear energy reactors. Mr. Fujiwara also submitted several documents and emails that dealt with how the reactor inspections were improperly handled by JNES even though JNES denies all allegations. [42]

Walter Tamosaitis

The Hanford site resulted in a number of whistleblowers during the efforts to clean the site up. Walter Tamosaitis blew the whistle on the Energy Department’s plan for waste treatment at the Hanford site in 2011. Tamosaitis’s concern was the possibility of explosive hydrogen gas being built up inside tanks that the company was to store the harmful chemical sludge they were trying to put into hibernation for its chemical life. Shortly after this Tamosaitis was demoted and two years later, fired which triggered his lawsuit for wrongful termination. A $4.1 million settlement was offered to Tamosaitis from AECOM on 12 August 2015. Tamosaitis has since been reinstated.

Donna Busche blew the whistle resulting in her 2013 lawsuit with claims that the URS “retaliated against her. She was head of nuclear safety and a URS employee around the time when she expressed her concerns.

Gary Brunson reported 34 safety and engineering violations after quitting in 2012. Brunson was federal engineering chief before he quit.

Shelly Doss earned “$20,000 in emotional distress and $10,000 in callous disregard of her rights” as well as reinstatement in 2014. Doss was an environmental specialist at the time of her firing in 2011 working for Washington River Protection Solutions.

Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins

In 2012, Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins publicly accused the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of downplaying flood risks for nuclear plants which are sited on waterways downstream from large reservoirs and dams. They are engineers with over 20 years of combined government and military service who work for the NRC. Other nuclear safety advocates have supported their complaints.

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Healtth-Ebola: Ebola virus lingers in patient’s eyeball even after recovery| -ABC News


New Poll: Americans Want Mandatory Vaccines (because ignorance hurts more than oneself)


New Poll: Americans Want Mandatory Vaccines

A new poll conducted by Ipsos for Reuters found that 78 percent of Americans believe all children should be vaccinated. Just over 70 percent think schools should be able to suspend unvaccinated students during outbreaks of contagious diseases. And 65 … More… Discuss

The Ebola Diaries: Trying to heal patients you can’t touch: Goats and Soda |NPR


http://www.npr.org/v2/?i=385528882&m=385646993&t=audio/a

THe Ebola Diaries: Trying to heal patients you can't touch: Goats and Soda |NPR

The Ebola Diaries: Trying to heal patients you can’t touch: Goats and Soda |NPR (click on picture to access the story and inteview at NPR)

Must read: Ebola in Liberia: According to Dr. Kwan Kew Lai’s Blog


Today is the Feast of St. Kew, a little known Welsh saint, probably of the fifth century. She was the sister of a hermit called Docco who founded a monastery at or near the village of St. Kew which is now in Cornwall, England. Nothing much is known about her except that she was able to cause some wild boars to obey her, this ability caught the attention of her said brother who condescended to finally speak to her. Why they were not on speaking terms to begin with was a mystery.What is in a name? Kew is my given name. It would be unheard of to have a saint with my name especially someone from Asia. My daughter, Cara, was told by her Confraternity Christian Development (CCD) teacher that everyone has a saint who bears his or her name. She searched in vain for a saint with her name.

via Ebola in Liberia.

***featured on by NPR: The Ebola Diaries: Trying To Heal Patients You Can’t Touch http://n.pr/1EaPxUw

From BBC: First Ebola case linked to bat play


First Ebola case linked to bat play http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-30632453

Les “combattants d’Ebola”, personnalités de l’année pour le “Time”


Les “combattants d’Ebola”, personnalités de l’année pour le “Time”

‘Why I Came To Help Fight Ebola’ – World Food Programme Uploaded on Nov 26, 2014


‘Why I Came To Help Fight Ebola’

quotation: “Humans in space suits make monkeys nervous.” ― Richard Preston, “The Hot Zone…”


The Hot Zone

The Hot Zone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Humans in space suits make monkeys nervous.”
Richard Preston, The Hot Zone: The Terrifying True Story of the Origins of the Ebola Virus

this pressed: 10 Shocking Things About Ebola : Discovery News


Early symptoms of Ebola can appear harmless — fever, headache, aches, chills and sore throat. They could be the stuff of a normal illness.

But as the virus progresses, victims will experience nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, rash, chest pain and cough, weight loss and bleeding. In some cases, organs will shut down and cause unstoppable bleeding.

In the last stages of the disease, in a process known as a cytokine storm, the immune system goes haywire and inflammatory molecules called cytokines attack the body’s own tissue. Technically, then, it’s not the virus that kills people but instead their own immune systems ultimately turn against them.

Show here is Dr. Kent Brantly, a doctor who treated patients in Liberia before contracting the virus himself. Fortunately, he survived.

Samaritan’s Purse

via 10 Shocking Things About Ebola : Discovery News.

this pressed: Surgeon who contracted Ebola virus in Sierra Leone dies at Nebraska hospital | Fox News


In this April 2014, file photo, provided by the United Methodist News Service, Dr. Martin Salia poses for a photo at the United Methodist Church‘s Kissy Hospital outside Freetown, Sierra Leone. (AP)

 

A surgeon who contracted the Ebola virus while working in Sierra Leone died at a Nebraska hospital where he was transported for treatment, the facility said Monday.

A statement released Monday by Nebraska Medical Center said Dr. Martin Salia “has passed away as a result of the advanced symptoms of the disease.”

“Dr. Salia was extremely critical when he arrived here, and unfortunately, despite out best efforts, we weren’t able to save him,” said Dr. Phil Smith, medical director of the biocontainment unit.

Salia, 44, was being treated in the medical center’s biocontainment unit. He arrived Saturday by plane from West Africa, and was transported by ambulance for treatment at the hospital, where two other Ebola patients have been successfully treated. Officials said Salia might be more ill than the first Ebola patients treated successfully in the United States. On Sunday officials had described his condition as “an hour-by-hour situation.”

via Surgeon who contracted Ebola virus in Sierra Leone dies at Nebraska hospital | Fox News.

this pressed: Ebola virus refuses to stick to the script | Follow Ebola


English: Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC mi...

English: Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“What has been revealed over the past two months is how skittish and profoundly insecure we feel, as individuals and as a species, and how fear is a brushfire easily fanned, by memories of best-selling books like Richard Preston’s 1994 “The Hot Zone” — soon to be a television miniseries, directed by Ridley Scott! — and by the fear-mongering of news media and politicians like New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. Most unnerving is that the virus isn’t conforming to popular expectation. A doctor in the full hazmat regalia still got infected? That’s not supposed to happen. The CDC proving to be as fallible as any human organization? Who’s writing this thing?Well, no one is. That’s how reality works. Things fall apart and get put back together — or not — in ways you wouldn’t believe. Entropy happens.”

via Ebola virus refuses to stick to the script | Follow Ebola.

Pathogenesis schematic

Pathogenesis schematic (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

this pressed for your right to know: Number of people being actively monitored for Ebola in New York has tripled to 357 — Los Angeles Times


this pressed: Louisiana Leper Home documents panic in the face of disease – The Globe and Mail


Baton Rouge, LA - 10/30/2014 - Mr. Simeon Peterson (aka "Mr. Pete" 86) sits in the physical therapy room at the National Hansen's Disease Center in Baton Rouge. Mr. Peterson was relocated to the leprosy camp in Carville, LA from his native US Virgin Islands in 1951. He is one of the last living residents of the leprosy center. (William Widmer/William Widmer)Baton Rouge, LA – 10/30/2014 – Mr. Simeon Peterson (aka “Mr. Pete” 86) sits in the physical therapy room at the National Hansen’s Disease Center in Baton Rouge. Mr. Peterson was relocated to the leprosy camp in Carville, LA from his native US Virgin Islands in 1951. He is one of the last living residents of the leprosy center. (William Widmer/William Widmer)

Louisiana Leper Home documents panic in the face of disease
***Omar El Akkad CARVILLE, LA. — The Globe and Mail

***Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014, 9:54 PM EST

via Louisiana Leper Home documents panic in the face of disease – The Globe and Mail.

this pressed for your right to know: BBC News – Ebola: When health workers’ duty to treat is trumped


Doctors preparing to treat Ebola patients Medical staff must wear protective suits whenever they treat Ebola patients

The president of the World Bank has urged thousands of health workers to volunteer in the battle against Ebola, invoking their duty under their oath to help patients. But is there such an obligation? Medical ethicist Dr Daniel Sokol says we should expect some healthcare staff to refuse to go to work, wherever Ebola patients are being treated.

In all major Ebola outbreaks, medical staff have fled health centres, leaving dying patients behind. This one is no exception.

Seeing colleagues succumb to the disease, many doctors, nurses and laboratory technicians have failed to turn up to work, putting even greater pressure on those who remain.

If several cases of Ebola emerged in the UK, it would be naive to assume that no healthcare worker would refuse to work.

In 2003, I worked as an intern in clinical ethics at a hospital in Toronto. That was the city most affected by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (Sars) outside Asia, with about 250 people infected.

Of those, about half were health workers. Posters lined the walls of the hospital, hailing the staff as heroes.

via BBC News – Ebola: When health workers’ duty to treat is trumped.

this pressed for your right to know: Read the State Department’s memo on Ebola policies: http://t.co/7SN1xBx8v7 — Fox News Politics


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Read more>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> HERE

Internal memo pushes bringing non-citizens to US for #Ebola treatment— Ebola


this pressed for your right to know: Sex and Ebola: How risky? – CBS News|


This undated file image provided by the CDC shows the Ebola virus. AP Photo/CDC

When Dr. Craig Spencer went to volunteer in West Africa with the humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders, it took him far away from his home, family, friends and other people he loves, including his fiancé Morgan Dixon. Once he returned, Doctors Without Borders advised that he should monitor his health for signs of illness like running a fever, but that “as long as a returned staff member does not experience any symptoms, normal life can proceed.”

“Normal life” may presumably include sexual activity — but could that put a person’s partner at risk?

via Sex and Ebola: How risky? – CBS News.

this pressed: Obama aides criticize Ebola quarantine rules – USA TODAY


“If you put everyone in one basket, even people who are clearly no threat, then we have the problem of the disincentive of people that we need,” Fauci said on ABC’s This Week. “Let’s not forget the best way to stop this epidemic and protect America is to stop it in Africa, and you can really help stopping it in Africa if we have our people, our heroes, the health care workers, go there and help us to protect America.”

Aides to President Obama are criticizing decisions by three states to quarantine people who are returning from Ebola-stricken West Africa.

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and United Nations ambassador Samantha Power said quarantines may discourage health workers from traveling to West Africa to help block the disease at its source.

“If you put everyone in one basket, even people who are clearly no threat, then we have the problem of the disincentive of people that we need,” Fauci said on ABC’s This Week. “Let’s not forget the best way to stop this epidemic and protect America is to stop it in Africa, and you can really help stopping it in Africa if we have our people, our heroes, the health care workers, go there and help us to protect America.”

via Obama aides criticize Ebola quarantine rules.

NIH’s Dr. Anthony Fauci: Returning Ebola health care workers shouldn’t face ‘draconian’ rules — NBC Nightly News


this pressed: BREAKING: NY, New Jersey governors issue quarantine for travelers who had contact with Ebola-infected people in W. Africa. — The Associated Press October 24, 2014


PANDEMIC UNPREPARED? Watchdog rips DHS for buying aging med supplies|24/10/2014 18:34 by: Fox News


The Associated Press contributed to this report.
24/10/2014 18:34 by: Fox News

PANDEMIC UNPREPARED? Watchdog rips DHS for buying aging med supplies

PANDEMIC UNPREPARED? Watchdog rips DHS for buying aging med supplies

Excerpts:
“The chief Homeland Security watchdog ripped the department at a hearing on Friday for not “thinking through” its purchase of millions of dollars’ worth of pandemic response supplies, saying much of the protective gear and drugs are expired or will be soon.

Inspector General John Roth testified at a House oversight hearing on Ebola, a health crisis that has sharpened focus on the government’s preparedness for an outbreak — even though officials maintain the likelihood of an Ebola outbreak remains low. Roth, ahead of the hearing, released an August audit that found the department has “no assurance” it has enough protective equipment and antiviral medication to respond to a pandemic.

The findings prompted criticism from lawmakers on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

“We spent millions of dollars for a pandemic … We don’t know the inventory, we don’t know who’s got it, and we don’t know who’s gonna get it,” Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., said.

Roth responded: “You are correct.”

Roth said the department spent $9.5 million starting in 2006 on pandemic protective equipment, as well as nearly $7 million on antiviral drugs for emergency workers. However, his opening statement and audit faulted the department for not “adequately” conducting an assessment of what they needed.

The result, he said, is the department cannot be sure it has enough, and in some cases it might have far too much. For instance, he said the department has 16 million surgical masks, but could not demonstrate the need for that many.

He specifically cited the department for having a glut of supplies that is or will soon be expired. He said much of their material has a “finite shelf life” — including thousands of bottles of hand sanitizer, some up to four years expired, and 200,000 respirators that are beyond their five-year usability guarantee.

The audit also found “most” of the antiviral medication is nearing the expiration date.

“As a result, DHS and components may not have sufficient [protective gear or medication] to provide to the workforce during a pandemic,” the audit says.

DHS, in their official response to the audit, said the department agrees with the intent of all the inspector general’s recommendations, but claimed the report “has not appropriately characterized a number of issues.”

Among them, DHS disputed the finding that they had no assurance they have enough equipment and medication. DHS suggested the shelf life of their supplies is longer than the audit made it seem, and the IG was basing its conclusions only on manufacturer information as opposed to other research.

In a written statement on Friday, DHS spokesman S.Y. Lee also said the department is committed to employee safety, and is “satisfied” with the current DHS stocks to deal with any Ebola response.

“We are constantly seeking to improve our pandemic preparedness and are committed to protecting our employees in order to ensure the effectiveness of our mission,” Lee said. Lee said the IG recommendations were not addressed specifically to the Ebola response, but said the department “had already previously identified many of the issues prior to the review, and have taken comprehensive actions to address them.”

While Friday’s hearing delved into the government’s preparedness for a full-scale outbreak, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle continued to press witnesses over the measures currently being employed to prevent the handful of U.S. Ebola cases from spreading into a larger crisis.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., said the latest diagnosed case of Ebola, in New York City, is “particularly distressing.”

Dr. Nicole Lurie, assistant HHS secretary for preparedness and response, stressed health officials are working “24/7” to contain the outbreak in West Africa and are basing changes in U.S. policies on “lessons learned from each emergency.”

She said in prepared remarks that the likelihood of an outbreak in the U.S. is remote, and that “there is an epidemic of fear, but not of Ebola, in the United States.” The remarks were written before a fourth Ebola case was diagnosed in the U.S. — a doctor in New York City who had treated patients in Guinea. Lurie did not repeat the statements during her testimony.

Issa said it would be a “major mistake” to underestimate the virus:

“Recognize that what we don’t know could kill us,” he said.

PANDEMIC UNPREPARED? Watchdog rips DHS for buying aging med supplies

via PANDEMIC UNPREPARED? Watchdog rips DHS for buying aging med supplies.

***The Associated Press contributed to this report.

***24/10/2014 18:34     by: Fox News

this pressed for your right to know: Follow our LIVE coverage on the Ebola crisis here: — Reuters Live (@ReutersLive)


EBOLA – The Plague Fighters – NOVA Documentary (invite your friends to learn about Ebola!)


EBOLA – The Plague Fighters – NOVA Documentary – FULL

The Ebola virus The Search for a Cure |BBC Full Documentary 2014 (ignorance, fear, unfounded hope: fight back with knowledge!)


The Ebola virus The Search for a Cure BBC Full Documentary 2014

from NOVA | SURVIVING EBOLA |PBS (“because knowledge keeps one rational, unlike ignorance”)


NOVA | SURVIVING EBOLA

from National Geographic – Inside an Ebola Clinic in West Africa


Inside an Ebola Clinic in West Africa

this pressed: Family of 6 quarantined in Connecticut over Ebola fears


Family of 6 quarantined in Connecticut over Ebola fears. |The Truth24.com

this pressed for your right to know: Ebola Contact Monitoring Graph from CDC: number of people at risk “decreasing each day”— CBSDFW (@CBSDFW)


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“Suddenly he goes into the last phase—the human virus bomb explodes. Military biohazard specialists have ways of describing this occurrence. They say that the victim has “crashed and bled out.” Or more politely they say that the victim has “gone down.”
Richard Preston, The Hot Zone

this pressed for your peace of mind: Travelers entering the U.S. from Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia to be monitored for 21 days starting Monday| Lucy Westcott (@lvzwestcott)


Experts say Ebola virus unlikely to spread to North America | CTV Calgary News


Kathy Mueller, a former CTV news anchor, recently returned to Canada from Sierra Leone where she assisted the Red Cross dead body management team.

“While we were laying one person to rest, the grave next to them was being dug,” said Mueller. “It was a constant conveyor belt of burials.”

More than 1,200 people have contracted the Ebola virus in Liberia and the virus has claimed the lives of nearly 700 people.

via Experts say Ebola virus unlikely to spread to North America | CTV Calgary News.

this pressed for your right to know: What We Were Told About Ebola|FactCheck.org


At a July 28 press briefing concerning the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official Stephan Monroe said the virus “poses little risk to the U.S. general population.” But, he added, “it’s possible that someone could become infected with the Ebola virus in Africa and then get on a plane to the U.S.” Monroe called this scenario a “very remote possibility,” but he didn’t say it could never happen, as the senator claimed.

via What We Were Told About Ebola |FactCheck.org

this pressed for your right to know: Schumer urges Obama to send Ebola experts to NYC..|TheTruth24.com


Sen. Charles Schumer wants the ​Obama administration to immediately put a team of experts on the ground in the Big Apple to ensure the safety of New Yorkers in case someone tests positive for Ebola.

Since the city that never sleeps has two ​international ​airports in the region — JFK and Newark — that see more people arriving from virus-​​ridden west African nations than any other ​part of the country, the ​D​emocratic lawmaker urged the ​​Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Sunday to dispatch specialized teams to the city as a way to “remain vigilant” against the threat of Ebola.

“We’re also asking, while that team is on the ground here, that they go around and do the same thing our city and state health departments are doing, go inspect the hospitals to make sure that they have everything in place,” Schumer said Sunday.

via Schumer urges Obama to send Ebola experts to NYC...

this pressed for your right to know: AP photographer captures Ebola outbreak in Africa in pictures


or view the video @  http://on.msnbc.com/1sZD1V7

this pressed for your right to know: Battle Over Ebola Travel Ban: Health Officials Call It a Big Mistake – NBC News.com


A Washington Post-ABC News Poll said that 67 percent of Americans support restricting entry to the U.S. to travelers who have been in Ebola-affected countries.

Other countries — most recently including Jamaica, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, Colombia, and St.Lucia — have already taken steps to ban travelers from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone or restrict entry until after a 21-day quarantine. Nigeria, Senegal and Democratic Republic of Congo are also on some of the banned lists.

Battle Over Ebola Travel Ban: Health Officials Call It a Big Mistake – NBC News.com.

this pressed for your right to know: Obama Says Ebola Travel Bans Could Make Things Worse – NBC News.com


WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama on Saturday urged Americans to avoid hysteria over Ebola, and played down the idea of travel bans from Ebola-ravaged countries in West Africa, explaining that restrictions could make things worse. Lawmakers this week urged Obama to bar people from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea from entering the United States. Obama has said he is not philosophically opposed to travel bans, but in his weekly address made it clear that he is not leaning toward them.

“We can’t just cut ourselves off from West Africa,” Obama said, explaining it would make it harder to move health workers and supplies into the region, and would motivate people trying to get out the region to evade screening, making it harder to track cases. “Trying to seal off an entire region of the world – if that were even possible – could actually make the situation worse,” he said.

via Obama Says Ebola Travel Bans Could Make Things Worse – NBC News.com.

this pressed for your right to know: 2nd Nurse with Ebola may have had worse case during flights..


via 2nd Nurse with Ebola may have had worse case during flights...

18/10/2014 07:20     by: CBSNews

this pressed for your right to know: Ebola Questions: Judicial Watch Wants Answers|via Judicial Watch


English: Color-enhanced electron micrograph of...

English: Color-enhanced electron micrograph of Ebola virus particles. Polski: Mikrofotografia elektronowa cząsteczek wirusa Ebola w fałszywych kolorach. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ebola Questions: Judicial Watch Wants Answers|

via Judicial Watch

this pressed for your right to know: Ebola cases in the U.S. spark protests, calls for a travel ban — Reuters U.S. News (@ReutersUS)


Ebola Infected Nurse Speaks From Hospital Bed ( VIDEO ) Nina Pham Texas Health Dallas


Ebola Infected Nurse Speaks From Hospital Bed ( VIDEO ) Nina Pham Texas Health Dallas

Former Obama spokesman floats flight ban to fight Ebola: The Truth 24.com (by: CBSNews)


Excepts: ” Carney said on CNN. “I think that would demonstrate a level of seriousness in response to this that is merited at this point.”

Administration officials insist that a travel ban could actually hurt efforts to fight the virus. The move would “slow down the ability of the United States and other international partners to actually get expertise and capabilities and equipment into the affected areas,” White House Homeland Security Adviser Lisa Monaco said earlier this month.

Obama acknowledges Ebola missteps

Amid Ebola fears, should the U.S. ban air travel from West Africa?

Full coverage: Ebola virus outbreak

The idea of a travel ban is certain to come up at a congressional hearing on the U.S. response to Ebola Thursday afternoon. Seven of the panel’s 14 Republicans say it’s time for the administration to at least consider restricting the flow of people from West Africa to the U.S., and House Speaker John Boehner said Wednesday afternoon that a temporary travel ban, “is something that the president should absolutely consider” in response to the crisis. (16/10/2014 19:20     by: CBSNews)

via Former Obama spokesman floats flight ban to fight Ebola.

Congressman Michael Burgess on Fox Business Network 10-10-14


Congressman Michael Burgess on Fox Business Network 10-10-14

this pressed for your right to think freely: TX US Rep @michaelcburgess puts it plainly – This is not a political issue it’s a public health issue. #preach #ebola pic.twitter.com/UBcUlQXndw — Mireya Villarreal (@cbsmireya)


Dallas nurse Briana Aguirre: ‘We never talked about Ebola’ before Thomas Eric Duncan arrived – Health – TODAY.com


Excerpts: “Administrators never discussed with staff how the hospital would handle an Ebola case prior to Duncan’s arrival, Aguirre alleged.

“We never talked about Ebola and we probably should have,” she said. Instead, “they gave us an optional seminar to go to. Just informational, not hands on. It wasn’t even suggested we go … We were never told what to look for.”

“I expected more out of us,” Aguirre said.

Earlier in the week, a union that says it represents nurses in every state criticized the hospital, saying that protocols to protect workers were not in place.

Aguirre said she never dealt directly with Duncan, who was initially put in an area with “up to seven other patients,” but she talked with colleagues who did work directly with the patient. She said there was mass confusion over procedures, including how to handle Duncan’s lab work.

“It was just a little chaotic scene. Our infectious disease department was contacted to ask, what is our protocol. And their answer was, we don’t know. We’re going to have to call you back,” she said.”

via Dallas nurse Briana Aguirre: ‘We never talked about Ebola’ before Thomas Eric Duncan arrived – Health – TODAY.com.
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/32545640

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/32545640

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

this pressed for your right to know: Texas Nurse ‘Can No Longer Defend’ Hospital After Ebola Handling | TIME


Texas Nurse ‘Can No Longer Defend’ Hospital After Ebola Handling | TIME.


Second Case of Ebola Transmission in US

A second US nurse who treated Liberian Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the disease, raising concerns that more of the dozens of hospital staffers involved in Duncan’s care may come down with the virus. Further concerns were raised after it emerged that the sickened nurse took a commercial flight the night before she was diagnosed. Health officials are now assessing the flight’s 132 passengers for any signs of illness, though the likelihood of transmission at that time was remote. More… Discuss

this pressed for your right to know: Vulnerabilities in Ebola planning – The Washington Post


Ebola_vulnerabilitiesB - Copy

CDC Ebola_vulnerabilities

The Washington Post

Vulnerabilities in Ebola planning

The infection of two Dallas health care workers has highlighted vulnerabilities in the CDC’s protocols for those dealing with Ebola patients. The current protocol allows for potential skin exposure of caregivers. The CDC is revising those guidelines and will likely make them more similar to those used in biological containment facilities.

via Vulnerabilities in Ebola planning – The Washington Post.

this pressed – for your right to know: Cases of Ebola outside of West Africa and other Ebola facts | The New York Times


thi spressed-for your right to know: Governments seize colloidal silver being used to successfully treat Ebola patients | Starship Earth: The Big Picture


Governments seize colloidal silver being used to successfully treat Ebola patients | Starship Earth:

The Big Picture.

Le Liberia apprend à vivre avec le virus Ebola http://t.co/rG63x00kNS pic.twitter.com/hIuApC1RQn — RFI (@RFI)