Category Archives: MY TAKE ON THINGS

make music part of your life series: Alexander Glazunov – Concert Waltz Nr. 2


Alexander Glazunov – Concert Waltz Nr. 2

historic musical bits: BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No.7 ‘Archduke’ | E.Gilels, L.Kogan, M.Rostropovich | 1956


BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No.7 ‘Archduke’ | E.Gilels, L.Kogan, M.Rostropovich | 1956

Make music part of your life series: Romanian Rhapsody George Enescu


Romanian Rhapsody George Enescu

historic musical bits: Tchaikovsky Variations on a Rococo Theme (Rostropovich/Kondrashin)


Tchaikovsky Variations on a Rococo Theme (Rostropovich/Kondrashin)

historic musical bits: Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)


Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)

Sokolov – Bach-Brahms Chaconne for the left hand alone


Sokolov – Bach-Brahms Chaconne for the left hand alone.wmv

great compositions/performances: Rachmaninov – Concerto 1 – Pletnev


Rachmaninov – Concerto 1 – Pletnev

 

make music part of your life series: Willem van Twillert plays, J.S. Bach, Bist du bei mir (BWV 508), Hinsz-organ, Leens


Willem van Twillert plays, J.S. Bach, Bist du bei mir [BWV 508], Hinsz-organ, Leens [NL]

historic musical bits: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan

Stairway to Heaven live (Rodrigo y Gabriela)


Stairway to Heaven live (Rodrigo y Gabriela)

Antony singing If It Be Your Will (sometimes , people find their voice, and once in a while they recognize genius)


Antony singing If It Be Your Will (poem and song by the genius of Leonard Cohen )


Bird on a wire-Perla Batalla_ Special_Features “I’m Your Man”

Va amintesc: Din Muzica Popoarelor: Irish & Celtic Music Collection 1


Irish & Celtic Music Collection 1

Pastravaria Vistisoara un loc in rai, Tara Fagarsului


Pastravaria Vistisoara un loc in rai, Tara Fagarsului (accesibil de aici)

Pastravaria Vistisoara un loc in rai, Tara Fagarsului (accesibil de aici)

Just a Thought: “So long as we adapt without giving up or giving in.”


Just a Thought:  “So long as we adapt without giving up or giving in.”

By George-B, July 1, 2015.

great compositions/performances: Dvorák – Symphony No 8 in G major, Op 88 – Krivine


Dvorák – Symphony No 8 in G major, Op 88 – Krivine

great compositions/performances: ,Claude Debussy – Nocturnes


Claude Debussy – Nocturnes

great compositions/performances: Glazunov “Symphony No 7″ USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony OrchestraGennadi Rozhdestvensky


Glazunov “Symphony No 7″ Gennadi Rozhdestvensky


Schumann Kinderszenen op. 15 Radu Lupu

Published on Oct 18, 2013

Robert Schumann Kinderszenen, op. 15
Radu Lupu , January 1993

Kinderszenen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood”), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen.[7]

Parts/Movements

  1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen (Of Foreign Lands and Peoples),  G major
  2. Curiose Geschichte (A Curious Story),  D major
  3. Hasche-Mann (Blind Man’s Buff), B minor
  4. Bittendes Kind (Pleading Child), D major
  5. Glückes genug (Quite Happy), D major
  6. Wichtige Bebebenheit (An Important Event), A major
  7. Träumerei (Dreaming), F major
  8. Am Camin (At the Fireside), F major
  9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd (Knight of the Hobby-Horse), C major
  10. Fast zu ernst (Almost too Serious), G-sharp minor
  11. Fürchtenmachen (Frightening), E minor
  12. Kind im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep), E minor
  13. Ffrom Der Dichter spricht (The Poet Speaks), G major

Description by Blair Johnston  (ALL MUSIC)

The 13 pieces that constitute Robert Schumann‘s Kinderszenen for piano (Scenes from Childhood), Op. 15 (1838) showcase their creator’s musical imagination at the peak of its poetic clarity. As a result, the Kinderszenen have long been staples of the repertoire as utterly charming yet substantial miniatures, the sort of compact keyboard essays in which Schumann‘s genius found full expression. Kinderszenen was one of the projects Schumann worked on during the spring of 1838 to get through a difficult period of separation from his fiancée, Clara Wieck, who was on tour as a pianist and whose father objected to the idea of her marriage to the composer. In March of that year, Schumann wrote to Clara, “I have been waiting for your letter and have in the meantime filled several books with pieces…. You once said to me that I often seemed like a child, and I suddenly got inspired and knocked off around 30 quaint little pieces…. I selected several and titled them Kinderszenen. You will enjoy them, though you will need to forget that you are a virtuoso when you play them.” The Kinderszenen are a touching tribute to the eternal, universal memories and feelings of childhood from a nostalgic adult perspective; unlike a number of Schumann‘s collections of piano character pieces (e.g. Album for the Young, Op. 68), the Kinderszenen are not intended to be played by children. Schumann claimed that the picturesque titles attached to the pieces were added as an afterthought in order to provide subtle suggestions to the player, a model Debussy followed decades later in his Preludes. Almost all of the Kinderszenen are miniature ternary (ABA) forms. Scene No. 1, “Von fremden Ländern und Menschen” (Of Foreign Lands and People), opens with a lovely melody whose basic motivic substance, by appearing in several vague guises throughout many of the other pieces, serves as a general unifying element. The seventh Scene, “Träumerei” (Reverie), is easily the most famous piece in the set; its charming melody and quieting power have recommended it to generations of concert pianists who wish to calm audiences after a long series of rousing encores. The Kinderszenen contain many delicate musical touches; Scene No. 4, “Bittendes Kind” (Pleading Child), for example, is harmonically resolved only when an unseen force (a parent?) gives in and grant the child’s wish at the beginning of No. 5, “Glückes genug” (Quite Happy). In the final piece, “Der Dichter spricht” (The Poet Speaks), Schumann removes himself just a bit from the indulgent reverie to formulate a narrator’s omniscient view of the child. Quietly, gently, the many moods and feelings that Schumann touched upon over the course of this remarkable 20-minute work are lovingly recalled, and the composition concludes, contentedly, in the same key of G major in which it began.

Lafayette’s Hermione, by George-B: HAPPY JULY 4!


Lafayette's Hermione,  by George-, B Copyright 2105 (no Getty's you can't claim this...It's mine!)

Lafayette’s Hermione, by George-, B Copyright 2105 (no Getty’s you can’t claim this…It’s mine!)

Lafayette’s Hermione,  by George-B (copyright 2015)

From Saints Peter and Paul Pray for Us.


Sts-Peter-and-Paul - Pray for Us

Sts-Peter-and-Paul – Pray for Us (access CBCP News from EUZICASA)

CBCP News

Saints Peter and Paul, pray for us.

Download this cool graphic at our website
http://www.cbcpnews.com/cbcpnews/?p=58893

Great compositions/performances: ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major


ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major

Great compositions/performances: Antonin Dvorak , String Quintet No. 3, In E Flat Major, Op 97, by Dvorak Quartet, with Josef Kodousesk, viola


Henry David Thoreau — ‘A lake is a landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. … ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden.

Antonin Dvorak,String Quintet No.3, In E Flat Major, Op 97(It is a Viola Quitet)

NEW AT EUZICASA: WIDGET – CIDSE – TOGETHER FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE (CHANGE FOR THE PLANET -CARE FOR THE PROPLE-ACCESS THIS NEW WEBSITE FROM EUZICASA)


CIDSE - TOGETHER FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE (CHANGE FOR THE PLANET -CARE FOR THE PROPLE-ACCESS THIS NEW WEBSITE FROM EUZICASA)

CIDSE – TOGETHER FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE (CHANGE FOR THE PLANET -CARE FOR THE PROPLE – ACCESS THIS NEW WEBSITE FROM EUZICASA)

Wednesday, 01 July 2015 09:15

“Change for the Planet – Care for the People”- a new CIDSE sustainable lifestyle campaign launched today

Written by 

CIDSE Press release, 1 July 2015: “Change for the Planet – Care for the People”- a new CIDSE sustainable lifestyle campaign launched today

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: @ChangeandCare #change4planet

CIDSE, the international alliance of 17 Catholic development organisations from Europe and North America, will today launch (1s July 2015) a three year (2015-2017) campaign on sustainable lifestyles: “Change for the Planet – Care for the People.”

“CIDSE and its members call for policy changes and sustainable lifestyle choices. We believe that collective and individual changes are crucial to respond to the urgency we face through climate change, environmental degradation and the consequence they have on people’s lives.” said Bernd Nilles, CIDSE Secretary General.

The campaign links Catholic development work for social justice with the promotion of sustainable living. The global over-exploitation of natural resources puts people and planet at risk, and those suffering most are vulnerable communities and the poor. Furthermore, ethical standards being overlooked in the production phase and throughout the supply chain creates a situation which is tolerant and creates further human rights violations. People often want to consume fair and sustainable products, but politics and markets do not follow this demand, by putting profit before people’s interest.

Pope Francis’ Encyclical Laudato si’, states: “Every effort to protect and improve our world entails profound changes in lifestyles, models of production and consumption, and the established structures of power which today govern societies”. This campaign aims at contributing to these changes. As Pope Francis affirms, we are convinced that “a change in lifestyle could bring healthy pressure to bear on those who wield political, economic and social power”.

“Change for the Planet – Care for the People” therefore calls for a radical change in people’s lifestyles towards living simply and making different and more conscious choices. This campaign will focus over the next three years on energy and food consumption, by calling for better policies as well as on everybody to do their share. Through social media activities, workshops and events we will invite people to make a difference through their daily choices, and to contribute this way to building a better world: cut the amount of the energy you use, buy local and sustainably produced food, place priority on taking public transport, and eat less meat- are examples of daily practices that count. Several successful models of sustainable living all around the world already exist, and our campaign will also be a platform for them to resonate and be tried out by other people. The campaign will further connect people and mobilise the Catholic movement.

In 2015 we especially look to the UN Climate summit in Paris – COP21 (30 November – 12 December) as the key political opportunity to call for a fair global deal for people and planet. Central to this is phasing out fossil fuels and phasing in 100% renewables with sustainable energy access for all. We want to show people’s power to bring about the change we call for, and which policy makers are not delivering. We join our voice with the voices of thousands of people that will mobilise before and during COP21 in Paris and all around the world calling for new models of well-being and development in order to prevent further climate change and to promote justice.

Follow “Change for the Planet- Care for the People” on Facebook and Twitter: @ChangeandCare #change4planet

 

Note to the editors
CIDSE is an international alliance of Catholic development agencies working together for global justice. Our 17 member organisations from Europe and North America come together under the umbrella of CIDSE to fight poverty and inequality. We challenge governments, business, churches, and international bodies to adopt policies and behaviors that promote human rights, social justice and sustainable development. These are important elements of our mission, which we try to achieve through joint advocacy, campaigning and development cooperation work. We work with people of all faiths and none.
http://www.cidse.org/who-we-are.html
www.cidse.org

For additional information please contact:

Chiara Martinelli
Campaign coordinator
martinelli(at)cidse.org

Valentina Pavarotti
Communications Officer
pavarotti(at)cidse.org

 

Human dignity must be center of political debate – Pope on Greek debt crisis :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)



Pope Francis greets Greek pilgrims at a General Audience address in St. Peter’s Square, June 25, 2014. Credit: Daniel Ibanez/CNA.
Pope Francis greets Greek pilgrims at a General Audience address in St. Peter’s Square, June 25, 2014. Credit: Daniel Ibanez/CNA

By Ann Schneible

Vatican City, Jul 1, 2015 / 11:38 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Francis on Wednesday called for prayer for the people of Greece, shortly after the nation defaulted on a significant loan payment on its more than $300 billion debt.

“The news from Greece regarding the economic and social situation of the country is worrying,” Fr. Federico Lombardi, Holy See press officer, said in a July 1 statement. “Pope Francis invites all the faithful to unite in prayer for the good of the beloved Greek people.”

Greece faces a debate over the role of austerity measures, such as pension cuts and tax hikes, as it negotiates new financial bailouts with its creditors. The country’s unemployment rate is above 25 percent, and individuals are unable to remove more than $70 a day from ATMs.

The Vatican’s statement adds that “the dignity of the human person must remain at the centre of any political and technical debate, as well as in the taking of responsible decisions.”

“The Holy Father wishes to convey his closeness to all the Greek people, with a special thought for the many families gravely beset by such a complex and keenly felt human and social crisis.”

A June 30 deadline for Greece to make a roughly $1.7 billion payment to the International Monetary Fund came and went yesterday.

The country, which is part of the eurozone, has been in financial crisis for years. Economically the weakest nation in the eurozone, Greece was hit hard during the 2008 global financial crisis. Beginning in 2010, it began receiving financial bailouts, on the condition that it adopt austerity measures such as pension cuts, tax hikes, and public sector layoffs.

Greece’s unemployment rate is now around 25 percent and its banks have been closed, with ATM withdrawals limited to roughly $66 a day.

The current ruling party, Syriza, was elected in January on an anti-austerity platform. The next month, Greece negotiated an extension on repaying its debt, but yesterday’s default threatens a breakdown of the situation and raises fears of Greece leaving the eurozone.

Greece will hold a referendum July 5 whether or not to remain in the eurozone, and whether or not to support the terms offered by its creditors for a further, third bailout of some $32 billion lasting two years. Germany, the largest creditor to Greece, is strongly in favor of austerity measures in the Mediterranean country as a condition of another bailout.

Greece is also facing a July 20 payment deadline of more than $3.8 billion to the European Central Bank.

It is feared that without another bailout or an extension of Greece’s repayment deadlines, the nation’s crisis could affect the economic stability of the eurozone.

via Human dignity must be center of political debate – Pope on Greek debt crisis :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

quotation: “To endure is greater than to dare;…” – William Makepeace Thackeray


To endure is greater than to dare; to tire out hostile fortune; to be daunted by no difficulty; to keep heart when all have lost it—who can say this is not greatness?

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

Saint of the Day for Thursday, July 2nd, 2015: St. Bernardino Realino


Image of St. Bernardino Realino

St. Bernardino Realino

St. Bernardino Realino was born into a noble family of Capri, Italy in 1530. After receiving a thorough and devout Christian education at the hands of his mother, he went on to study medicine at the … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Cetatea Făgăraşului added a new photo. – Cetatea Făgăraşului: Cetatea Rupea


Cetatea Rupea

Cetatea Rupea, Tara Fagarasului, Romania

Astazi ne indreptam privirea asupra unei Cetati vecine!

Cetatea Rupea este unul dintre cele mai vechi vestigii arheologice de pe teritoriul României, primele semne de așezări omenești datând din paleotic si neoliticul timpuriu (5.500-3.500 î.H.). Prima atestare documentară datează din anul 1324 când sașii răsculați împotriva regelui Carol Robert, al Ungariei s-au refugiat în interiorul cetății, Castrum Kuholm. Numele de Kuholom face referire la roca pe care a fost ridicata: bazaltul. Documente din secolul al XV-lea menționează cetatea ca fiind un important centru comercial și meșteșugăresc, cu 12 bresle. Cetatea a servit de-a lungul timpului ca fortificație dar și refugiu pentru populația ce locuia dealurile și valea din împrejurimi, așezarea ei fiind strategică: la îmbinarea drumurilor ce făceau legătura între Transilvania, Moldova și Țara Românească prin pasurile sud-estice.

Cetatea Rupea, ridicatǎ pe Dealul Cohalmului, dominând de sus orașul, a fost construitǎ și extinsǎ în secolele al XIV-lea– al XVII-lea, ca cetate și refugiu pentru satele din împrejurimi. În prezent este în stadiu de ruinǎ. Curtinele formează 4 incinte, fiind întărite din loc în loc cu turnuri poligonale, circulația fiind controlatǎ de mai multe porți interioare care compartimenteazǎ ansamblul fortificat. Incinta centralǎ este prevăzută cu un reduit și cu o capelă.

sursa info: wikipedia

sursa foto: Johann Hantzy Kessler

via Cetatea Făgăraşului added a new photo. – Cetatea Făgăraşului.

Holy Mass with the imposition of the Pallium 2015.06.29


Holy Mass with the imposition of the Pallium 2015.06.29

great compositions/performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (BBC Proms 2012)


Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Proms 2012)

greaat compositions/performances: Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)


Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)

quotation: “It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts….” (Joseph Conrad (1857-1924))


It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts. Perhaps it’s just as well; and it may be that it is this very dullness that makes life to the incalculable majority so supportable and so welcome.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss


Saint Peter’s tomb

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 
The floor above Saint Peter’s tomb (see text)

 
St. Peter’s baldachin, by Bernini, in the modern St. Peter’s Basilica. St. Peter’s tomb lies directly below this structure.

Saint Peter’s tomb is a site under St. Peter’s Basilica that includes several graves and a structure said by Vatican authorities to have been built to memorialize the location of St. Peter’s grave. St. Peter’s tomb is near the west end of a complex of mausoleums that date between about AD 130 and AD 300.[1] The complex was partially torn down and filled with earth to provide a foundation for the building of the first St. Peter’s Basilica during the reign of Constantine I in about AD 330. Though many bones have been found at the site of the 2nd-century shrine, as the result of two campaigns of archaeological excavation, Pope Pius XII stated in December 1950 that none could be confirmed to be Saint Peter’s with absolute certainty.[2] However, following the discovery of further bones and an inscription, on June 26, 1968 Pope Paul VI announced that the relics of St. Peter had been identified.

The grave claimed by the Church to be that of St. Peter lies at the foot of the aedicula beneath the floor. The remains of four individuals and several farm animals were found in this grave.[3] In 1953, after the initial archeological efforts had been completed, another set of bones were found that were said to have been removed without the archeologists’ knowledge from a niche (loculus) in the north side of a wall (the graffiti wall) that abuts the red wall on the right of the aedicula. Subsequent testing indicated that these were the bones of a 60-70-year-old man.[4] Margherita Guarducci argued that these were the remains of St. Peter and that they had been moved into a niche in the graffiti wall from the grave under the aedicula “at the time of Constantine, after the peace of the church” (313).[5] Antonio Ferrua, the archaeologist who headed the excavation that uncovered what is known as the St. Peter’s Tomb, said that he wasn’t convinced that the bones that were found were those of St. Peter.[6]

The upper image shows the area of the lower floor of St. Peter’s Basilica that lies above the site of St. Peter’s tomb. A portion of the aedicula that was part of St. Peter’s tomb rose above level of this floor and was made into the Niche of the Pallium[7] which can be seen in the center of the image.

Death of Peter at Vatican Hill

 

The earliest reference to Peter’s death is in a letter of Clement, bishop of Rome, to the Corinthians. (1 Clement, (a.k.a. Letter to the Corinthians), written c. 96 AD. The historian Eusebius, a contemporary of Constantine, wrote that St. Peter “came to Rome, and was crucified with his head downwards,” attributing this information to the much earlier theologian Origen, who died c. 254 AD.[8] St. Peter’s martyrdom is traditionally depicted in religious iconography as crucifixion with his head pointed downward.

Peter’s place and manner of death are also mentioned by Tertullian (c. 160-220) in Scorpiace,[9] where the death is said to take place during the Christian persecutions by Nero. Tacitus (56-117) describes the persecution of Christians in his Annals, though he does not specifically mention Peter.[10] “They were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt.” Furthermore, Tertullian says these events took place in the imperial gardens near the Circus of Nero. No other area would have been available for public persecutions after the Great Fire of Rome destroyed the Circus Maximus and most of the rest of the city in the year 64 AD.

This account is supported by other sources. In the The Passion of Peter and Paul, dating to the fifth century, the crucifixion of Peter is recounted. While the stories themselves are apocryphal, they were based on earlier material, helpful for topographical reasons. It reads, “Holy men … took down his body secretly and put it under the terebinth tree near the Naumachia, in the place which is called the Vatican.”[11] The place called Naumachia would be an artificial lake within the Circus of Nero where naval battles were reenacted for an audience. The place called Vatican was at the time a hill next to the complex and also next to the Tiber River, featuring a cemetery of both Christian and pagan tombs.

Tracing the original tombs

Dionysius of Corinth mentions the burial place of Peter as Rome when he wrote to the Church of Rome in the time of the Pope Soter (died 174), thanking the Romans for their financial help. “You have thus by such an admonition bound together the planting of Peter and of Paul at Rome and Corinth. For both of them planted and likewise taught us in our Corinth. And they taught together in like manner in Italy, and suffered martyrdom at the same time.”[12]

 
Fourth century glass mosaic of St. Peter, located at the Catacombs of Saint Thecla.

Catholic tradition holds that the bereaved Christians followed their usual custom in burying him as near as possible to the scene of his suffering. According to Catholic lore, he was laid in ground that belonged to Christian proprietors, by the side of a well-known road leading out of the city, the Via Cornelia (site of a known pagan and Christian cemetery) on the hill called Vaticanus. The actual tomb was an underground vault, approached from the road by a descending staircase, and the body reposed in a sarcophagus of stone in the center of this vault.[11]

The Book of Popes mentions that Pope Anacletus built a “sepulchral monument” over the underground tomb of St. Peter shortly after his death.[13] This was a small chamber or oratory over the tomb, where three or four persons could kneel and pray over the grave. The pagan Roman Emperor, Julian the Apostate, mentions in 363 A.D. in his work Three Books Against the Galileans that the tomb of St. Peter was a place of worship, albeit secretly.[14]

There is evidence of the existence of the tomb (trophoea, i.e., trophies, as signs or memorials of victory) at the beginning of the 3rd century, in the words of the presbyter Caius refuting the Montanist traditions of a certain Proclus: “But I can show the trophies of the Apostles. For if you will go to the Vatican, or to the Ostian way, you will find the trophies of those who laid the foundations of this church.”[12]

Saint of the Day for Monday, June 29th, 2015: St. Peter, First Pope (St. Apostol Petru)


Image of St. Peter, First Pope

St. Peter, First Pope

St. Peter, from the Crypt of St. Peter, c.700 Ad Giclee Print

St. Peter, from the Crypt of St. Peter, c.700 Ad Giclee Print

Simon Peter or Cephas, the first pope, Prince of the Apostles, and founder, with St. Paul, of the see of Rome. Peter was a native of Bethsaida, near Lake Tiberias, the son of John, and worked, like … continue reading
29 июня в день памяти апостола его ...

The New Testament indicates that Peter was the son of John (or Jonah or Jona)[4] and was from the village of Bethsaida in the province of Galilee or Gaulanitis. His brother Andrew was also an apostle. According to New Testament accounts, Peter was one of twelve apostles chosen by Jesus from his first disciples. Originally a fisherman, he played a leadership role and was with Jesus during events witnessed by only a few apostles, such as the Transfiguration. According to the gospels, Peter confessed Jesus as the Messiah,[5] was part of Jesus’s inner circle,[6] thrice denied Jesus,[7] and preached on the day of Pentecost.[8]

According to Christian tradition, Peter was crucified in Rome under Emperor Nero Augustus Caesar. It is traditionally held that he was crucified upside down at his own request, since he saw himself unworthy to be crucified in the same way as Jesus. Tradition holds that he was crucified at the site of the Clementine Chapel. His mortal remains are said to be those contained in the underground Confessio of St. Peter’s Basilica, where Pope Paul VI announced in 1968 the excavated discovery of a first-century Roman cemetery. Every June 29 since 1736, a statue of Saint Peter in St. Peter’s Basilica is adorned with papal tiara, ring of the fisherman, and papal vestments, as part of the celebration of the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul. According to Catholic doctrine, the direct papal successor to Saint Peter is Pope Francis

 MORE HERE:

More Saints of the Day

make music part of your life series: Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12


Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

make music part of your life series: Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 (“Spring”)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BS_rG_XZ0Y%5B/emebed%5D

Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 [complete] (Spring)

quotation: Follow your honest convictions and be strong. William Makepeace Thackeray


Follow your honest convictions and be strong.

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

Just a thought: When immorality changes the definition of morality one’s left with…amorality. George – B.


Just a thought:  When immorality changes the definition of morality one’s left with…amorality.

George – B.

quotation: Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles. Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616


Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major


Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

What happens when an entire country becomes infested with demons? :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


What happens when an entire country becomes infested with demons?

Credit: Estitxu Carton via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Credit: Estitxu Carton via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Vatican City, Jun 16, 2015 / 03:09 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Can a country with deep Christian roots like Mexico find itself at the mercy of demons? Some in the Church fear so.

And as a result, they called for a nation-wide exorcism of Mexico, carried out quietly last month in the cathedral of San Luis Potosí.

High levels of violence, as well as drug cartels and abortion in the country, were the motivation behind the special rite of exorcism, known as “Exorcismo Magno.”

Cardinal Juan Sandoval Íñiguez, the archbishop emeritus of Guadalajara, presided at the closed doors ceremony, the first ever in the history of Mexico.

Also participating were Archbishop Jesús Carlos Cabrero of San Luis Potosí, Spanish demonologist and exorcist Father José Antonio Fortea, and a smaller group of priests and lay people.

The event was not made known to the general public beforehand. According to Archbishop Cabrero, the reserved character of the May 20 ceremony was intended to avoid any misguided interpretations of the ritual.

But how can an entire country become infested by demons to the point that it’s necessary to resort to an Exorcismo Magno?

“To the extent sin increases more and more in a country, to that extent it becomes easier for the demons to tempt (people),” Fr. Fortea told CNA.

The Spanish exorcist warned that “to the extent there is more witchcraft and Satanism going on in a country, to that extent there will be more extraordinary manifestations of those powers of darkness.”

Fr. Fortea said that “the exorcism performed in San Luís Potosí is the first ever carried out in Mexico in which the exorcists came from different parts of the country and gathered together to exorcise the powers of darkness, not from a person, but from the whole country.”

“This rite of exorcism, beautiful and liturgical, had never before taken place in any part of the world. Although it had taken place in a private manner as when Saint Francis (exorcised) the Italian city of Arezzo,” he stated.

The Spanish exorcist explained, however, that the celebration of this ritual will not automatically change the difficult situation Mexico is going through in a single day.

“It would be a big mistake to think that by performing a full scale exorcism of the country everything would automatically change right away.”

Nevertheless, he emphasized that “if with the power we’ve received from Christ we expel the demons from a country, this will certainly have positive repercussions, because we’ll make a great number of the tempters flee, even if this exorcism is partial.”

“We don’t drive out all the evil spirits from a country with just one ceremony. But even though all will not be expelled, those that were removed are not there anymore.”

Fr. Fortea emphasized that “when the exorcists of a country drive out its demons, it has to be done in faith. You’re not going to see anything, feel anything, there’s not going to be any extraordinary phenomenon. We have to have faith that God conferred on the apostles a power, and that we can use this power.”

“In any case, if this ritual were to be carried out in more countries once year, before or after, this would put an end to any extraordinary manifestations which would show us the rage of the devil. Because, without a doubt, the demons hate to be driven out of a place or to be bound with the power of Christ.”

The Spanish exorcist said that “it would be very desirable that when there’s an annual meeting of exorcists in a country, a ritual such as this exorcismo magno that took place in Mexico be performed.”

He also emphasized that a bishop “can authorize its occurrence once a year with his priests in the cathedral.”

“The bishop is the shepherd and he can use the power he has received to drive away the invisible wolves from the sheep, since Satan is like a roaring lion prowling around looking for someone to devour, and the shepherds can drive away the predator from the victim,” he concluded.

Tags: Mexico, Exorcism, Demons

via What happens when an entire country becomes infested with demons? :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

quotation: Agatha Christie


I have learnt that I am me, that I can do the things that, as one might put it, me can do, but I cannot do the things that me would like to do.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

Paganini: Cantabile op. 17 | Keiko Yamaguchi, violin


Paganini: Cantabile op. 17 | Keiko Yamaguchi, violin

Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants


Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants

In Middle East martyrdoms, Pope Francis sees seeds of Christian unity :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Vatican City, Jun 20, 2015 / 06:02 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Meeting with Syriac Orthodox leaders on Friday, Pope Francis decried the continuing martyrdom of Middle East Christians, and gave special mention to two Christian bishops kidnapped in Syria two years ago.

“The blood of the martyrs is the seed of unity in the Church and the instrument of the building up of the kingdom of God, which is a kingdom of peace and of justice,” the Pope said June 19.

“Let us ask the Lord, too, for the grace of always being ready to forgive and of being workers of reconciliation and peace. This is what animates the witness of the martyrs.”

The Roman Pontiff encouraged prayers for the victims of violence in the Middle East. He particularly mentioned Syriac Orthodox Metropolitan Gregorios Ibrahim and Greek Orthodox Metropolitan Paul Yazigi, two archbishops of Aleppo, Syria who were kidnapped together in 2013.

The Pope’s comments came during a meeting with Syriac Orthodox Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II of Antioch, who was accompanied by a delegation of his Church.

The Syriac Orthodox Church is one of the Oriental Orthodox Churches, which rejected the Council of Chalcedon held in 451. The Church has about 1.2 million members around the world, and its patriarchate is now based in Damascus.

The Roman Pontiff told Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem that the Syrian Church has been “a Church of martyrs from the beginning.” He lamented that the Syriac Orthodox Church, with other Christian communities and other minorities, continues to endure “the terrible sufferings caused by war, violence, and persecutions.”

“So much suffering! So many innocent victims. In the face of all this, it seems that the powers of this world are incapable of finding solutions,” the Pope said.

He added: “in this moment of harsh trial and of sorrow, let us strengthen ever more the bonds of friendship and fraternity between the Catholic Church and the Syriac Orthodox Church. Let us hasten our steps along the common path, keeping our gaze fixed on the day when we will be able to celebrate our belonging to the one Church of Christ around the same altar of Sacrifice and of praise.”

“Let us exchange the treasures of our traditions as spiritual gifts, because that which unites us is much greater than that which divides us.”

The tradition of papal meetings with Syriac Orthodox leaders dates back to 1971 when Blessed Paul VI met with then-Patriarch Ignatius Jacob III. Pope Francis said that at that encounter, both leaders “consciously began what we can call a ‘holy pilgrimage’ toward full communion between our Churches.”

Bl. Paul VI and the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch signed a common declaration of faith that laid a “dynamic foundation” for the journey to unity, Pope Francis said.

He cited Saint Ignatius of Antioch’s Letter to the Magnesians, in which the Church Father prayed for unity among Christians. He also prayed a Syrian prayer that asks for God’s sanctification and prays that Mary’s prayers be “strength for our souls.”

Tags: Syrian Civil War, Church unity, Oriental Orthodoxy, Syriac Orthodox Church

via In Middle East martyrdoms, Pope Francis sees seeds of Christian unity :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

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Doamna Stanca (died 1603) was the wife of Michael the Brave.


Doamna Stanca (died 1603) was the wife of Michael the Brave. Tradition says that they were married in the Proieni church, Vâlcea County, in 1584.

Doamna Stanca at Făgăraș

In 1600, the sometime master of Făgăraș Citadel, Michael the Brave, gave the castle and the Făgăraș domain to Doamna Stanca. He retreated there after the defeat at Mirăslău (18/28 September 1600) and sheltered his family there until 1601.

Doamna Stanca settled there with their two children, Nicolae Pătrașcu and Lady Florica. Michael built a church for his family in the southern part of the city. After the Battle of Mirăslău, the three were held hostage in the city, and after the killing of the Voivode near Turda, on 9/10 August 1601, Doamna Stanca lived there as a slave.

“Two Generations Ice-skating ” (above: Me, 1963/ Bellow: my Father and friends, 1934. Both pictures at the Cetatea Fagaras, Tara Fagarasului, Romania Mare, si… Mai Mica) My Photo Collection)


"Two Generations Ice-skating " (above: Me, 1963/ Bellow: my Father and friends, 1934. Both pictures at the Cetatea Fagaras, Fagaras, Romania) My Photo Collection)

“Two Generations Ice-skating ” (above: Me, 1963/ Bellow: my Father and friends, 1934. Both pictures at the Cetatea Fagaras, Fagaras, Romania) My Photo Collection)

image of today: Tatal meu in fata Statuii Doamnei Stanca, cetatea Fagaras, Romania Mare, 1939 (©my phopt collection)


Tatal meu in fata Statuii Doamnei Stanca, cetatea Fagaras, 1939

Tatal meu in fata Statuii Doamnei Stanca, cetatea Fagaras, 1939