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Ana Vidović

Ana Vidović (born 8 November 1980) is a classical guitarist; originally from Croatia, she now resides in the United States.[3] A former child prodigy, she has won a number of prizes and international competitions all over the world.

Ana Vidović

Ana Vidović 2011 (cropped).jpg

Vidović in Paraguay, 2011.

Background information
Born 8 November 1980(age 39)
Karlovac, SR Croatia SFR Yugoslavia (Now Croatia)
Instruments Classical guitar
Years active 1988–present[1][2]
Website www.anavidovic.com

BiographyEdit

Vidović on a session (2006)

Born in Karlovac, Croatia |. A child prodigy, she started playing guitar at the age of five, inspired by her brother Viktor. She is also the sister of concert pianist Silvije Vidovic. Her father was an electric guitar player. Vidović began performing at the age of eight; by the age of 11 she was performing internationally; at 13 she became the youngest student to attend the prestigious Academy of Music in Zagreb where she studied with Professor Istvan Romer.

Vidović’s reputation in Europe led to an invitation to study at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, U.S. (with Manuel Barrueco[4]), from which she graduated in May 2005. She has lived in the United States since, where she also works as a private tutor.

Vidović plays a Jim Redgate guitar exclusively and has said, “When I got it and began to play, I immediately knew that this was the instrument that I want to be playing for a long time.”[3][5]She has released six CDs published by Croatia Records, BGS, and Naxos and has released two DVDs published by Mel Bay publications.

Vidović has won a number of prizes and competitions, including first prizes in the Albert Augustine International Competition in Bath, England, the Fernando Sorcompetition in Rome, Italy, and the Francisco Tárrega competition in Benicasim, Spain. Other top prizes include the Eurovision Young Musicians competition, the Mauro Giuliani competition in Italy, the Printemps de la Guitare in Belgium, and the Young Concert Artists International Auditions in New York. The Gramophone remarked on her “extraordinary dexterity”.[6]

DiscographyEdit

CDs
  • Ana Vidovic, Croatia Records, 1994
  • Ana Vidović – Guitar, BGS Records (BGCD 103), 1996
  • The Croatian Prodigy, BGS, 1999
  • Guitar Recital, Naxos Laureate Series (8.554563), 2000
  • Ana Vidovic Live!, Croatia Records, 2001
  • Federico Moreno Torroba Guitar Music Vol. 1, Naxos (8.557902), 2007
Videos
  • Mel Bay Presents – Ana Vidovic – Guitar Virtuoso, Mel Bay Publications Inc. (MB21186DVD), 2005
  • Mel Bay Presents – Ana Vidovic – Guitar Artistry In Concert, Mel Bay Publications Inc. (MB21991DVD), 2009

ReferencesEdit

This content adapted from a program provided by the Bloomington Classical Guitar Society for Vidović’s March 5, 2005 performance in Bloomington, Indiana, USA

  1. ^ Nina Ožegović (12 January 2010). “Ana Vidović: Američki život hrvatske kraljice gitare”[Ana Vidović: American life of Croatian guitar queen] (in Croatian). Nacional (weekly). Archived from the original on 22 January 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  2. ^ GUITAR HERO: A master of classical guitar, Croatia’s Ana Vidovic will kick off the Lively Arts season Saturday
  3. ^ a b Shaw, Robert (7 October 2008). Hand Made, Hand Played: The Art & Craft of Contemporary Guitars. Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-57990-787-7. Retrieved 4 May2012.
  4. ^ “Ana Vidovic- Bio, Albums, Pictures – Naxos Classical Music”. http://www.naxos.com. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  5. ^ “Redgate”. Classicguitar.com. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  6. ^ Mackenzie, Sir Compton; Stone, Christopher (2007). The Gramophone. C. Mackenzie. p. 129. Retrieved 4 May 2012.

External linksEdit

Ana Vidović

Ana Vidović (born 8 November 1980) is a classical guitarist; originally from Croatia, she now resides in the United States.[3] A former child prodigy, she has won a number of prizes and international competitions all over the world.

Ana Vidović

Ana Vidović 2011 (cropped).jpg

Vidović in Paraguay, 2011.

Background information
Born 8 November 1980(age 39)
Karlovac, SR Croatia SFR Yugoslavia (Now Croatia)

Instruments Classical guitar
Years active 1988–present[1][2]
Website www.anavidovic.com

BiographyEdit

Vidović on a session (2006)

Born in Karlovac, Croatia |. A child prodigy, she started playing guitar at the age of five, inspired by her brother Viktor. She is also the sister of concert pianist Silvije Vidovic. Her father was an electric guitar player. Vidović began performing at the age of eight; by the age of 11 she was performing internationally; at 13 she became the youngest student to attend the prestigious Academy of Music in Zagreb where she studied with Professor Istvan Romer.

Vidović’s reputation in Europe led to an invitation to study at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, U.S. (with Manuel Barrueco[4]), from which she graduated in May 2005. She has lived in the United States since, where she also works as a private tutor.

Vidović plays a Jim Redgate guitar exclusively and has said, “When I got it and began to play, I immediately knew that this was the instrument that I want to be playing for a long time.”[3][5]She has released six CDs published by Croatia Records, BGS, and Naxos and has released two DVDs published by Mel Bay publications.

Vidović has won a number of prizes and competitions, including first prizes in the Albert Augustine International Competition in Bath, England, the Fernando Sorcompetition in Rome, Italy, and the Francisco Tárrega competition in Benicasim, Spain. Other top prizes include the Eurovision Young Musicians competition, the Mauro Giuliani competition in Italy, the Printemps de la Guitare in Belgium, and the Young Concert Artists International Auditions in New York. The Gramophone remarked on her “extraordinary dexterity”.[6]

DiscographyEdit

CDs
  • Ana Vidovic, Croatia Records, 1994
  • Ana Vidović – Guitar, BGS Records (BGCD 103), 1996
  • The Croatian Prodigy, BGS, 1999
  • Guitar Recital, Naxos Laureate Series (8.554563), 2000
  • Ana Vidovic Live!, Croatia Records, 2001
  • Federico Moreno Torroba Guitar Music Vol. 1, Naxos (8.557902), 2007
Videos
  • Mel Bay Presents – Ana Vidovic – Guitar Virtuoso, Mel Bay Publications Inc. (MB21186DVD), 2005
  • Mel Bay Presents – Ana Vidovic – Guitar Artistry In Concert, Mel Bay Publications Inc. (MB21991DVD), 2009

ReferencesEdit

This content adapted from a program provided by the Bloomington Classical Guitar Society for Vidović’s March 5, 2005 performance in Bloomington, Indiana, USA

  1. ^ Nina Ožegović (12 January 2010). “Ana Vidović: Američki život hrvatske kraljice gitare”[Ana Vidović: American life of Croatian guitar queen] (in Croatian). Nacional (weekly). Archived from the original on 22 January 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  2. ^ GUITAR HERO: A master of classical guitar, Croatia’s Ana Vidovic will kick off the Lively Arts season Saturday
  3. ^ a b Shaw, Robert (7 October 2008). Hand Made, Hand Played: The Art & Craft of Contemporary Guitars. Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-57990-787-7. Retrieved 4 May2012.
  4. ^ “Ana Vidovic- Bio, Albums, Pictures – Naxos Classical Music”. http://www.naxos.com. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  5. ^ “Redgate”. Classicguitar.com. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  6. ^ Mackenzie, Sir Compton; Stone, Christopher (2007). The Gramophone. C. Mackenzie. p. 129. Retrieved 4 May 2012.

External linksEdit

Watch “Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash – Wanted Man (Take 1)” on YouTube


Watch “Johnny Cash – God’s Gonna Cut You Down” on YouTube



You can run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down

Go tell that long tongue liar
Go and tell that midnight rider
Tell the rambler
The gambler
The back biter
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
Well my goodness gracious let me tell you the news
My head’s been wet with the midnight dew
I’ve been down on bended knee talkin’ to the man from Galilee
He spoke to me in the voice so sweet
I thought I heard the shuffle of the angel’s feet
He called my name and my heart stood still
When he said, “John, go do my will!”
Go tell that long tongue liar
Go and tell that midnight rider
Tell the rambler
The gambler
The back biter
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
You can run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
Well, you may throw your rock and hide your hand
Workin’ in the dark against your fellow man
But as sure as God made black and white
What’s down in the dark will be brought to the light
You can run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
Go tell that long tongue liar
Go and tell that midnight rider
Tell the rambler
The gambler
The back biter
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut you down
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: John R. Cash / Traditional
God’s Gonna Cut You Down lyrics © BMG Rights Management

Watch “Complete Beethoven Piano Sonatas – Claudio Arrau” on YouTube


Watch “Frank & Nancy Sinatra ~ Something Stupid (1967)” on YouTube


Watch “Franz Schubert Piano Sonatas D 566, 784, 850, András Schiff” on YouTube


Watch “Billie Holiday – “Strange Fruit” Live 1959 [Reelin’ In The Years Archives]” on YouTube


Watch “Regina Spektor – “Don’t Leave Me (Ne Me Quitte Pas)” Official Music Video” on YouTube


Watch “Antonio Vivaldi – Four Seasons Budapest Strings Bela Banfalvi, Conductor” on YouTube


Watch “Willie Nelson Remember Me ( I’m the One Who Loved You ♥ )” on YouTube


Golden interpretations: Watch “Valentina Lisitsa plays Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2” on YouTube


List of compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Ludwig_van_Beethoven?wprov=sfla1


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List of compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven

Title page of Beethoven’s Symphonies from the Gesamtausgabe

The compositions of Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) consist of 722 works[1] written over forty-five years, from his earliest work in 1782 (variations for piano on a march by Ernst Christoph Dressler) when he was only twelve years old and still in Bonn, till his last work just before his death in Vienna in 1827. Beethoven composed in all the main genres of classical music, including symphonies, concertos, string quartets, piano sonatas and one opera. His works range from requiring a solo performer to needing a large orchestra and chorus to perform.

Beethoven straddled both the classical and romantic periods, working in genres associated with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his teacher Joseph Haydn such as the piano concerto, string quartet and symphony, while on the other hand providing a precursor to Romantic composers such as Hector Berliozand Franz Liszt with programmatic works such as his Pastoral Symphonyand Piano Sonata “Les Adieux[2]. Beethoven’s work is typically divided into three periods. The “Early” period where Beethoven composed in the “Viennese” style. The “Middle” or “Heroic” period where his work is characterised by struggle and heroism, such as in the EroicaSymphony, the Appassionata Sonataand in his sole opera Fidelio. Beethoven’s “Late” period is marked by intense, personal expression and an emotional and intellectual profundity. Although his output dropped drastically in his later years this period saw the composition of masterpieces such as the Late Quartets, the Final Five Piano Sonatas, the Diabelli Variations, the Missa Solemnis and his Ninth Symphony[3].

Beethoven’s works are classified by both genre and various numbering systems[4]. The most well known numbering system for Beethoven’s works is that by opus number, assigned by Beethoven’s publishers during his lifetime. Only 172 of Beethoven’s works have opus numbers, divided among 138 opus numbers. Many works that were unpublished or else published without opus numbers have been assigned either “WoO” (Werke ohne Opuszahl—works without opus number), Hess or Biamonti numbers. For example, the short piano piece “Für Elise“, is more fully known as the “Bagatelle in A minor, WoO 59 (‘Für Elise’)”. Some works are also commonly referred to by their nicknames, such as the Kreutzer Violin Sonata, or the ArchdukePiano Trio.

As well as these numbering systems, works are also often identified by their number within their genre. For example, the 14th string quartet, published as Opus 131, may be referenced either as “String Quartet No. 14” or “the Opus 131 String Quartet“. The listings include all of these relevant identifiers. While other catalogues of Beethoven’s worksexist, the numbers here represent the most commonly used.

List of works by genreEdit

Beethoven, caricatured by J. P. Lyser

Beethoven’s works are published in several editions, the first of these was Ludwig van Beethovens Werke: Vollständige kritisch durchgesehene überall berechtigte Ausgabe published between 1862 and 1865 with a supplemental volume in 1888 by Breitkopf & Härtel, commonly known as the “Beethoven Gesamtausgabe” [GA]. While this was a landmark achievement at the time, the limitations of this edition soon became apparent. Between 1959 and 1971 Willy Hess prepared a supplemental edition, Beethoven: Sämtliche Werke: Supplemente zur Gesamtausgabe, [HS] containing works that were not in the Gesamtausgabe.

Since 1961 the Beethoven Archive has been publishing a new scholarly–critical Complete Edition of Beethoven’s works, Beethoven: Werke: neue Ausgabe sämtlicher Werke[5][NA]. However, only 42 of the projected 56 volumes have been published so far.[6] As this edition has not been published in full there are works without an NA designation.

Legend for publications – p: parts s: full score vs: vocal score

Orchestral musicEdit

Beethoven wrote nine symphonies, nine concertos, and a variety of other orchestral music, ranging from overtures and incidental music for theatrical productions to other miscellaneous “occasional” works, written for a particular occasion. Of the concertos, seven are widely known (one violin concerto, five piano concertos, and one triple concerto for violin, piano, and cello); the other two are an early piano concerto (WoO 4) and an arrangement of the Violin Concerto for piano and orchestra (Opus 61a).

SymphoniesEdit

No.[7] Title, key Composition, first performance Publication Dedication, remarks GA NA
Op. 21 Symphony No. 1, C 1799–1800; 2 April 1800 p: Leipzig 1801 Baron Gottfried van Swieten i/1 i/1[6]
Op. 36 Symphony No. 2, D 1801–2; 5 April 1803 p: Vienna, 1804; for piano, violin, cello: Vienna, 1805 Prince Karl von Lichnowsky i/2 i/1[6]
Op. 55 Symphony No. 3(“Eroica”), E 1803; 7 April 1805[8] p: Vienna, 1806 Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz i/3 i/2[6]
Op. 60 Symphony No. 4, B 1806; March 1807 p: Vienna, 1808 Count Franz von Oppersdorff i/4 i/2[6]
Op. 67 Symphony No. 5, C 1807–8;[9] 22 Dec 1808 p: Leipzig, 1809 Prince Lobkowitz and Count Andreas Razumovsky i/5 i/3[6]
Op. 68 Symphony No. 6(“Pastoral”), F 1808; 22 Dec 1808 p: Leipzig, 1809 Prince Lobkowitz and Count Rasumovsky i/6 i/3[6]
Op. 92 Symphony No. 7, A 1811–12; 8 Dec 1813 s, p: Vienna, 1816 Count Moritz von Fries; i/7
Op. 93 Symphony No. 8, F 1812; 27 Feb 1814 s, p: Vienna, 1817 shortened version of end of 1st movt, HS iv i/8
Op. 125 Symphony No. 9(“Choral”), D 1822–24; 7 May 1824 s, p: Mainz, 1826 Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia i/9 i/5[6]

Beethoven is believed to have intended to write a Tenth Symphony in the last year of his life; a performing version of possible sketches was assembled by Barry Cooper.[10]

ConcertosEdit

No. Title, key Composition, first performance Publication Dedication, remarks GA NA
WoO 4 Piano Concerto No. 0, E 1784 s: GA survives only in pf score (with orch cues in solo part) xxv/310 iii/5[6]
WoO 5 Violin Concerto, fragment, C 1790–92 Vienna, 1879 part of 1st movt only; 1st edn ded. Gerhard von Breuning HS iii
Hess 12 Oboe Concerto, lost, F ?1792–3 sent to Bonn from Vienna in late 1793; a few sketches survive
Op. 19 Piano Concerto No. 2, B begun c1788, rev. 1794–5, 1798; 29 March 1795 p: Leipzig, 1801 Carl Nicklas von Nickelsberg; score frag. rejected from early version, HS iii ix/66 iii/2[6]
cadenza for first movement 1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
Op. 15 Piano Concerto No. 1, C 1795, rev. 1800; 18 Dec 1795 p: Vienna, 1801 Princess Barbara Odescalchi (née Countess von Keglevics) ix/65 iii/2[6]
3 cadenzas for first movement 1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
Op. 37 Piano Concerto No. 3, c ?1800–03; 5 April 1803 p: Vienna, 1804 Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia ix/67 iii/2[6]
cadenza for first movement 1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
Op. 56 Triple Concerto for violin, cello, and piano, C 1804–7; May 1808 p: Vienna, 1807 Prince Lobkowitz ix/70 iii/1[6]
Op. 58 Piano Concerto No. 4, G 1804–6/7; 22 Dec 1808 p: Vienna, 1808 Archduke Rudolph of Austria ix/68 iii/3[6]
2 cadenzas for first movement, cadenza for finale ?1809 GA ix/70a vii/7[6]
cadenza for first movement, 2 cadenzas for finale (Hess 81, 82, 83) ?1809 NA HSx vii/7[6]
Op. 61 Violin Concerto, D 1806; 23 Dec 1806 p: Vienna, 1808; London, 1810 Stephan von Breuning iv/29; HSx iii/4[6]
Op. 61a Beethoven’s arrangement of Opus 61 for piano, D 1807 p: Vienna, 1808; London, 1810 Julie von Breuning ix/73 (solo part) iii/5[6][6]
Cadenza for first movement, cadenza for finale ?1809 GA ix/70a vii/7

Best interpretations: Watch “Pathétique,Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13,”,Valentina Lisitsa,SHEET MUSIC” on YouTube



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Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (/ˈlʊdvɪɡ vænˈbt(h)vən/ (About this soundlisten)

listen)listen); German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːthoːfn̩] (About this sound

listen
); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composerand pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the classical and romantic eras in classical music, he is considered to be one of the greatest composers of all time.

Ludwig van Beethoven

Portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820

Beethoven, 1820

Born
Baptised 17 December 1770[1]
Died 26 March 1827 (aged 56)

Works

List of compositions
Signature
Signature written in ink in a flowing script

Beethoven was born in Bonn, the capital of the Electorate of Cologne, and part of the Holy Roman Empire. He displayed his musical talents at an early age and was vigorously taught by his father Johann van Beethoven, and was later taught by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe. At age 21, he moved to Vienna and studied composition with Joseph Haydn. Beethoven then gained a reputation as a virtuoso pianist, and was soon courted by Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky for compositions, which resulted in Opus 1 in 1795.

The piece was a great critical and commercial success, and was followed by Symphony No. 1 in 1800. This composition was distinguished for its frequent use of sforzandi, as well as sudden shifts in tonal centers that were uncommon for traditional symphonic form, and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments.[2] In 1801, he also gained notoriety for his six String Quartetsand for the ballet The Creatures of Prometheus. During this period, his hearing began to deteriorate, but he continued to conduct, premiering his third and fifth symphonies in 1804 and 1808, respectively. His condition worsened to almost complete deafness by 1811, and he then gave up performing and appearing in public.

During this period of self exile, Beethoven composed many of his most admired works; his seventhsymphony premiered in 1813, with its second movement, Allegretto, achieving widespread critical acclaim.[3] He composed the piece Missa Solemnis for a number of years until it premiered 1824, which preceded his ninth symphony, with the latter gaining fame for being among the first examples of a choral symphony.[4] In 1826, his fourteenth String Quartet was noted for having seven linked movements played without a break, and is considered the final major piece performed before his death a year later.

His career is conventionally divided into early, middle, and late periods; the “early” period is typically seen to last until 1802, the “middle” period from 1802 to 1812, and the “late” period from 1812 to his death in 1827. During his life, he composed nine symphonies; five piano concertos; one violin concerto; thirty-two piano sonatas; sixteen string quartets; two masses; and the opera Fidelio. Other works, like Für Elise, were discovered after his death, and are also considered historical musical achievements. Beethoven’s legacy is characterized for his innovative compositions, namely through the combinations of vocals and instruments, and also for widening the scope of sonata, symphony, concerto, and quartet,[5] while he is also noted for his troublesome relationship with his contemporaries.

Life and career

Background and early life

Continue reading

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Watch “Mix – Frank Sinatra – Somewhere Beyond The Sea” on YouTube


Lyrics


Somewhere beyond the sea
Somewhere waiting for me
My lover stands on golden sands
And watches the ships that go sailin’

Somewhere beyond the sea
She’s there watching for me
If I could fly like birds on high
Then straight to her arms
I’d go sailing

It’s far beyond the stars
It’s near beyond the moon
I know beyond a doubt
My heart will lead me there soon

We’ll meet beyond the shore
We’ll kiss just as before
Happy we’ll be beyond the sea
And never again I’ll go sailing

I know beyond a doubt, ah
My heart will lead me there soon
We’ll meet (I know we’ll meet) beyond the shore
We’ll kiss just as before
Happy we’ll be beyond the sea
And never again I’ll go sailing

No more sailing
So long sailing
Bye bye sailing

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Albert Lasry / Charles Trenet / Jack Lawrence

Beyond the Sea lyrics © Raoul Breton Editions, Round Hill Music Big Loud Songs, Carlin America Inc

Watch “Gordon Lightfoot – Sundown (Lyrics)” on YouTube



I can see her lyin’ back in her satin dress
In a room where ya do what ya don’t confess
Sundown you better take care
If I find you beenn creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown ya better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs

She’s been lookin’ like a queen in a sailor’s dream
And she don’t always say what she really means
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
I can picture every move that a man could make
Getting lost in her lovin’ is your first mistake
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again
I can see her lookin’ fast in her faded jeans
She’s a hard lovin’ woman, got me feelin’ mean
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Gordon Lightfoot
Sundown lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc

Watch “Vincent van Gogh art ALIVE – Atelier des Lumières (Paris, France)” on YouTube


Watch “The Chantels – Look In My Eyes” on YouTube


Look in my eyes,and tell me you love me
Tell me you love me, or darling I’ll be gone
(Gone, gone, gone, gone)

Look in my eyes,and tell me that you’re the
One for me, and that our love will always be
Or darling I’ll be gone (gone, gone, gone, gone, gone)

You said it that time
So glad you’re all mine
What’s it to be? Do you wanna be?
And let me know,a little more time
Have that love to be ,or darling set me free

Look in my eyes,and tell me you love me
Tell me you love me or darling all be gone
(Gone, gone, gone, gone)

Do-oooo di,di,di,di,di
Do-oooo di,di,di,di,di

Written by: RICHARD BARRETT

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Lyrics Licensed & Provided by LyricFind

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Watch “Louis Armstrong “Cabaret” 1966″ on YouTube


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Watch “George Enescu Ciocarlia Tezaur folcloric) – HQ” on YouTube


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