Category Archives: PEOPLE AND PLACES HISTORY

Quote: Chang Jian (708-763)


Quote:  Chang Jian (708-763)

Quote: Chang Jian (708-763)

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Watch “The Traitor_Martha Wainwright_Leonard Cohen_I’m Your Man_720HD-022711.avi” on YouTube


Play “The Traitor”

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Now the Swan it floated on the English river
Ah the Rose of High Romance it opened wide
A sun tanned woman yearned me through the summer
And the judges watched us from the other side

I told my mother “Mother I must leave you
Preserve my room but do not shed a tear
Should rumour of a shabby ending reach you
It was half my fault and half the atmosphere”

But the Rose I sickened with a scarlet fever
And the Swan I tempted with a sense of shame
She said at last I was her finest lover
And if she withered I would be to blame

The judges said you missed it by a fraction
Rise up and brace your troops for the attack
Ah the dreamers ride against the men of action
Oh see the men of action falling back

But I lingered on her thighs a fatal moment
I kissed her lips as though I thirsted still
My falsity had stung me like a hornet
The poison sank and it paralyzed my will

I could not move to warn all the younger soldiers
That they had been deserted from above
So on battlefields from here to Barcelona
I’m listed with the enemies of love

And long ago she said “I must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that Rose and wind the Swan”

So daily I renew my idle duty
I touch her here and there, I know my place
I kiss her open mouth and I praise her beauty
And people call me traitor to my face

GeorgeB

General Comment:

Well I guess, it is fundamentally positive, and for a long time I just amaze myself at the beauty of the methaphore, the idea of the world as a stage, as the scene of a quest, in which the spectators are the judges as well, then I heard Leonard Cohen’s explaantion of the line of thought that made him write the poem. It goes like this:

“It was called “The traitor”. It was about the feeling that we have of betraying some mission that we were mandated to fulfill, and being unable to fulfill it, and then coming to understand that the real mandate was not to fulfill it, and that the deeper courage was to stand guiltless in the predicament in which you found yourself”.

It talks about the unvoidable predicament of failure from without, and the only right posture when one’s faced with a situation in which one cannot but fail: standing guiltless, in the predicament in which you find yourself. I think that is positive: not blaming yourself for outcomes of which you could not fully control.

Rating: +1

No Replies

12 Years AgoWinters

General Comment:

  1. It seems to be about a man settling for someone who is not right for him rather than what his heart desires. He becomes an enemy of love, The Men of Action Falling back is the man too weak to take action and leave, following his heart. He has a relationship of physical love but not real love. He is a traitor to himself.

Rating: 0

No Replies

11 Years Agobhoover247

General Comment:

The rose is the womans genitals, the swan would be his. The line “run some wire through the rose and wind the swan” would be the woman asking him to have sex with her. He daily performs his “idle duty” but he doesn’t love her. He has become an “enemy of love” for betraying his true love.

Rating: 0

1 Reply

9 Years AgoRJSoftware

General Comment:

Damb, aint any Cohen song remotley happy?

Rating: 0

No Replies

9 Years AgoStrangerinme

General Comment:

And long ago she said “I must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that Rose and wind the Swan”

God what a punishment ( the cruelty of the victim is almost far more than of the criminal)
He betrayed her , she doesn’t love him no more but she keeps her body for him to have sex with while her soul is somewhere else …

Rating: 0

No Replies

6 Years AgoJohnnyBee

My Interpretation:

What the Traitor has betrayed is the ideal of love. His ‘scarlet fever’ is lust, but when it is satisfied by ‘lingering on her thighs’, the Traitor is shamed. He recognises that other young men go off to battle without high ideals and they too become ‘the enemies of love’.
Lovely metaphors – great Leonard Cohen.

Rating: 0

No Replies

4 Months Agoalerique

General Comment:

Please, note parallels with famous ‘O Rose Thou Art Sick’ by William Blake, with specific reference to Englishness to remove further doubts. This is widened reinterpretation of the famous poem from the worm’s point of view.

O Rose thou art sick.
The invisible worm,
That flies in the night
In the howling storm:

Has found out thy bed
Of crimson joy:
And his dark secret love
Does thy life destroy.

Rating: 0

Watch “Fischer/Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64/Myung Whun Chung/Festival de Saint Denis.” on YouTube


Violin Concerto (Mendelssohn
Felix Mendelssohn’s Violin Concertoin E minor, Op. 64, is his last large orchestral work. It forms an important part of the violin repertoire and is one of the most popular and most frequently performed violin concertosin history.[1][2][3] A typical performance lasts just under half an hour.
Violin Concertoby Felix Mendelssohn

Mendelssohn in 1846

KeyE minorCatalogueOp. 64Year1844PeriodRomanticGenreConcertoComposed1838–1844Movements3ScoringViolin and orchestraPremiereDate13 March 1845LocationLeipzig
Mendelssohn originally proposed the idea of the violin concerto to Ferdinand David, a close friend and then concertmaster of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. Although conceived in 1838, the work took another six years to complete and was not premiered until 1845. During this time, Mendelssohn maintained a regular correspondence with David, who gave him many suggestions. The work itself was one of the foremost violin concertos of the Romantic era and was influential on many other composers.

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THOUGHT: C J.YUNG


THOUGHT: C J.YUNG

THOUGHT: C J.YUNG

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“Monday’s Prospects” (my virtual graphic arts work)


“Monday’s Prospects” (my virtual graphic arts work)

Monday’s Prospects

Thoughts of Wisdom: Givers Have To Learn to Set Limits…


Thoughts of Wisdom: Givers Have To Learn to Set Limits...

Thoughts of Wisdom: Givers Have To Learn to Set Limits…

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Thoughts of Wisdom: Forgive them, even when they are not sorry…


Thoughts of Wisdom:  Forgive them, even when they are not sorry...

Thoughts of Wisdom: Forgive them, even when they are not sorry…

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Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark…


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Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark…


Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark...

Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark…

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Watch “”The Rain in Spain” – Rex Harrison, Wilfrid Hyde-White and Audrey Hepburn, 1964″ on YouTube


Watch “Hugh Laurie – Saint James Infirmary (Let Them Talk, A Celebration of New Orleans Blues)” on YouTube


It was down by old Joe’s barroom, on the corner of the square
They were serving drinks as usual, and the usual crowd was there
On my left stood Big Joe McKennedy, and his eyes were bloodshot red
And he turned his face to the people, these were the very words he said
I was down to St. James infirmary, I saw my baby there
She was stretched out on a long white table,
So sweet, cool and so fair
Let her go, let her go, God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this whole wide world over
Never find a sweeter man as me
When I die please bury me in my high top Stetson hat
Put a twenty dollar gold piece on my watch chain
The gang’ll know I died standing pat
Let her go, let her go God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this wide world over
Never find a sweeter man as me
I want six crapshooters to be my pallbearers
Three pretty women to sing a song
Stick a jazz band on my hearse wagon
Raise hell as I stroll along
Let her go Let her go
God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this whole wide
World over
She’ll never find a sweeter
Man as me
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Joe Primrose / Irving Mills
St. James Infirmary lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, Downtown Music Publishing, Spirit Music Group, BMG Rights

St. James Infirmary Blues

“St. James Infirmary” on tenor sax

St. James Infirmary Blues” is an American jazz song of uncertain origin. Louis Armstrong made the song famous in his 1928 recording on which Don Redman was credited as composer; later releases gave the name Joe Primrose, a pseudonym of Irving Mills. The melody is 8 bars long, unlike songs in the classic blues genre, where there are 12 bars. It is in a minor key, and has a 4/4 time signature, but has also been played in 3/4.

Authorship and historyEdit

“St. James Infirmary Blues”, sometimes known as “Gambler’s Blues”, is often regarded as an American folk song of anonymous origin. Moore and Baxter published a version of “Gambler’s Blues” in 1925.[1]In 1927, Carl Sandburg published a book called The American Songbagwhich contained lyrics for two versions of a song called “Those Gambler’s Blues”.[2] However, the song “St. James Infirmary Blues” is sometimes credited to the songwriter Joe Primrose (a pseudonym for Irving Mills), who held copyrights for several versions of the song, registering the first in 1929. He claimed the rights to this specific title and won a case in the U.S. Supreme Court on this basis, the defendants having failed to produce the documentary evidence required by the court that the song had been known by that name for some years.[1]

“St. James Infirmary Blues” is sometimes said to be based on an eighteenth-century traditional folk song called “The Unfortunate Rake” (also known as “The Unfortunate Lad” or “The Young Man Cut Down in His Prime”) about a soldier who uses his money on prostitutes and then dies of venereal disease. But the familiar recorded versions (such as Armstrong’s) bear little relation to the older traditional song. The earliest known form of this song was called “The Buck’s Elegy” and is set in Covent Garden, London.[3]

According to Robert W. Harwood, A. L. Lloyd was the first person to connect “St. James Infirmary” with “The Unfortunate Lad/Rake”.[1]:36 Harwood refers to a five-page article by Lloyd in the January 1947 issue of the English music magazine Keynote.[4] In 1956, Lloyd published a revised version of this article in Sing magazine.[5] In both articles Lloyd refers to an English broadside song entitled “The Unfortunate Lad”, commenting that the song is sometimes known as “The Unfortunate Rake”. No date or source for the latter title is given. The opening line of this version of the song refers to the “lock hospital”, not to an institution named St James. The term “lock hospital” was the name of an institution in Southwark, London, where lepers were isolated and treated. The lock in Southwark was used for those suffering from venereal diseases. The longer term came into use as a generic term for a hospital treating venereal diseases. Its first recorded use is 1770.

Lloyd claims that a song collected by Cecil Sharp in the Appalachians in 1918 which contains the words “St James Hospital” is the parent song and that it looks like an elder relative of “The Dying Cowboy”. The opening of that song, as quoted by Lloyd, is:

As I went down by St James Hospital one morning,
So early one morning, it was early one day,
I found my son, my own son,
Wrapped up in white linen, as cold as the clay.

He also claims that this Appalachian version derives in turn from the version published by Such in London in the 1850s which refers to a lock hospital. The opening verse of this song, entitled “The Unfortunate Lad”, is:

As I was walking down by the Lock Hospital,
As I was walking one morning of late,
Who did I spy but my own dear comrade,
Wrapp’d up in flannel, so hard was his fate.

Lloyd’s articles comment on the jazz hit “St. James Infirmary Blues”. The first article asserts that “the song is, or was before it became corrupted, a narrative ballad. Such ballads are rare in Negro song…So doubts are raised about whether ‘St. James Infirmary’ began life as a Negro song”.[4]:10 The second article includes the following comment on the song: “Most versions of ‘Infirmary’ include a number of stanzas from other songs, grafted on to the main stem – a confusion especially common with songs current among Negroes. The curious switchover from the actual death of the girl to the hypothetical death of the gambler creates some ambiguity too”.[5]:19 Lloyd points out that in some early variants of “The Unfortunate Rake” the sex of the victim of venereal disease was female. “We realise that the confusion in the ‘Infirmary’, where the dead person is a woman but the funeral is ordered for a man, is surely due to the fact that the original ballad was commonly recorded in a form in which the sexes were reversed, so singers were often in two minds whether they were singing of a rakish man or a bad girl”.[5]:21

Lloyd’s second article is cited as a reference by Kenneth Goldstein in his liner notes for a 1960 Folkways LP called The Unfortunate Rake. These liner notes are often used as a source for the history of “St. James Infirmary Blues”. One example is an article by Rob Walker.[6] The liner notes raise the question of whether St. James’ Hospital was a real place and, if so, where it was. Goldstein claimed in the notes that “St. James” refers to London’s St. James Hospital, a religious foundation for the treatment of leprosy. His references list an article by Kenneth Lodewick. That article states, giving no reference or source for the idea, that the phrase “St. James Hospital” refers to a hospital of that name in London.[7]There is some difficulty in this because the hospital in question closed in 1532 when Henry VIIIacquired the land to build St James’s Palace.[8]

Another possibility suggested by Higginbotham on the basis of his claim that the song “St. James Infirmary” dates at least from the early nineteenth century, is the Infirmary section of the St James Workhousewhich the St. James Parish opened in 1725 on Poland Street, Piccadilly, and which continued well into the nineteenth century.[9] This St. James Infirmary was contemporaneous with the estimated advent of the song “The Unfortunate Lad”, but it is not the London Lock Hospital. Another difficulty is that, out of the early versions of the song mentioned in the references given by Goldstein, only the one collected by Cecil Sharp in the Appalachians in 1918, and one found in Canada in the 1920s, make use of the phrase “St. James”.

The liner notes link the Rake to an early fragment called “My Jewel, My Joy”, stating that it was heard in Dublin. The same statement appears in the Lodewick article referenced in those notes[7] The notes given in the source cited for this fragment, a collection of songs collected by William Forde and published by P. W. Joyce, state that the song was heard in Cork, not Dublin.[10]

The version of the “Unfortunate Rake” on the LP of that name is sung by Lloyd, of whom it has been said that he “sometimes modified lyrics or melodies to make the songs more palatable for contemporary listeners”,[1]:38 and its first verse is as follows:

As I was a-walking down by St. James Hospital,
I was a-walking down by there one day.
What should I spy but one of my comrades
All wrapped up in a flannel though warm was the day.[a]

The liner notes[11] state that Lloyd is singing a nineteenth century broadside version, but do not specify which. The Lloyd article cited in the references given in the liner notes,[5]refers to a version published by Such and to no other version. The title and words sung by Lloyd are not those of the Such broadside[12] which has no reference to St. James and is not called “The Unfortunate Rake”. Lloyd recorded a slightly different version in 1966, this time calling the song “St James Hospital”.[13] In 1967, his book Folk Song in England was published.[14] This includes some comment on the song, claims without any supporting references or information that a Czech version pre-dates the British ones, repeats the confusion between Dublin and Cork as the place where the “My Jewel My Joy” fragment had been heard, and includes an unattributed quotation of two verses that differ from the versions sung by Lloyd.

Variations typically feature a narrator telling the story of a young man “cut down in his prime” (occasionally, a young woman “cut down in her prime”) as a result of morally questionable behaviour. For example, when the song moved to America, gambling and alcohol became common causes of the youth’s death.[15]

There are numerous versions of the song throughout the English-speaking world. For example, it evolved into other American standards such as “The Streets of Laredo“.[16]

The song, “Dyin’ Crapshooter’s Blues”, has sometimes been described as a descendant of “The Unfortunate Rake”, and thus related to “St. James Infirmary Blues”. This song was issued as a record four times in 1927, and attributed to pianist, arranger, and band-leader Porter Grainger.[17] Blind Willie McTell recorded a version of the former for John Lomax in 1940 and claimed to have begun writing the song around 1929.

Gottlieb considered whether there were Jewish American influences through the use of the Ukrainian Dorian mode, but only found hints of this in a version published by Siegmeister and Downes.[18] He also suggests that there may have been Jewish influences on the rendition by Cab Calloway.[18]:211 A melody very similar to the Armstrong version can be found in an instrumental composition entitled “Charleston Cabin”, which was recorded by Whitey Kaufman’s Original Pennsylvania Serenaders in 1924 (three years before the earliest recording of “Gambler’s Blues”).[1]:39

As with many folk songs, there is much variation in the lyric from one version to another. These are the first two stanzas as sung by Louis Armstrong on a 1928 Odeon Records release:

I went down to St. James Infirmary,
Saw my baby there,
Stretched out on a long white table,
So cold, so sweet, so fair.

Let her go, let her go, God bless her,
Wherever she may be,
She can look this wide world over,
But she’ll never find a sweet man like me.

Some of the versions, such as the one published as “Gambler’s Blues” and attributed to Carl Moore and Phil Baxter, frame the story with an initial stanza or stanzas in which a separate narrator goes down to a saloon known as “Joe’s barroom” and encounters a customer who then relates the incident about the woman in the infirmary. Later verses commonly include the speaker’s request to be buried according to certain instructions, which vary according to the version.[19]

Other versionsEdit

Koko the clown (a rotoscopedCab Calloway) performing the song in the 1933 Betty Boopanimation Snow White

The song was first recorded (as “Gambler’s Blues”) in 1927 by Fess Williams and his Royal Flush Orchestra with credits given to Moore and Baxter.[1]:150This version mentions an infirmary but not by name. The song was popular during the jazz era, and by 1930 at least eighteen different versions had been released.[1]:30 The Duke Ellington Orchestra recorded the song using pseudonyms such as “The Ten Black Berries”, “The Harlem Hot Chocolates”, and “The Jungle Band”,[1]:19 while Cab Callowayperformed a version in the 1933 Betty Boop animated film Snow White, providing vocals and dance moves for Koko the clown.[20]

In 1961, Bobby “Blue” Bland released a version of “Saint James Infirmary” on the flip side of his No. 2 R&B hit “Don’t Cry No More” and included it in his album Two Steps from the Blues.[21][22]In 1967 the French-American singer Joe Dassin recorded the song. In 1968, Don Partridge released a version on his self-named album, as did Eric Burdon and the Animals on their album Every One of Us.[23]Dock Boggs recorded a version of the song entitled “Old Joe’s Barroom” (1965)[24]

The song was often performed by cabaret surrealists The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo in South California; the band’s vocalist and songwriter, Danny Elfman, often cited Cab Calloway as his inspiration in his youth. The White Stripes covered the song on their self-titled debut album, and Jack White says he and fellow band member, Meg White, were introduced to the song from a Betty Boop cartoon.[25] In 1981, Bob Dylan adapted the song when he wrote and recorded “Blind Willie McTell”. The song was written for his 1983 release, Infidels, but was not released until The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991 (Columbia, 1991).[26] In 2012, Trombone Shortyand Booker T. Jones performed an instrumental version as the opening number of the “Red, White, and Blues” concert at the White House.[27]

See alsoEdit

Watch “In the Upper Room” on YouTube


In the upper room with Jesus
Singing in tears blessed fears
Daily there my sins confessing
Beggin for his mercy sweet
Trusting his grace and power
Seeking help in loving prayers
It is this how I feel the spirit
And I sat with him and pray
Oh, he’s in in the upper room
With Jesus
Oh, it’s in the upper room
When my lord and your god
When he’s in the upper room
Yes, he’s in the upper room
Well he’s in the upper room
Talking with the Lord
Oh my, Hallelujah, Lord
He’s in the upper room
With Jesus
Oh, he’s in the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Yes, and your God
I know he’s in the upper room
It’s in the upper room
Lord, he’s in, yeah, the upper room
Talking with the Lord, oh yes
But Hallelujah
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room, Lord
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room, Lord
In the upper room
Yeah, in the upper room, Lord
In the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Oh, and your God
Hallelujah
It’s in the upper room
With Jesus
Oh, in the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Yes, and your God
You know I’m in the upper room, whoo
It’s in the upper room
Lord, he in the upper room
Talking with the Lord
Oh, yeah, yeah
Hallelujah
It’s in the upper room
With Jesus
Now I’m in the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Yes, and you God
You know I’m in the upper room
Yeah, I’m in the upper room
Lord, he’s in, in the upper room
Talking with my Lord, oh yeah
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Mahalia Jackson
In the Upper Room lyrics © Bess Music

Watch “Johnny Cash – Supper Time” on YouTube


Many years ago in days of childhood
I used to play till evenin’ shadows come
Then windin’ down that old familiar pathway
I’d hear my mother call at set of sun

Come home, come home it’s supper time
The shadows lengthen fast
Come home, come home it’s supper time
We’re going home at last

Some of the fondest memories of my childhood
Were woven around supper time
When my mother used to call
From the backsteps of the old homeplace
“Come on home now son, it’s supper time”

Ah, but I’d love to hear that once more
But you know for me time has woven the realization of
The truth that’s even more thrilling and that’s when
The call come up from the portals of glory
To come home, for it’s supper time

When all of God’s children
Shall gather around the table
Of the Lord himself
And the greatest supper time of them all

Come home, come home, it’s supper time
The shadows lengthen fast
Come home, come home, it’s supper time
We’re going home at last

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Ira F. Stanphill
Suppertime lyrics © Capitol Christian Music Group

From Wikipedia:

Supper Time

Supper Time” is a popular song written by Irving Berlin for the 1933 musical As Thousands Cheer, where it was introduced by Ethel Waters.

It is about a wife’s reaction to news of her husband’s lynching.[1]

Notable recordingsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lyrics of Supper Time at lyrics.astraweb.com

Watch “Green, Green Grass of Home (Live at Folsom State Prison, Folsom, CA – January 1968)” on YouTube



The old home town looks the same
As I step down from the train
And there to meet me is my Mama and Papa
Down the road I look and there runs Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries

It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
Yes, they’ll all come to meet me, arms reaching, smiling sweetly
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home

The old house is still standing tho’ the paint is cracked and dry
And there’s that old oak tree that I used to play on
Down the lane I walk with my sweet Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home

Then I awake and look around me
At four grey walls that surround me
And I realize, yes, I was only dreaming
For there’s a guard and there’s a sad old padre
Arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak
Again I touch the green, green grass of home

Yes, they’ll all come to see me
In the shade of that old oak tree
As they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Curly Putman
Green Green Grass Of Home lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Green, Green Grass of Home

Song written by Curly Putman


Green, Green Grass of Home“, written by Claude “Curly” Putman Jr. and first recorded by singer Johnny Darrell, is a country song originally made popular by Porter Wagoner in 1965, when it reached No. 4 on the country chart. That same year, it was sung by Bobby Bare and by Jerry Lee Lewis, who included it in his album Country Songs for City Folks (later re-issued as All Country). Tom Jones learned the song from Lewis’ version, and in 1966, he had a worldwide No. 1 hit with it.

Quick facts: Released, Genre
Quick facts: B-side, Released

Lyrics

A man returns to his childhood home; it seems that this is his first visit home since leaving in his youth. When he steps down from the train, his parents are there to greet him, and his beloved, Mary, comes running to join them. All is welcome and peace; all come to meet him with “arms reaching, smiling sweetly.” With Mary, the man strolls at ease among the monuments of his childhood, including “the old oak tree that I used to play on.” It is “good to touch the green, green grass of home.” Yet the music and the words are full of foreshadowing, strongly suggestive of mourning.

Abruptly, the man switches from song to speech as he awakens in prison: “Then I awake and look around me, at four grey walls that surround me. And I realize that I was only dreaming.” He is, indeed, on death row. As the singing resumes, we learn that the man is waking on the day of his scheduled execution (“there’s a guard, and there’s a sad old padre, arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak”), and he will return home only to be buried: “Yes, they’ll all come to see me in the shade of that old oak tree, as they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home.”

The Joan Baez version ends: “Yes, we’ll all be together in the shade of the old oak tree / When we meet beneath the green, green grass of home.”

Tom Jones version

Welsh singer Tom Jones, who was appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1965, visited Colony Records while staying in New York City. On asking if they had any new works by Jerry Lee Lewis, he was given the new country album.

Impressed with the song, Jones recorded and released the song in the UK in 1966 and it reached No. 1 on 1 December, staying there for a total of seven weeks. The song has sold over 1.25 million copies in the UK as of September 2017. Jones’ version also reached #11 pop, #12 easy listening on the Billboard US charts.

In February 2009, Jones performed the song live on a special Take-Away Show with Vincent Moon, along with “If He Should Ever Leave You” and “We Got Love“, live in front of a camera in a hotel room in New York.

In September 2006, Jones performed the song as a duet with Jerry Lee Lewis during the taping of the latter’s Last Man Standing TV special in New York City, and credited Lewis with providing the inspiration behind his own recording.

Jones sang the song on the 2009/10 edition of Jool’s Annual Hootenanny on 1 January 2010.

Chart performance

More information: Chart (1967), Peak position

Other versions

Since then it has been recorded by many other solo vocalists and groups including:

Watch “Green, Green Grass of Home (Live at Folsom State Prison, Folsom, CA – January 1968)” on YouTube


The old home town looks the same
As I step down from the train
And there to meet me is my Mama and Papa
Down the road I look and there runs Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
Yes, they’ll all come to meet me, arms reaching, smiling sweetly
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
The old house is still standing tho’ the paint is cracked and dry
And there’s that old oak tree that I used to play on
Down the lane I walk with my sweet Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
Then I awake and look around me
At four grey walls that surround me
And I realize, yes, I was only dreaming
For there’s a guard and there’s a sad old padre
Arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak
Again I touch the green, green grass of home
Yes, they’ll all come to see me
In the shade of that old oak tree
As they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home

From Wikipedia:

Green, Green Grass of Home

Song written by Curly Putman


Green, Green Grass of Home“, written by Claude “Curly” Putman Jr. and first recorded by singer Johnny Darrell, is a country song originally made popular by Porter Wagoner in 1965, when it reached No. 4 on the country chart. That same year, it was sung by Bobby Bare and by Jerry Lee Lewis, who included it in his album Country Songs for City Folks (later re-issued as All Country). Tom Jones learned the song from Lewis’ version, and in 1966, he had a worldwide No. 1 hit with it.

Quick facts: Released, Genre
Quick facts: B-side, Released

Lyrics

A man returns to his childhood home; it seems that this is his first visit home since leaving in his youth. When he steps down from the train, his parents are there to greet him, and his beloved, Mary, comes running to join them. All is welcome and peace; all come to meet him with “arms reaching, smiling sweetly.” With Mary, the man strolls at ease among the monuments of his childhood, including “the old oak tree that I used to play on.” It is “good to touch the green, green grass of home.” Yet the music and the words are full of foreshadowing, strongly suggestive of mourning.

Abruptly, the man switches from song to speech as he awakens in prison: “Then I awake and look around me, at four grey walls that surround me. And I realize that I was only dreaming.” He is, indeed, on death row. As the singing resumes, we learn that the man is waking on the day of his scheduled execution (“there’s a guard, and there’s a sad old padre, arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak”), and he will return home only to be buried: “Yes, they’ll all come to see me in the shade of that old oak tree, as they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home.”

The Joan Baez version ends: “Yes, we’ll all be together in the shade of the old oak tree / When we meet beneath the green, green grass of home.”

Tom Jones version

Welsh singer Tom Jones, who was appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1965, visited Colony Records while staying in New York City. On asking if they had any new works by Jerry Lee Lewis, he was given the new country album.

Impressed with the song, Jones recorded and released the song in the UK in 1966 and it reached No. 1 on 1 December, staying there for a total of seven weeks. The song has sold over 1.25 million copies in the UK as of September 2017. Jones’ version also reached #11 pop, #12 easy listening on the Billboard US charts.

In February 2009, Jones performed the song live on a special Take-Away Show with Vincent Moon, along with “If He Should Ever Leave You” and “We Got Love“, live in front of a camera in a hotel room in New York.

In September 2006, Jones performed the song as a duet with Jerry Lee Lewis during the taping of the latter’s Last Man Standing TV special in New York City, and credited Lewis with providing the inspiration behind his own recording.

Jones sang the song on the 2009/10 edition of Jool’s Annual Hootenanny on 1 January 2010.

Chart performance

More information: Chart (1967), Peak position

Other versions

Since then it has been recorded by many other solo vocalists and groups including:

Watch “The most Romantic Music by Antonin Dvorak. American Suite in A, opus 98b.” on YouTube


American Suite

The American Suite in A major (Czech: Suita A dur), Op. 98b, B. 190, is an orchestral suite written in 1894–1895 by Czech composer Antonín Dvořák.

BackgroundEdit

Dvořák initially wrote the Suite in A major for piano, Op. 98, B. 184, in New York between February 19 and March 1, 1894.[1] He orchestrated it in two parts more than a year after his return to the United States and immediately before his departure for Europe. The piano version was performed soon after its composition, but the orchestral version waited some years. The orchestral version of the American Suite was first played in concert in 1910 and not published until 1911, seven years after Dvořák’s death in 1904.

MovementsEdit

The suite is written in five movements, each with a marked rhythm:

  1. Andante con moto
  2. Allegro
  3. Moderato (alla pollacca)
  4. Andante
  5. Allegro

Analysis and receptionEdit

As often is the case with Dvořák, the orchestral version gives the work a new breadth. The cyclic aspects of Dvořák’s composition are apparent, in that the principal theme of the first movement recurs during the conclusion of the work. This opening theme is marked by his American-influenced style. It is difficult to determine whether it comes from the typical folk music of the New World or simply from the music of the Czech emigrants, to which the Dvořák liked to listen during his stay in the United States.

This mix of American influence with Slavic tradition is also perceptible in the rhythm of the “alla Polacca” third movement, and in the last movement’s themes native to the Far East, played by flute and oboe in unison, where the orchestra passes easily from the minor theme to the major one.

Far from any exoticism, the art of Dvořák’s orchestral work is in the field of pure music, and it is undoubtedly for this reason that Brahmsappreciated it. Even in New York, when Dvořák encouraged his pupils to work on their own folk melodies, it was authentic recreation of the popular folk musics that he called for.

Appearances in popular cultureEdit

Along with several other works by Dvořák (including some of the Slavonic Dances and the second movement of the New World Symphony), the first movement, Andante con moto is part of the sound track to Sid Meier’s Civilization IV. The allegro was used in the trailer for The Elder Scrolls II Daggerfall.

Watch “MY WAY (Frank Sinatra) LYRICS” on YouTube


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“My Way” lyrics

Frank Sinatra Lyrics

Play “My Way”

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“My Way”

And now, the end is near
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I’ll say it clear
I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain
I’ve lived a life that’s full
I traveled each and every highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

Regrets, I’ve had a few
But then again, too few to mention
I did what I had to do and saw it through without exemption
I planned each charted course, each careful step along the byway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

Yes, there were times, I’m sure you knew
When I bit off more than I could chew
But through it all, when there was doubt
I ate it up and spit it out
I faced it all and I stood tall and did it my way

I’ve loved, I’ve laughed and cried
I’ve had my fill, my share of losing
And now, as tears subside, I find it all so amusing
To think I did all that
And may I say, not in a shy way
Oh, no, oh, no, not me, I did it my way

For what is a man, what has he got?
If not himself, then he has naught
To say the things he truly feels and not the words of one who kneels
The record shows I took the blows and did it my way

[instrumental]

Yes, it was my way

Thanks to James Worman for correcting these lyrics.

Listen to music like Frank Sinatra

live near Downey

Writer(s): Paul Anka, Claude François
Paul Anka wrote the lyrics for this song based on a French song called “Comme d’habitude”, recorded by Claude Francois in 1967. Anka heard it in France and wrote “My Way” when he returned to New York. He gave it to Frank Sinatra, who recorded it on the 30th of December 1968.
Despite being the signature song for Frank Sinatra, he didn’t like it actually, and said in his later years about it as “a Paul Anka pop hit which became a kind of national anthem”.
In the UK, this song entered the charts six times between 1970-1971 becoming the song with the longest stay on the chart.
Elvis Presley performed “My Way” live in the end of his career. His live version of it was released as a single after his death in 1977.
The Sex Pistols recorded a Punk version of this track in 1979. Their version was used during

https://youtu.be/GME3fMeK5ts

Je me lèveEt je te bouscule
Tu ne te réveilles pas
  1. Comme d’habitude
    Sur toi je remonte le drap
    J’ai peur que tu aies froid
    Comme d’habitude
    Ma main caresse tes cheveux
    Presque malgré moi
    Comme d’habitude
    Mais toi tu me tournes le dos
    Comme d’habitude
    Alors je m’habille très vite
    Je sors de la chambre
    Comme d’habitude
    Tout seul je bois mon café
    Je suis en retard
    Comme d’habitude
    Sans bruit je quitte la maison
    Tout est gris dehors
    Comme d’habitude
    J’ai froid, je relève mon col
    Comme d’habitude
    Comme d’habitude
    Toute la journée
    Je vais jouer à faire semblant
    Comme d’habitude
    Je vais sourire
    Comme d’habitude
    Je vais même rire
    Comme d’habitude
    Enfin je vais vivre
    Comme d’habitude
    Et puis le jour s’en ira
    Moi je reviendrai
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu seras sortie
    Et pas encore rentrée
    Comme d’habitude
    Tout seul j’irai me coucher
    Dans ce grand lit froid
    Comme d’habitude
    Mes larmes, je les cacherai
    Comme d’habitude
    Comme d’habitude
    Même la nuit
    Je vais jouer à faire semblant
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu rentreras
    Comme d’habitude
    Je t’attendrai
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu me souriras
    Comme d’habitude
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu te déshabilleras
    Comme d’habitude
    Tu te coucheras
    Comme d’habitude
    On s’embrassera
    Comme d’habitude
    Translate to English
    Source: LyricFind
    Songwriters: Gilles Thibaut / Claude François / Jacques Revaux
    Comme D’Habitude lyrics © Warner Chappell Music France, Jeune Musique Editions

Watch “Strangers In The Night – Frank Sinatra (LYRICS/LETRA) [60s]” on YouTube


Frank Sinatra Lyrics

Listen to music like Frank Sinatra

live near Downey

“Something”

Something in the way she moves
Attracts me like no other lover
Something in the way that she woos me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

Somewhere in her smile she knows
I don’t need no other lover
Something in her style that shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

You’re asking me will my love grow
Well, I don’t know, no, I don’t know
You stick around, Jack, it might show
I don’t know, no, I don’t know

Something in the way she knows
All I gotta do is just think of her
Something in the things that she shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

[instrumental]

You’re asking me will my love grow
I don’t know, no, I don’t know
But you hang around, Jack, it might show
I don’t know, no, I don’t know

Something in the way she knows me
And all I gotta do is just think of her
Something in those things that she shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

Mm, mm, mm, mm, mm, mm

I don’t plan to leave her now

Thank You: to all followers of euzicasa! I promise all and each and everyone of you a great time while visiting this website!


Thank You: to all followers of euzicasa! I promise all and each and everyone of you a great time while  visiting this website!

Thank You: to all followers of euzicasa! I promise all and each and everyone of you a great time while visiting this website!

daniel barenboim | euzicasa


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Watch “Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb (1963 / 1964) Full Movie” on YouTube


ROBERT RAJCZAKOWSKI: Renaissance Art and Architecture


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Calligraphy: Daruma Museum Gallery


https://darumamuseumgallery.blogspot.com/2007/07/calligraphy.html?m=1

Calligraphy


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]

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Daruma Pilgrims Gallery

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Calligraphy , shodoo 書道 Shodo

The Way of the Brush


Child prodigy Minamoto no Shigeyuki executing calligraphy

源成之の席書

Torii Kiyonaga (1752–1815)

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
East Asian calligraphy

Asian calligraphy typically uses ink brushes to write Chinese characters
(called Hanzi in Chinese, Hanja in Korean, Kanji in Japanese, and Hán
Tu in Vietnamese). Calligraphy (in Chinese, Shufa 書法, in Korean, Seoye
書藝, in Japanese Shodō 書道, all meaning “the way of
writing”) is considered an important art in East Asia and the most
refined form of East Asian painting.

© Read more in the WIKIPEDIA

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
77 Dances: Japanese Calligraphy by Poets, Monks, and Scholars, 1568-1868


Stephen Addis

– source – Shambhala Publications

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Dragon Horse Temple 龍馬山

. Yoshitsune Temple Gikeiji at Minmaya

「義経寺」(ぎけいじ) 三厩村 .


. Dragon Calligraphy .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Tanchu Terayama and Zen Calligraphy: Hitsuzendo

“Dragon” Calligraphy by Yamaoka Tesshu

Scrolls with Daruma, many with calligraphy

Inkstone, 翡翠硯(すずり) suzuri with Daruma face !

Literally “The Way of Writing” – – –

All about Calligraphy by Mark Schumacher !

History of Japanese ink painting

source : www.ink-treasures.com

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
– quote –

Four Treasures of the Study 文房四宝

Four Jewels of the Study or Four Friends of the Study

is an expression used to denote the brush, ink, paper and ink stone used
in Chinese and other East Asian calligraphic traditions. The name
appears to originate in the time of the Southern and Northern Dynasties
(420-589 AD).

– Brush, Ink, Paper, Inkstone

– – – More in the WIKIPEDIA !
. Doing Business in Edo - 江戸の商売 .


hitsuboku uri 筆墨売り selling brushes and ink

two of the four treasures

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Artists involved in beyondcalligraphy.com project are members of the All Japan Organization of Calligraphy Art and Literature (全日本書芸文化院, Zen Nihon Shogei Bunkain) which has a long tradition and utmost respect here in Japan.

We are also members of Shosoin (書宗院), a calligraphy organization devoted
to the study and research of Chinese and Japanese calligraphy, founded
by grand master calligrapher Kuwahara Suihou (桑原翠邦) who was the most
talented pupil of grand master Hidai Tenrai (比田井天来), often called “the
father of modern calligraphy”. Grand master Hidai Tenrai was an
initiator of avant-garde calligraphy in Japan, a trend that has had
great influence not only on Chinese artists and calligraphers but also
modern abstract painters, sculptors, etc., all over the world.

source : www.beyond-calligraphy.com

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

“Frog and calligrapher”

Tsukioka (Taiso) Yoshitoshi

Ono no Tōfū (894-966) Ono no Doofu, Ono no Dofu, Ono no Tofu
quote

Ono no Michikaze or Ono no Tōfū 小野 道風

(894 – February 9, 966) was a prominent Shodōka (Japanese calligrapher) who lived in the Heian period (794–1185).

One of the so-called Sanseki 三跡 (Three Brush Traces), along with
Fujiwara no Sukemasa and Fujiwara no Yukinari. Tōfū is considered the
founder of Japanese style calligraphy or wayōshodō 和様書道.

© More in the WIKIPEDIA !

Ono no Takamura (小野 篁) also known as

Sangi no Takamura 参議篁, Sangi no Takamura

(802 – February 3, 853)

Ono no Michikaze and Ono no Komachi are Takamura’s direct descendants.

. Shrine Onoterusaki jinja 小野照崎神社 .
小野炭や手習ふ人の灰ぜせり

Ono-zumi ya tenarau hito no hai zeseri
this charcoal from Ono –

a student of calligraphy

scribbles in the ashes

The famous calligrapher Ono no Toofuu 小野東風 / 小野道風 (894 – 967) is said to
have practised writing characters in the ashes of a brazier.
. Matsuo Basho and Charcoal from Ono .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
. Calligraphy from China .

Ouyang Xun 歐陽詢

(557–641)

and Japanese Kinoshita Mariko 木下真理子

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
…………… H A I K U

KIGO for the New Year
First Calligraphy, kakizome 書初め

….. kissho 吉書 “auspicious writing”

On January 2, people take the brush for the first time in the New Year.
The ink is ground with fresh first water (wakamizu) from the well. The
words written include a wish for the New Year or some auspicious poems.

The writing is hung at the Shelf of the Gods (kamidana), to make the deities aware of your wish.

Others burn the paper outside and judge from the hight of the smoke and
paper pieces if the Gods accept your offering and your writing will
improve in the coming year.
. fude hajime 筆始(ふではじめ)first use of the brush

….. shihitsu 試筆(しひつ), shigoo 試毫(しごう)

shikan 試簡(しかん), shimen 試免(しめん)

shiei 試穎(しえい), shiko 試觚(しこ)

shishun 試春(ししゅん)”first calligraphy in spring”
. Kitano no fudehajime sai 北野の筆始祭

(きたののふではじめさい)

first use of the brush ceremony at Kitano .

Kitano Tenmangu in Kyoto 北野天満宮 京都

hatsu suzuri 初硯(はつすずり)first use of the ink stone


taking the brush

365 days

first calligraphy

Gabi Greve
. NEW YEAR – KIGO for HUMANITY

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
writing a spell, gihoo o kaku 儀方を書く (ぎほうをかく)

….. gihoo o shosu 儀方を書す(ぎほうをしょす)

observance kigo for mid-summer

In ancient China it was custom on May 5 to write the two
characters GIHO 儀方 on a piece of paper and paste this onto the four main
pillars of the home to ward off mosquitoes and flies during the summer
time. In Japan, this tradition was followed for some time too.
. Mosquitoes and kigo

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


First Birthday Calligraphy in India

haiku topic for India

We have calligraphy in every Indian language – an art that was practiced
most widely, until the computer fonts came into being! The most
preferred is the Sanskritised letters in English – English lettering
which resembles the Sanskrit script.

On a child’s first birthday – his/ her hand is guided by the Hindu
priest who writes the first letters of the alphabets of the child mother
tongue, on rice [with the husk] placed on a plate.

Kala Ramesh

.. .. .. .. ..

© Hindu Wisdom, Indian Art

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

– – – – – LINKS to online dictionaries

古文書くずし字検索

http://komonjo.riok.net/charSrch/index.html

東京大学史料編纂所

http://wwwap.hi.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ships/db.html

漢字データベースプロジェクト

http://kanji-database.sourceforge.net/

http://www.buddhism-dict.net/ddb/ – (sign in with user name = guest)

http://www.aisf.or.jp/~jaanus/ – JAANUS

http://www.eudict.com/

http://jigen.net/kanji/13661

http://www.kanjijiten.net./

http://kotobank.jp/

http://www.smartkanji.net/

http://www.wul.waseda.ac.jp/kotenseki/index.html

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/jhti/cgi-bin/jhti/vocasel.cgi

(search classical Japanese texts)

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/onlinejdic.html

(Online Japanese Dictionaries and Glossaries)

http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx?submitButton1=Etymology&characterInput=%E5%AF%BF

http://factsanddetails.com/japan.php?itemid=682&catid=20&subcatid=128

http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/Lindict/

http://en.glosbe.com/ja/en/

筆墨硯紙事典 – 天来書院

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[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]

[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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Quote: Jenny Uglow (about gardens)


Quote: Jenny Uglow (about gardens)

Quote: Jenny Uglow (about gardens)

https://pin.it/2echp552cl6icy

In theory: The capacity to be alone is the capacity to love


In theory: The capacity to be alone is the capacity to love

In theory: The capacity to be alone is the capacity to love

https://pin.it/f53mawm64b2zba

10 common fallacies everyone should know


10 common fallacies everyone should know

10 common fallacies everyone should know

https://pin.it/5ugrhlyx62evja

Proverb: Yiddish Proverb


Proverb: Yiddish Proverb

Proverb: Yiddish Proverb

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The cultural icenerg


The cultural icenerg

The cultural icenerg

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Afternoon of a Faun

L’après-midi d’un faune (or The Afternoon of a Faun) may refer to the following:

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Quote: Nicolae “Nicola” Tesla


Quote: Nicolae

Quote: Nicolae “Nicola” Tesla

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Watch “Joan of Arc – Jennifer Warnes & Leonard Cohen” on YouTube



Now the flames they followed joan of arc
As she came riding through the dark;
No moon to keep her armour bright,
No man to get her through this very smoky night.
She said, I’m tired of the war,
I want the kind of work I had before,
A wedding dress or something white
To wear upon my swollen appetite.

Well, I’m glad to hear you talk this way,
You know I’ve watched you riding every day
And something in me yearns to win
Such a cold and lonesome heroine.
And who are you? she sternly spoke
To the one beneath the smoke.
Why, I’m fire, he replied,
And I love your solitude, I love your pride.
Then fire, make your body cold,
I’m going to give you mine to hold,
Saying this she climbed inside
To be his one, to be his only bride.
And deep into his fiery heart
He took the dust of joan of arc,
And high above the wedding guests
He hung the ashes of her wedding dress.
It was deep into his fiery heart
He took the dust of joan of arc,
And then she clearly understood
If he was fire, oh then she must be wood.
I saw her wince, I saw her cry,
I saw the glory in her eye.
Myself I long for love and light,
But must it come so cruel, and oh so bright?
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Richard Webb / David Jonathan Cohen / Caroline Norris
Joan of Arc lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group

QUOTE: SECRECY IS THE KEYSTONE TO ALL TYRANNY (ROBERT A. HEINLEIN)


QUOTE: SECRECY IS THE KEYSTONE TO ALL TYRANNY (ROBERT A. HEINLEIN)

QUOTE: SECRECY IS THE KEYSTONE TO ALL TYRANNY (ROBERT A. HEINLEIN)

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Dmitri Shostakovich

Shostakovich in 1950

Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich(Russian: About this soundДми́трий Дми́триевич Шостако́вич

Дми́трий Дми́триевич Шостако́вич Дми́трий Дми́триевич Шостако́вич , tr. Dmitriy Dmitrievich Shostakovich, pronounced [ˈdmʲitrʲɪj ˈdmʲitrʲɪjɪvʲɪtɕ ʂəstɐˈkovʲɪtɕ]; 25 September [O.S. 12 September] 1906 – 9 August 1975) was a Russian composer and pianist. He is regarded as one of the major composers of the 20th century.[1]

Shostakovich achieved fame in the Soviet Union under the patronage of Soviet chief of staff Mikhail Tukhachevsky, but later had a complex and difficult relationship with the government. Nevertheless, he received accolades and state awards and served in the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR (1947) and the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union (from 1962 until his death).

A polystylist, Shostakovich developed a hybrid voice, combining a variety of different musical techniques into his works. His music is characterized by sharp contrasts, elements of the grotesque, and ambivalent tonality; the composer was also heavily influenced by the neo-classical style pioneered by Igor Stravinsky, and (especially in his symphonies) b