Category Archives: Health and Environment

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968)


Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968)

The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is an international agreement to limit the spread of nuclear weapons. It was originally signed by the US, Britain, the USSR, and 59 other countries in 1968. The major signatories agreed not to help nonnuclear states obtain or produce nuclear weapons, while the nonnuclear signatories agreed not to try to obtain them. The treaty was extended indefinitely in 1995, and nearly 190 countries are now party to it. Which nations have never signed it? More… Discuss

Researchers discover what powers enzyme that helps cancer grow – UPI.com


Although researchers have long been aware of an enzyme that helps cancer cells to grow, they have just identified a protein that assists it and may be able to find a way to prevent the runaway growth of tumors by blocking the helper protein. Photo by Tatiana Shepeleva/Shutterstock

COPENHAGEN, Denmark, June 29 (UPI) — Researchers have discovered the protein that allows the enzyme ADAM17 to remove molecules from the surface of cancer cells, helping them to grow.

The protein PACS-2 helps ADAM17 transport into and out of the cell. However, if the protein is blocked, the enzyme returns to the cell surface less often, meaning it can’t help cells to grow.

via Researchers discover what powers enzyme that helps cancer grow – UPI.com.

Pool parasite can live in chlorine for ten days – UPI.com


The Centers for Disease Control recommends that swimmers shower before geting in the pool to prevent them from carrying infectious bacteria into the water. Photo: Monkey Business Images/shutterstock

The Centers for Disease Control recommends that swimmers shower before geting in the pool to prevent them from carrying infectious bacteria into the water. Photo: Monkey Business Images/shutterstock

ATLANTA, June 29 (UPI) — The Centers for Disease Control is warning swimmers to shower before going into the pool in order to avoid spreading the chlorine-resistant pathogen cryptosporidium, which has caused several outbreaks in recent years.

While E. coli and norovirus are killed within hours by chemicals used for treating pools, cryptosporidium survives in pools and hot tubs for up to ten days, and can cause gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea.

“This parasite is extremely chlorine-resistant,” Michele Hlavsa, an epidemiologist at the CDC, told CBS News. “Swimmers bring it into the water when they are sick with diarrhea.”

Researchers reviewed data from 2011 and 2012, finding that 90 outbreaks related to recreational water resulted in at least 1,788 cases, 95 hospitalizations and 1 death, according to the CDC’s study, which is published on its website.

Of the outbreaks, 77 percent of them were in treated bodies of water such as pools and spas.

Cryptosporidium was responsible for 52 percent of the treated water outbreaks, and was also responsible for 54 percent of all the outbreaks cause by infectious pathogens.

“Since 1988, the year that the first U.S. treated recreational water-associated outbreak of Cryptosporidium was detected, the number of these outbreaks reported annually has significantly increased,” researchers wrote in the report.

If contracted, the parasite can be cleared from the body in about two to three weeks, however it can be fatal in a person with a weakened immune system, Hlavasa said.

“With these outbreaks, we see they disproportionately affect young children,” Hlavasa told ABC News. “They’re the ones who can go to a pool and young children tend to carry lots of germs.”

The CDC recommends swimmers shower before entering the pool, not swallow the water, and not urinate or defecate in the water while swimming; swimmers are discouraged from entering pools altogether if they have diarrhea.

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via Pool parasite can live in chlorine for ten days – UPI.com.

8 Simple Ways To Eat Less Sugar


Eating too much sugar is bad for your health. You’ve heard it before. Excessive consumption can increase your risk for obesity, heart disease and a host of other health complicatio sugary sugar giphy

The World Health Organization recommends the average adult consume no more than 25 grams of sugar a day, but exceeding this is all too easy. A single 12-ounce can of Coca-Cola, for instance, packs 39 grams of the stuff. And added sugar sneaks into unsuspecting edibles, like hamburgers and “healthy” Greek yogurts.

Cutting back on your sugar intake is a smart choice, but it’s tough to know where to start. If you’re looking to taper off, start with a few of the tweaks below. Introduce them to your everyday routine, and eventually they’ll turn into a habit.

1. Make over your morning coffee.

The two sugars you routinely put into your cup of joe can add up. Try reducing the amount of sugar you use little by little, and rely on full-fat dairy to provide satisfaction. See if your taste buds respond well to cinnamon; the spice pairs perfectly with coffee’s nutty hints, and is, above all, sugar free.

2. Quit your soda habit.

Diet or regular, drinking any kind of pop promotes weight gain and amplifies sugar cravings. We’ve mentioned that a standard can of Coke contains 39 grams of sugar, enough to fill a person’s daily recommended intake and then some. And even though the diet kind has no sugar marked on its label, it won’t do any good in the war against sugar. According to a study published in the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, the artificial sweeteners in these drinks lead people to overeat, or overcompensate, for the lack of calories contained in the beverages. Artificial sweeteners don’t offer the same hunger-dampening biological rewards that natural sweeteners do, causing the drinker to seek out something caloric. The sweetness in both diet and non-diet soda prompts side effects similar to addiction, making drinkers crave more sugar.

3. Snack on something healthy before food shopping.

Researchers from Cornell University found that snacking on something nutritious before supermarket shopping, like an apple, can actually encourage shoppers to purchase 25 percent more fruits and vegetables than they normally would. Fewer sugary items in your cart means there will be fewer sugary items at home, and fewer sugary items in your belly.

4. Shop the perimeter of the grocery store.

Now that you’ve had your apple, stick to the outer aisles of the supermarket, where conventional stores place the produce, meat and seafood departments — the foods you should focus on. If you avoid the aisles that contain shelves of near-irresistible sugary sweets, you’ll be less likely to buy them.

5. Find a new favorite condiment.

Ketchup is a miracle flavor, but one of the reasons we all love it so much could be because it contains a whole lot of sugar. The sad reality is that dousing your fries in the red stuff is comparable to pouring a couple sugar packets on top. If you’re already eating fries, consider switching to a condiment with less sugar — like mustard or vinegar — instead.

6. Drink more water.

Are you sure you’re hungry? Thirst and dehydration can often disguise themselves as hunger. To determine whether you’re actually hungry or simply thirsty, drink a cup of water and wait a moment. If you’re feeling good, your body was probably trying to tell you it was parched.

7. Eat the grape, not the raisin.

When given the choice, choose fresh over dried fruit. Dried fruit boasts many of the same benefits of its plumper counterparts, but removing a food’s water content concentrates the amount of sugar and calories per serving. A cup of grapes, for instance, contains 15 grams of sugar and around 60 calories. A cup of raisins contains 98 grams of sugar and nearly 500 calories.

8. Make your own salad dressing.

Even if they taste savory, bottled salad dressings typically contain lots of sugar. Two tablespoons of Kraft’s Tuscan House Italian dressing, for example, contains two grams. This seems pretty minuscule, but chances are you’ll be dousing your greens in a serving way over two measly tablespoons. Making your own dressing at home is incredibly easy — and cheap! — and will help you control how much sugar you’re ingesting when you’re eating something as healthy-seeming as a salad.

via 8 Simple Ways To Eat Less Sugar.

L’Iran aurait transféré de l’équipement nucléaire au Soudan (WikiLeaks) | i24news – Voir plus loin


L’Iran aurait transféré de l’équipement nucléaire au Soudan (WikiLeaks)

Ryad a mis en garde contre la diffusion de “documents qui pourraient être des faux”

AFPAFP”Centrifugeuses nucléaires Iran”

L’Iran aurait fait parvenir de l’équipement nucléaire, dont des centrifugeuses, vers le Soudan en 2012 selon des diplomates saoudiens, indique un document révélé par WikiLeaks la semaine dernière.

“Des sources de l’ambassade ont fait savoir que des containers iraniens sont arrivés cette semaine à l’aéroport de Khartoum contenant de l’équipement technique sensible dont des centrifugeuses pour enrichir de l’uranium, et un deuxième envoi devrait avoir lieu cette semaine,” explique le document qui date de février 2012 et est qualifié de “très secret”.

Les autorités saoudiennes ont mis en garde samedi contre la diffusion de “documents qui pourraient être des faux” en réponse à la publication la veille par le site WikiLeaks de quelque 60.000 câbles et mémos présentés comme des communications confidentielles de la diplomatie saoudienne.

L’avertissement, diffusé par le ministère des Affaires étrangères sur son fil Twitter, ne conteste pas directement l’authenticité des documents mis en ligne par WikiLeaks, qu’il n’est pas possible de vérifier de source indépendante.

Mais dans un communiqué diffusé dimanche, le porte-parole du ministère, Ossama Naqli, prévient que l’Arabie saoudite “ne permettra pas aux ennemis de l’Etat (…) de partager ou publier” les documents, dont “beaucoup ont été fabriqués de manière très grossière”.

Dans ce texte diffusé par l’agence de presse SNA, il ajoute qu’une enquête est en cours et que le ministère engagera des poursuites contre les personnes impliquées dans cette fuite.

Wikileaks affirme que ces 60.000 documents divulgués comportent des communications d’ambassades, des échanges de courriers électroniques entre diplomates et des notes préparées par d’autres organismes de l’Etat saoudien. Ils contiennent des discussions sur la position de l’Arabie dans les questions régionales ou sur les moyens d’influencer les médias.

WikiLeaks, dont l’initiative est ignorée par les médias saoudiens publics et privés, indique qu’il détient au total un demi-million de notes confidentielles et annonce qu’elles seront mises en ligne.

Le site créé par Julian Assange ne précise pas comment il s’est procuré ces documents mais dans un communiqué de presse, il fait mention d’une déclaration saoudienne remontant au mois de mai relative à un piratage informatique dans le royaume qu’avait revendiqué par la suite un groupe du nom de Yemeni Cyber Army.

(i24news avec Reuters)

via L’Iran aurait transféré de l’équipement nucléaire au Soudan (WikiLeaks) | i24news – Voir plus loin.

Translate this report with:    https://translate.google.com/

Mgr Yousif Mirkis, archevêque de Kirkouk en Irak : « Toute ma vie je n’ai connu que des troubles »


Mgr Yousif Mirkis, archevêque de Kirkouk en Irak : « Toute ma vie je n’ai connu que des troubles »

Berkeley balcony was ‘severely dry rotted,’ city says By Jaxon Van Derbeken Updated 7:53 pm, Tuesday, June 23, 2015


Berkeley balcony was ‘severely dry rotted,’ city says

Updated 7:53 pm, Tuesday, June 23, 2015
The Berkeley apartment balcony that collapsed last week, killing six people and injuring seven, was supported by laminated wooden beams that are considered especially vulnerable to water damage and became “severely dry rotted,” a city inspection report released Tuesday showed.

The Berkeley apartment balcony that collapsed last week, killing six people and injuring seven, was supported by laminated wooden beams that are considered especially vulnerable to water damage and became “severely dry rotted,” a city inspection report released Tuesday showed. (click to Access report @ SF-GATE)

Berkeley balcony was ‘severely dry rotted,’ city says — SFGate (@SFGate) June 24, 2015


Is your health yours, or in the hands of the unregulated food industry? BPA messes with your hormones—and it’s in these canned foods— Mother Jones (@MotherJones)


Cellophane (safest food grade packaging)


Cellophane

Cellophane is a thin, transparent sheet or tube of regenerated cellulose, which is the chief constituent of the cell walls of plants. It is used in packaging, as a membrane for dialysis, and can be moisture-proofed. Invented in 1908, cellophane is made by dissolving cellulose alkali, aging it, then regenerating it by forcing it through a slit into a dilute acid solution where it precipitates. Cellophane sales have dwindled because of the presence of what pollutant in its production process? More… Discuss

War is the mother of poverty, Pope Francis says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


By Ann Schneible

Vatican City, Jun 3, 2015 / 03:30 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- In his weekly general audience, Pope Francis lamented the suffering inflicted on families already struggling from poverty in countries torn by the “great predator” of war.

“Truly, war is the ‘mother of all poverty,’ the pontiff said Wednesday, addressing the crowds in Saint Peter’s Square.

“War impoverishes the family,” he said. It is “a great predator of lives, of souls, and of the most sacred and precious loved ones.”

Since late last year, Pope Francis has been centering his Wednesday catechesis on the theme of family as part of the lead-up to the World Day of Families in September, as well as October’s Synod of Bishops on the Family.

Continuing with his June 3 catechesis, the Pope centered his address around the particular difficulties which many families face, especially with regard to poverty.

He lamented the “misery” and “degradation” experienced by poor families inflicted by war, as well as those living in the peripheries.

via War is the mother of poverty, Pope Francis says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

American voters reject Washington as it is.#uniteblue #BernieSanders— AlterNet (@AlterNet)


Corporate America is obsessed w #Millennials. But health care companies are focused on parents— CNNMoney (@CNNMoney)


Just a Thought: The oldest Christian Faith is here ( it is the rock on which the roots gave a 2000 Years old oak tree…of many branches


Just a thought: “The oldest Christian Faith is here: it is the rock on which the roots gave a 2000 Years old oak tree…of many branches… they would not exist without the common roots of  our  common FAITH.”

-George-B

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Weird Spring Weather in L.A. Is Nearly a 100-Year Anomaly — L.A. Weekly (@LAWeekly)


 

From the Hill : 1000 Yards up un Peppergrass Trail


From the Hill : 1000 Yards up un Peppergrass Trail

This Pressed: Podcast: Reporting on the NSA Before It Was Cool – ProPublica Podcast


ProPublica Podcast

Reporting on the NSA Before It Was Cool

by Nicole Collins Bronzan

ProPublica, May 18, 2015, 11:01 a.m.

David Sleight/ProPublica

As a reporter who covered the National Security Agency before before the Edward Snowden documents brought it to the mainstream, Patrick Radden Keefe of The New Yorker says it would be easy to feel jealous of the journalists breaking those stories now. “But I’ve sort of moved on,” Keefe says, “and I watch those stories with great interest.”

This week he joins ProPublica’s Assistant Managing Editor Eric Umansky and Senior Reporter Jesse Eisinger of ProPublica for a podcast on what he’s been up to since his book “Chatter: Dispatches from the Secret World of Global Eavesdropping.”

Highlights include discussion of:

  • How technology has in some ways degraded American spying efforts. “I think there’s been a kind of notion of the technical silver bullet that has greatly endangered privacy, but also undermined national security,” Keefe says. (1:54)
  • The way he chooses his subjects — sometimes on the news, but often not. (16:51)
  • The tension between daily, incremental reporting and magazine-style coverage. “When I have a piece come out, there will always be some snarky daily reporter who will say, sort of, ‘Nothing new here, folks!’ ” (18:36)
  • His recent New Yorker story on the long conflict in Northern Ireland known as the Troubles, told through the story of Jean McConville, a former member of a secret Irish Republican Army unit who was abducted in front of her children in 1972. She was never seen again. (10:43)

Hear their conversation on SoundCloud and Stitcher, and read Keefe’s story “Where the Bodies Are Buried,” from the March 16 issue of The New Yorker.

via Reporting on the NSA Before It Was Cool – ProPublica. (Podcast)

“Ebullient, Cleansing, Awakening… Refreshing, Graceful, Water …The Well Spring of Life”


“Ebullient, Cleansing, Awakening…
Refreshing, Graceful, Water …
The Well Spring of Life”

From dawn to dusk, as Kathmandu rebuilds— BBC News Asia (@BBCNewsAsia) May 15, 2015


The Black Death


The Black Death

The Black Death was a form of bubonic plague

The bubonic plague described by Athanasius Kircher

The bubonic plague described by Athanasius Kircher (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

that was pandemic throughout Europe, the Middle East, and much of Asia in the 14th century. Thought to have been caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, it killed between one-third and half of Europe’s population and at least 75 million people worldwide. Recently, it has been argued that the Black Death was not caused by bubonic plague, at all, but by what? More… Discuss

A woman says she was fired after she deleted an app that her boss used to track her, 24/7: — CNNMoney (@CNNMoney) May 13, 2015


 

New at the #Vatican: Palestinian Liberation Organization –> State of Palestine.— Religion NewsService (@RNS) May 13, 2015


Vatican decision to recognize Palestine upsets Israeli government, Jewish advocacy groups – Religion News Service


JERUSALEM (RNS) The Vatican’s decision to recognize Palestine as a sovereign state on Wednesday (May 13) angered Israeli officials.

The move comes four days before the first-ever canonization of two Palestinian nuns and it solidifies the standing of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, who is scheduled to meet with Pope Francis at the Vatican on Saturday.

Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Emmanuel Nahshon told The Times of Israel that the government is “disappointed by the decision. We believe that such a decision is not conducive to bringing the Palestinians back to the negotiating table.”

Israel insists that for the Palestinians to achieve statehood, they must first end their armed struggle against Israel and recognize its right to exist as the homeland of the Jewish people.

Although the treaty codifies the Holy See’s relations with the Palestinian Authority, the Vatican has already referred to the “State of Palestine” in some official documents, including the official program handed out during Pope Francis’ Holy Land pilgrimage last year.

In recent years, the Vatican has stepped up its efforts to support Palestinian Christians in East Jerusalem, the West Bank and Gaza as their numbers have dwindled due to emigration spurred by wars and economic hardships.

A majority of Christians in the Holy Land — including Israel — are either ethnic Palestinians or live alongside them in the same towns and villages. Sisters Maria Baouardy and Mary Alphonsine Danil Ghattas, who were both Christian Arabs, are due to be canonized by Pope Francis on Sunday.

William Shomali, the auxiliary bishop of the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem, said the Vatican’s announcement “was not a surprise” because “the pope called President Abbas the president of the State of Palestine” during his 2014 pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

But David Harris, executive director of the AJC, the leading global Jewish advocacy organization, said the decision was “regrettable“ and “counterproductive to all who seek true peace between Israel and the Palestinians.”

“We are fully cognizant of the pope’s goodwill and desire to be a voice for peaceful coexistence, which is best served, we believe, by encouraging a resumption of Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, rather than unilateral gestures outside the framework of the negotiating table,” Harris concluded.

Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League, said the action was “premature” and would “undermine the only real solution to the decades-old conflict, which is engaging in direct negotiations.”

YS/MG END CHABIN

Categories: Institutions, Politics

Tags: AJC, Foreign Ministry, Israel, Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, Palestine, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, Vatican

via Vatican decision to recognize Palestine upsets Israeli government, Jewish advocacy groups – Religion News Service.

Cabbage leaf mustard – Recipes Wiki


wpid-20150512_125401.jpg

Mustard greens

Wikipedia Article About Mustard greens on Wikipedia

The mustards are several plant species in the genus Brassica whose proverbially tiny mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by   grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard. The seeds are also pressed to make mustard oil, and the edible leaves can be eaten as mustard greens.

Mild white mustard (Brassica hirta) grows wild in North Africa, the Middle East and Mediterranean Europe and has spread farther by long cultivation; brown or Indian mustard (B. juncea), originally from the foothills of the Himalaya, is grown commercially in the UK, Canada and the US; black mustard (B. nigra) in Argentina, Chile, the US and some European countries. Canada grows 90% of all the mustard seed for the international market.

In addition to the mustards, the genus Brassica also includes cabbages, cauliflower, rapeseed and turnips.

There has been recent research into varieties of mustards that have a high oil content for use in the production of biodiesel, a renewable liquid fuel similar to diesel fuel. The biodiesel made from mustard oil has good cold flow properties and cetane ratings. The leftover meal after pressing out the oil has also been found to be an effective pesticide.

An interesting genetic relationship between many species of mustard have been observed, and is described as the Triangle of U.

via Cabbage leaf mustard – Recipes Wiki.

Brassica juncea
Brassica juncea - Köhler–s Medizinal-Pflanzen-168.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Brassica
Species: B. juncea
Binomial name
Brassica juncea
(L.) Vassiliĭ Matveievitch Czernajew (1796 – 1871)

 

today’s birthday: Sir Ronald Ross (1857)


Sir Ronald Ross (1857)

Born and raised in India, English physician Ronald Ross joined the Indian Medical Service after completing medical school and undertook the study of malaria, then a disease that was not well understood. After years of research, he demonstrated the malarial parasite, Plasmodium, in the stomach of the Anopheles mosquito, identifying the disease’s mechanism of transmission. His discoveries earned him a Nobel Prize in 1902. When is World Mosquito Day, instituted by Ross, observed? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828)


Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828)

Rossetti was a British painter, poet, and founding member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, an association of painters who aimed to combat the shallow conventionalism of academic painting and revive the fidelity to nature and the vivid realistic color that they considered typical of Italian painting before Raphael. Although Rossetti found some financial success as a painter, his lasting reputation rests upon his poetry. What did he have buried with his wife—and later exhumed? More… Discuss

Cumin


Cumin

Cumin
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Apiales
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Cuminum
Species: C. cyminum
Binomial name
Cuminum cyminum
L.[1]

Cumin (/ˈkjuːmɨn/ or UK /ˈkʌmɨn/, US /ˈkmɨn/; sometimes spelled cummin; Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to India. Its seeds (each one contained within a fruit, which is dried) are used in the cuisines of many different cultures, in both whole and ground form.

Etymology

The English “cumin” derives from the Old English cymen (or Old French cumin), from Latin cuminum,[2] which is the latinisation of the Greek κύμινον (kuminon),[3] cognate with Hebrew כמון (kammon) and Arabic كمون (kammun).[4] Forms of this word are attested in several ancient Semitic languages, including kamūnu in Akkadian.[5] The ultimate source is the Sumerian word gamun.[6] The earliest attested form of the word κύμινον (kuminon) is the Mycenaean Greek ku-mi-no, written in Linear B syllabic script.[7]

Description

Cumin is the dried seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum, a member of the parsley family. The cumin plant grows to 30–50 cm (0.98–1.6 ft) tall and is harvested by hand. It is an annual herbaceous plant, with a slender, branched stem 20–30 cm tall. The leaves are 5–10 cm long, pinnate or bipinnate, with thread-like leaflets. The flowers are small, white or pink, and borne in umbels. The fruit is a lateral fusiform or ovoid achene 4–5 mm long, containing a single seed. Cumin seeds resemble caraway seeds, being oblong in shape, longitudinally ridged, and yellow-brown in color, like other members of the umbelliferae family such as caraway, parsley and dill.

History

Cumin seeds

Cumin has been in use since ancient times. Seeds excavated at the Syrian site Tell ed-Der have been dated to the second millennium BC. They have also been reported from several New Kingdom levels of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites.[8]

Originally cultivated in Iran and the Mediterranean region,[citation needed] cumin is mentioned in the Bible in both the Old Testament (Isaiah 28:27) and the New Testament (Matthew 23:23). The ancient Greeks kept cumin at the dining table in its own container (much as pepper is frequently kept today), and this practice continues in Morocco. Cumin was also used heavily in ancient Roman cuisine. It was introduced to the Americas by Spanish and Portuguese colonists. There are several different types of cumin but the most famous ones are black and green cumin which are both used in Persian cuisine.

Today, the plant is mostly grown in China, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Iran, Turkey, Morocco, Egypt, Syria, Mexico, Chile and India. Since cumin is often used as part of birdseed and exported to many countries, the plant can occur as a rare casual in many territories including Britain.[9] Cumin occurs as a rare casual in the British Isles, mainly in Southern England; but the frequency of its occurrence has declined greatly. According to the Botanical Society of the British Isles’ most recent Atlas, only one record has been confirmed since 2000.

In India, cumin has been used for millennia as a traditional ingredient of innumerable kormas, masalas, soups and other spiced gravies.In Sanskrit, Cumin is known as jiraka. Jira means “that which helps digestion”. As per Ayurveda cumin seeds promote digestion and also enhance sexual vigour. It is a stimulant, thus works on erectile dysfunctions. Cumin also increases strength. It could be because of its property of stimulating metabolic digestion which helps in a thorough absorption of micro nutrients from the food. It also enhances taste of the food and alleviates Kapha. Cumin helps in lacto genesis so it could be given in small quantity to lactating mothers.

Dust Bowl: Dust Storm Hits Great Plains (1934) (Watch the documentary!)


Dust Bowl: Dust Storm Hits Great Plains (1934)

In the 1930s, severe drought conditions in the Great Plains region of the US and decades of farming without crop rotation led to a series of devastating dust storms. The storms, called “dusters” or “black blizzards,” caused widespread ecological and agricultural damage. In May 1934, one of the worst storms to hit the Dust Bowl blew massive amounts of Great Plains topsoil all the way to the East Coast and dumped the equivalent of how many pounds of debris on Chicago, Illinois? More… Discuss

Stinging Dust & Forgotten Lives: The Dust Bowl (2008)

Uploaded on Aug 30, 2011

Ponder for a moment that you are huddled around a dimly lit lamp in a vast dusty room with your family. All eyes have a look of fear from the gusty winds shaking your home. The next morning, after the storm blows over, you look outside to find your house, barn, animals, fence, and water well have all been buried by feet of soil. All is lost. You must live…but how?

Over a hundred years ago people left the American east to find a better life. They migrated and established homestead throughout the Great Plains. There, they would prosper with fields of plenty, until, they exhausted the land. Again, they migrated westward to find a better life and provide opportunities for their starving children. STINGING DUST & FORGOTTEN LIVES presents the effects of the Dust Bowl on humanity during the 1930s. Meteorological conditions are often the first to blame, however, it was economic gain of the nation that doubled the unfortunate fate of the dusters.

For more information visit tcpfilms.com/​sdfl

Copyright 2008 by Cameron Douglas Craig and Kevin Harker Jeanes

Yerba Mate in Buenos Aires


Yerba Mate-Rosamonte_My Digital Oil Paintings Series

yerba mate tea served in gourd with bombilla straw.

Gourd and bombilla straw

Koeh-074

 

 

Newtons_cradle_animation_book_2

Yerba Mate in Buenos Aires

From The Hill: Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!


Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!

Eating healthy is much more expensive than 10%— Fitness Motivation


Healtth-Ebola: Ebola virus lingers in patient’s eyeball even after recovery| -ABC News


Chlorophyll


Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll is a green pigment that gives most plants their color and enables them to carry out photosynthesis, the process through which plants get energy from light. Chlorophyll absorbs light in the red and blue-violet portions of the visible spectrum; the green portion is not absorbed and, reflected, gives chlorophyll its characteristic green color. Only one animal has been found to use the chlorophyll it has eaten to perform photosynthesis for itself. What is it? More… Discuss

How Does Dry Cleaning Work?


How Does Dry Cleaning Work?

Dry cleaning is the process of cleaning fabrics without water. Special solvents and soaps are used so as not to harm fabrics. The practice began in France in the middle of the 19th century, after a dye-works owner noticed that his tablecloth became cleaner after his maid spilled kerosene on it. Early solvents were extremely flammable and led to many fires and explosions. Newer chlorinated hydrocarbon synthetic solvents, such as perchlorethylene, are nonflammable but pose what other dangers? More… Discuss

The Puerto Rican Parrot


The Puerto Rican Parrot

The Puerto Rican Parrot is the only remaining native parrot in US territory and one of the 10 most endangered bird species in the world. It has green feathers with black edges, a red forehead, and white ovals around the eyes. It was abundant at the time of Columbus’ arrival, but its numbers declined with the clearing of Puerto Rico’s virgin forests to make way for agricultural, mainly sugar cane, production. In 1975, the population reached an absolute low of how many individuals? More… Discuss

The History of Auto Racing


The History of Auto Racing

Automobile racing originated in France in 1894, almost immediately after the construction of the first successful petrol-fueled autos, and it appeared in the US the following year. Open-road races were banned in France in 1903, however, after they led to 8 fatalities. Today, there are several different categories of racing. In open-wheel, stock-car, and other types of circuit auto races, flags are displayed to communicate instructions to competitors. What does a black flag signify? More… Discuss

Sunflowers


Sunflowers

The sunflower is a plant native to the New World and common throughout the US. Its stem can grow up to 10 ft (3 m) tall, and its flower head, commonly having yellow rays, can reach 1 ft (30 cm) in diameter. The sunflower was domesticated around 1000 BCE in the Americas, where the Incas venerated it as an image of their sun god, and it reached Europe in the 16th century. It is valued today for its oil-bearing seeds that can be made into bread. The sunflower is the state flower of what US state? More… Discuss

quotation: Nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose—a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye. Mary Shelle


Nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose—a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851) Discuss

FRANKENSTEIN – Frankenstein by Mary Shelley – Unabridged Audiobook 1831 Edition – FabAudioBooks

today’s holiday: Arbor Day


Arbor Day

Julius Sterling Morton (1832-1902), one of the earliest American conservationists, settled on the treeless plains of Nebraska in 1855. Morton began planting trees and urged his neighbors to do the same. On April 10, 1872, when he proposed that a day be set aside for planting trees, the response was overwhelming: a million trees were planted in Nebraska on that day alone. All 50 states now observe Arbor Day—usually on the last Friday in April. Most observances take place in public schools, where the value of trees is discussed and trees and shrubs are planted. More… Discuss

Kraft removing synthetic colors from iconic macaroni & cheese | Reuters (question: Are food formulators human, or some alien beings, completely different from the rest of us?)


A box of Kraft Velveeta shells and cheese is displayed in a grocery store in New York March 25, 2015. Reuters/Eduardo Munoz

(Reuters) – Kraft Foods Group Inc on Monday said it is revamping its family-friendly macaroni and cheese meal, removing synthetic colors and preservatives from the popular boxed dinner.

The move comes at a time when Kraft is battling sluggish demand as consumers shift to brands that are perceived as healthier, including foods that are organic or less processed.

The company has also been targeted by consumer advocacy groups. The groups have pressured Kraft to remove artificial food dyes from its products, complaining that the additives are not used, and in some cases, banned in other countries.Kraft spokeswoman Lynne Galia said the changes were being made to address concerns expressed by consumers, including demands for improved nutrition and “simpler ingredients.”

“We know parents want to feel good about the foods they eat and serve their families,” Galia said in an emailed statement about the changes to its macaroni and cheese product.

Galia said the changes will be effective by January 2016 for “Original Kraft Macaroni & Cheese” in the United States. The company is also removing synthetic colors by the end of 2016 in Canada for its Kraft Dinner Original.

In 2014, Kraft launched its Mac & Cheese Boxed Shapes with no synthetic colors, and in January of this year, the Northfield, Illinois-based company moved to no artificial preservatives for the Boxed Shapes product in the United States, the company said.

Kraft also said it is replacing synthetic colors with those derived from natural sources, like paprika, annatto and turmeric.

Heather White, executive director of the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy organization for health and environmental issues, applauded Kraft’s move and said it should be an example for other companies.

“The announcement from Kraft should be a wake-up call for other food manufacturers to take notice, go back to the drawing board, reformulate and get rid of these synthetic ingredients of concern, especially in food that is marketed to children,” White said.

Kraft Foods is one of North America’s largest consumer packaged food and beverage companies, with annual revenues of more than $18 billion. Its brands include Capri Sun, Jell-O, Kool-Aid, Lunchables, Maxwell House and Oscar Mayer.

Kraft shares were up about 1 percent at $87.58 on Monday.

(Reporting by Carey Gillam in Kansas City, Missouri; Additional reporting by Anjali Athavaley in New York; Editing by G Crosse and Lisa Shumaker)

via Kraft removing synthetic colors from iconic macaroni & cheese | Reuters.

this day in the yesteryear: First Pasteurization Test Conducted (1862)


First Pasteurization Test Conducted (1862)

Pasteurization is the process of heating beverages or food, such as milk, beer, or cheese, to a specific temperature for a specific period of time in order to kill microorganisms that could cause disease, spoilage, or undesired fermentation. The process was named after its creator, French chemist and microbiologist Louis Pasteur, who conducted the first pasteurization test with fellow French scientist Claude Bernard in 1862. Why is pasteurization not designed to kill all microorganisms in food? More… Discuss

Pasteurization is the process of heating beverages or food, such as milk, beer, or cheese, to a specific temperature for a specific period of time in order to kill microorganisms that could cause disease, spoilage, or undesired fermentation. The process was named after its creator, French chemist and microbiologist Louis Pasteur, who conducted the first pasteurization test with fellow French scientist Claude Bernard in 1862. Why is pasteurization not designed to kill all microorganisms in food? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Haile Gebrselassie (1973)


Haile Gebrselassie (1973)

Widely considered one of the greatest distance runners in history, Haile Gebrselassie is an Ethiopian long-distance track and road running athlete. Over the course of his career, he has set more than 20 records and won numerous Olympic and World Championship titles, achieving major competition wins in outdoor, indoor, cross country, and road running races as short as 1,500 meters and as long as full marathons. In 1995, he beat the world record for the 5,000-meter run by how many seconds? More… Discuss

Foot Binding


Foot Binding

Foot binding originated during the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in the wealthiest parts of China. By the end of the practice’s thousand-year history, it had spread to all classes and was viewed as a status symbol. Young girls’ feet were wrapped in tight bandages that restricted growth, causing breakage and deformity. Most often, the men that foot binding was intended to impress would never see the woman’s bare feet, as they were concealed within tiny “lotus shoes.” When and why did the practice end? More… Discuss

Fighting Boko Haram: Chad aims to ‘destroy’ militant group | euronews, world news


Luis Carballo will be online to discuss his experiences in Chad on Thursday at 15:00 CET. He’ll answer your questions in English, Spanish or French so please post them in the live blog at the foot of this page, email them to askluis@scribblelive.com or Tweet them using the hashtag #askeuronewsluis. You can follow Luis on Twitter @granangular.

For more than a decade, the Islamist group Boko Haram had a limited strategy: to create an Islamic caliphate in northern Nigeria. But now it has spread its terror campaign to neighbouring countries as well.

Chad, Niger and Cameroon have responded with a military alliance which, since January, has been helping the Abuja government.

“What these children have seen, you wouldn’t wish it on your worst enemy.”

In March, Boko Haram signed a deal with ISIL, or the self proclaimed Islamic State. This turned the conflict into an international one, switching on red lights across the region and accelerating a joint offensive.

via Fighting Boko Haram: Chad aims to ‘destroy’ militant group | euronews, world news.

>>>>>>RELATED READING<<<<<<<

>>>>>>RELATED READING<<<<<<<

Champagne


Champagne

The word “Champagne,” when capitalized, refers specifically to the white, sparkling wine made in the Champagne region of France. Generally, production begins with the fermentation of grapes with low sugar and high acid levels to produce a still wine, which is blended with other wines, a small amount of sugar and yeast, and stored. During the second fermentation, carbon dioxide is trapped in the bottle. How should Champagne be poured in order to preserve the bubbles? More… Discuss

Vaccines are key to stopping the spread of disease: http://t.co/4M5IP54eGc. — U.S. Surgeon General (@Surgeon_General)


Moonshining


Moonshining

Home-distillation of alcohol came to be called “moonshining” in English speaking countries because it was usually conducted at night to avoid arrest for the production of illegal liquor. Home-distillation is, however, a world-wide phenomenon and is not illegal everywhere. In New Zealand, for example, stills are legally sold openly on the market along with instruction manuals. What used to be a common, perhaps unreliable, folk test for determining the presence of lead in moonshine? More… Discuss

this pressed for….TRANSPARENCY: U.S. Nerve Gas Hit Our Own Troops in Iraq| via NEWSWEEK/REUTERS


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Atef Hassan/Reuters

U.S. Nerve Gas Hit Our Own Troops in Iraq

By Barbara Koeppel 3/27/15 at 11:52 AM

Atef Hassan/Reuters

Filed Under: U.S., Iraq War

During and immediately after the first Gulf War, more than 200,000 of 700,000 U.S. troops sent to Iraq and Kuwait in January 1991 were exposed to nerve gas and other chemical agents. Though aware of this, the Department of Defense and CIA launched a campaign of lies and concocted a cover-up that continues today.

A quarter of a century later, the troops nearest the explosions are dying of brain cancer at two to three times the rate of those who were farther away. Others have lung cancer or debilitating chronic diseases, and pain.

More complications lie ahead.

via U.S. Nerve Gas Hit Our Own Troops in Iraq.| NEWSWEEK/REUTERS

this day in the yesteryear: Ireland Bans Smoking in All Public Places (2004)


Ireland Bans Smoking in All Public Places (2004)

In the latter part of the 20th century, research on the health risks of secondhand tobacco smoke spurred legislative bodies throughout the world to consider smoking bans. On March 29, 2004, Ireland became the first country to implement a nationwide ban on smoking in public places, including all enclosed workplaces. Many nations have since followed with similar legislation. Which Pope instituted the first known public smoking ban in 1590 by threatening smokers with excommunication? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Three Mile Island nuclear power plant radiation release Accident (1979)


Three Mile Island Accident (1979)

Both mechanical failure and human error contributed to the 1979 failure of a nuclear reactor cooling system at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Pennsylvania, which led to overheating, partial melting of the reactor’s uranium core, and the release of radioactive gases. Though it caused no immediate deaths or injuries, the incident increased public fears about the safety of nuclear power. What nuclear accident-themed film was released just two weeks before the incident? More… Discuss