Category Archives: MEMORIES

quotation: One man’s ways may be as good as another’s, but we all like our own best. Jane Austen


One man’s waysmay be as good as another’s, but we all like our own best.Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Ireland Bans Smoking in All Public Places (2004)


Ireland Bans Smoking in All Public Places (2004)

In the latter part of the 20th century, research on the health risks of secondhand tobacco smoke spurred legislative bodies throughout the world to consider smoking bans. On March 29, 2004, Ireland became the first country to implement a nationwide ban on smoking in public places, including all enclosed workplaces. Many nations have since followed with similar legislation. Which Pope instituted the first known public smoking ban in 1590 by threatening smokers with excommunication? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 28

1774   Britain passes the Coercive Act against rebellious Massachusetts.
1854   Britain and France declare war on Russia.
1864   A group of Copperheads attack Federal soldiers in Charleston, Illinois. Five are killed and twenty wounded.
1885   The Salvation Army is officially organized in the United States.
1908   Automobile owners lobby Congress in support of a bill that calls for vehicle licensing and federal registration.
1910   The first seaplane takes off from water at Martinques, France.
1917   The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) is founded, Great Britain’s first official service women.
1921   President Warren Harding names William Howard Taft as chief justice of the United States.
1930   Constantinople and Angora change their names to Istanbul and Ankara respectively.
1933   Nazis order a ban on all Jews in businesses, professions and schools.
1939   The Spanish Civil War ends as Madrid falls to Francisco Franco.
1941   The Italian fleet is routed by the British at the Battle of Battle of Cape Matapan
1941   English novelist Virginia Woolf throws herself into the River Ouse near her home in Sussex. Her body is never found.
1942   A British ship, the HMS Capbeltown, a Lend-Lease American destroyer, which was specifically rammed into a German occupied dry-dock in France, explodes, knocking the area out of action for the German battleship Tirpitz.
1945   Germany launches the last of its V-2 rockets against England.
1946   Juan Peron is elected President of Argentina. He will hold the office for six years.
1962   The U.S. Air Force announces research into the use of lasers to intercept missiles and satellites.
1969   Dwight D. Eisenhower dies at Walter Reed General Hospital in Washington, D.C.
1979   A major accident occurs at Pennsylvania’s Three Mile Island nuclear power plant
1986   The U.S. Senate passes $100 million aid package for the Nicaraguan contras.
1990   Jesse Owens receives the Congressional Gold Medal from President George Bush.
1999   An American Stealth F117 Nighthawk is shot down over northern Yugoslavia during NATO air strikes.
Born on March 28
1652   Samuel Sewall, British colonial merchant and one of the Salem witch trial judges.
1818   Wade Hampton, Confederate general in the American Civil War.
1862   Aristide Briand, premier of France (1909-22).
1868   Maxim Gorky, Russian short story writer and novelist.
1895   James McCudden, the first RAF pilot to receive the Victoria Cross.
1909   Nelson Algren, novelist (The Man with the Golden Arm, A Walk on the Wild Side).
1929   Frederick Exley, American novelist (A Fan’s Notes).
1930   Jerome Isaac Friedman, American physicist, helped confirm the existence of quarks.
1936   Mario Vargas Llosa, Peruvian novelist (Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, Death in the Andes).

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.T5TBUD5j.dpuf

today’s holiday: Teachers’ Day in the Czech Republic (birthday of Jan Amos Komensky)


Teachers’ Day in the Czech Republic

March 28 is the birthday of Jan Amos Komensky (or John Comenius; 1592-1670), a noted educational reformer and theologian in the former Czechoslovakia. Komensky was the first person to write an illustrated textbook for children, used for teaching Latin words; he was also a proponent of compulsory education. It has been traditional for children to honor him on Teachers’ Day, or Komensky Day, by bringing flowers and gifts to their teachers. The day is also observed with lectures, music, and educational activities. More… Discuss

quotation: If you are not a thinking man, to what purpose are you a man at all? Samuel Taylor Coleridge


If you are not a thinking man, to what purpose are you a man at all?

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

happy birthday Gorky — “The Devil” a LibriVox audiobooks


Maxim Gorky — The Devil {audiobook}

this day in the yesteryear: Three Mile Island nuclear power plant radiation release Accident (1979)


Three Mile Island Accident (1979)

Both mechanical failure and human error contributed to the 1979 failure of a nuclear reactor cooling system at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Pennsylvania, which led to overheating, partial melting of the reactor’s uranium core, and the release of radioactive gases. Though it caused no immediate deaths or injuries, the incident increased public fears about the safety of nuclear power. What nuclear accident-themed film was released just two weeks before the incident? More… Discuss

Beethoven Sonata Op 106 “Hammerklavier” Part 1 Valentina Lisitsa , great compositions/performances


Beethoven Sonata Op 106 “Hammerklavier” Part 1 Valentina Lisitsa

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 28

1774   Britain passes the Coercive Act against rebellious Massachusetts.
1854   Britain and France declare war on Russia.
1864   A group of Copperheads attack Federal soldiers in Charleston, Illinois. Five are killed and twenty wounded.
1885   The Salvation Army is officially organized in the United States.
1908   Automobile owners lobby Congress in support of a bill that calls for vehicle licensing and federal registration.
1910   The first seaplane takes off from water at Martinques, France.
1917   The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) is founded, Great Britain’s first official service women.
1921   President Warren Harding names William Howard Taft as chief justice of the United States.
1930   Constantinople and Angora change their names to Istanbul and Ankara respectively.
1933   Nazis order a ban on all Jews in businesses, professions and schools.
1939   The Spanish Civil War ends as Madrid falls to Francisco Franco.
1941   The Italian fleet is routed by the British at the Battle of Battle of Cape Matapan
1941   English novelist Virginia Woolf throws herself into the River Ouse near her home in Sussex. Her body is never found.
1942   A British ship, the HMS Capbeltown, a Lend-Lease American destroyer, which was specifically rammed into a German occupied dry-dock in France, explodes, knocking the area out of action for the German battleship Tirpitz.
1945   Germany launches the last of its V-2 rockets against England.
1946   Juan Peron is elected President of Argentina. He will hold the office for six years.
1962   The U.S. Air Force announces research into the use of lasers to intercept missiles and satellites.
1969   Dwight D. Eisenhower dies at Walter Reed General Hospital in Washington, D.C.
1979   A major accident occurs at Pennsylvania’s Three Mile Island nuclear power plant
1986   The U.S. Senate passes $100 million aid package for the Nicaraguan contras.
1990   Jesse Owens receives the Congressional Gold Medal from President George Bush.
1999   An American Stealth F117 Nighthawk is shot down over northern Yugoslavia during NATO air strikes.
Born on March 28
1652   Samuel Sewall, British colonial merchant and one of the Salem witch trial judges.
1818   Wade Hampton, Confederate general in the American Civil War.
1862   Aristide Briand, premier of France (1909-22).
1868   Maxim Gorky, Russian short story writer and novelist.
1895   James McCudden, the first RAF pilot to receive the Victoria Cross.
1909   Nelson Algren, novelist (The Man with the Golden Arm, A Walk on the Wild Side).
1929   Frederick Exley, American novelist (A Fan’s Notes).
1930   Jerome Isaac Friedman, American physicist, helped confirm the existence of quarks.
1936   Mario Vargas Llosa, Peruvian novelist (Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, Death in the Andes).

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.TfTSNyYq.dpuf

Catholics in England gather to pray for Richard III, one of their own :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Leicester, England – March 23, 2015. Requiem Mass for the Repose of the soul of King Richard III with Cardinal Vincent Nichols of Westminster at Holy Cross Priory.

Nottingham, England, Mar 25, 2015 / 02:25 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- In preparation for the reinternment of the remains of Richard III, a 15th century English king whose body was only recently rediscovered, Cardinal Vincent Nichols of Westminster has offered Compline and a Requiem Mass for the late monarch.

“This evening we fulfil a profound and essential Christian duty: that of praying for the dead, for the repose of their eternal souls,” Cardinal Nichols preached during a March 23 Requiem Mass said at Holy Cross Priory in Leicester.

“The prayer we offer for him this evening is the best prayer there is: the offering of the Holy Mass, the prayer of Jesus himself, made complete in the oblation of his body and blood on the altar of the cross, present here for us on this altar.”

Richard III was born in 1452, and reigned over England from 1483-1485, when he died in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York; he was succeeded by Henry VII, founder of the House of Tudor.

His corpse was buried without pomp, and subsequently lost. It was found in 2012 under a parking lot in Leicester, 30 miles south of Nottingham, on the site of Greyfriars, a Franciscan friary dissolved during the English Reformation.

His body has been kept at the University of Leicester, and was processed to Leicester Cathedral, an Anglican church, on Sunday.

That evening, Cardinal Nichols led a Compline service at the cathedral, during which Richard’s coffin was sprinkled with holy water, and incensed.

“This sprinkling with holy water is a reminder that King Richard, at the beginning of his life, was baptised,” the cardinal reflected. “He was thereby called to live as a follower of Jesus Christ.”

“The deepest intentions of Richard have always been hard to fathom. Yet that is often true for many of us. Within the depth of his heart, amidst all his fears and ambitions, there surely lay a strong desire to provide his people with stability and improvement.”

Cardinal Nichols noted Richard’s achievements, including a development of the presumption of innocence, the concept of blind justice, the practice of granting bail, and translating laws into the vernacular, while adding that “nevertheless his reign was marked by unrest and the fatal seepage of loyalty and support.”

“All of this reminds us, if we need reminding, that baptism does not guarantee holiness of life or saintliness of nature. But it gives a fundamental and enduring shape to a journey through life, in all its struggles and failures.”

He recalled Richard as a man of prayer and “anxious devotion,” who composed a surviving prayer and established chapels.

“We pray that, being brought into the presence of that Divine majesty, Richard may be embraced by God’s merciful love, there to await the final resurrection of all things in the fullness of time.”

Until its reburial, Richard III’s body will remain at Leicester Cathedral. More than 20,000 visited the cathedral to view the coffin. The reinternment will be held at the cathedral on Thursday, led by Justin Welby, the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury.

On Monday, March 23, Cardinal Nichols said a Requiem Mass at Holy Cross Priory, a Dominican parish in Leicester. He wore a chasuble known as the “Westminster Vestment,” which is believed to be from Richard III’s own wardrobe. The chasuble’s embroidery matches that described from his inventories, and has been dated to the third quarter of the 15th century.

The Mass was attended by several bishops from across England and Wales, as well as by Tim Stevens, the Anglican Bishop of Leicester.

Msgr. Thomas McGovern, administrator of the Diocese of Nottingham – which includes Leicester – commented that “it is fitting that, after 530 years, Richard III’s mortal remains are once again laid to rest, this time in Leicester Cathedral, the mediaeval Catholic parish church of Leicester, not far from where they were first buried by the Franciscan friars after the Battle of Bosworth.”

“Just as Mass would have been offered for the repose of his soul by the priests who buried him, we do him the same service tonight, asking Almighty God to receive him into the kingdom of heaven with his sins forgiven. May he rest in peace.”

Cardinal Nichols remarked during his homily that “during this week, Mass is being offered in many Catholic Churches for the repose of the soul of King Richard III. Rightly so. That is exactly what he would have wished, having himself set up at least one chantry chapel for Masses to be celebrated for the dead of both sides of the Battle of Towton in 1461.”

“This evening we pray that the merciful judgement of our loving God is extended to him in every degree, for we know that it is only the gift of God’s mercy that protects us from the demands of God’s justice … We offer this holy Mass that even while his remains are lying in the Cathedral nearby, his soul is united with God in the glory of heaven there to await the final resurrection of all things in Christ.”

via Catholics in England gather to pray for Richard III, one of their own :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Johannes Brahms – Theme & Variations in D minor


Johannes Brahms – Theme & Variations in D minor

Antonin Dvorak – New World Symphony (Full)


Antonin Dvorak – New World Symphony (Full)

Viktor’s Tale, The Terminal- John Williams


Viktor’s Tale, The Terminal- John Williams

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 25

708   Constantine begins his reign as Catholic Pope.
1634   Lord Baltimore founds the Catholic colony of Maryland.
1655   Puritans jail Governor Stone after a military victory over Catholic forces in the colony of Maryland.
1668   The first horse race in America takes place.
1776   The Continental Congress authorizes a medal for General George Washington.
1807   British Parliament abolishes the slave trade.
1813   The frigate USS Essex flies the first U.S. flag in battle in the Pacific.
1865   Confederate forces capture Fort Stedman, during the siege of Petersburg, Va.
1879   Japan invades the kingdom of Liuqiu (Ryukyu) Islands, formerly a vassal of China.
1905   Rebel battle flags that were captured during the American Civil War are returned to the South.
1911   A fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company, a sweatshop in New York City, claims the lives of 146 workers.
1915   The first submarine disaster occurs when a U.S. F-4 sinks off the Hawaiian coast.
1919   The Paris Peace Commission adopts a plan to protect nations from the influx of foreign labor.
1931   Fifty people are killed in riots that break out in India. Mahatma Gandhi was one of many people assaulted.
1940   The United States agrees to give Britain and France access to all American warplanes.
1941   Yugoslavia joins the Axis powers.
1953   The USS Missouri fires on targets at Kojo, North Korea, the last time her guns fire until the Persian Gulf War of 1992.
1954   RCA manufactures its first color TV set and begins mass production.
1957   The European Common Market Treaty is signed in Rome. The goal is to create a common market for all products–especially coal and steel.
1965   Martin Luther King Jr. leads a group of 25,000 to the state capital in Montgomery, Ala.
1969   John Lennon and Yoko Ono stage a bed-in for peace in Amsterdam.
1970   The Concorde makes its first supersonic flight.
1975   Hue is lost and Da Nang is endangered by North Vietnamese forces. The United States orders a refugee airlift to remove those in danger.
1981   The U.S. Embassy in San Salvador is damaged when gunmen attack, firing rocket propelled grenades and machine guns.
1986   President Ronald Reagan orders emergency aid for the Honduran army. U.S. helicopters take Honduran troops to the Nicaraguan border.
Born on March 25
1133   Henry II, King of England (1154-1189).
1767   Joachim Murat, Napoleon’s brother in law who became king of Naples in 1808.
1797   John Winebrenner, U.S. clergyman who founded the Church of God.
1839   William Bell Wait, educator of the blind.
1867   Gutzon Borglum, sculptor of Mount Rushmore.
1868   Arturo Toscanini, Italian conductor.
1906   Alan John Percivale Taylor, English historian.
1908   David Lean, British film director (Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia).
1925   (Mary) Flannery O’Connor, novelist and short story writer.
1934   Gloria Steinem, political activist, editor.
1942   Aretha Franklin, American singer, the “Queen of Soul.”

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.ej4kNFlL.dpuf

today’s holiday: Tichborne Dole (2015)


Tichborne Dole (2015)

The custom of handing out a dole, or allotment of flour, to the village poor in Tichborne, Hampshire, England, dates back to the 12th or 13th century. Lady Mabella Tichborne, who was on her deathbed at the time, begged her husband to grant her enough land to provide an annual bounty of bread to the poor, who were suffering from a recent failure of the wheat crop. On March 25, or Lady Day, each year, villagers in need of assistance gather at the porch of Tichborne House to claim their portion of the gift: a gallon of flour for adults, half as much for children. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: World’s First Passenger Railway Begins Service (1807)


World’s First Passenger Railway Begins Service (1807)

In 1804, British Parliament approved the laying of a railway line between Swansea and Oystermouth in South Wales to move limestone from the quarries of Mumbles to Swansea and to the markets beyond. Later renamed the Swansea and Mumbles Railway, the line was approved to carry passengers in 1807. The world’s first regular passenger service began that same year and operated in one form or another for more than a century and a half before it was decommissioned. What powered the line’s first trains? More… Discuss

this pressed: DHS Report: 1.13 Million Foreign Students in US


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NEWSMAX_INDEPENDENT_AMERICAN (click to access story, or follow the link bellow)

Home | Newsfront

Tags: foreign students | college | DHS

DHS Report: 1.13 Million Foreign Students in US

Wednesday, 25 Mar 2015 07:31 AM

By Elliot Jager

Financially hard-pressed public universities, but also comparatively well-off private schools, are intensively recruiting foreign undergraduates who pay premium tuition fees. Some 1.13 million international students are currently enrolled in U.S. colleges, the Department of Homeland Security reported on Wednesday, according to The Wall Street Journal.

States have been cutting the amount of money they set aside for higher education. This obliges colleges to have students pick up a higher share of their education costs in tuition fees, Bloomberg reported.

Special: Homeowners in for a Huge Surprise about their Mortgage. Read:

Some colleges even send emissaries abroad to recruit foreign students. The University of Colorado Boulder currently has a foreign student population of 6.5 percent. Administrators want to boost the figure to 10 percent. Most of the schools international students are from China, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. These students pay $35,231 annually in tuition compared with $10,971 for instate residents, according to the Journal.

The increasing flow of foreign students into U.S. colleges is facilitated by rising affluence in China and by the policies of oil-rich Arab countries that provide openhanded scholarships.

The highest number of foreign students, 331,371, is from China. Next is India with 146,336. South Korea comes in third with 87,384. Saudi Arabia is fourth with 81,000 students compared to about 5,000 at the time of the 9/11 attacks.

via DHS Report: 1.13 Million Foreign Students in US.

Who’s eating all from your plate? this pressed: Private Chat With Steve Forbes Turns Ugly


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NEWSMAX_INDEPENDENT_AMERICAN

One of the perks of being the financial publisher at Newsmax is the opportunity to meet and work with various industry icons.

This past winter, I was fortunate enough to be introduced to Steve Forbes during a trip to New York City. We met so I could get Steve’s take on politics, investing, and economics.

The conversation started out light, but when the topic of retirement came up, the talk got much darker.

Steve told me how the Federal Reserve’s recent policies are intentionally hurting seniors, how money managers are quietly walking away with up to 70% of investor returns, and how millions of baby boomers are destined to run out of money during their retirements.

Needless to say, the conversation got ugly, quick.

I readily agreed with Steve’s thoughts on the Federal Reserve, but I had to stop him when he said Wall Street money managers were walking away with up to 70% of investors’ profits.

If this were true, it was tantamount to outright theft.

And that’s when Steve showed me how hidden, compounding fees are gutting investor accounts without investors even realizing its happening — and worst of all, it’s 100% LEGAL!

Look, it’s one thing for big banks to get aggressive with deposit accounts, nickel-and-diming clients to death with check and ATM fees, but now we’re talking about Wall Street aggression against federally regulated retirement accounts.

That’s when Steve showed me how this fee compounding makes it mathematically impossible for Wall Street fund managers to outperform their benchmarks.

You may want to let that sink in for a minute. Whatever your financial adviser is telling you about your account performance is likely rigged.

But you have to see it for yourself to believe it.

Editor’s Note: Click Here to Watch This Exclusive Interview with Steve Forbes

Steve went on to show me how these fees compound within investor accounts and can easily “cut your returns in half or more.”

He said, “If you would normally have $100,000 [in your account], you could end up with, say, $30,000 or $40,000 because of what fees eat up.”

As Steve continued to expose the details, I told him our private chat needed to go “on the record.” We had to get this message out to as many people as possible.

And he agreed. But there was one condition — we both knew we couldn’t sound off publicly on a massive problem like this without also providing a solution.

So my team and I came up with a plan.

A plan that will allow anyone the chance to make incredible returns in the stock market — no matter their age, income, or investment experience.

And in the new video interview featuring Steve Forbes, we reveal this plan, and what you can do to ensure you don’t lose another cent to Wall Street’s greed.

But I have to warn you.

After witnessing the evidence Steve Forbes and my team have put together in this exclusive video, you will never look at investing the same way again.

And more importantly, once you see how easy it is to sidestep Wall Street’s greed machine, I think you’ll see why we believe we are about to turn Wall Street on its head.

Christian Hill

Financial Publisher

Newsmax Finance

via Private Chat With Steve Forbes Turns Ugly.

Moulin Rouge at Montmartre in Paris, 1923 — Classic Pics (@classicepics)


Best Classical Music: Beethoven “Symphony No 8″ Karajan (London, 20.V.1955), great compositions/performances


Beethoven “Symphony No 8″ Karajan

historical musical bits (1985): Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic, great compositions/performances


Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

Angela Gheorghiu “Sempre libera Follie! Traviata Scala 2007 , great compositions/performances


Angela Gheorghiu “Sempre libera Follie! Traviata Scala 2007

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op. 42 – III. Mélodie (“Chant sans paroles”)


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op. 42 – III. Mélodie (“Chant sans paroles”)

Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers -


Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers –

Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace


Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace

historic musical bits: Leonid Kogan – Fritz Kreisler – Liebesfreud ,great compositions/performances


Leonid Kogan – Fritz Kreisler – Liebesfreud

the amazing pianist Valentina Lisitsa plays Liszt Un Sospiro Concert Étude No. 3 , great compositions/performances


Liszt Un Sospiro Concert Étude No. 3 Valentina Lisitsa

today’s holiday: Argentina National Day of Memory for Truth and Justice (2015)


Argentina National Day of Memory for Truth and Justice (2015)

In Argentina, this is a public holiday that commemorates all those who lost their lives or otherwise suffered under the National Reorganization Process, a military dictatorship that seized power in Argentina on March 24, 1976. The junta held power for eight years, and, in that time, at least 30,000 citizens were kidnapped, tortured, and executed for their political views. Around the country, art exhibitions, poetry readings, prayer services, and other cultural events are dedicated to remembering the events of March 24. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (1989)


Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (1989)

On March 24, 1989, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker hit Prince William Sound’s Bligh Reef and spilled approximately 11 million US gallons (41 million liters) of crude oil into the sea, covering 11,000 square miles (28,000 km²) of ocean. As a result of the spill, an estimated 250,000 sea birds, 1,000 sea otters, and countless fish and other wildlife died. The ship’s captain was widely criticized after the incident, but many others factors contributed to the crash. What are some examples? More… Discuss

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn – The Gulag Archipelago – AudioBook – Part 1-7 playlist


Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn – The Gulag Archipelago – AudioBook – Part 1-7 playlist

Gulag


Gulag

The Gulag was a system of forced-labor prison camps in the USSR, from the Russian acronym for the Main Directorate of Corrective Labor Camps, a department of the Soviet secret police. It was first established under Lenin during the early Bolshevik years and ultimately included 476 camp complexes. The system reached its peak after 1928 under Stalin, who used it to maintain the Soviet state by keeping its populace in a state of terror. Whose book publicized the gulag system to the Western world? More… Discuss

Antonin Dvorak American Suite in A, Op. 98b


Antonin Dvorak American Suite in A, Op. 98b

Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez


Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez

L. v. Beethoven: Op. 25 / Serenade [Serenata] for flute, violin and viola in D major (Vienna, 1796?)


L. v. Beethoven: Op. 25 / Serenade [Serenata] for flute, violin and viola in D major (Vienna, 1796?)

YouTube Most Viewed: Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt Suites – 1 and 2 Published on May 5, 2013/1,077,272 views


Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt Suites – 1 and 2

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 23

1657   France and England form an alliance against Spain.
1743   Handel’s Messiah is performed for the first time in London.
1775   American revolutionary hero Patrick Henry, while addressing the House of Burgesses, declares “give me liberty, or give me death!”
1791   Etta Palm, a Dutch champion of woman’s rights, sets up a group of women’s clubs called the Confederation of the Friends of Truth.
1848   Hungary proclaims its independence of Austria.
1857   Elisha Otis installs the first modern passenger elevator in a public building, at the corner of Broome Street and Broadway in New York City.
1858   Eleazer A. Gardner of Philadelphia patents the cable street car, which runs on overhead cables.
1862   Confederate General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson faces his only defeat at the Battle of Kernstown, Va
1880   John Stevens of Neenah, Wis., patents the grain crushing mill. This mill allows flour production to increase by 70 percent.
1901   A group of U.S. Army soldier led by Brig. Gen. Frederick Funston capture Emilio Aguinaldo, the leader of the Philippine Insurrection of 1899.
1903   The Wright brothers obtain an airplane patent.
1909   British Lt. Ernest Shackleton finds the magnetic South Pole.
1909   Theodore Roosevelt begins an African safari sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society.
1917   Austrian Emperor Charles I makes a peace proposal to French President Poincare.
1920   Great Britain denounces the United States because of its delay in joining the League of Nations.
1921   Arthur G. Hamilton sets a new parachute record, safely jumping 24,400 feet.
1927   Captain Hawthorne Gray sets a new balloon record soaring to 28,510 feet.
1933   The Reichstag gives Adolf Hitler the power to rule by decree.
1942   The Japanese occupy the Anadaman Islands in the Indian Ocean.
1951   U.S. paratroopers descend from flying boxcars in a surprise attack in Korea.
1956   Pakistan becomes the first Islamic republic, although it is still within the British Commonwealth.
1967   Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. calls the Vietnam War the biggest obstacle to the civil rights movement.
1970   Mafia boss Carlo Gambino is arrested for plotting to steal $3 million.
1972   The United States calls a halt to the peace talks on Vietnam being held in Paris.
1981   U.S. Supreme Court upholds a law making statutory rape a crime for men but not women.
Born on March 23
1900   Erich Fromm, German psychologist (The Sane Society).
1907   Daniele Bovet, Swiss-born Italian pharmacologist.
1908   Joan Crawford, American actress.
1910   Akira Kurosawa, film director (Rashomon, The Seven Samurai).
1912   Werner von Braun, German-born rocket pioneer.
1929   Sir Roger Bannister, the first man to run the mile in less than four minutes.

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.iDSDvISX.dpuf

today’s image: Colonial Reaction to the Stamp Act



Colonial Reaction to the Stamp Act
Young hothead Patrick Henry addresses the Virginia House of Burgesses on May 29, 1765. Henry emerged as a major spokesman after British lawmakers passed the Stamp Act on March 22, placing a heavy tax on all legal documents, newspapers, diplomas, licenses and even playing cards issued or sold in America. The colonists viewed the act as taxation without representation and reacted with a violence that astonished the British. Henry proposed the Virginia Resolves, five resolutions that denied Parliament’s right to tax America. He shocked the more conservative members of the Virginia legislature when he reportedly said, ‘Caesar had his Brutus, Charles I his Cromwell. May George III profit from their example.’

Engraving from Peter F. Rothermel’s 1851 painting, Patrick Henry before the Virginia House of Burgesses, National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.bVwQo3JX.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: Russia’s Czar Paul I Assassinated (1801)


Russia’s Czar Paul I Assassinated (1801)

After his mother, Catherine the Great, suffered a stroke, Paul I ascended to the throne. The new czar instituted a number of reforms that angered the nobility and provoked a conspiracy against him. On the night of his murder, Paul was confronted in his bedroom and pressured to sign his abdication. When he refused, the assassins struck him with a sword, strangled him, and trampled him to death. Though he did not participate in the attack, his successor knew about the plot. Who was he? More… Discuss

[GMMFS2012] Michelangelo Quartet – Beethoven String Quartet E minor, op.59, no.2, ‘Razumovsky’


[GMMFS2012] Michelangelo Quartet – Beethoven String Quartet E minor, op.59, no.2, ‘Razumovsky’

quotation: The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt. Rene Descartes


The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt.

Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 21

630   Heraclius restores the True Cross, which he has recaptured from the Persians.
1556   Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, is burned at the stake at Oxford after retracting the last of seven recantations that same day.
1617   Pocahontas (Rebecca Rolfe) dies of either small pox or pneumonia while in England with her husband, John Rolfe.
1788   Almost the entire city of New Orleans, Louisiana, is destroyed by fire.
1806   Lewis and Clark begin their trip home after an 8,000 mile trek of the Mississippi basin and the Pacific Coast.
1865   The Battle of Bentonville, N.C. ends, marking the last Confederate attempt to stop Union General William Sherman.
1851   Emperor Tu Duc orders that Christian priests are to put to death.
1858   British forces in India lift the siege of Lucknow, ending the Indian Mutiny.
1906   Ohio passes a law that prohibits hazing by fraternities.
1908   Frenchman Henri Farman carries a passenger in a bi-plane for the first time.
1910   The U.S. Senate grants ex-President Teddy Roosevelt an annual pension of $10,000.
1918   The Germans launch the ‘Michael’ offensive, better remembered as the First Battle of the Somme.
1928   President Calvin Coolidge presents the Congressional Medal of Honor to Charles Lindbergh, a captain in the US Army Air Corps Reserve, for making the first solo trans-Atlantic flight. On June 11, 1927, Lindbergh had received the first Distinguished Flying Cross ever awarded.
1939   Singer Kate Smith records “God Bless America” for Victor Records.
1941   The last Italian post in East Libya, North Africa, falls to the British.
1951   Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall reports that the U.S. military has doubled to 2.9 million since the start of the Korean War.
1963   Alcatraz Island, the federal penitentiary in San Francisco Bay, California, closes.
1965   The United States launches Ranger 9, last in a series of unmanned lunar explorations.
1971   Two U.S. platoons in Vietnam refuse their orders to advance.
1975   As North Vietnamese forces advance, Hue and other northern towns in South Vietnam are evacuated.
1980   President Jimmy Carter announces to the U.S. Olympic Team that they will not participate in the 1980 Summer Games in Moscow as a boycott against Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.
1984   A Soviet submarine crashes into the USS Kitty Hawk off the coast of Japan.
Born on March 21
1685   Johann Sebastian Bach, German composer.
1806   Benito Juarez, President of Mexico.
1869   Albert Kahn, architect who originated modern factory design.
1869   Florenz Ziegfeld, producer, creator of Ziegfeld Follies.
1885   Raoul Lufbery, French-born American fighter pilot of World War I.

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.SLpTJQCE.dpuf

today’s image: A Pony Express Rider (because no culture can survive without reliable communication)



A Pony Express rider makes a friendly gesture toward men putting up a telegraph line, in a wood engraving (from a painting by George M. Ottinger) that appeared in the November 2, 1867, Harper’s Weekly. The completion of the transcontinental telegraph on October 24, 1861, actually cost such riders their jobs. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.JPdsG59p.dpuf

happy birthday Bach: Concerto for Two Keyboards in C major, BWV 1061, Andras Schiff, Peter Serkin


Bach: Concerto for Two Keyboards in C major, BWV 1061, Andras Schiff, Peter Serkin

Happy birthday Bach: Mozart Quartet No 19 K 465 Dissonanze Dissonances Hagen Quartet



Mozart Quartet No 19 K 465 Dissonanze Dissonances Hagen Quartet

The String Quartet No. 19 in C Major, KV. 465 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, nicknamed “Dissonance” on account of its unusual slow introduction, is perhaps the most famous of his quartets. It is the last in the set of six quartets composed between 1782-1785 that he dedicated to Joseph Haydn.
According to the catalog of works Mozart began early the preceding year, the quartet was completed on January 14, 1785. As is normal with Mozart’s later quartets, it is in four movements:
1. Adagio-Allegro
2. Andante cantabile – in F major
3. Menuetto. Allegro. (C major, trio in C minor)
4. Allegro molto
The first movement opens with ominous quiet Cs in the cello, joined successively by the viola (on A♭ moving to a G), the second violin (on E♭) and the first violin (on A), thus creating the “dissonance” itself and narrowly avoiding a greater one. This lack of harmony and fixed key continues throughout the slow introduction before resolving into the bright C major of the Allegro section of the first movement, which is in sonata form. Mozart goes on to use chromatic and whole tone scales to outline fourths. Arch shaped lines emphasizing fourths in the first violin (C – F – C) and the violoncello (G – C – C’ – G’) are combined with lines emphasizing fifths in the second violin and viola. Over the barline between the second and third measures of the example a fourth-suspension can be seen in the second violin’s tied C. In another of his string quartets, KV 464, such fourth-suspensions are also very prominent.
The second movement is in sonatina form, i.e. lacking the development section. Alfred Einstein writes of the coda of this movement that “the first violin openly expresses what seemed hidden beneath the conversational play of the subordinate theme.” The third movement is a minuet and trio, with the exuberant mood of the minuet darkening into the C minor of the trio. The last movement is also in sonata form.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

Happy birthday Bach: Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 (Freiburger Barockorchester)



Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 (Freiburger Barockorchester)

happy birthday Bach: Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Dorische Toccata BWV 538, Deaken/Marcussen-organ Goes [NL]


happy birthday Bach!

Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Dorische Toccata BWV 538, Deaken/Marcussen-organ Goes [NL]

 

quotation: Sir Walter Scott


There is a vulgar incredulity, which in historical matters, as well as in those of religion, finds it easier to doubt than to examine.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) Discuss

today’s birthday: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685) Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Ich ruf zu dir, [BWV 639] Garrels-organ, Purmerend


Johann Sebastian Bach (1685)

 


Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Ich ruf zu dir, [BWV 639] Garrels-organ, Purmerend

One of the greatest and most influential composers of the Western world, Bach created masterful works in almost every musical form known in his period. During his lifetime, Bach was better known as an organist than as a composer, and his works, which include the Brandenburg Concertos, four orchestral suites, and more than 200 church cantatas, were not fully appreciated until long after his death. Bach is the most represented composer on the Voyager Golden Record, which is what? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Who Shot J.R.? (1980) (remember Dallas?)


Who Shot J.R.? (1980)

The 1980 season finale of the popular prime-time soap opera Dallas ended with the show’s central character—J.R. Ewing, a greedy, scheming oil baron—being shot by an unknown assailant. The cliffhanger left viewers wondering for months whether he would survive and which of his many enemies had pulled the trigger. The episode that revealed the culprit became one of the highest rated television shows in history, drawing an estimated 83 million viewers. So, who shot J.R.? More… Discuss

Migraines


Migraines

A migraine is a headache characterized by recurrent attacks of severe pain, usually on one side of the head. It may be preceded by flashes or spots before the eyes or a ringing in the ears, and accompanied by double vision, nausea, vomiting, or dizziness. It affects women 3 times as often as men and is frequently inherited. Although the exact cause is unknown, evidence suggests a genetically transmitted functional disturbance of cranial circulation. What is the origin of the word “migraine?” More… Discuss