Category Archives: MEMORIES

History of the Christianity’s first 1000 years


History of the Christianity’s first 1000 years

Iraq’s Lost Treasures (the treasure of Nimrud)


Iraq’s Lost Treasures (the treasure of Nimrud)

Max Bruch – Symphony No.3 in E-major, Op.51 (1887) , great compositions/performances


Max Bruch – Symphony No.3 in E-major, Op.51 (1887)

Alleluia – Randall Thompson (South Dakota State University Concert Choir)


Alleluia – Randall Thompson (South Dakota State University Concert Choir)

Johann Nepomuk Hummel. Adagio – Theme and Variations for Oboe and Orchestra in F minor – F major


Johann Nepomuk Hummel. Adagio – Theme and Variations for Oboe and Orchestra in F minor – F major

Historic Musical Bits: Leonid Kogan “Fantasy in C op 131″ Schumann


Leonid Kogan “Fantasy in C op 131″ Schumann

Today’s holiday: Feast of Excited Insects (2015)


Feast of Excited Insects (2015)

Known as Gyeongchip in Korea and as Ching Che in China, the Feast of Excited Insects marks the transition from winter to spring. It is the day when the insects are said to come back to life after hibernating all winter. In China, it is the day when “the dragon raises his head,” summoning the insects back to life, and people perform various rituals designed to prepare for the onslaught. In Korea, this is one of 24 days in the lunar calendar that marks the beginning of a new season. Farmers prepare their fields and begin planting their barley, cabbage, and other vegetables. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Michelangelo (1475)


Michelangelo (1475)

Among the world’s most celebrated artists, Michelangelo was one of the foremost figures of the Renaissance. The marble David, completed before his 30th birthday, is a sculptural masterpiece, and his paintings in the Sistine Chapel are among the most influential frescoes in the history of Western art. A true “Renaissance man,” he also was an architect and poet and wrote hundreds of sonnets and madrigals. Where in the Sistine Chapel is there a disguised self-portrait of Michelangelo? More… Discuss

“Freedom Fries”


“Freedom Fries”

“Freedom fries” was a short-lived name used by some in the US for French fries after France resisted condoning the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In March, 2003, all references to French fries and French toast on the menus of restaurants run by the House of Representatives were removed. By July 2006, however, the move had been reversed. Politically-motivated renamings were also seen during World War I, when anti-German sentiment led some to refer to sauerkraut as what? More… Discuss

Must Read: This Pressed: Behind Supreme Court’s Obamacare Case, A Secretive Society’s Hidden Hand – ProPublica


Behind Supreme Court’s Obamacare Case, A Secretive Society’s Hidden Hand

For more than 30 years, the Federalist Society has worked behind the scenes to shape Supreme Court outcomes to a conservative agenda. In King v. Burwell, its influence could eliminate health insurance subsidies for millions of people.

The Supreme Court has no shortage of potentially precedent-shattering cases on its docket this term. But the one the justices are hearing tomorrow, King v. Burwell, could be the most consequential.

King focuses on the issue of whether low-income people who get insurance under the Affordable Care Act’s federal exchanges are entitled to tax subsidies. Much has been said (and written) about what could happen if the justices rule “no”: Millions of people in as many as 37 states could lose their health coverage. The political earthquake could be cataclysmic.

 

Yet, few reports have highlighted the role of the Federalist Society, the conservative law group whose ideas are at the intellectual heart of the King v. Burwell challenge. That’s not surprising, given that the group’s members have played a mostly behind-the-scenes part in King — and in many of the most significant conservative legal victories of the last 30 years.

In a new book, “Ideas with Consequences: The Federalist Society and the Conservative Counterrevolution,” Pomona College political scientist Amanda Hollis-Brusky channels her inner investigative journalist to trace the group’s influence on the courts, and especially, the Supreme Court.

Note: This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Q. What is the Federalist Society? What did it grow out of?

A. The Federalist Society was founded in 1982 by a small group of conservative and libertarian law students at Yale and the University of Chicago. Many of the founders had worked on the Reagan presidential campaign, and when they arrived in their elite law schools, they noticed a profound mismatch between the ideas that were achieving political ascendancy — about limited government and free markets and states’ rights — and a liberal orthodoxy that was embedded in almost all major legal institutions of the time.

Flash forward 30 years: The Federalist Society has matured into a self-professed “society of ideas” that claims 40,000 to 60,000 members. These include every Republican-appointed attorney general and solicitor general since the 1980s, dozens of federal judges, and four sitting U.S. Supreme Court justices: Antonin Scalia, who was one of the organization’s original mentors at the University of Chicago; Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and John Roberts.

Q. How does it operate?

A. The Federalist Society doesn’t exhibit its power in a way that is easily recognizable. It doesn’t bring court cases, or lobby, or publish position papers, or officially endorse political or judicial candidates. Instead, it trains and socializes its members through thousands of events every year. It promotes collaboration. Members are encouraged to draw on their training and networks as they go about their work as judges, policy makers, litigators and academics. In this way, the Federalist Society’s influence is one step removed from the policy process. Yet that influence is profound.

Q. The Federalist Society doesn’t even make public its membership rosters. How did you trace its impact on policy and the courts?

A. I used speaker agendas from Federalist Society national student conferences and lawyer conferences from 1982 to 2012 to construct a database of everyone who’s ever participated in one of these meetings: 1,190 individuals in all. These are the thought leaders — the Mick Jaggers of the movement. If you are invited to speak at a national conference, it signals true believership.

Then I tracked their movements: What Supreme Court cases were they participating in? Were they consistently promoting a certain kind of scholarship or set of beliefs?

I identified the key areas of law that have taken a significant conservative turn over the past 30 years. And by reviewing transcripts from meetings and conferences, I was able to show how those ideas were gestated within the Federalist Society network for decades before being accepted by the Supreme Court.

Q. What kind of ideas?

A. The organization’s statement of principles provides a useful frame. The first part says: We believe the state exists to preserve freedom. Two key areas where this principle has played out are the Second Amendment — there has been a radical reframing of the right to bear arms as a right on par with speech and religious freedom — and campaign finance, culminating in Citizens United and the idea that corporations and individuals both have free speech rights.

A second Federalist principle holds that the separation of governmental powers is central to the Constitution. There’s been a very, very concerted effort to narrow the federal power over interstate commerce, to restrict the ability of Congress to regulate, and to dramatically expand states’ rights.

The third principle is the idea that it is the role of the judicial branch to say what the law is and not what it ought to be. That is the key issue in King v. Burwell.

Q. Let’s talk about the Supreme Court’s first Obamacare decision in 2012. Conservatives greeted that ruling with shock, outrage, disappointment. They lost — the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was upheld. But in your view, that ruling was actually an important Federalist Society victory. Why?

A. For one thing, they won on the Medicaid expansion issue. Conservatives and libertarians had fought that expansion, arguing that it was a coercive policy that infringed on states’ rights. The proposed expansion was a keystone of the ACA, so that part of the ruling was a huge blow to health care reform.

The Federalist Society also prevailed on the issue of the constitution’s Commerce Clause. Congress had argued that the Commerce Clause gave it the power to regulate health care, but a majority of the justices disagreed. That precedent has further contributed to the narrowing of the federal commerce powers.

It’s true, Chief Justice Roberts found a way to salvage the ACA’s individual mandate based on the power of Congress to impose taxes. That made many conservatives very unhappy. But the Federalist Society didn’t just get half a loaf, it got 80 percent of the loaf.

Q. King v. Burwell is avery different type of case. How does the issue at the center of it reflect Federalist Society thinking?

A. Unlike the 2012 challenge to the ACA, King v. Burwell is not a constitutional case. It’s a statutory case. At issue is whether people in states with federally facilitated health insurance exchanges are entitled to receive the tax benefits that make insurance affordable. The parties in this case are asking the Supreme Court to interpret just five words: what is meant by an “exchange established by the State.”

There are two very different ways to look at the issue of statutory interpretation. For many years, the dominant view was: If the meaning of that language is not immediately apparent, judges should look to legislative history – what was Congress’s intent when they wrote those words? In the case of Obamacare, the legislative intent is pretty clear: Congress’s aim was to provide tax benefits to lower income Americans to help underwrite the cost of insurance.

But since the 1980s, there’s been a quiet revolution in statutory interpretation by the courts. Instead of taking into consideration legislative history and intent, there’s been a shift to just looking at the plain meaning of the text and ignoring everything else because supposedly things like legislative history are too subjective. This revolution began with a core group of Federalist Society members centered in the Reagan Justice Department. Justice Scalia has been a major proponent.

If the plaintiffs in King v. Burwell prevail, the Federalist Society will have two victories. The obvious one is that Obamacare will suffer another major setback. The other will be to more firmly entrench this idea of statutory interpretation – we shouldn’t look at legislative history; we shouldn’t look at consequences; we should just look at the plain meaning of the words, and our inquiry ends there. The Supreme Court majority’s approach could well be: The ACA says what it says — let Congress fix it. But they know full well that this Congress will not pass that fix.

Q. This idea of ignoring Congressional intent, and just reading the plain text of a statute, comes up in another important Supreme Court case this year,Young v. UPS, which focuses on pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. How has Federalist Society thinking shaped the Supreme Court’s rulings on sex discrimination?

A. Young v. UPS is another case of statutory interpretation — in this instance, the question centers on the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978. The Act prohibits employers from treating pregnant women differently from other employees who are “similar in their ability, or inability, to work.” But what does that mean? Women’s rights advocates say it’s obvious: Pregnant women must not be discriminated against in the workplace. But many employers said it means that pregnant women can’t be treated any differently than “similarly situated” male employees — otherwise women are getting preferential treatment. Never mind that men can’t be similarly situated because men can’t get pregnant.

One of the ways the Federalist Society has been effective is in changing the debate. Twenty or 30 years ago, if you were going to hear oral arguments in a case about the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, much of the discussion would have focused on statutory intent — the fact that the entire purpose of this Act, regardless of how the language is phrased, was to prevent discrimination on account of pregnancy. That is virtually not talked about now.

In the Young oral arguments last December, almost the entire focus was on the meaning of “similarly situated” and “similar in their ability or inability to work.” There was a lot of discussion about semicolons. And when you limit the conversation in this way, the effect almost always is to limit protections, to restrict rights.

by Nina Martin

ProPublica, March 3, 2015, 2:24 p.m.

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Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts speaks during the 2007 National Lawyer Convention, put on by the Federalist Society. The conservative law group’s ideas could determine the outcome of the most consequential case of the court’s 2014-15 term, a challenge to the Affordable Care Act. (Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)

The Supreme Court has no shortage of potentially precedent-shattering cases on its docket this term. But the one the justices are hearing tomorrow, King v. Burwell, could be the most consequential.

King focuses on the issue of whether low-income people who get insurance under the Affordable Care Act’s federal exchanges are entitled to tax subsidies. Much has been said (and written) about what could happen if the justices rule “no”: Millions of people in as many as 37 states could lose their health coverage. The political earthquake could be cataclysmic.

Yet, few reports have highlighted the role of the Federalist Society, the conservative law group whose ideas are at the intellectual heart of the King v. Burwell challenge. That’s not surprising, given that the group’s members have played a mostly behind-the-scenes part in King — and in many of the most significant conservative legal victories of the last 30 years.

In a new book, “Ideas with Consequences: The Federalist Society and the Conservative Counterrevolution,” Pomona College political scientist Amanda Hollis-Brusky channels her inner investigative journalist to trace the group’s influence on the courts, and

via Behind Supreme Court’s Obamacare Case, A Secretive Society’s Hidden Hand – ProPublica.

Big firms—across industries—are spending $ on their own infrastructure due to a strong economy— Rani Molla


Ravel Valses nobles et sentimentales


Ravel Valses nobles et sentimentales

‘Capital punishment must end’ – Catholic publications unite in rare joint statement :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Washington D.C., Mar 5, 2015 / 04:02 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Four U.S. Catholic publications with a broad range of audiences have come together in a joint editorial citing Church leaders in calling for an end to the death penalty in the United States.

“Capital punishment must end,” stated a March 5 editorial by America magazine, the National Catholic Register, the National Catholic Reporter and Our Sunday Visitor.

The death penalty is both “abhorrent and unnecessary,” the publications said, arguing that the practice of capital punishment drains resources in court battles that would be “better deployed in preventing crime in the first place and working toward restorative justice for those who commit less heinous crimes.”

via ‘Capital punishment must end’ – Catholic publications unite in rare joint statement :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

J.S. Bach – St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244 / Aria: “Erbarme dich, mein Gott”


J.S. Bach – St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244 / Aria: “Erbarme dich, mein Gott”

Suite No.4 in G major Op.61 Mozartiana


Suite No.4 in G major Op.61 Mozartiana

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 5

1624   Class-based legislation is passed in the colony of Virginia, exempting the upper class from punishment by whipping.
1766   Antonio de Ulloa, the first Spanish governor of Louisiana, arrives in New Orleans.
1793   Austrian troops crush the French and recapture Liege.
1821   James Monroe becomes the first president to be inaugurated on March 5, only because the 4th was a Sunday.
1905   Russians begin to retreat from Mukden in Manchuria, China.
1912   The Italians become the first to use dirigibles for military purposes, using them for reconnaissance flights behind Turkish lines west of Tripoli.
1918   The Soviets move the capital of Russia from Petrograd to Moscow.
1928   Hitler’s National Socialists win the majority vote in Bavaria.
1933   Newly inaugurated President Franklin D. Roosevelt halts the trading of gold and declares a bank holiday.
1933   Hitler and Nationalist allies win the Reichstag majority. It will be the last free election in Germany until after World War II.
1943   In desperation due to war losses, fifteen and sixteen year olds are called up for military service in the German army.
1946   In Fulton, Missouri, Winston Churchill tells a crowd that “an iron curtain has descended on the Continent [of Europe].”
1956   The U.S. Supreme Court affirms the ban on segregation in public schools in Brown vs. Board of Education.
1969   Gustav Heinemann is elected West German President.
1976   Britain gives up on the Ulster talks and decides to retain rule in Northern Ireland indefinitely.
1984   The U.S. Supreme Court rules that cities have the right to display the Nativity scene as part of their Christmas display.
Born on March 5
1326   Louis I (the Great), King of Hungary.
1574   William Oughtred, mathematician and inventor of the slide rule.
1824   Elisha Harris, U.S. physician and founder of the American Public Health Association.
1824   James Merritt Ives, lithographer for Currier and Ives.
1853   Howard Pyle, writer and illustrator (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood).
1870   Frank Norris, novelist (McTeague, The Octopus).
1887   Heitor Villa-Lobos, Brazillian composer.
1908   Rex Harrison, actor.
1938   Lynn Margulis, biologist.
1948   Leslie Marmon Silko, writer (Ceremony).

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.ZdUi8cYV.dpuf

quotation: “Death is the only physician,…”, George Eliot


Death is the only physician, the shadow of his valley the only journeying that will cure us of age and the gathering fatigue of years.George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

today’s birthday: Rosa Luxemburg (1871)


Rosa Luxemburg (1871)

Luxemburg was a Polish-born German revolutionary and Marxist political theorist. She helped found the Polish Socialist party, was a leader in the German Social Democratic Party, and collaborated with Karl Liebknecht in founding the Spartacus League in 1916. Imprisoned during World War I for opposing the war, Luxemburg continued to secretly write politically inflammatory essays and had them illegally smuggled out of prison and published. How did she die? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Boston Massacre (1770)


Boston Massacre (1770)

Many Bostonians resented the heavy British military presence in their city during the late 1700s, and the soldiers’ enforcement of the unpopular Townshend Acts merely exacerbated the tense situation. On March 5, 1770, soldiers opened fire on an aggressive, rioting civilian mob, killing five men. The Boston Massacre, as it became known, fueled the anti-British sentiment that culminated in the American Revolutionary War. Which future US president served as the troops’ defense lawyer? More… Discuss

BBC – Culture – The Ajanta Caves: Discovering lost treasure


The Ajanta Caves, 30 spellbinding Buddhist prayer halls and monasteries carved, as if by sorcery, into a horseshoe-shaped rock face in a mountainous region of India’s Maharashtra state, 450km (280 miles) east of Mumbai, were ‘discovered’ by accident in 1819.

Unknown for more than 1,000 years except to wild animals, insects, flood waters, prodigious foliage and perhaps the local Bhil people, this magnificent work of art, architecture and contemplation, was abandoned by those who created it as long ago as AD 500. In 1983 it was designated a Unesco World Heritage Site.

John Smith, a young British cavalry officer, was on a tiger hunt when he spotted the mouth of a cave high above the Waghora (Tiger) River that could only have been man made. Scrambling up with his party, Smith entered the cave and, branding a flaming grass torch, encountered a great vaulted and colonnaded hall, its walls covered in faded paintings. Beneath a dome, a timeless praying Buddha fronted a mound-like shrine, or stupa

via BBC – Culture – The Ajanta Caves: Discovering lost treasure.

China’s version of ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ is going viral— msnbc (@msnbc)


From VATICAN: POPE FRANCIS PRAYS FOR THE PERSECUTED CHRISTIANS


Pope Francis prays for world’s persecuted Christians

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Beethoven – Gilels Piano Sonata No. 2


Beethoven – Gilels Piano Sonata
No. 2

Cello Concerto in B flat Major, G.482 – I. Allegro moderato


Cello Concerto in B flat Major, G.482 – I. Allegro moderato

Niccolo Paganini Sonata No 2 Nikolas Pylarinos violin and Evangelos Nikolaides guitar


Niccolo Paganini Sonata No 2 Nikolas Pylarinos violin and Evangelos Nikolaides guitar

Would you recognize ‘Homeless Jesus’ on a park bench in DC? :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Washington D.C., Mar 4, 2015 / 04:18 am (CNA/EWTN News).- A statue of “Homeless Jesus” now sits just outside Catholic Charities in downtown Washington, D.C., with the organization’s president hoping it will spur passers-by to service.

“My hope is it would just remind us all that there’s a population out there that needs our help and assistance, and that we meet Jesus in them. We meet Jesus in those in need,” said the president and CEO of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, Monsignor John Enzler.

The statue was sculpted by Canadian artist Timothy P. Schmalz. Pope Francis blessed a small model of the statue back in November 2013.

via Would you recognize ‘Homeless Jesus’ on a park bench in DC? :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Johann Sebastian Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 – I. Allegro


Johann Sebastian Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 – I. Allegro

†Felix Mendelssohn Symphony No 2 B flat major ‘Lobgesang’ ‘Hymn of Praise’† R.Chailly La Scala Philh


Glazunov: Symphony No. 7 in F major ‘Pastorale’, Op. 77 (Anissimov, Moscow Symphony Orchestra)


Glazunov: Symphony No. 7 in F major ‘Pastorale’, Op. 77 (Anissimov, Moscow Symphony Orchestra)


Cardinal Luis Tagle to Pope Francis

Invitation to the dance ( Carl Maria von Weber )


Invitation to the dance ( Carl Maria von Weber )

)Carl Maria von Weber: Der Freischütz Ouverture (The National Philharmonic of Russia)


Carl Maria von Weber Der Freischütz ouverture

Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)


Mendelssohn:  A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

vladimir martynov – the beatitudes-kronos quartet


vladimir martynov – the beatitudes-kronos quartet

Friedrich von Flotow “Overture” Martha


Friedrich von Flotow “Overture” Martha

André Rieu – The Second Jazz Suite Waltz (Shostakovich)


André Rieu – The Second Waltz (Shostakovich)

Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty – I. Pas d’action


Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty – I. Pas d’action 

from EUZICASA: Henry and June Movie: soundtrack playlist: 17 videos


Lucienne Boyer – Parlez-Moi D’Amour [1930]

just a thought: “Pirates worst day at work: No matter how much they hammered at those statues…the gold was not hidden in there!”


just a thought: “Pirates worst day at work: No matter how much they hammered at those statues…the gold was not hidden in there!”

this pressed for history: Iraq’s National Museum To Open For First Time Since 2003 Invasion : The Two-Way : NPR


A man looks at ancient Assyrian human-headed winged bull statues at the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad on Saturday.

Days after video emerged showing self-declared Islamic State extremists taking sledge hammers to pre-Islamic antiquities inside the Mosul museum, the Iraqi government has reopened the country’s national museum, shuttered since the 2003 U.S. invasion of the country that toppled Saddam Hussein.

The National Museum’s reopening was moved up as a retort to the move by ISIS in Mosul, which has been almost universally condemned as a most uncivilized act in a part of the world widely considered the cradle of civilization.

“The events in Mosul led us to speed up our work and we wanted to open it today as a response to what the gangs of Daesh did,” Iraq’s Deputy Tourism Minister Qais Hussein Rashid said, using an Arabic acronym for ISIS.

The National Museum, which displays artifacts from the Mesopotamian era, was looted and then closed after the U.S. invasion. Agence France-Presse quotes Rashid as saying that around 4,300 of the roughly 15,000 looted pieces have been recovered in the past 12 years. Authorities are still tracking down more than 10,000 items in markets and auctions.

via Iraq’s National Museum To Open For First Time Since 2003 Invasion : The Two-Way : NPR.

Cultural Museum of Mosul


Cultural Museum of Mosul

this pressed for humanity: The Plight Of Mosul’s Museum: Iraqi Antiquities At Risk Of Ruin : NPR


July 09, 2014 4:11 PM ET

(As you can see the issue was known to the civilized world for many months! but nothing but meetings and comdemnations were issued, and nothing done to prevent the distruction of humanity’s historic treasures)

http://www.npr.org/v2/?i=330183802&m=330183803&t=audio
http://www.npr.org/v2/?i=330183802&m=330183803&t=audio
http://www.npr.org/2014/07/09/330183802/the-plight-of-mosuls-museum-iraqi-antiquities-at-risk-of-ruin

Christopher Dickey, foreign editor for the Daily Beast, speaks to Melissa Block about the dangers facing antiquities in a museum and other archaeological sites in the Iraqi city of Mosul.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I’m Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I’m Melissa Block. As Sunni insurgents have swept through Iraq seizing cities, they’ve also begun destroying ancient artifacts. Shrines, tombs and statues that the group ISIS believes are against Islam. Present day Iraq was once Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers and considered the cradle of civilization. Now there’s great concern that antiquities and archaeological sites will be wiped out. As Christopher Dickey writes in the Daily Beast, it’s a virtual certainty that irreplaceable history will be annihilated or sold into the netherworld of corrupt and cynical collectors. Mr. Dickey joins me not from Paris. Thanks for being with us.

CHRISTOPHER DICKEY: Sure thing Melissa.

BLOCK: And you write of particular concern about the province of Nineveh and the city of Mosul, in particular the Mosul Museum. Describe what’s there and the significance of these artifacts.

DICKEY: Well, what’s at risk are some beautiful monumental sculptures, these winged figures, lions and bulls, with the faces of bearded men – Kings, that clearly were idols in the time of the Assyrians. But that are now part and parcel of the history of Western civilization and biblical history especially. And then we’ve also got gorgeous gold jewelry which certainly will go onto the black market and all kinds of smaller pieces of sculpture, earthenware, the kinds of things that give you the texture as well as the beauty of life in that period. So it’s a rich museum but all of that collection is now in the hands of ISIS.

via The Plight Of Mosul’s Museum: Iraqi Antiquities At Risk Of Ruin : NPR.

euzicasa, o cugetare: despre dor, scoverzi, si Ioana Radu


Dor este in engleza “longing” , in franceza “désir”… apoi daca oamenii de pe acele meleaguri, sufera la fel de dor, asa cum suferim noi, sua daca sufera de dor de casa la fel cum sufera de dor de ibit sau iubita, daca sufera la fel la tinerete, asa cum sufera la batrineta, cred ca la urma urmei, dupa ce tot evestejit, si iarna nu mai pleaca…e dorul de soare si de ultima primavara care e cel mai puternic EUZICASA.
Am vazut niste scoverzi, aici, pe Facebook, si mi s-a facut dor din mai multe puncte de vedere: pentru ca stiu ca nimeni nu face scoverzi asa cum facea mama mare, deasemenea din cauza ca nu as putea sa le ating (din cauza zaharului) chiar daca erau aurite, si din cauza ca era o vreme cand puteam sa maninc cate as fi dorit, pana al refuz. Tot asa cum puteam sa mananc un borcan ce heciumpeci (pasta de macese), si cate si mai cate… spec ca nu am luat prea mult din poezia dorului, numai ca sa umplu spatiul virtual cu sentimente negative. ”
Format: MPEG4; Resolution: 1280×720(HD);…
youtube.com

Stravinsky Divertimento from “The Fairy’s Kiss” (Muti-Philadelphia Orchestra with Maetro Mutti.)


Stravinsky Divertimento from “The Fairy’s Kiss” (Muti-Philadelphia Orch.)

THE DHAMMAPADA – FULL AudioBook | Buddhism – Teachings of The Buddha (“Hatred ceases by love”)


THE DHAMMAPADA – FULL AudioBook | Buddhism – Teachings of The Buddha

The Dhammapada by Unknown, Translated by F. Max Mueller – FULL AudioBook – The Dhammapada is is a Buddhist scripture, containing 423 verses in 26 categories. According to tradition, these are verses spoken by the Buddha on various occasions, most of which deal with ethics. It is is considered one of the most important pieces of Theravada literature. Despite this, the Dhammapada is read by many Mahayana Buddhists and remains a very popular text across all schools of Buddhism. (Summary from Wikipedia.org)

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- READ along by clicking (CC) for Closed Caption Transcript!

- LISTEN to the entire audiobook for free!

Chapter listing and length:

01 — Chapters 1-4 — 00:14:36
Read by: Roger Turnau

02 — Chapters 5-8 — 00:10:52
Read by: Måns Broo

03 — Chapters 9-14 — 00:19:16
Read by: Chris Masterson

04 — Chapters 15-18 — 00:13:30
Read by: Chris Masterson

05 — Chapters 19-22 — 00:17:01
Read by: Denny Sayers

06 — Chapters 23-25 — 00:16:44
Read by: Roger Turnau

07 — Chapter 26 — 00:10:35
Read by: Scott

Total running time: 1:42:34

This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
This video: Copyright 2013. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved.

just a thought: “A myopic look upon reality keeps one caged in the past; …”


just a thought:  “A myopic look upon reality keeps one caged in the past; Instead of freeing oneself to human development, recognizing the reality with a clear view, somehow that is like not being able to see the forest because of the tree, close and right in one’s eye sight.

Take as many steps backward until you can see the forest around the obstructing  tree, and look again!  It may change your life, and help that one’s life in the present, and see choices,  anew!”

Copyright © 2015 [George-B]. All Rights Reserved.



History Of Egypt, Chaldea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Vol. 1, by Gaston Maspero, Audiobook

History of Human Society – Civilizations: The_Encyclopedia_of_Ancient Civilizations_Arthur_Cotterell


The_Encyclopedia_of_Ancient Civilizations_Arthur_Cotterell

The_Encyclopedia_of_Ancient Civilizations_Arthur_Cotterell (click to enlarge)


THE BEST ANCIENT EGYPT DOCUMENTARY (MUST SEE !!!): Kudos to Egypt for Fighting for its rightful place among the civilized nations of the Earth including the fight for revenge its kidnapped and slaughtered citizens by ISIS


THE BEST ANCIENT EGYPT DOCUMENTARY (MUST SEE !!!)

† this pressed for Christians everywhere †: BBC News – Islamic State: Fears grow for abducted Syrian Christians


It is not clear where the IS militants have taken the abducted Assyrians Continue reading the main story: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-31622883

It i not clear where the IS militants have taken the abducted Assyrians

Continue reading the main story

Islamic State – Other Reports:

Asymmetry of fear

Kobane unbeaten

What is IS?

Key countries

There are fears that more members of an Assyrian Christian community in north-eastern Syria were abducted by Islamic State militants than at first thought.

Initial reports had put the number of missing at 90, but one activist said as many as 285 people had been seized on Monday in Hassakeh province.

Efforts to try to negotiate their release are reported to be under way.

Some 1,000 local Assyrian families are believed to have fled their homes in the wake of the abductions.

Kurdish and Christian militia are battling IS in the area, amid reports of churches and homes having been set ablaze.

Thousands of Christians in Syria have been forced from their homes by the threat from IS militants.

In areas under their control, Christians have been ordered to convert to Islam, pay jizya (a religious levy), or face death. IS militants in Libya also recently beheaded 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians.

via BBC News – Islamic State: Fears grow for abducted Syrian Christians.

find out more about the Assirian Christians HERE