Category Archives: MY TAKE ON THINGS

Cetatea Făgăraşului added a new photo. – Cetatea Făgăraşului: Cetatea Rupea


Cetatea Rupea

Cetatea Rupea, Tara Fagarasului, Romania

Astazi ne indreptam privirea asupra unei Cetati vecine!

Cetatea Rupea este unul dintre cele mai vechi vestigii arheologice de pe teritoriul României, primele semne de așezări omenești datând din paleotic si neoliticul timpuriu (5.500-3.500 î.H.). Prima atestare documentară datează din anul 1324 când sașii răsculați împotriva regelui Carol Robert, al Ungariei s-au refugiat în interiorul cetății, Castrum Kuholm. Numele de Kuholom face referire la roca pe care a fost ridicata: bazaltul. Documente din secolul al XV-lea menționează cetatea ca fiind un important centru comercial și meșteșugăresc, cu 12 bresle. Cetatea a servit de-a lungul timpului ca fortificație dar și refugiu pentru populația ce locuia dealurile și valea din împrejurimi, așezarea ei fiind strategică: la îmbinarea drumurilor ce făceau legătura între Transilvania, Moldova și Țara Românească prin pasurile sud-estice.

Cetatea Rupea, ridicatǎ pe Dealul Cohalmului, dominând de sus orașul, a fost construitǎ și extinsǎ în secolele al XIV-lea– al XVII-lea, ca cetate și refugiu pentru satele din împrejurimi. În prezent este în stadiu de ruinǎ. Curtinele formează 4 incinte, fiind întărite din loc în loc cu turnuri poligonale, circulația fiind controlatǎ de mai multe porți interioare care compartimenteazǎ ansamblul fortificat. Incinta centralǎ este prevăzută cu un reduit și cu o capelă.

sursa info: wikipedia

sursa foto: Johann Hantzy Kessler

via Cetatea Făgăraşului added a new photo. – Cetatea Făgăraşului.

Holy Mass with the imposition of the Pallium 2015.06.29


Holy Mass with the imposition of the Pallium 2015.06.29

great compositions/performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (BBC Proms 2012)


Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Proms 2012)

greaat compositions/performances: Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)


Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)

quotation: “It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts….” (Joseph Conrad (1857-1924))


It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts. Perhaps it’s just as well; and it may be that it is this very dullness that makes life to the incalculable majority so supportable and so welcome.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss


Saint Peter’s tomb

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 
The floor above Saint Peter’s tomb (see text)

 
St. Peter’s baldachin, by Bernini, in the modern St. Peter’s Basilica. St. Peter’s tomb lies directly below this structure.

Saint Peter’s tomb is a site under St. Peter’s Basilica that includes several graves and a structure said by Vatican authorities to have been built to memorialize the location of St. Peter’s grave. St. Peter’s tomb is near the west end of a complex of mausoleums that date between about AD 130 and AD 300.[1] The complex was partially torn down and filled with earth to provide a foundation for the building of the first St. Peter’s Basilica during the reign of Constantine I in about AD 330. Though many bones have been found at the site of the 2nd-century shrine, as the result of two campaigns of archaeological excavation, Pope Pius XII stated in December 1950 that none could be confirmed to be Saint Peter’s with absolute certainty.[2] However, following the discovery of further bones and an inscription, on June 26, 1968 Pope Paul VI announced that the relics of St. Peter had been identified.

The grave claimed by the Church to be that of St. Peter lies at the foot of the aedicula beneath the floor. The remains of four individuals and several farm animals were found in this grave.[3] In 1953, after the initial archeological efforts had been completed, another set of bones were found that were said to have been removed without the archeologists’ knowledge from a niche (loculus) in the north side of a wall (the graffiti wall) that abuts the red wall on the right of the aedicula. Subsequent testing indicated that these were the bones of a 60-70-year-old man.[4] Margherita Guarducci argued that these were the remains of St. Peter and that they had been moved into a niche in the graffiti wall from the grave under the aedicula “at the time of Constantine, after the peace of the church” (313).[5] Antonio Ferrua, the archaeologist who headed the excavation that uncovered what is known as the St. Peter’s Tomb, said that he wasn’t convinced that the bones that were found were those of St. Peter.[6]

The upper image shows the area of the lower floor of St. Peter’s Basilica that lies above the site of St. Peter’s tomb. A portion of the aedicula that was part of St. Peter’s tomb rose above level of this floor and was made into the Niche of the Pallium[7] which can be seen in the center of the image.

Death of Peter at Vatican Hill

 

The earliest reference to Peter’s death is in a letter of Clement, bishop of Rome, to the Corinthians. (1 Clement, (a.k.a. Letter to the Corinthians), written c. 96 AD. The historian Eusebius, a contemporary of Constantine, wrote that St. Peter “came to Rome, and was crucified with his head downwards,” attributing this information to the much earlier theologian Origen, who died c. 254 AD.[8] St. Peter’s martyrdom is traditionally depicted in religious iconography as crucifixion with his head pointed downward.

Peter’s place and manner of death are also mentioned by Tertullian (c. 160-220) in Scorpiace,[9] where the death is said to take place during the Christian persecutions by Nero. Tacitus (56-117) describes the persecution of Christians in his Annals, though he does not specifically mention Peter.[10] “They were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt.” Furthermore, Tertullian says these events took place in the imperial gardens near the Circus of Nero. No other area would have been available for public persecutions after the Great Fire of Rome destroyed the Circus Maximus and most of the rest of the city in the year 64 AD.

This account is supported by other sources. In the The Passion of Peter and Paul, dating to the fifth century, the crucifixion of Peter is recounted. While the stories themselves are apocryphal, they were based on earlier material, helpful for topographical reasons. It reads, “Holy men … took down his body secretly and put it under the terebinth tree near the Naumachia, in the place which is called the Vatican.”[11] The place called Naumachia would be an artificial lake within the Circus of Nero where naval battles were reenacted for an audience. The place called Vatican was at the time a hill next to the complex and also next to the Tiber River, featuring a cemetery of both Christian and pagan tombs.

Tracing the original tombs

Dionysius of Corinth mentions the burial place of Peter as Rome when he wrote to the Church of Rome in the time of the Pope Soter (died 174), thanking the Romans for their financial help. “You have thus by such an admonition bound together the planting of Peter and of Paul at Rome and Corinth. For both of them planted and likewise taught us in our Corinth. And they taught together in like manner in Italy, and suffered martyrdom at the same time.”[12]

 
Fourth century glass mosaic of St. Peter, located at the Catacombs of Saint Thecla.

Catholic tradition holds that the bereaved Christians followed their usual custom in burying him as near as possible to the scene of his suffering. According to Catholic lore, he was laid in ground that belonged to Christian proprietors, by the side of a well-known road leading out of the city, the Via Cornelia (site of a known pagan and Christian cemetery) on the hill called Vaticanus. The actual tomb was an underground vault, approached from the road by a descending staircase, and the body reposed in a sarcophagus of stone in the center of this vault.[11]

The Book of Popes mentions that Pope Anacletus built a “sepulchral monument” over the underground tomb of St. Peter shortly after his death.[13] This was a small chamber or oratory over the tomb, where three or four persons could kneel and pray over the grave. The pagan Roman Emperor, Julian the Apostate, mentions in 363 A.D. in his work Three Books Against the Galileans that the tomb of St. Peter was a place of worship, albeit secretly.[14]

There is evidence of the existence of the tomb (trophoea, i.e., trophies, as signs or memorials of victory) at the beginning of the 3rd century, in the words of the presbyter Caius refuting the Montanist traditions of a certain Proclus: “But I can show the trophies of the Apostles. For if you will go to the Vatican, or to the Ostian way, you will find the trophies of those who laid the foundations of this church.”[12]

Saint of the Day for Monday, June 29th, 2015: St. Peter, First Pope (St. Apostol Petru)


Image of St. Peter, First Pope

St. Peter, First Pope

St. Peter, from the Crypt of St. Peter, c.700 Ad Giclee Print

St. Peter, from the Crypt of St. Peter, c.700 Ad Giclee Print

Simon Peter or Cephas, the first pope, Prince of the Apostles, and founder, with St. Paul, of the see of Rome. Peter was a native of Bethsaida, near Lake Tiberias, the son of John, and worked, like … continue reading
29 июня в день памяти апостола его ...

The New Testament indicates that Peter was the son of John (or Jonah or Jona)[4] and was from the village of Bethsaida in the province of Galilee or Gaulanitis. His brother Andrew was also an apostle. According to New Testament accounts, Peter was one of twelve apostles chosen by Jesus from his first disciples. Originally a fisherman, he played a leadership role and was with Jesus during events witnessed by only a few apostles, such as the Transfiguration. According to the gospels, Peter confessed Jesus as the Messiah,[5] was part of Jesus’s inner circle,[6] thrice denied Jesus,[7] and preached on the day of Pentecost.[8]

According to Christian tradition, Peter was crucified in Rome under Emperor Nero Augustus Caesar. It is traditionally held that he was crucified upside down at his own request, since he saw himself unworthy to be crucified in the same way as Jesus. Tradition holds that he was crucified at the site of the Clementine Chapel. His mortal remains are said to be those contained in the underground Confessio of St. Peter’s Basilica, where Pope Paul VI announced in 1968 the excavated discovery of a first-century Roman cemetery. Every June 29 since 1736, a statue of Saint Peter in St. Peter’s Basilica is adorned with papal tiara, ring of the fisherman, and papal vestments, as part of the celebration of the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul. According to Catholic doctrine, the direct papal successor to Saint Peter is Pope Francis

 MORE HERE:

More Saints of the Day

make music part of your life series: Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12


Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

make music part of your life series: Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 (“Spring”)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BS_rG_XZ0Y%5B/emebed%5D

Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 [complete] (Spring)

quotation: Follow your honest convictions and be strong. William Makepeace Thackeray


Follow your honest convictions and be strong.

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

Just a thought: When immorality changes the definition of morality one’s left with…amorality. George – B.


Just a thought:  When immorality changes the definition of morality one’s left with…amorality.

George – B.

quotation: Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles. Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616


Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major


Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 2 in A major

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

What happens when an entire country becomes infested with demons? :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


What happens when an entire country becomes infested with demons?

Credit: Estitxu Carton via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Credit: Estitxu Carton via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Vatican City, Jun 16, 2015 / 03:09 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Can a country with deep Christian roots like Mexico find itself at the mercy of demons? Some in the Church fear so.

And as a result, they called for a nation-wide exorcism of Mexico, carried out quietly last month in the cathedral of San Luis Potosí.

High levels of violence, as well as drug cartels and abortion in the country, were the motivation behind the special rite of exorcism, known as “Exorcismo Magno.”

Cardinal Juan Sandoval Íñiguez, the archbishop emeritus of Guadalajara, presided at the closed doors ceremony, the first ever in the history of Mexico.

Also participating were Archbishop Jesús Carlos Cabrero of San Luis Potosí, Spanish demonologist and exorcist Father José Antonio Fortea, and a smaller group of priests and lay people.

The event was not made known to the general public beforehand. According to Archbishop Cabrero, the reserved character of the May 20 ceremony was intended to avoid any misguided interpretations of the ritual.

But how can an entire country become infested by demons to the point that it’s necessary to resort to an Exorcismo Magno?

“To the extent sin increases more and more in a country, to that extent it becomes easier for the demons to tempt (people),” Fr. Fortea told CNA.

The Spanish exorcist warned that “to the extent there is more witchcraft and Satanism going on in a country, to that extent there will be more extraordinary manifestations of those powers of darkness.”

Fr. Fortea said that “the exorcism performed in San Luís Potosí is the first ever carried out in Mexico in which the exorcists came from different parts of the country and gathered together to exorcise the powers of darkness, not from a person, but from the whole country.”

“This rite of exorcism, beautiful and liturgical, had never before taken place in any part of the world. Although it had taken place in a private manner as when Saint Francis (exorcised) the Italian city of Arezzo,” he stated.

The Spanish exorcist explained, however, that the celebration of this ritual will not automatically change the difficult situation Mexico is going through in a single day.

“It would be a big mistake to think that by performing a full scale exorcism of the country everything would automatically change right away.”

Nevertheless, he emphasized that “if with the power we’ve received from Christ we expel the demons from a country, this will certainly have positive repercussions, because we’ll make a great number of the tempters flee, even if this exorcism is partial.”

“We don’t drive out all the evil spirits from a country with just one ceremony. But even though all will not be expelled, those that were removed are not there anymore.”

Fr. Fortea emphasized that “when the exorcists of a country drive out its demons, it has to be done in faith. You’re not going to see anything, feel anything, there’s not going to be any extraordinary phenomenon. We have to have faith that God conferred on the apostles a power, and that we can use this power.”

“In any case, if this ritual were to be carried out in more countries once year, before or after, this would put an end to any extraordinary manifestations which would show us the rage of the devil. Because, without a doubt, the demons hate to be driven out of a place or to be bound with the power of Christ.”

The Spanish exorcist said that “it would be very desirable that when there’s an annual meeting of exorcists in a country, a ritual such as this exorcismo magno that took place in Mexico be performed.”

He also emphasized that a bishop “can authorize its occurrence once a year with his priests in the cathedral.”

“The bishop is the shepherd and he can use the power he has received to drive away the invisible wolves from the sheep, since Satan is like a roaring lion prowling around looking for someone to devour, and the shepherds can drive away the predator from the victim,” he concluded.

Tags: Mexico, Exorcism, Demons

via What happens when an entire country becomes infested with demons? :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

quotation: Agatha Christie


I have learnt that I am me, that I can do the things that, as one might put it, me can do, but I cannot do the things that me would like to do.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

Paganini: Cantabile op. 17 | Keiko Yamaguchi, violin


Paganini: Cantabile op. 17 | Keiko Yamaguchi, violin

Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants


Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants

In Middle East martyrdoms, Pope Francis sees seeds of Christian unity :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Vatican City, Jun 20, 2015 / 06:02 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Meeting with Syriac Orthodox leaders on Friday, Pope Francis decried the continuing martyrdom of Middle East Christians, and gave special mention to two Christian bishops kidnapped in Syria two years ago.

“The blood of the martyrs is the seed of unity in the Church and the instrument of the building up of the kingdom of God, which is a kingdom of peace and of justice,” the Pope said June 19.

“Let us ask the Lord, too, for the grace of always being ready to forgive and of being workers of reconciliation and peace. This is what animates the witness of the martyrs.”

The Roman Pontiff encouraged prayers for the victims of violence in the Middle East. He particularly mentioned Syriac Orthodox Metropolitan Gregorios Ibrahim and Greek Orthodox Metropolitan Paul Yazigi, two archbishops of Aleppo, Syria who were kidnapped together in 2013.

The Pope’s comments came during a meeting with Syriac Orthodox Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem II of Antioch, who was accompanied by a delegation of his Church.

The Syriac Orthodox Church is one of the Oriental Orthodox Churches, which rejected the Council of Chalcedon held in 451. The Church has about 1.2 million members around the world, and its patriarchate is now based in Damascus.

The Roman Pontiff told Patriarch Ignatius Aphrem that the Syrian Church has been “a Church of martyrs from the beginning.” He lamented that the Syriac Orthodox Church, with other Christian communities and other minorities, continues to endure “the terrible sufferings caused by war, violence, and persecutions.”

“So much suffering! So many innocent victims. In the face of all this, it seems that the powers of this world are incapable of finding solutions,” the Pope said.

He added: “in this moment of harsh trial and of sorrow, let us strengthen ever more the bonds of friendship and fraternity between the Catholic Church and the Syriac Orthodox Church. Let us hasten our steps along the common path, keeping our gaze fixed on the day when we will be able to celebrate our belonging to the one Church of Christ around the same altar of Sacrifice and of praise.”

“Let us exchange the treasures of our traditions as spiritual gifts, because that which unites us is much greater than that which divides us.”

The tradition of papal meetings with Syriac Orthodox leaders dates back to 1971 when Blessed Paul VI met with then-Patriarch Ignatius Jacob III. Pope Francis said that at that encounter, both leaders “consciously began what we can call a ‘holy pilgrimage’ toward full communion between our Churches.”

Bl. Paul VI and the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch signed a common declaration of faith that laid a “dynamic foundation” for the journey to unity, Pope Francis said.

He cited Saint Ignatius of Antioch’s Letter to the Magnesians, in which the Church Father prayed for unity among Christians. He also prayed a Syrian prayer that asks for God’s sanctification and prays that Mary’s prayers be “strength for our souls.”

Tags: Syrian Civil War, Church unity, Oriental Orthodoxy, Syriac Orthodox Church

via In Middle East martyrdoms, Pope Francis sees seeds of Christian unity :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

More HERE

Doamna Stanca (died 1603) was the wife of Michael the Brave.


Doamna Stanca (died 1603) was the wife of Michael the Brave. Tradition says that they were married in the Proieni church, Vâlcea County, in 1584.

Doamna Stanca at Făgăraș

In 1600, the sometime master of Făgăraș Citadel, Michael the Brave, gave the castle and the Făgăraș domain to Doamna Stanca. He retreated there after the defeat at Mirăslău (18/28 September 1600) and sheltered his family there until 1601.

Doamna Stanca settled there with their two children, Nicolae Pătrașcu and Lady Florica. Michael built a church for his family in the southern part of the city. After the Battle of Mirăslău, the three were held hostage in the city, and after the killing of the Voivode near Turda, on 9/10 August 1601, Doamna Stanca lived there as a slave.

“Two Generations Ice-skating ” (above: Me, 1963/ Bellow: my Father and friends, 1934. Both pictures at the Cetatea Fagaras, Tara Fagarasului, Romania Mare, si… Mai Mica) My Photo Collection)


"Two Generations Ice-skating " (above: Me, 1963/ Bellow: my Father and friends, 1934. Both pictures at the Cetatea Fagaras, Fagaras, Romania) My Photo Collection)

“Two Generations Ice-skating ” (above: Me, 1963/ Bellow: my Father and friends, 1934. Both pictures at the Cetatea Fagaras, Fagaras, Romania) My Photo Collection)

image of today: Tatal meu in fata Statuii Doamnei Stanca, cetatea Fagaras, Romania Mare, 1939 (©my phopt collection)


Tatal meu in fata Statuii Doamnei Stanca, cetatea Fagaras, 1939

Tatal meu in fata Statuii Doamnei Stanca, cetatea Fagaras, 1939

Descopera Romania – Cetatea Fagarasului (travel with purpose and discover historic places and the people who built and maintain them)


Descopera Romania – Cetatea Fagarasului

Ocean’s Kingdom – Paul McCartney


Ocean’s Kingdom – Paul McCartney

Haiku – Words, poetic thought by George-G (The Smudge ans other poems) (“Words know the meaning…”)


Haiku – Words, poetic thought by George-G
(The Smudge ans other poems)

Words know the Story,
what has been, is, will be.
Words – learn the meaning.

©By George -B

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, June 16th, 2015: St. John Francis Regis


Image of St. John Francis Regis

St. John Francis Regis

St. John Francis Regis Confessor of the Society of Jesus June 16     True virtue, or Christian perfection, consists not in great or shining actions, but resides in the heart, and … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

great compositions/performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

great compsitions/performances: L. Boccherini Sinfonia in re minore op 12 n 4 “La casa del diavolo”


L. Boccherini Sinfonia in re minore op 12 n 4 “La casa del diavolo”

historic musical bits: Abbado conducts Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major ‘Classical’, Op. 25


Abbado conducts Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major ‘Classical’, Op. 25

Route 66


Route 66

Also known as the “The Main Street of America,” Route 66 was established in 1926 and ran from Chicago, Illinois, in a south-westerly direction to Los Angeles, California, for a total of 2,448 miles (3,939 km). It was a major path of the migrants who went west, especially during the 1930s, and it supported the economies of the communities through which it passed. More direct routes and increasingly sophisticated engineering techniques led to its being decommissioned in what year? More… Discuss

Make music part of your life series: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, L. 86 Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra , Max Pommer


Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, L. 86

Published on Apr 4, 2015

Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, L. 86 · Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra · Claude Debussy · Max Pommer

℗ 2013 Cobra Entertainment LLC

Released on: 2013-12-31

great compositions/performances: Martha Argerich – Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3


Martha Argerich – Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 3

historic musical bits: Andrés Segovia: Guitar Concerto N°1, Op.99 – Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco


Andrés Segovia: Guitar Concerto N°1, Op.99 – Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco

great compositions/performances: ,Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218


Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, June 9th, 2015: St. Ephrem


Image of St. Ephrem

St. Ephrem

“I was born in the way of truth: though my childhood was unaware of the greatness of the benefit, I knew it when trial came.” Ephrem (or Eprhaim) the Syrian left us hundreds of hymns … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

today’s holiday: St. Columba’s Day


St. Columba’s Day

Along with St. Bridget and St. Patrick, St. Columba (c. 521-597) is a patron saint of Ireland. Although he led an exemplary life, traveling all over Ireland to set up churches, schools, and monasteries, he is chiefly remembered for his self-imposed exile to the island of Iona off the Scottish coast. He landed at Iona on the eve of Pentecost, and proceeded to found a monastery and school from which he and his disciples preached the gospel throughout Scotland. Although he had been forbidden to see his native country again, he returned several years later. More… Discuss

04/06/2015 Santa Misa del Corpus Christi presidida por el Santo Padre Papa Francisco


 

04/06/2015 Santa Misa del Corpus Christi presidida por el Santo Padre Papa Francisco

make music part of your life series: , Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III



O. Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III.

***************************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

English: Ottorino Respighi, photography by Mad...

English: Ottorino Respighi, photography by Madeline Grimoldi at 1935 Deutsch: Ottorino Respighi, Fotografie von Madeline Grimoldi um 1935 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2013)

Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 3 (1932)

Suite No. 3 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

  1. Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  2. Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec.XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)
  3. Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  4. Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)

Is your health yours, or in the hands of the unregulated food industry? BPA messes with your hormones—and it’s in these canned foods— Mother Jones (@MotherJones)


make music part of your llife series: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet – Fantasy Overture


today’s holiday: South Korea Memorial Day


South Korea Memorial Day

South Korea (officially the Republic of Korea) has designated June 6 as a national holiday to honor soldiers and civilians who sacrificed their lives for their country during the Korean War, 1950-1953. The main ceremony of remembrance is held at the National Cemetery in the capital city, Seoul. Throughout the country, officials and citizens pray and lay flowers at the graves of the war dead. Citizens display the flag of South Korea, which is called Tae-guk-gi, on the front doors of their homes to commemorate the civilians and soldiers who died in war. More… Discuss

poetry: Aleksandr Pushkin: The Bronze Horseman A Petersburg Story 1833


 

Aleksandr Pushkin

Aleksandr Pushkin

The Bronze Horseman

A Petersburg Story

1833INTRODUCTION

The incident, described in this story is based on a truth.
The details of the flood are taken from the contemporary magazines.
The curious ones can consult the record, prepared by V. I. Berkh.

PROLOGUE

On a deserted, wave-swept shore,
He stood – in his mind great thoughts grow –
And gazed afar. The northern river
Sped on its wide course him before;
One humble skiff cut the waves’ silver.
On banks of mosses and wet grass
Black huts were dotted there by chance –
The miserable Finn’s abode;
The wood unknown to the rays
Of the dull sun, by clouds stowed,
Hummed all around. And he thought so:
‘The Swede from here will be frightened;
Here a great city will be wrought
To spite our neighborhood conceited.
From here by Nature we’re destined
To cut a door to Europe wide,
To step with a strong foot by waters.
Here, by the new for them sea-paths,
Ships of all flags will come to us –
And on all seas our great feast opens.’ 

An age passed, and the young stronghold,
The charm and sight of northern nations,
From the woods’ dark and marshes’ cold,
Rose the proud one and precious.
Where once the Finnish fisherman,
Sad stepson of the World, alone,
By low riverbanks’ a sand,
Cast into waters, never known,
His ancient net, now on the place,
Along the full of people banks,
Cluster the tall and graceful masses
Of castles and palaces; and sails
Hasten in throng to the rich quays
From all the lands our planet masters;
The Neva-river’s dressed with rocks;
Bridges hang o’er the waters proud;
Abundantly her isles are covered
With dark-green gardens’ gorgeous locks… 

By the new capital, the younger,
Old Moscow’s eclipsed at once -
Such is eclipsed a queen-dowager
By a new queen when her time comes.
I love you, Peter’s great creation,
I love your view of stern and grace, 
The Neva wave’s regal procession,
The grayish granite – her bank’s dress,
The airy iron-casting fences,
The gentle transparent twilight,
The moonless gleam of your nights restless,
When I so easy read and write
Without a lamp in my room lone,
And seen is each huge buildings’ stone
Of the left streets, and is so bright 
The Admiralty spire’s flight,
And when, not letting the night’s darkness
To reach the golden heaven’s height,
The dawn after the sunset hastens –
And a half-hour’s for the night.
I love your so sever winter’s 
Quite still and fresh air and strong frost, 
The sleighs race on the shores river’s,
The girls – each brighter than a rose,
The gleam and hum of the balls’ dances,
And, on the bachelors’ free feast,
The hissing of the foaming glasses
And the punch’s bluish flaming mist.
I love the warlike animation
Of the play-fields of the god Mars,
And horse-and-footmen priests’ of wars 
So homogeneous attraction,
In their ranks, in the rhythmic moves,
Those flags, victories and rended,
The glitter of those helmets, splendid,
Shot through in military strives.
I love, O capital my fairest,
Your stronghold guns’ thunder and smoke,
In moments when the northern empress
Adds brunches to the regal oak
Or Russia lauds a winning stroke
To any new and daring foe,
Or, breaking up the light-blue ice,
The Neva streams it and exults,
Scenting the end of cold and snow.

City of Peter, just you shine
And stand unshakable as Russia!
May make a peace with beauty, thine,
The conquered nature’s casual rushes;
And let the Finnish waves forget
Their ancient bondages and malice
And not disturb with their hate senseless
The endless sleep of Peter, great!

The awful period was that,
It’s fresh in our recollection…
This time about, my dear friend,
I am beginning my narration.
My story will be very sad.


PART ONE

On Petrograd, sunk into darkness,
November breathed with fall cold’s harshness.
And, splashing, with the noisy waves
Into the brims of her trim fences,
The Neva raved, like the seek raves
In a bed, that has become the restless.
Now it was very dark and late;
The rain stroke ‘gainst the window’s flat.
And the wind blew with sadly wailing.
Right at this time, from being a guest
Evgeny, for his nightly rest,
Came home. This name was most prevailing
In our young hero’s name choice.
It sounds pleasantly. Of course,
With it my pen’s had long connections
It needn’t the special commendations,
Though in the times, in Lithe gone,
It might have been the most attractive
And under Karamzin’s pen, fine,
Sung in some legends, our native;
But now it is forgotten by 
The world and rumors. Our guy
Lives in Kolomna: he’s in service,
Avoids the rich ones, and ne’er sad is
For his kin which had left the world,
Or for the well-forgotten old.

So, he is home – our Evgeny,
Took off his greatcoat, undressed,
Lay in his poor bed, but oppressed 
He was by his thoughts, so many.
What did he thought of? Well, of that
That he was poor and that his bread, 
His honour and his independence
Just by hard work must be achieved, 
That God should send to him from heavens
More mind and money. That do live 
Such idle, fully happy creatures –
The lazy-bones, quite ludicrous,.
Whose life is absolutely light!
That he had served for two long years;
And that the weather, former fierce,
Hadn’t come less fierce, that the flood
In the Neva is getting higher,
The bridges might be got entire,
And that his sweet Parasha’s place
For two-free days wouldn’t be accessed.
There sighed Evgeny with his soul,
And dreamed as dreams a real bard:

“To marry then? Of course it’s hard. 
But why don’t marry, in a whole?
I’m of the young and healthy sight,
Ready to work for day and night;
I’ll someway find the good repose,
The simple and shy place, at last,
Parasha will be there composed. 
The year or, may be, two will pass –
I’m in position, to my dear 
I’ll give all family to bear
And bring our children up, at once...
Such we’ll start life, at last repose,
With hand-in-hand, such we’ll come both,
And our grandsons will bury us...” 

Thus he did dream. And a great sadness
Embraced his soul in that night,
He wished the wind’s weep to be lesser,
Rain’s siege of windows – not so tight.
At last his sleepy eyes were closed...
And now the night is getting gray –
That night, so nasty and morose, 
And it is coming – the pale day
The awful day! During the night
Neva had strived for sea ‘gainst tempests
But, having lost all her great battles,
The river ceased the useless fight…
And in the morn on her shores proud,
Stood people in a pressed in lot
And saw the tall and heard the loud 
Fierce waters’ mountains, it had brought.
But by the force of airy breathing
Blocked from the Gulf, the wide Neva
Came back – the wrathful one and seething -
And flooded islands, near and far;
The weather grew into the cruel,
Neva – more swelling and more brutal,
Like in a kettle boiled and steamed,
And then, as a wild creature seemed,
Jumped on the city. And before it,
All ran away from its strait path,
And all got emptied there; at once.
The waters flew into the cellars,
And raised up to the fence of canals –
And, like Triton, Petropol sails
Sunk in the water till his waist. 

Siege and assault! The evil waters
Thrust into windows, like slaughters.
The mad boats row into a glass.
The stalls are under the wet mass.
The wrecks of huts, the logs, roofs’ pieces,
The stores of the tread, auspicious,
The things, carried the pale want from,
The bridges got away by storm,
The coffins from the graveyards - float,
Along the streets!
                               The populace
Sees God’s great wrath and waits for death.
All is destroyed: bread and abode.
And how to live?
                           The monarch, blessed, 
Tsar Aleksandr, in a good fashion,
Still governed Russia that year, dread,
And from the balcony he, sad 
And pale, said: “Ne’er the God-made nature
Can be subdued by any tsars.”
And, in a thought, looked at the evil’s 
With his full of deep sadness eyes.
The streets turned into the fast rivers,
Running to made lakes, dark and grievous,
The Palace was an island, sad,
That loomed over the blackened waters.
The Tsar decreed – from end to end,
Down the shortest streets and longest,
On danger routs over the waves,
His generals set into the sailing –
To save the drawing and straining
On streets and in their homes-graves.

Then on the widest Square of Peter,
Where with his glass a new pile glittered,
Where on its porch, too highly placed,
With their paw raised, as if they’re living,
Stood two marble lions, overseeing.
On one of them, as for a race,
Without his hat, arms – tightly pressed,
Awfully pale – no stir appeared –
Evgeny sat. And there he feared
Not his own death. He did not hear
How the wrathful roller neared,
Greedily licking his shoes’ soles,
And how flagged him the rain coarse,
And how the fierce wind there wailed,
Or how it’d blown off his hat.
His looks of deepest desperation
Were all set on a single place
Without a move. The waves, impatient, 
Had risen there, like tallest crags,
Lifted from waked deeps in a madness,
There wreckage swam, there wailed a tempest …
O, God! O, God! – Right on that place,
Alas! so close to the waves,
And by the shores of the Gulf Finnish,
A willow-tree, a fence unfinished
And an old hut: there they must be –
A widow and her child Parasha –
His soul’s dream … Or does he see
It in a dream? … And, like the usher 
Of dreams – a sleep, is our life none –
Just Heavens make of Earth a fun?  

And he, like under conjuration,
Like in jail irons’ limitation,
Cannot come down. Him around
Only black waters could be found!
And turned to him with his back, proudest,
On height that never might be tossed,
Over Neva’s unending wildness,
Stands, with his arm, stretched to skies, lightless, 
The idol on his brazen horse. 


PART TWO

But now, sated with distraction
And tired of its rude attack,
Neva, at last, was coming back,
Looking at ruins with satisfaction
And leaving with a little attention
Its prey behind. A reprobate,
With his sever and low set,
Thus, thrusting in a village, helpless,
Breaks, slaughters, robs all and oppresses:
The roar, rape, swore, alert and wails!...
And, under their large booty posted,
Afraid of chases and exhausted,
The robbers speed to their old place,
Losing their loot along the road.

The waves were gone, the pavement, broad,
Was opened, and Evgeny, stressed, 
With heart half-dead and stifled throat,
In a hope, fear and awful pains,
Runs to the stream, just now restrained.
But, in the winning celebration,
Waves still were boiling with a passion,
As if to flames, under them fanned;
They still were with white foam covered,
And Neva’s breast was heavily moved,
Like the steed’s one after a race.
Evgeny sees a boat here;
He runs to it – a find, revered, –
He calls a boatman at once –
The boatman, a guy quite careless,
Just for ten kopeks, with great gladness,
Takes him into the waves’ wild dance.

And for a long with these waves, close,
The much trained rower was in fight,
And to sink deeply mid their rows,
The scuff, with its brave sailors both,
Was apt all time… The other side
Is reached, at last. And the frustrated
Runs through the so well-known street
To his old places. He doesn’t meet
A thing, he’d known. The view’s rated
As the worst one! All’s in a mess –
All is failed down or swept or stressed:
The little houses are bent down,
Some – shifted, some – razed to their ground
By awful forces of the waves;
The bodies, waiting for their graves,
Are lying round, like aft fight, merciless.
Our poor Evgeny – his mind’s flamed – 
Half-dead under the tortures, endless,
Runs there where the inhumane fate
Would give him the unknown message,
As if a letter, sealed to bear;
He’s now in the suburbs’ wreckage,
There is the Gulf, the house is near… 
But what is this? He stopped, frustrated,
Went back, returned a little later…
He looks… he walks … he looks once more.
There is the place their house for
And willow-tree. The gates were here –
They’re swept… But where’s the house, o grace? 
And full of troubles, hard to wear,
He walked and walked around the place. 
Told to himself in voices loud –
And suddenly, as if all’s found,
Struck his forehead and fell in laugh.
The night embraced the city, stuffed
With all its woe. And still for hours
A sleep was running from each house –
The folk recalling the past day.
Now, through the clouds, weak and pale,
The morn ray flashed o’er the mute city
And did not found e’en a trace
Of the past woe. The dawn, witty,
Had safely screened the doing, base.
The former life had got its place.
Along the streets now free of flooding,
With cold indifference, folks are moving.
Just having left his lodge of night,
The clerk is going at his site.
The petty tradesman, very dauntless, 
Is opening his cellar – wet, 
Robbed by the waves’ impudent set –
Intending to revenge his losses
On brothers-humans. From the yard
Is pulled the boat, full of mud.
Count Khvostov, a pet of Zeus,
Now is singing his songs, deathless,
To the Neva shores’ former plight.

What’s of Evgeny, our poor hero? …
Alas! His agitated mind,
Against the immense woe’s billow
Didn’t stand untouchable. The wind’s
And Neva’s noise was always growing 
In his poor ears. Mute and half-blind,
With awful thoughts, he was a-roaming, 
Being quite tortured by some dream.
A week, month passed by as a stream,
At his past home he wasn’t returning
And his landlord, when the rent’s time
Had gone, gave his corner to some
Bard, sunk in a poverty unduly.
Evgeny didn’t come for his stuff
And soon became a stranger, fully,
To world: his day wasn’t long enough
For walk; he slept on wharfs till morning
His bread was one a beggar has,
He wore the dirt and rotten dress.
The evil children, with cries joyful, 
Sometimes threw stones to his back,
Often the coachmen’ whips, wrathful,
Stung his thin body – for his track
Was cast without choosing direction –
He seemed to notice nothing else –
He was quiet deafened and oppressed
By noise of inner agitation. 
And thus he strayed in his life’s mist – 
Not humane being, nor some beast –
Not fish, nor flesh – not living creature,
Nor ghost of dead … But once he slept 
By Neva’s wharf – the summer’s features
Were now like autumn’s. The wind, bad,
Was breathing there. The roller, sad,
Was splashing its complain and groan
And striking ‘gainst the steps of stone,
Like the offended at the door
Of justice that doesn’t hear him more.
The poor waked up. All was gloom round:
Falling the rain, wind wailing loud,
And it was answered through the night
By some alone distant guard...
Evgeny got up in a hurry, 
He recollected his all flurry,
Stood on a spot, began to walk 
And stopped again, almost choked, 
Intently gazing him around
With a wild terror on his face... 
It seemed that he himself had found
By a big house where were placed,
With their paw up, as if quite living,
Two marble lions, overseeing,
And in the height, strait o’er him posed,
Over the rock, fenced with cast iron, 
With arm stretched into the skies, sullen, 
The idol sat on his bronze horse.

Evgeny startled. Became clear
The strange thoughts, torturing his mind –
He named the place where played the flood,
Where ran the waters-spoilers, fierce, – 
Merging in one rebellious stream, –
The lions, square and, at last, him,
Who stood without a move and sound –
The cooper head piercing black skies –
Him, by whose fatal enterprise
This city under sea took ground...
He’s awful in the nightly dark!
In what a thought his brow’s sunk!
What a great might in it lies, hidden!
And what a fire’s in this steed!
O, proud horse, where do you speed!
Where will you down your bronze hoofs, flittin’?
O, karma’s mighty sovereign!
Not thus you’d reared Russia, sullen,
Into the height, with a curb, iron,
Before an abyss in your reign?

The poor madman circled around
The foot of the black idol’s mass,
He gazed into the brazen face 
Of the half-planet’s ruler, proud.
And was his breast oppressed. He laid
On the cold barrier his forehead.
His eyes were veiled with a mist-cover,
His heart was all caught with a flame,
His blood seethed. Gloomy he became
Before the idol, looming over, 
And, having clenched his teeth and fist,
As if possessed by evil powers,
“Well, builder-maker of the marvels,”
He whispered, trembling in a fit,
“You only wait!...”- And to a street,
At once he started to run out –
He fancied: that the great tsar’s face,
With a wrath suddenly embraced,
Was turning slowly around...
And strait along the empty square
He runs and hears as if there were,
Just behind him, the peals of thunder,
Of the hard-ringing hoofs’ reminders, –
A race the empty square across,
Upon the pavement, fiercely tossed;
And by the moon, that palled lighter,
Having stretched his hand over roofs,
The Brazen Horseman rides him after –
On his steed of the ringing hoofs.
And all the night the madman, poor,
Where’er he might direct his steps,
Aft him the Bronze Horseman, for sure,
Keeps on the heavy-treading race.

And from this time, when he was going,
Along this square, only by chance,
A sense of terror was deforming 
His features. And he would then press
His hand to heart in a great fastness,
As if to make its tortures painless,
Take off the worn peaked cap at once,
Didn’t turn from earth his fearful eyes
And try to pass by.
                                  A small island’s
Seen in the sea quite near a shore.
A fisherman, the late catch for,
Would sail to it with his net, silent,
Sometimes – and boil there his soup, poor;
Or an official clerk would moor
To it in a boat-walking Sunday’s.
The empty isle. Seeds don’t beget
There any plant. A player, sightless,
The flood, had pulled there a ghost, sad, 
Of an old hut. The water over,
It had been left like a bush, black.
Last spring, by a small barging rover,
It was conveyed to the shore, back –
Destroyed and empty. By its entry,
They’d found the poor madman of mine
And, for a sake of the Divine, 
Buried his corpse in that soil, scanty. 


Translated by Yevgeny Bonver, March, 2004 - March, 2005
© Copyright, poetryloverspage.com, 2004-2005

today’s birthday: Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin (1799)


Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin (1799)

Among the giants of Russian literature, Pushkin was a poet and writer whose masterpieces include the poem The Bronze Horseman, the drama The Stone Guest, and his verse novel Eugene Onegin, which contains witty descriptions of 19th-century Russian society. Pushkin established the modern poetic language of Russia, using Russian history for the basis of many works, but his career was cut short when he died after a duel with a young Frenchman. How old was he when he died? More… Discuss

The Cloister of Pater Noster – Jerusalem


JPN-pater-l

(Click to access site)

Tatal Nostru (Convent of Pater Noster - Ierusalim)

NEW AT EUZICASA: Widget Christusrex.org (visit the Convent of Pater Noster)


Convent of Pater Noster
Visit:  http://www.christusrex.org/www1/icons/index.html

Dominus Vobiscum! Pater Noster ( Chant Catholique )



Pater Noster ( Chant Catholique )


Pater noster, qui es in caelis

sanctificetur nomen tuum
adveniat regnum tuum
fiat voluntas tua
sicut in caelo et in terra.

Panem nostrum quotidianum
da nobis hodie
et dimitte nobis debita nostra
sicut et nos dimittimus
debitoribus nostris
et ne nos inducas in tentationem
sed libera nos a malo.

Amen.

 

Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe


Vatican Radio:  Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe

Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe (click to access site)

(Vatican Radio)  The annual meeting of the Eastern Catholic hierarchs  of Europe is taking place in Prague- Břevnov (Czech Republic), at the invitation of Mgr Ladislav Hučko, Apostolic Exarch for Byzantine Rite Catholics resident in the Czech Republic. The meeting will take place at the Benedictine Archabbey of St Adalbert and St Margaret (Břevnov).

In Břevnov, the bishops representing 14 Eastern Catholic Churches in Europe are discussing issues concerning the family in Europe and the role and mission of the Eastern Catholic Churches.  The discussions are taking place with a view, too, to the upcoming Ordinary Synod of Bishops on the Family this coming October. Participants at the meeting are examining two reports: one on The contemporary family in Europe by Deacon Jaroslav Max Kašparů, a well-known lecturer in the Czech Republic; and one on the “sacramental potential” of the family by Fr Volodymyr Los, a priest of the Greek-Catholic Church diocese of Buchach, Ukraine.

Mgr Ladislav Hučko was expected to illustrate the situation and mission of the Greek-Catholic Church in the Czech Republic.

The meeting will end on Sunday 7 June with the celebration of the Divine Liturgy along with the local community in the Greek-Catholic Cathedral of St Clement.

Participants at the meeting, organised by the Council of European Episcopal Conferences (CCEE), include Mgr Cyril Vasil’, Archbishop Secretary of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches, and Mgr Duarte da Cunha, CCEE General Secretary.

Just a thought: “Nobody knows best what’s in the soul of a artist but the artist himself:…”


George Bost

commented on a video on YouTube.

Shared publicly  –  Jan 14, 2015

 

Just a thought: “Nobody knows best what’s in the soul of a artist but the artist himself:  The audience is captive to the guessing,,even when everything is all exposed, there and then. I am impressed! I too am all I can be: captive (rather captivated!) audience!”

-George-B

#NationalDonutFreeDay: Celebrate your new found health, by eating healthier! Create your health culture!


 

#NationalDonutFreeDay: Celebrate your new found health, by eating healthier! Create your health culture!Screenshot_2