Category Archives: Poetry, Poets, Writers

Watch Valentina Lisitsa: F. Schubert Sonata A major # 20 D.959 Valentina Lisitsa Another exceptional interpretation, from the unequaled Valentina Lisitsa


F. Schubert Sonata A major # 20 D.959 Valentina Lisitsa

Published on Jul 25, 2016

Does it seem to you that the world has gone mad? Wars, bombings, killings, hate….
I can offer but a little remedy, an escape rather. Music equivalent of “slow TV”, something created not to excite our over-driven nerves, but to soothe, to lull, to put in ultimate trance, to make the time stand still and the troubles of outside world fade away, if only for a few minutes.
Nobody has done it better than my beloved Franz Schubert.
There is a famous quip about two musicians arguing over the merits ( or weaknesses) of Schubert late piano sonatas, one describing the unusual time span of the pieces as “the heavenly lengths”, another – replying “they aren’t that heavenly, they are just plain LENGTHS”.
Yes, Schubert is unique in a sense that he’s dispensed not only with customary time restrains established by the need to keep the listener “interested”, but also with the medley of rather theatrical “action heroes” prerequisite for a virtuoso performer to feel adequate 🙂 His music is not about heroes and villains, gods and devils.
His music is about you and I, about regular people living their lives, loving, longing, suffering, dying….all without the world taking notice and without the headlines.That’s the real charm and beguiling spell of his music – this is about us, the regular human beings, whom he understood better than any other composer.
You might not be able to fully enjoy this piece from the first try, or if you have your thoughts wondering around, thinking of million little things, looking for easy gratification of virtuoso finger-work and thunderous chords.
You will enjoy it if you allow yourself to surrender to this music, to its flow, as slow, smooth and spellbinding neurasthenia waters of mythical river Lethe, the river of forgetfulness and oblivion.

“J’ai trop vu,
trop senti,
trop aimé dans ma vie;
Je viens chercher vivant le calme du Léthé.”

“I have seen too much,
felt too much,
loved too much in my life;

I come to seek, still living,
the calm of Lethe.”

A.de Lamartine

00:00 1. Allegro
17:17 2. Andantino
26:14 3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento
31:20 4. Rondo: Allegretto – Presto.

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Questioning, by GeorgeB


Questioning,  by GeorgeB

I’m closing my eye, now,
Over the vast desert of the skies filled with shine…
Covered by the green grass, with a pillow…of sea grass…
I let my inner eye open…
to alert me…
                                        should
The rain will fall
The thunder clouds will explode
The snow will engulf me alive
The fire will not be extinguished in time
The earth will open
where I lay…
Oh God, what a good guardian you are…

Do I deserve your love?
———————————

(Copywright 2016,
The smudge and other poems page)

Watch “Leonard Cohen – A Thousand Kisses Deep” on YouTube



The ponies run, the girls are young,
The odds are there to beat.
You win a while, and then it’s done ?
Your little winning streak.
And summoned now to deal
With your invincible defeat,
You live your life as if it?s real,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

I’m turning tricks, I’m getting fixed,
I’m back on Boogie Street.
You lose your grip, and then you slip
Into the Masterpiece.
And maybe I had miles to drive,
And promises to keep:
You ditch it all to stay alive,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

And sometimes when the night is slow,
The wretched and the meek,
We gather up our hearts and go,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

Confined to sex, we pressed against
The limits of the sea:
I saw there were no oceans left
For scavengers like me.
I made it to the forward deck.
I blessed our remnant fleet…
And then consented to be wrecked,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

I’m turning tricks, I’m getting fixed,
I’m back on Boogie Street.
I guess they won’t exchange the gifts
That you were meant to keep.
And quiet is the thought of you,
The file on you complete,
Except what we forgot to do,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

And sometimes when the night is slow,
The wretched and the meek,
We gather up our hearts and go,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

The ponies run, the girls are young,
The odds are there to beat .

Watch “Leonard Cohen-In My Secret Life” on YouTube


https://youtu.be/ym3_m_Apfas
LEONARD COHEN LYRICS

“In My Secret Life”

I saw you this morning.
You were moving so fast.
Can’t seem to loosen my grip
On the past.
And I miss you so much.
There’s no one in sight.
And we’re still making love
In My Secret Life.

I smile when I’m angry.
I cheat and I lie.
I do what I have to do
To get by.
But I know what is wrong,
And I know what is right.
And I’d die for the truth
In My Secret Life.

Hold on, hold on, my brother.
My sister, hold on tight.
I finally got my orders.
I’ll be marching through the morning,
Marching through the night,
Moving cross the borders
Of My Secret Life.

Looked through the paper.
Makes you want to cry.
Nobody cares if the people
Live or die.
And the dealer wants you thinking
That it’s either black or white.
Thank G-d it’s not that simple
In My Secret Life.

I bite my lip.
I buy what I’m told:
From the latest hit,
To the wisdom of old.
But I’m always alone.
And my heart is like ice.
And it’s crowded and cold
In My Secret Life.

Hubert Rossel: Le livre / Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules / Hubert Rossel


La « petite église » (Szent Katalin templom) de Gyergyóditró/ Ditrău, celle de Gyergyóalfalu/Joseni et celle de Csíkdelne/DelniÅ£a sont toutes les trois parmi les 80 églises fortifiées à être analysées et replacées dans leur contexte historique dans le livre “Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules”… Pour plus d’informations on peut aussi se rendre sur le site http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net

TRANSYLVANIE – ERDÉLY – SIEBENBÜRGEN – TRANSYLVANIA

La Transylvanie a été choisie par les guides Lonely Planet comme la région la plus tendance pour un voyage en 2016. Parmi les différents points d’attraction de cette région figurent les églises fortifiées des communautés saxonne et sicule. De nombreux ouvrages existent en français pour présenter les églises saxonnes, les plus grandes et les plus connues. Mais il n’y en a qu’un seul en français pour parler des églises sicules et les remettre dans leur contexte historique et culturel : Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules (http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net/). Songez-y lorsque vous préparez votre voyage, si vous compter aller dans cette région!
La photo ci-dessous présente l’église fortifiées de Zabola/Zăbala, dans le judeţ de Kovaszna/Covasna.

Transylvania has been selected by the Lonely Planet travel guidebooks as the first of the most likely areas for a trip in 2016. Of the various points of attraction of this area are the fortified churches of the Saxon and the Szekler communities. Many books exist in French to introduce the Saxon churches, the largest ones and best known. But there is only one in French to talk about the Szekler churches and put them in their historical and cultural context: Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules. (http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net/). Consider this when planning your trip, if you plan to go to this region!
The picture below figures the Zabola/Zăbala fortified church, in the judeţ Kovaszna/Covasna
image

The Traitor, Leonard Cohen With Martha Wainright (from I’m Your Man Show)


New! Read & write lyrics explanations

  • Highlight lyrics and explain them to earn Karma points.

Now the swan it floated on the english river
Ah the rose of high romance it opened wide
A sun tanned woman yearned me through the summer
And the judges watched us from the other side

I told my mother “mother I must leave you
Preserve my room but do not she’d a tear
Should rumour of a shabby ending reach you
It was half my fault and half the atmosphere”

But the rose I sickened with a scarlet fever
And the swan I tempted with a sense of shame
She said at last I was her finest lover
And if she withered I would be to blame

The judges said you missed it by a fraction
Rise up and brace your troops for the attack
Ah the dreamers ride against the men of action
Oh see the men of action falling back

But I lingered on her thighs a fatal moment
I kissed her lips as though I thirsted still
My falsity had stung me like a hornet
The poison sank and it paralysed my will

I could not move to warn all the younger soldiers
That they had been deserted from above
So on battlefields from here to barcelona
I’m listed with the enemies of love

And long ago she said “i must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that rose and wind the swan”

So daily I renew my idle duty
I touch her here and there — I know my place
I kiss her open mouth and I praise her beauty
And people call me traitor to my face

Watch “Doru Stanculescu – Hai, hai, haidi, hai (Pe sub flori ma leganai)” on YouTube


Ai, hai lyrics

Artist: Doru Stănculescu
Translations: English, French, German
Romanian
Ai, hai

N-a ști nimeni că m-am dus,
Numa’ m-or vedea că nu-s.

Sus e cerul, largă-i lumea,
Bine c-a-nfrunzit pădurea!

Ai, hai, ai, haidi, haidi, hai,
Pe sub flori mă legănai.

Sus e cerul, largă-i lumea,
N-a ști nimeni că m-am dus.

Bine c-a-nfrunzit pădurea,
Numa’ m-or vedea că nu-s

Ai, hai, ai, haidi, haidi, hai,
Pe sub flori mă legănai.

© 2008-2016 LyricsTranslate.com

Like a bridge over troubled waters (Simon and Garfunkel YouTube)


image

Like a bridge over troubled waters

Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge over troubled water (with lyrics)

Ce- ti doresc eu tie dulce Romanie- Veta Biris


Ce- ti doresc eu tie dulce Romanie- Veta Biris

this day in the yesteryear: John Milton Publishes Areopagitica (1644)


John Milton Publishes Areopagitica (1644)

Best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost, Milton, a 17th-century English poet, was also a writer of several political and moral pamphlets. More than two decades before his poetic masterpiece was published, Milton wrote Areopagitica, his best known prose work. One of the great arguments in favor of the freedom of the press, it was published in 1644 in response to his dissatisfaction with the strict censorship of the press exercised by Parliament. For what is the pamphlet named? More… Discuss

Haiku: biking, poetic thought by George-B (The smudge and other poems Page)


Haiku: biking, poetic thought by George-B.
The smudge and other poems Page

Left leg, right leg, left…
The bicycle is rolling…
right leg-left leg-right…

Bicycle ride

Bicycle ride


AMÁLIA canta ” AVÉ MARIA FADISTA ” de Gabriel de Oliveira e Música: Vianinha

quotation: Of all lies, art is the least untrue. Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880)


Of all lies, art is the least untrue.Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) Discuss

Historic musical bits: #PrayersForParis Imagine – The Beatles – John Lennon


Imagine – The Beatles – John Lennon

today’s birthday: Esaias Tegnér (1782)


Esaias Tegnér (1782)

Tegnér was the most popular of the Swedish romantic poets. An optimistic nationalist in his youth, he wrote the militant anti-Russian Svea and Axel, followed by Frithjof’s Saga, which is based on collections of Scandinavian sagas and is considered the masterpiece of the Swedish Gothic tradition. The son of a pastor and a bishop himself, his sermons and speeches are classics of the Swedish language. Subject to periods of madness, he composed what epic poem in an asylum? More… Discuss

make music part of your life: TE DEUM – F. J. HAYDN (Gregorian Chant Lyrics Latin/English)


TE DEUM – F.J.HAYDN

 

Original Best of Leonard Cohen (1975 compilation)


Original Best of Leonard Cohen (1975 compilation)

Access here: The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection


The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection

LibriVox – founded in 2005 – is a community of volunteers from all over the world who record public domain texts: poetry, short stories, whole books, even dramatic works, in many different languages. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain in the USA and available as free down

The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection

The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection (Click to access the Website!)

today’s birthday: John Keats (1795)


John Keats (1795)

Considered one of the greatest English poets, Keats worked as a surgeon’s apprentice before devoting himself entirely to poetry at age 21. During a few intense months in 1819, he produced many of his greatest works, including “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” “Ode to a Nightingale,” and “To Autumn.” His Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems is perhaps the greatest single volume of poetry published in England in the 19th century. Tragically, Keats died at just 25 from what disease? More… Discuss

quotation: Two cheers for Democracy: one because it admits variety and two because it permits criticism. E. M. Forster


Two cheers for Democracy: one because it admits variety and two because it permits criticism.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

quotation: “To some men of early performance it is useless. …” Thomas Hardy


Thomas Hardy

To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who are late to develop, it just enables them to finish the job.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) Discuss

today’s birthday: Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772)


Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772)

One of the most versatile and influential figures in the English Romantic movement, Coleridge was a poet and critic who perfected a sensuous lyricism in his poetry that was echoed by many later poets. His most famous works include “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” and “Kubla Khan.” Known for his influential lectures on Shakespeare, he later wrote Biographia Literaria, the most significant work of general literary criticism of the Romantic period. To what drug was Coleridge addicted? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Virgil (70 BCE)


Virgil (70 BCE)

Virgil was a Roman poet and the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics, and the Aeneid, widely regarded as one of the greatest long poems in world literature. The Aeneid, Rome’s national epic, tells the legendary story of the Trojan hero Aeneas, whose descendants become the founders of Rome. What later poet portrayed Virgil as the guide to Hell in his great literary classic The Divine Comedy? More… Discuss

Paul Simon and Friends (1/6) “Father and Daughter” (2007): Happy Birthday Paul!


Paul Simon and Friends (1/6) “Father and Daughter” (2007) HD

Poezii care vor trai intotdeauna: Vasile Alecsandri – MioriÅ£a


Vasile Alecsandri – MioriÅ£a

Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right – Bob Dylan


Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right – Bob Dylan

Georges Brassens: La Parapluie


Published on Feb 20, 2013

Je tenais a partager l’amour que j’ai pour cet artiste et cette chanson.

Paroles:

Il pleuvait fort sur la grand-route,
Elle cheminait sans parapluie,
J’en avait un, volé sans doute
Le matin même à un ami.
Courant alors à sa rescousse,
Je lui propose un peu d’abri
En séchant l’eau de sa frimousse,
D’un air très doux elle m’a dit oui.
Un petit coin de parapluie,
Contre un coin de Paradis.
Elle avait quelque chose d’un ange,
Un petit coin de Paradis,
Contre un coin de parapluie.
Je ne perdait pas au change,
Pardi!
Chemin faisant que se fut tendre
D’ouïr à deux le chant joli
Que l’eau du ciel faisait entendre
Sur le toit de mon parapluie.
J’aurais voulu comme au déluge,
voir sans arrêt tomber la pluie,
Pour la garder sous mon refuge,
Quarante jours, Quarante nuits.
Un petit coin de parapluie,
Contre un coin de Paradis.
Elle avait quelque chose d’un ange,
Un petit coin de Paradis,
Contre un coin de parapluie.
Je ne perdait pas au change,
Pardi!
Mais bêtement, même en orage,
Les routes vont vers des pays.
Bientôt le sien fit un barrage
A l’horizon de ma folie.
Il a fallut qu’elle me quitte,
Après m’avoir dit grand merci.
Et je l’ai vue toute petite
Partir gaiement vers mon oubli.
Un petit coin de parapluie,
Contre un coin de Paradis.
Elle avait quelque chose d’un ange,
Un petit coin de Paradis,
Contre un coin de parapluie.
Je ne perdait pas au change,
Pardi!

Georges Brassens: La Prière Paroles Par Francis Jammes


La Prière Paroles
Par Francis Jammes

Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
Tandis que des enfants s’amusent au parterre
Et par l’oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
Son aile tout à coup s’ensanglante et descend
Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par les gosses battus, par l’ivrogne qui rentre
Par l’âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
Et par l’humiliation de l’innocent châtié
Par la vierge vendue qu’on a déshabillée
Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids
S’écrie: ” Mon Dieu ! ” par le malheureux dont les bras
Ne purent s’appuyer sur une amour humaine
Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu’il traîne
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde
Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe
Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains
Par le malade que l’on opère et qui geint
Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri
Par l’oiseau rappelant l’oiseau tombé du nid
Par l’herbe qui a soif et recueille l’ondée
Par le baiser perdu par l’amour redonné
Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie
Je vous salue, Marie.
**********************************************************

Francis Jammes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 
Francis Jammes.

Francis Jammes (French pronunciation: ​[ʒam];[1] born 2 December 1868 in Tournay, Hautes-Pyrénées – died 1 November 1938 in Hasparren, Pyrénées-Atlantiques) was a French poet. He spent most of his life in his native region of Béarn and the Basque Country and his poems are known for their lyricism and for singing the pleasures of a humble country life (donkeys, maidens). His later poetry remained lyrical, but also included a strong religious element brought on by his “conversion” to Catholicism (more a return to the faith as he had always been a Catholic).

Biography

He was a mediocre student and failed his baccalauréat with a zero for French.[1]

 
Francis Jammes by Jean Veber

The young author’s first poems began to be read in Parisian literary circles around 1895, and they were appreciated for their fresh tone which broke considerably from symbolist tendencies of the period. Jammes fraternised with other writers, including André Gide (with whom he travelled to Algeria in 1896), Stéphane Mallarmé and Henri de Régnier. His most famous collection of poems — De l’angélus de l’aube à l’angélus du soir (“From morning Angelus to evening Angelus”) — appeared in 1897 in the Mercure de France; Le Deuil des Primevères (“The Mourning of Primulas”) (1901) was also well received. While working up to that point as a notary’s clerk, the author was thenceforth able to live from his writings. In 1905 Francis Jammes, influenced by the poet Paul Claudel with whom he became close, “converted” to Catholicism (in actuality a return to being a practicing Catholic)[1] and his poetry became more austere and occasionally more dogmatic.

In the eyes of Parisian literary circles, Francis Jammes was generally considered a solitary provincial who chose to live a life of retreat in his mountainous Pyrenees, and his poems never became entirely fashionable. The author sought nomination to the Académie française several times, but was never elected.

Jammes was the original author of Georges Brassens‘s song La Prière (“The Prayer”). The lyrics were taken from the poem Les Mystères douloureux (“The Agonies of Christ”) published in the collection L’Église habillée de feuilles (“The Church Clothed in Leaves”) (1906); Brassens changed some of the words to make the text more rhythmic.

Jammes was known to have an ardent passion for field sports, especially game hunting. He was known to have also been a believer in the conservation of endangered species.

Thirteen poems from his cycle Tristesses (“Sorrows”), were set to music by composer Lili Boulanger in 1914 under the title Clairières dans le ciel (“Clearings in the Sky”) a title Jammes had given to an assorted collection of poetry of which Tristesses was a part. The whole cycle was composed for soprano, flute and piano by Michel Bosc.

Works: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/29523

 

MUSIC DIVINE: Gabriel Fauré – In Paradisum – Requiem in D Minor Op. 48


Gabriel Faur̩ РIn Paradisum РRequiem in D Minor Op. 48

quotation: The charity that is a trifle to us can be precious to others. Homer


The charity that is a trifle to us can be precious to others.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC) Discuss

*Let the sun fall down* Kim Richey


*Let the sun fall down* Kim Richey

Song: A Place Called Home, by: Kim Richey 2002


Published on Oct 26, 2013

Lyric Video
Song: A Place Called Home
By: Kim Richey

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

La Prière – Georges Brassens (1965) (“Je vous salut Marie…”)


La Pri̬re РGeorges Brassens (1965)

Et Si Tu N’Existais Pas – Joe Dassin Lyrics


Et Si Tu N’Existais Pas – Joe Dassin Lyrics

Jacques Brel – Ne Me Quitte Pas


Jacques Brel – Ne Me Quitte Pas

Carpenters – Bless the Beasts and the Children (Original Soundtrack version)


Carpenters – Bless the Beasts and the Children (Original Soundtrack version)

quotation: Love may be or it may not, but where it is, it ought to reveal itself in its immensity. Honore de Balzac


Love may be or it may not, but where it is, it ought to reveal itself in its immensity.

Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) Discuss

today’s birthday: Jorge Luis Borges (1899)


Jorge Luis Borges (1899)

Borges was an Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story writer. Much of his work is rich in fantasy and metaphorical allegory, including the story collection Ficciones, which won him an international following. In the 1920s, Borges was afflicted by a worsening hereditary blindness and was totally blind by the mid-1950s. Forced to abandon the writing of long texts, he began dictating his works. What literary movement is Borges credited with establishing in South America? More… Discuss

The man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it. Homer


The man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC) Discuss

quotation: The good befriend themselves. Sophocles


The good befriend themselves.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

Antony singing If It Be Your Will (sometimes , people find their voice, and once in a while they recognize genius)


Antony singing If It Be Your Will (poem and song by the genius of Leonard Cohen )

Just a Thought: “So long as we adapt without giving up or giving in.”


Just a Thought:  “So long as we adapt without giving up or giving in.”

By George-B, July 1, 2015.

quotation: A mother is a mother still, The holiest thing alive. Samuel Taylor Coleridge


A mother is a mother still,

The holiest thing alive.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

quotation: “To endure is greater than to dare;…” – William Makepeace Thackeray


To endure is greater than to dare; to tire out hostile fortune; to be daunted by no difficulty; to keep heart when all have lost it—who can say this is not greatness?

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

quotation: Criticism, that fine flower of personal expression in the garden of letters. Joseph Conrad


Criticism, that fine flower of personal expression in the garden of letters.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

quotation: “It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts….” (Joseph Conrad (1857-1924))


It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts. Perhaps it’s just as well; and it may be that it is this very dullness that makes life to the incalculable majority so supportable and so welcome.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

quotation: The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings. Kate Chopin


The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings.

Kate Chopin (1851-1904) Discuss

today’s birthday: Pearl S. Buck (1892)


Pearl S. Buck (1892)

Buck was raised in China by her American missionary parents and left the country but a few times before she was 40. She drew upon her experiences there in her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Good Earth, which describes the struggles of a Chinese peasant and his slave wife. Together with Sons and A House Divided, it forms a trilogy, part of the body of work that earned Buck the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938. Buck also wrote five novels under what pseudonym? More… Discuss

quotation: Words are but wind; and learning is nothing but words; ergo, learning is nothing but wind. Jonathan Swift


Words are but wind; and learning is nothing but words; ergo, learning is nothing but wind.

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) Discuss