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You’re gonna love it: List of nuclear whistleblowers


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List of nuclear whistleblowers

Wikimedia list article


There have been a number of nuclear whistleblowers, often nuclear engineers, who have identified safety concerns about nuclear power and nuclear weapons production. In 1976 Gregory Minor, Richard Hubbard and Dale Bridenbaugh “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants in the United States, and Fukushima in Japan. George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. Other nuclear power whistleblowers include Arnold Gundersen and David Lochbaum.

2000 candles in memory of the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, at a commemoration 25 years after the nuclear accident, as well as for the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011.

Karen Silkwood

The first prominent nuclear whistleblower was Karen Silkwood, who worked as a chemical technician at a Kerr-McGee nuclear fuel plant. Silkwood became an activist in the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union in order to protest health and safety issues. In 1974, she testified to the United States Atomic Energy Commission about her concerns. A few months later she died in a car crash under mysterious conditions on the way to a meeting with a New York Times reporter and a national union leader. The 1983 film Silkwood is an account of this story.

The “GE Three”

On 2 February 1976, Gregory C. Minor, Richard B. Hubbard, and Dale G. Bridenbaugh (known as the GE Three) “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants, and their action has been called “an exemplary instance of whistleblowing“.

The three engineers gained the attention of journalists and their disclosures about the threats of nuclear power had a significant impact. They timed their statements to coincide with their resignations from responsible positions in General Electric‘s nuclear energy division, and later established themselves as consultants on the nuclear power industry for state governments, federal agencies, and overseas governments. The consulting firm they formed, MHB Technical Associates, was technical advisor for the movie, “The China Syndrome.” The three engineers participated in Congressional hearings which their disclosures precipitated.

Browns Ferry Unit 1 under construction

Browns Ferry nuclear power plant construction began in 1966. It was located in Alabama and in 1967 it earned a federal construction permit. The plant received new design standards which call for “physical separation of electrical cables.” There was an issue with the instructions on how to accomplish this so the AEC inspector F.U. Bower requested that the AEC elaborate; however, there was no response from the organization and installation went on. Still, no instructions were issued after five failed inspections in 1970. The lack of cable separation instructions led to the sacrifice of safety coolant systems in two of the units in order to improve one with severe safety violation. The ignorance of the AEC led to the fire that occurred on 22 March 1975, that almost led to a radiation leak. The substance separating the wires caught fire when tests to find air leaks with a candle ignited it thus resulting in damage to the control systems. With damage to the control systems, the cooling system that keeps the units from leaking radiation did not work properly. Somehow the situation was avoided and the units were put out of service. Throughout the occurrence of these events Bridenbaugh had been discussing his reservations on the safety at the plant in vain and in 1976 a year later Bridenbaugh, Hubbard and Minor resigned.

Crystal River 3 and Lou Putney

Lou Putney came on the scene of the Crystal River 3 plant after receiving a call from a plant engineer. The engineer claimed that the managers hired engineers based on “good ol’ boy mentality.” The plant had experience numerous shut downs since 1978. Along with this concern, the engineer was not confident that the manager possessed the qualifications to be a manager. Although the engineer pursued nothing further with his complaint, it prompted Putney to purchase shares of stock in the company that would allow him to file “shareholder resolutions.” Putney had looked into the nuclear reactors that were built of an unsafe material for emergency cooling procedures. The NRC had placed Crystal River on the top 14 worst reactors list because of this. So, the shares were purchased in 1981, which is when Putney filed his first shareholder resolution requesting the plant be shut down. This tradition was upheld by Putney for seven years until he was required to purchase more stock in order to continue filing resolutions. Over the course of sixteen years, Putney filed a total of fourteen shareholder resolutions. All of these resolutions were ignored and were met with offers to buy out his shares so he could no longer file the resolutions. The plant was officially decommissioned in September 2009.

Ronald Goldstein

Ronald J. Goldstein was a supervisor employed by EBASCO, which was a major contractor for the construction of the South Texas plants. In the summer of 1985, Goldstein identified safety problems to SAFETEAM, an internal compliance program established by EBASCO and Houston Lighting, including noncompliance with safety procedures, the failure to issue safety compliance reports, and quality control violations affecting the safety of the plant.

SAFETEAM was promoted as an independent safe haven for employees to voice their safety concerns. The two companies did not inform their employees that they did not believe complaints reported to SAFETEAM had any legal protection. After he filed his report to SAFETEAM, Goldstein was fired. Subsequently, Golstein filed suit under federal nuclear whistleblower statutes.

The U.S. Department of Labor ruled that his submissions to SAFETEAM were protected and his dismissal was invalid, a finding upheld by Labor Secretary Lynn Martin. The ruling was appealed and overturned by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled that private programs offered no protection to whistleblowers. After Goldstein lost his case, Congress amended the federal nuclear whistleblower law to provide protection reports made to internal systems and prevent retaliation against whistleblowers.

Fernald Nuclear Incidents

Aerial view of Fernald Feed Materials Production Center
Uranium components fabricated at Fernald

The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center was built in Crosby Township, Ohio in 1951, and decommissioned in 1989. Fernald processed uranium trioxide and uranium tetrafluoride, among other radioactive materials, to produce the uranium fuel cores for nuclear weapons. It was shrouded in suspicion with many manager changes and the people of the town ill-informed of the purpose of the plant. The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center also conducted an evaluation of how much material was contaminated by Radium. Using 138 pieces of the CR-39 film assays, they were able to determine that people working in the area where K-65 silos ( Underground chamber used to store missiles) had lower levels of exposure of materials contaminated by Radon than the Q-11 silos between the period of 1952-1988 Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology.Throughout 1951-1995 the plant had numerous scandals including faking numbers for contamination and disregarding evidence of ground water pollution. Among the citizens affected by the pollution was Mrs. Lisa Crawford who took action. Crawford and other residents filed a lawsuit in 1985 and became president of the organization FRESH (Fernald Residents for Environmental Safety and Health). A lawsuit was then filed once again against Fernald by former employees several years later in 1990. After several years of being heavily advised not to blow the whistle, the workers earned themselves a $15 million settlement and lifelong medical monitoring. In 1992, FERMCO was hired to construct a cleanup plan for the plant and in 1996, around accusations of wasteful spending, the cleanup of ground water and soil was completed.

Mordechai Vanunu

Mordechai Vanunu 2009

Mordechai Vanunu blew the whistle on the nuclear plant in Dimona, Israel in an interview with The Sunday Times that was published on 5 October 1986. According to Vanunu, this plant had been producing nuclear weapons for 10 to 20 years. It is estimated that there may be around 200 nuclear weapons in possession of Israel’s nuclear weapons program. Vanunu demonstrated his knowledge to Frank Barnaby and John Steinbach and they confirmed the credibility of his story. Frank Barnaby wrote in his Declaration of Frank Barnaby in the Matter of Mordechai Vanunu that Vanunu had the bare minimum knowledge of nuclear physics that a technician should have and accurately described the makeup of the nuclear plant in Dimona. Having served in full his 18 years prison term, ruled in closed door trial, including 11 years in solitary Vanunu has been further in and out of jail after. In 2007, sentenced to six months for violating terms of his parole, and in May 2010, again to three months for having met foreigners in violation of his release terms from jail.

Vanunu is ethnic Mizrahi Jew, born in Marrakesh Morocco, having emigrated to Israel, following its independence in 1948, like did many of the North African Jewish community did. Amnesty International issued a press release on 2 July 2007, stating that “The organisation considers Mordechai Vanunu to be a prisoner of conscience and calls for his immediate and unconditional release.”[6] Vanunu has been characterized internationally as a whistleblower[7][8] and by Israel as a traitor. Despite the whistle blown towards the operation of the nuclear weapons program in Israel, the Israeli government denied the existence of all allegations.Mordechai Vanunu is known as Israel`s Nuclear Whistleblower.

Arnold Gundersen

In 1990 Arnold Gundersen discovered radioactive material in an accounting safe at Nuclear Energy Services in Danbury, Connecticut, the consulting firm where he held a $120,000-a-year job as senior vice-president. Three weeks after he notified the company president of what he believed to be radiation safety violations, Gundersen was fired. According to The New York Times, for three years, Gundersen “was awakened by harassing phone calls in the middle of the night” and he “became concerned about his family’s safety”. Gundersen believes he was blacklisted, harassed and fired for doing what he thought was right.

The New York Times reports that Gundersen’s case is not uncommon, especially in the nuclear industry. Even though nuclear workers are encouraged to report potential safety hazards, those who do risk demotion and dismissal. Instead of correcting the problems, whistleblowers say, industry management and government agencies attack them as the cause of the problem. Driven out of their jobs and shunned by neighbors and co-workers, whistleblowers often turn to each other for support.

The Whistleblower Support Fund is an organization that has compiled resources for whistleblowers to access if they are considering whistleblowing. It was founded by Donald Ray Soeken, who has counseled whistleblowers for 35 years. In addition, a social network to connect whistleblowers to other whistleblowers will be implemented. It will be a private discussion where whistleblowers can safely seek support.

David Lochbaum

In the early 1990s, nuclear engineer David Lochbaum and a colleague, Don Prevatte, identified a safety problem in a plant where they were working, but were ignored when they raised the issue with the plant manager, the utility and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). After bringing their concerns to Congress, the problem was corrected not just at the original nuclear plant but at plants across the country.

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown was the whistleblower on the Thermo-Lag scandal, as well as on silicone foam firestop issues in the US and Canada, exposing the fact that fireproofing of wiring between control rooms and reactors did not function as intended and exposing bounding and combustibility issues with organic firestops.

George Galatis

George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer and whistleblower who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. The unsafe procedures meant that spent fuel rod pools at Unit 1 had the potential to boil, possibly releasing radioactive steam throughout the plant. Galatis eventually took his concerns to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to find that they had “known about the unsafe procedures for years”. As a result of going to the NRC, Galatis experienced “subtle forms of harassment, retaliation, and intimidation”.

Rainer Moormann

Rainer Moormann in 2004

Rainer Moormann is a German chemist and nuclear power whistleblower. Since 1976 he has been working at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, doing research on safety problems with pebble bed reactors, fusion power and spallation neutron sources. In 2008 Moormann published a critical paper on the safety of pebble bed reactors, which raised attention among specialists in the field, and managed to distribute it via the media, facing considerable opposition. For doing this despite the occupational disadvantages he had to accept as a consequence, Moormann was awarded the whistleblower award of the Federation of German Scientists (VDW) and of the German section of the International Association of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms (IALANA).

Setsuo Fujiwara

Setsuo Fujiwara, who used to design reactors, said he clashed with supervisors over an inspection audit he conducted in March 2009 at the Tomari nuclear plant in Japan. Fujiwara refused to approve a routine test by the plant’s operator, Hokkaido Electric Power, saying the test was flawed. A week later, he was summoned by his supervisor, who ordered him to correct his written report to indicate that the test had been done properly. After Fujiwara refused, his employment contract was not renewed. “They told me my job was just to approve reactors, not to raise doubts about them”, said Fujiwara, 62, who is now suing the nuclear safety organization to get rehired. In a written response to questions from The New York Times, the agency said it could not comment while the court case was under way. Along with the lawsuit Mr. Fujiwara filed against the agency he used to work for, he had gone to the Tokyo District Court to further write several complaints about how the JNES ( Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization) failed to follow the UN laws concerning how to properly inspect nuclear energy reactors. Mr. Fujiwara also submitted several documents and emails that dealt with how the reactor inspections were improperly handled by JNES even though JNES denies all allegations. [42]

Walter Tamosaitis

The Hanford site resulted in a number of whistleblowers during the efforts to clean the site up. Walter Tamosaitis blew the whistle on the Energy Department’s plan for waste treatment at the Hanford site in 2011. Tamosaitis’s concern was the possibility of explosive hydrogen gas being built up inside tanks that the company was to store the harmful chemical sludge they were trying to put into hibernation for its chemical life. Shortly after this Tamosaitis was demoted and two years later, fired which triggered his lawsuit for wrongful termination. A $4.1 million settlement was offered to Tamosaitis from AECOM on 12 August 2015. Tamosaitis has since been reinstated.

Donna Busche blew the whistle resulting in her 2013 lawsuit with claims that the URS “retaliated against her. She was head of nuclear safety and a URS employee around the time when she expressed her concerns.

Gary Brunson reported 34 safety and engineering violations after quitting in 2012. Brunson was federal engineering chief before he quit.

Shelly Doss earned “$20,000 in emotional distress and $10,000 in callous disregard of her rights” as well as reinstatement in 2014. Doss was an environmental specialist at the time of her firing in 2011 working for Washington River Protection Solutions.

Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins

In 2012, Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins publicly accused the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of downplaying flood risks for nuclear plants which are sited on waterways downstream from large reservoirs and dams. They are engineers with over 20 years of combined government and military service who work for the NRC. Other nuclear safety advocates have supported their complaints.

ist of nuclear whistleblowers

Wikimedia list article


There have been a number of nuclear whistleblowers, often nuclear engineers, who have identified safety concerns about nuclear power and nuclear weapons production. In 1976 Gregory Minor, Richard Hubbard and Dale Bridenbaugh “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants in the United States, and Fukushima in Japan. George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. Other nuclear power whistleblowers include Arnold Gundersen and David Lochbaum.

2000 candles in memory of the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, at a commemoration 25 years after the nuclear accident, as well as for the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011.

Karen Silkwood

The first prominent nuclear whistleblower was Karen Silkwood, who worked as a chemical technician at a Kerr-McGee nuclear fuel plant. Silkwood became an activist in the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union in order to protest health and safety issues. In 1974, she testified to the United States Atomic Energy Commission about her concerns. A few months later she died in a car crash under mysterious conditions on the way to a meeting with a New York Times reporter and a national union leader. The 1983 film Silkwood is an account of this story.

The “GE Three”

On 2 February 1976, Gregory C. Minor, Richard B. Hubbard, and Dale G. Bridenbaugh (known as the GE Three) “blew the whistle” on safety problems at nuclear power plants, and their action has been called “an exemplary instance of whistleblowing“.

The three engineers gained the attention of journalists and their disclosures about the threats of nuclear power had a significant impact. They timed their statements to coincide with their resignations from responsible positions in General Electric‘s nuclear energy division, and later established themselves as consultants on the nuclear power industry for state governments, federal agencies, and overseas governments. The consulting firm they formed, MHB Technical Associates, was technical advisor for the movie, “The China Syndrome.” The three engineers participated in Congressional hearings which their disclosures precipitated.

Browns Ferry Unit 1 under construction

Browns Ferry nuclear power plant construction began in 1966. It was located in Alabama and in 1967 it earned a federal construction permit. The plant received new design standards which call for “physical separation of electrical cables.” There was an issue with the instructions on how to accomplish this so the AEC inspector F.U. Bower requested that the AEC elaborate; however, there was no response from the organization and installation went on. Still, no instructions were issued after five failed inspections in 1970. The lack of cable separation instructions led to the sacrifice of safety coolant systems in two of the units in order to improve one with severe safety violation. The ignorance of the AEC led to the fire that occurred on 22 March 1975, that almost led to a radiation leak. The substance separating the wires caught fire when tests to find air leaks with a candle ignited it thus resulting in damage to the control systems. With damage to the control systems, the cooling system that keeps the units from leaking radiation did not work properly. Somehow the situation was avoided and the units were put out of service. Throughout the occurrence of these events Bridenbaugh had been discussing his reservations on the safety at the plant in vain and in 1976 a year later Bridenbaugh, Hubbard and Minor resigned.

Crystal River 3 and Lou Putney

Lou Putney came on the scene of the Crystal River 3 plant after receiving a call from a plant engineer. The engineer claimed that the managers hired engineers based on “good ol’ boy mentality.” The plant had experience numerous shut downs since 1978. Along with this concern, the engineer was not confident that the manager possessed the qualifications to be a manager. Although the engineer pursued nothing further with his complaint, it prompted Putney to purchase shares of stock in the company that would allow him to file “shareholder resolutions.” Putney had looked into the nuclear reactors that were built of an unsafe material for emergency cooling procedures. The NRC had placed Crystal River on the top 14 worst reactors list because of this. So, the shares were purchased in 1981, which is when Putney filed his first shareholder resolution requesting the plant be shut down. This tradition was upheld by Putney for seven years until he was required to purchase more stock in order to continue filing resolutions. Over the course of sixteen years, Putney filed a total of fourteen shareholder resolutions. All of these resolutions were ignored and were met with offers to buy out his shares so he could no longer file the resolutions. The plant was officially decommissioned in September 2009.

Ronald Goldstein

Ronald J. Goldstein was a supervisor employed by EBASCO, which was a major contractor for the construction of the South Texas plants. In the summer of 1985, Goldstein identified safety problems to SAFETEAM, an internal compliance program established by EBASCO and Houston Lighting, including noncompliance with safety procedures, the failure to issue safety compliance reports, and quality control violations affecting the safety of the plant.

SAFETEAM was promoted as an independent safe haven for employees to voice their safety concerns. The two companies did not inform their employees that they did not believe complaints reported to SAFETEAM had any legal protection. After he filed his report to SAFETEAM, Goldstein was fired. Subsequently, Golstein filed suit under federal nuclear whistleblower statutes.

The U.S. Department of Labor ruled that his submissions to SAFETEAM were protected and his dismissal was invalid, a finding upheld by Labor Secretary Lynn Martin. The ruling was appealed and overturned by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled that private programs offered no protection to whistleblowers. After Goldstein lost his case, Congress amended the federal nuclear whistleblower law to provide protection reports made to internal systems and prevent retaliation against whistleblowers.

Fernald Nuclear Incidents

Aerial view of Fernald Feed Materials Production Center
Uranium components fabricated at Fernald

The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center was built in Crosby Township, Ohio in 1951, and decommissioned in 1989. Fernald processed uranium trioxide and uranium tetrafluoride, among other radioactive materials, to produce the uranium fuel cores for nuclear weapons. It was shrouded in suspicion with many manager changes and the people of the town ill-informed of the purpose of the plant. The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center also conducted an evaluation of how much material was contaminated by Radium. Using 138 pieces of the CR-39 film assays, they were able to determine that people working in the area where K-65 silos ( Underground chamber used to store missiles) had lower levels of exposure of materials contaminated by Radon than the Q-11 silos between the period of 1952-1988 Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology.Throughout 1951-1995 the plant had numerous scandals including faking numbers for contamination and disregarding evidence of ground water pollution. Among the citizens affected by the pollution was Mrs. Lisa Crawford who took action. Crawford and other residents filed a lawsuit in 1985 and became president of the organization FRESH (Fernald Residents for Environmental Safety and Health). A lawsuit was then filed once again against Fernald by former employees several years later in 1990. After several years of being heavily advised not to blow the whistle, the workers earned themselves a $15 million settlement and lifelong medical monitoring. In 1992, FERMCO was hired to construct a cleanup plan for the plant and in 1996, around accusations of wasteful spending, the cleanup of ground water and soil was completed.

Mordechai Vanunu

Mordechai Vanunu 2009

Mordechai Vanunu blew the whistle on the nuclear plant in Dimona, Israel in an interview with The Sunday Times that was published on 5 October 1986. According to Vanunu, this plant had been producing nuclear weapons for 10 to 20 years. It is estimated that there may be around 200 nuclear weapons in possession of Israel’s nuclear weapons program. Vanunu demonstrated his knowledge to Frank Barnaby and John Steinbach and they confirmed the credibility of his story. Frank Barnaby wrote in his Declaration of Frank Barnaby in the Matter of Mordechai Vanunu that Vanunu had the bare minimum knowledge of nuclear physics that a technician should have and accurately described the makeup of the nuclear plant in Dimona. Having served in full his 18 years prison term, ruled in closed door trial, including 11 years in solitary Vanunu has been further in and out of jail after. In 2007, sentenced to six months for violating terms of his parole, and in May 2010, again to three months for having met foreigners in violation of his release terms from jail.

Vanunu is ethnic Mizrahi Jew, born in Marrakesh Morocco, having emigrated to Israel, following its independence in 1948, like did many of the North African Jewish community did. Amnesty International issued a press release on 2 July 2007, stating that “The organisation considers Mordechai Vanunu to be a prisoner of conscience and calls for his immediate and unconditional release.”[6] Vanunu has been characterized internationally as a whistleblower[7][8] and by Israel as a traitor. Despite the whistle blown towards the operation of the nuclear weapons program in Israel, the Israeli government denied the existence of all allegations.Mordechai Vanunu is known as Israel`s Nuclear Whistleblower.

Arnold Gundersen

In 1990 Arnold Gundersen discovered radioactive material in an accounting safe at Nuclear Energy Services in Danbury, Connecticut, the consulting firm where he held a $120,000-a-year job as senior vice-president. Three weeks after he notified the company president of what he believed to be radiation safety violations, Gundersen was fired. According to The New York Times, for three years, Gundersen “was awakened by harassing phone calls in the middle of the night” and he “became concerned about his family’s safety”. Gundersen believes he was blacklisted, harassed and fired for doing what he thought was right.

The New York Times reports that Gundersen’s case is not uncommon, especially in the nuclear industry. Even though nuclear workers are encouraged to report potential safety hazards, those who do risk demotion and dismissal. Instead of correcting the problems, whistleblowers say, industry management and government agencies attack them as the cause of the problem. Driven out of their jobs and shunned by neighbors and co-workers, whistleblowers often turn to each other for support.

The Whistleblower Support Fund is an organization that has compiled resources for whistleblowers to access if they are considering whistleblowing. It was founded by Donald Ray Soeken, who has counseled whistleblowers for 35 years. In addition, a social network to connect whistleblowers to other whistleblowers will be implemented. It will be a private discussion where whistleblowers can safely seek support.

David Lochbaum

In the early 1990s, nuclear engineer David Lochbaum and a colleague, Don Prevatte, identified a safety problem in a plant where they were working, but were ignored when they raised the issue with the plant manager, the utility and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). After bringing their concerns to Congress, the problem was corrected not just at the original nuclear plant but at plants across the country.

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown

Gerald W. Brown was the whistleblower on the Thermo-Lag scandal, as well as on silicone foam firestop issues in the US and Canada, exposing the fact that fireproofing of wiring between control rooms and reactors did not function as intended and exposing bounding and combustibility issues with organic firestops.

George Galatis

George Galatis was a senior nuclear engineer and whistleblower who reported safety problems at the Millstone 1 Nuclear Power Plant, relating to reactor refueling procedures, in 1996. The unsafe procedures meant that spent fuel rod pools at Unit 1 had the potential to boil, possibly releasing radioactive steam throughout the plant. Galatis eventually took his concerns to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to find that they had “known about the unsafe procedures for years”. As a result of going to the NRC, Galatis experienced “subtle forms of harassment, retaliation, and intimidation”.

Rainer Moormann

Rainer Moormann in 2004

Rainer Moormann is a German chemist and nuclear power whistleblower. Since 1976 he has been working at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, doing research on safety problems with pebble bed reactors, fusion power and spallation neutron sources. In 2008 Moormann published a critical paper on the safety of pebble bed reactors, which raised attention among specialists in the field, and managed to distribute it via the media, facing considerable opposition. For doing this despite the occupational disadvantages he had to accept as a consequence, Moormann was awarded the whistleblower award of the Federation of German Scientists (VDW) and of the German section of the International Association of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms (IALANA).

Setsuo Fujiwara

Setsuo Fujiwara, who used to design reactors, said he clashed with supervisors over an inspection audit he conducted in March 2009 at the Tomari nuclear plant in Japan. Fujiwara refused to approve a routine test by the plant’s operator, Hokkaido Electric Power, saying the test was flawed. A week later, he was summoned by his supervisor, who ordered him to correct his written report to indicate that the test had been done properly. After Fujiwara refused, his employment contract was not renewed. “They told me my job was just to approve reactors, not to raise doubts about them”, said Fujiwara, 62, who is now suing the nuclear safety organization to get rehired. In a written response to questions from The New York Times, the agency said it could not comment while the court case was under way. Along with the lawsuit Mr. Fujiwara filed against the agency he used to work for, he had gone to the Tokyo District Court to further write several complaints about how the JNES ( Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization) failed to follow the UN laws concerning how to properly inspect nuclear energy reactors. Mr. Fujiwara also submitted several documents and emails that dealt with how the reactor inspections were improperly handled by JNES even though JNES denies all allegations. [42]

Walter Tamosaitis

The Hanford site resulted in a number of whistleblowers during the efforts to clean the site up. Walter Tamosaitis blew the whistle on the Energy Department’s plan for waste treatment at the Hanford site in 2011. Tamosaitis’s concern was the possibility of explosive hydrogen gas being built up inside tanks that the company was to store the harmful chemical sludge they were trying to put into hibernation for its chemical life. Shortly after this Tamosaitis was demoted and two years later, fired which triggered his lawsuit for wrongful termination. A $4.1 million settlement was offered to Tamosaitis from AECOM on 12 August 2015. Tamosaitis has since been reinstated.

Donna Busche blew the whistle resulting in her 2013 lawsuit with claims that the URS “retaliated against her. She was head of nuclear safety and a URS employee around the time when she expressed her concerns.

Gary Brunson reported 34 safety and engineering violations after quitting in 2012. Brunson was federal engineering chief before he quit.

Shelly Doss earned “$20,000 in emotional distress and $10,000 in callous disregard of her rights” as well as reinstatement in 2014. Doss was an environmental specialist at the time of her firing in 2011 working for Washington River Protection Solutions.

Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins

In 2012, Larry Criscione and Richard H. Perkins publicly accused the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of downplaying flood risks for nuclear plants which are sited on waterways downstream from large reservoirs and dams. They are engineers with over 20 years of combined government and military service who work for the NRC. Other nuclear safety advocates have supported their complaints.

BBC News: President Obama drinks water in crisis-hit Flint


President Obama drinks water in crisis-hit Flint – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-36206897

American Rivers | Stop the Power Grab by Hydropower Companies sign on line


It shouldn’t come as a surprise that massive, coal-fired utilities like Duke Energy and Southern Company are pushing these anti-environment provisions.

http://act.americanrivers.org/page/speakout/power-grab-hydropower-companies

American Rivers | Stop the Power Grab by Hydropower Companies sign on line


It shouldn’t come as a surprise that massive, coal-fired utilities like Duke Energy and Southern Company are pushing these anti-environment provisions.

http://act.americanrivers.org/page/speakout/power-grab-hydropower-companies

today’s birthday: Marie Curie (1867)


Marie Curie (1867)

Marie Curie was a Polish-born French physical chemist. She married fellow physicist Pierre Curie in 1895, and together they discovered the elements radium and polonium—which Marie named after her native Poland. They also distinguished alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. For their work on radioactivity—a term she coined—the Curies shared the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physics with Henri Becquerel. This made Marie the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize. In 1911, she became the first person to win what? More… Discuss

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

Tough lessons to learn from Hiroshima and Nagasaki: just war, nuclear disarmament :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Ruins of Nagasaki, shortly after the Aug. 9, 1945 atomic bombing of the city the United States. Public Domain, via National Archives and Records Administration.

By Kevin J. Jones

Denver, Colo., Aug 6, 2015 / 12:10 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- The 70th anniversary of the US atomic strikes on Japan has prompted reflection, commemoration, and debate about the ethics of war and the world’s nuclear arsenal.

“There’s no winning in nuclear war,” Maryann Cusimano Love, an international relations professor at the Catholic University of America, told CNA. Hiroshima and Nagasaki teach “how horrific nuclear war is.”

“Many folks are not aware of how many nuclear weapons remain with us today and how dangerous these arsenals are,” she continued. “That is why the Catholic Church has continued to argue that we have to get rid of nuclear weapons, that the presence of these weapons is very dangerous for human life and very destabilizing.”

Seventy years ago, the only wartime use of nuclear weapons took place in the Aug. 6 attack on Hiroshima and the Aug. 9 attack on Nagasaki by the United States.

The Hiroshima attack killed around 80,000 people instantly and may have caused about 130,000 deaths, mostly civilians. The attack on the port city of Nagasaki killed about 40,000 instantly and destroyed a third of the city, the BBC reports.

The attacks took a heavy toll on all of Japan’s population, but Nagasaki was a historic center of Catholicism since European missionaries such as St. Francis Xavier arrived in the 16th century. After Japan’s rulers closed the country, in part due to fears of foreign domination, Japanese Catholics survived centuries of persecution before their freedom of religion was secured again in the 19th century.

via Tough lessons to learn from Hiroshima and Nagasaki: just war, nuclear disarmament :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

picture of the day: The Trinity Atomic Bomb Test



The Trinity Atomic Bomb Test

Just before dawn on July 16, 1945, the first atomic test bomb was exploded at a site called Trinity in the New Mexican desert. It was the culmination of 28 months of intense scientific research conducted under the leadership of physicist Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer (seen above) under the code name Manhattan Project. The successful atomic test was witnessed by only one journalist, William L. Laurence of the New York Times, who described seeing the blinding explosion: ‘One felt as though he had been privileged to…be present at the moment of the Creation when the Lord said: Let There be Light.’ Oppenheimer’s own thoughts from the Hindu Bhagavad-Gita were very different: ‘I am become death, the shatterer of worlds.’

Photo: Library of Congress

this day in the yesteryear: First Test of a Nuclear Weapon (1945) One of the darkest day in human history!


First Test of a Nuclear Weapon (1945)

Called the Trinity test, the first test of a nuclear weapon was conducted by the US in New Mexico on what is now White Sands Missile Range. The detonation of the implosion-design plutonium bomb—the same type used on Nagasaki, Japan, a few weeks later—was equivalent to the explosion of approximately 20 kilotons of TNT, and is usually considered the beginning of the Atomic Age. It is said that the scientists who observed the detonation set up a betting pool on what the result would be. Who won? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Glenn Seaborg (1912)


Glenn Seaborg (1912)

In 1940, American chemist Glenn Seaborg and his colleagues discovered plutonium. He soon joined the Manhattan Project and was instrumental in the development of the atomic bomb, which he unsuccessfully pressed President Truman not to use on civilian targets. In 1951, he and Edwin McMillan shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on transuranium elements. During his lifetime, Seaborg held dozens of patents—among them the only patents ever issued for what? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Three Mile Island nuclear power plant radiation release Accident (1979)


Three Mile Island Accident (1979)

Both mechanical failure and human error contributed to the 1979 failure of a nuclear reactor cooling system at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Pennsylvania, which led to overheating, partial melting of the reactor’s uranium core, and the release of radioactive gases. Though it caused no immediate deaths or injuries, the incident increased public fears about the safety of nuclear power. What nuclear accident-themed film was released just two weeks before the incident? More… Discuss

Litvinenko’s Autopsy Called “Most Dangerous” Ever


Litvinenko’s Autopsy Called “Most Dangerous” Ever

The 2006 autopsy of murdered ex-KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko was likely the most dangerous ever conducted, a pathologist told a UK inquiry this week. Litvinenko died of multiple organ failure after drinking tea dosed with polonium-210—a highly radioactive isotope that may have been undetectable post-mortem if police had not taken the unusual move of having him tested by atomic scientists just before he died. During the autopsy, pathologists wore protective suits with hoods fed with filtered air to avoid exposure to radiation. More… Discuss

Ethnography and folklore: VIKI STEFANOVICI – TARA FAGARASULUI (Old Romanian Countries)


VIKI STEFANOVICI-TARA FAGARASULUI

 

This pressed: Cake to celebrate the success of the atomic testing program, 1946 — Historical Pics


The “shadow” of a Hiroshima victim, permanently etched into stone steps, after the 1945 atomic bomb: you can tell that it was a elderly human being by the use of the cane in his right hand.


The "shadow" of a Hiroshima victim, permanently etched into stone steps, after the 1945 atomic bomb: you can tell that it was a elderly human being by the use of the cane in his right hand.

The “shadow” of a Hiroshima victim, permanently etched into stone steps, after the 1945 atomic bomb: you can tell that it was a elderly human being by the use of the cane in his right hand. (Click to enlarge in new window)

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: PAUL WARFIELD TIBBETS, JR. (1915)


Paul Warfield Tibbets, Jr. (1915)

A US Air Force colonel during World War II, Tibbets is best known for piloting the Enola Gay—named for his mother—on August 6, 1945, when it dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. The bomb, code-named Little Boy, was the first atomic weapon deployed in the history of warfare and killed tens of thousands of people. Initially hailed as a hero in the US, Tibbets became a target of controversy in the debate over the ethics of atomic warfare. What was his stance on the bombing later in life? More… Discuss

 

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New Independent Fukushima Food Contamination Results | SimplyInfo


polimasterdetectNew Independent Fukushima Food Contamination Results | SimplyInfo.

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Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video


Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Celsium-137 in salmon stockFukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video.

Related articles

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This Day in the Yesteryear: DEADLY INCIDENT AT EXPERIMENTAL US NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR (1960)


Deadly Incident at Experimental US Nuclear Power Reactor (1960)

The only fatal nuclear reactor incident in US history occurred at the US Army’s SL-1 experimental nuclear reactor. It was being restarted after an 11-day shutdown when a control rod was withdrawn too far, causing a “prompt critical” reaction. Water surrounding the core explosively vaporized and lifted the enormous reactor vessel more than 9 ft (2.7 m) off the ground. All three operators—one of whom was impaled and pinned to the ceiling—died. Why was the incident rumored to be a murder-suicide? More…Discuss

Calls for Safer Chemicals Dominate Listening Session on Chemical Security | Center for Effective Government


 

Calls for Safer Chemicals Dominate Listening Session on Chemical Security | Center for Effective Government.

Fukushima News 10/23/13: Fukushima Workers “We Hide Accidents”; Typhoon Threat Panics Tepco


Fukushima News 10/23/13: Fukushima Workers “We Hide Accidents”; Typhoon Threat Panics Tepco
Fukushima Workers Speak Out: We hide accidents at plant — CNN: Health is suffering — CBS: Radioactive materials “just pour right in” after cleanup (VIDEOS)
http://enenews.com/fukushima-workers-…

Fukushima plant struggles with typhoon threat
The operator of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant is racing to secure storage space for tainted rainwater as another powerful typhoon approaches.
Tokyo Electric Power Company has begun moving the rainwater into underground pools once deemed too leaky. The water is the result of typhoons and downpours that have filled barriers around radioactive waste water tanks.
TEPCO has been storing the most contaminated rainwater in tanks and in the basement of a turbine building. But with Typhoon Francisco set to hit Japan’s mainland over the weekend, the tanks are full.
Japan’s nuclear regulator has approved moving the tainted water to 3 underground pools. The pools have a total capacity of about 9,000 tons.
TEPCO stopped using the pools after similar models leaked in April. The utility now says it no other option but to use them.
The utility also says it found 140,000 becquerels per liter of Beta-ray emitting radioactivity in an onsite ditch on Wednesday. The radioactivity has doubled since the previous day. TEPCO says it is transferring the contaminated water to a tank.

NRA chief to meet TEPCO head on nuclear safety
Officials from Japan’s Nuclear Regulation Authority have criticized a report submitted by Tokyo Electric Power Company on safety measures at its nuclear plants.
The NRA met on Wednesday after TEPCO submitted the report to the authority on Tuesday of last week.
The report outlines the measures TEPCO is taking to prevent radioactive water leaks and other problems at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant. In the report, TEPCO also says it is capable of safely managing 2 reactors at the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa plant in Niigata Prefecture. The utility has plans to restart the reactors.

Japan pursuing new nuclear disposal technology
The Japanese government plans to develop new technology that would cut the environmental impact of highly radioactive waste from nuclear power plants.
The waste is believed to have an impact on the environment that lasts tens of thousands of years. The government’s current plan involves burying it deep underground. But officials have yet to choose a site due to safety concerns.

Fukushima readies for dangerous operation to remove 400 tons of spent fuel
http://rt.com/news/fukushima-operatio…

http://enenews.com/nuclear-expert-one…

Scientific Reports: It’s “remarkable” where plutonium from Fukushima reactor is suspected to have been found — “Even more unexpected” that it’s located outside main strip of contamination — Need to assess consequences for public of a release of plutonium-rich hot particles (PHOTO)
http://enenews.com/scientific-reports…

Tepco’s Typhoon measures to prevent contaminated water overflowing entirely messed up
http://fukushima-diary.com/2013/10/te…

Tepco discharged “rainwater” of 2 tank area dams again / Not even a Typhoon weather
http://fukushima-diary.com/2013/10/te…

Back-up tanks of 4,000 tonnes are already nearly full with two more Typhoons coming
http://fukushima-diary.com/2013/10/ba…

Japan Mulls Plan for One Operator to Run All Reactors: Energy
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10…

How Accurate Are The Instruments in Nuclear Reactors?
http://www.globalresearch.ca/how-accu…

Candu looks overseas after Ontario nixes new nuclear plants
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/candu…

The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry
http://nuclear-news.net/

FukushimaDiary
http://fukushima-diary.com/category/d…

http://enenews.com/

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Banning Lead Ammunition Could Give Condors a Chance


 

Banning Lead Ammunition Could Give Condors a Chance.

Lessons from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident



This week Fairewinds Chief Engineer Arnie Gundersen participated in two panel discussions in Boston and New York City entitled “The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident: Ongoing Lessons” Other panelists included Ralph Nader, Peter Bradford, Naoto Kan, Gregory Jaczko and Jean-Michel Cousteau.

The video above is a recording of Arnie’s speech entitled “Forty Good Years And One Very Bad Day.” To watch the entire NYC presentation, visit:
http://new.livestream.com/FukushimaLe…

Uploaded by permission. For more information, please visit:
http://fairewinds.org/podcast/fukushi…

For complete transcript, visit:
http://www.globalresearch.ca/lessons-…

 

Mercury Poisoning Symptoms



http://www.ihealthtube.com http://www.facebook.com/ihealthtube
Dr. Alison Adams discusses mercury toxicity and how it may affect you. Dr. Adams talks about how mercury can affect different parts of the body and how it reacts with other metals. Could your condition be from mercury toxicity? Please watch!

 

Just How Toxic is Mercury? – A Study by University of Calgary



In this video, you will see just how toxic mercury really is and how it causes damage to the brain.

Quoted from the video:

“Shown here is the neurite of a live neuron isolated from snail brain tissue displaying linear growth due to growth cone activity.

It is important to note that growth cones in all animal species, ranging from snails to humans, have identical structural and behavioral characteristics, and use proteins of virtually identical composition.

In this experiment, neurons also isolated from snail brain tissue were grown in culture for several days. Afterwhich, very low concentrations of mercury (30 micrograms) were added to the culture medium for 20 minutes.

Over the next 30 minutes, the neuron underwent rapid degeneration leaving the denuded neurofibrils seen here.

To understand how mercury causes this degeneration, let us return to our illustration. As mentioned before, tubulin proteins link together during normal cell growth to form microtubules which support the neurite structure.

When mercury ions are introduced into the culture medium, they infiltrate the cell and bind themselves to newly synthesized tubulin molecules.

More specifically, the mercury ions attach themselves to the binding sites reserved for Guanosine Triphosphate (GTP) on the beta subunit of the affected tubulin molecules.

Since bound GTP normally provides the energy which allows tubulin molecules to attach to one another, mercury ions bound to these sites prevent tubulin proteins from linking together.

Consequently, the neurite’s microtubules begin to disassemble into free tubulin molecules, leaving the neurites stripped of its support structure.

Ultimately, both the developing neurite and its growth cone collapse, and some denuded neurofibrils form aggregates, or tangles, as depicted here.

Shown here is a neurite growth cone stained specifically for tubulin and actin, before and after mercury exposure.

Note that the mercury has caused disintigration of tubilin microtubule structure. 

These new findings reveal important visual evidence as to how mercury causes neuro-degeneration.

More importantly, this study provides the first direct evidence that low-level mercury exposure is indeed a precipitating factor that can initiate this neuro-degenerative process within the brain.”

 

Elderly may be getting too many bone density tests | TIME.com


Elderly may be getting too many bone density tests | TIME.com.

Indeed, such tests should be done in middle age, and for sure as a precautionary, in patients diagnosed, or symptomatic of diseases and medical conditions (or suspected of such) including Diabetes, menopause, etc., in both genders. The Insurance industry, and the “established protocols to be followed upon by doctors, is hellishly denying patients (those who are endowed with any health care at all) greedy and limited to what administrators think care should be( a big banner, claiming that (‘CARE MORE” for instance) 🙂

Syria Govenrnment’s: “No evidence has been shown” they are responsible for attack


http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-57601138/strike-on-syria-may-unleash-more-turmoil-u.n-secretary-general-ban-ki-moon-warns/

Syria gov’t: “No evidence has been shown” they are responsible for attack

September 3, 2013, 12:22 AM

Syrian Deputy Foreign Minister tells CBS NewsElizabeth Palmer that “armed groups” were behind Damascus attack which killed hundreds, and Washington should put forward credible evidence to prove their case that the Syrian government used chemical weapons.

Strike on Syria may unleash more turmoil, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warns – CBS News


Strike on Syria may unleash more tuInsert an Imagermoil, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warns – CBS News.

 

International Coalition to Ban Uranium Weapons – Latest news


 

International Coalition to Ban Uranium Weapons – Latest news.

National Geographic – Gyre: Creating Art From a Plastic Ocean


Published on Aug 21, 2013

In this full-length web exclusive, National Geographic journeys along the remote Alaskan coast … in search of garbage. A team of scientists and artists investigates the buildup of marine debris washing out of the great gyres, or currents, in the Pacific Ocean. Called the Gyre Expedition, their goal is to create art from the trash they find to raise awareness about its impact on oceans and wildlife. Their artwork will become part of a traveling exhibition in 2014. 

Learn more about the expedition and the next phase of the Gyre Project:
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/gyre

 

BBC News – Fukushima nuclear plant: Radioactive water leak found


 

BBC News – Fukushima nuclear plant: Radioactive water leak found.

With New Leader in Place, EPA Can Recommit to Its Environmental Agenda | Center for Effective Government


 

With New Leader in Place, EPA Can Recommit to Its Environmental Agenda | Center for Effective Government.

Dare call this bread? By the way Forgot to mention High fructose, and high Corn Syrup you guys love so much to feed us!


Calories in Bread, Reduced-calorie, Wheat

 
 
 

Wondering how many calories are in Bread, Reduced-calorie, Wheat?

 

 
 
slice
 
Add to Log
 

Bread, Reduced-calorie, Wheat

AGrade
46Calories
 
 
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 slice (23 g)
Per Serving% Daily Value*

Calories 46

Calories from Fat 5

Total Fat 0.5g1%

Saturated Fat 0.1g0%

Polyunsaturated Fat 0.2g

Monounsaturated Fat 0.1g

Cholesterol 0mg0%

Sodium 118mg5%

Carbohydrates 10.0g3%

Dietary Fiber 2.8g11%

Sugars 0.7g

Protein 2.1g

 
Vitamin A 0% · Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 2% · Iron 4%
See More
 
*Based on a 2000 calorie diet

Bread, Reduced-calorie, Wheat Calories and Health Benefits

 

Fat

 

Pro

 

Carb

 

Alc

 
 

Water9.94 g

Energy46 kcal

Energy190 kj

Protein2.09 g

Total lipid (fat)0.53 g

Ash0.44 g

Carbohydrate, by difference10.03 g

Fiber, total dietary2.8 g

Sugars, total0.71 g

Calcium, Ca18 mg

Iron, Fe0.68 mg

Magnesium, Mg9 mg

Phosphorus, P23 mg

Potassium, K28 mg

Sodium, Na118 mg

Zinc, Zn0.26 mg

Copper, Cu0.032 mg

Manganese, Mn0.196 mg

Selenium, Se7 mcg

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid~ mg

Thiamin0.097 mg

Riboflavin0.068 mg

Niacin0.894 mg

Pantothenic acid0.145 mg

Vitamin B-60.029 mg

Folate, total21 mcg

Folic acid14 mcg

Folate, food6 mcg

Folate, DFE31 mcg_DFE

Choline, total4.3 mg

Vitamin B-12~ mcg

Vitamin B-12, added~ mcg

Vitamin A, IU~ IU

Vitamin A, RAE~ mcg_RAE

Retinol~ mcg

Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)0.06 mg

Vitamin E, added~ mg

Vitamin K (phylloquinone)~ mcg

Fatty acids, total saturated0.079 g

4:0~ g

6:0~ g

8:0~ g

10:0~ g

12:00.001 g

14:00.002 g

16:00.068 g

18:00.006 g

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated0.058 g

16:1 undifferentiated0.009 g

18:1 undifferentiated0.049 g

20:1~ g

22:1 undifferentiated~ g

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated0.223 g

18:2 undifferentiated0.211 g

18:3 undifferentiated0.012 g

18:4~ g

20:4 undifferentiated~ g

20:5 n-3~ g

22:5 n-3~ g

22:6 n-3~ g

Cholesterol~ mg

Tryptophan0.025 g

Threonine0.063 g

Isoleucine0.082 g

Leucine0.147 g

Lysine0.06 g

Methionine0.037 g

Cystine0.043 g

Phenylalanine0.102 g

Tyrosine0.063 g

Valine0.092 g

Arginine0.078 g

Histidine0.045 g

Alanine0.07 g

Aspartic acid0.1 g

Glutamic acid0.658 g

Glycine0.073 g

Proline0.226 g

Serine0.101 g

Alcohol, ethyl~ g

Caffeine~ mg

Theobromine~ mg

Carotene, beta~ mcg

Carotene, alpha~ mcg

Cryptoxanthin, beta~ mcg

Lycopene~ mcg

Lutein + zeaxanthin9 mcg

    Read more:

Calories in Bread, Reduced-calorie, Wheat | Nutrition and Health Facts

http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-bread-reduced-calorie-wheat-i18055#ixzz2bWTa0Qlw

This Day in the Yesteryear: US DROPS ATOMIC BOMB ON HIROSHIMA (1945)


US Drops Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima (1945)

After Germany surrendered in May 1945, the Allied forces focused on ending the war in the Pacific. Japan refused to surrender, dismissing the Allies’ vows to devastate the country. The atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima was the first ever dropped on a populated area. At least 130,000 people were killed, injured, or declared missing, and 90 percent of the city was leveled by the blast. Another atomic bomb was dropped on the city of Nagasaki three days later. When did Japan surrender? More… Discuss

Exclusive: Japan nuclear body says radioactive water at Fukushima an ’emergency’


Exclusive -_- Japan nuclear body says radioactive water at Fukushima an 'emergency'- From Reuters

Exclusive -_- Japan nuclear body says radioactive water at Fukushima an ’emergency’- From Reuters (Click to access Exclusive Report at Reuters)

EXCERPTS:

By Antoni Slodkowski and Mari Saito

TOKYO – Highly radioactive water seeping into the ocean from Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is creating an “emergency” that the operator is struggling to contain, an official from the country’s nuclear watchdog said on Monday.

This contaminated groundwater has breached an underground barrier, is rising toward the surface and is exceeding legal limits of radioactive discharge, Shinji Kinjo, head of a Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) task force, told Reuters.

Countermeasures planned by Tokyo Electric Power Co are only a temporary solution, he said.

 

Ignore fracking protests, government tells planners | Environment | The Observer


 

Ignore fracking protests, government tells planners | Environment | The Observer.

This Day in the Yesteryear: OPERATION SUNSHINE: FIRST CROSSING OF A SUBMERGED VESSEL AT NORTH POLE (1958)


Operation Sunshine: First Crossing of a Submerged Vessel at North Pole (1958)

The USS Nautilus was the world’s first operational nuclear-powered submarine. In 1958, the Nautilus embarked on Operation Sunshine, during which it completed the first submerged journey across the North Pole, resurfacing northeast of Greenland 96 hours later. During the mission, deep ice in the area of the Chukchi Sea forced the Nautilus to turn back temporarily. In the event that the submarine became trapped in ice, what dramatic action did its commander plan to take? More… Discuss

Success of EPA Climate Standards Will Depend on White House Support | Center for Effective Government


 

Success of EPA Climate Standards Will Depend on White House Support | Center for Effective Government.

THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY IS ESTABLISHED (1957)


The International Atomic Energy Agency Is Established (1957)

In 1953, during the Cold War, US President Dwight D. Eisenhower proposed the creation of an international body to regulate the use of nuclear power in his “Atoms for Peace” address to the United Nations General Assembly. Four years later, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was established to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The IAEA may purchase and sell fissionable materials, and it inspects for compliance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Is the IAEA part of the UNMore… Discuss

 


Kenneth Tompkins Bainbridge (1904)

Bainbridge was an American physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project, the US government program that produced the first atomic bomb. He was the director of Project Trinity, the first nuclear test explosion—the sole test before the bombs were used. The successful test took place in New Mexico on July 16, 1945, and Bainbridge called the blast “a foul and awesome display.” He later became an outspoken opponent of nuclear testing. What was Bainbridge’s other notable scientific accomplishment? More… Discuss

risk associated with fracking


risk associated with Fracking

INDIAN SCHOOLCHILDREN SICKENED AND KILLED BY CONTAMINATED LUNCH


Indian Schoolchildren Sickened and Killed by Contaminated Lunch

At least 25 schoolchildren in the Indian state of Biharhave died and dozens of others have been hospitalized after consuming a school-provided lunch apparently contaminated with insecticide. India’s Mid-Day Meal Scheme is the world’s largest school feeding program, providing free meals to 120 million children. Regrettably, it seems the entire incident could have been avoided if the headmistress had simply heeded the cook’s warning that something smelled funny about the food. Instead, she demanded that it be served anyway. Once news of the mass poisoning broke, the headmistress fled. It is not yet known whether the contamination was intentional. More… Discuss

 

French nuclear site way over budget and Barclays gets another fine – BUSINESS BULLETIN – 07/17/2013 – YouTube


French nuclear site way over budget and Barclays gets another fine – BUSINESS BULLETIN – 07/17/2013 – YouTube.

Advocate_-_ NY Farm Workers ‘Treated Like An Insect’


Advocate_-_  NY Farm Workers 'Treated Like An Insect'

Advocate_-_ NY Farm Workers ‘Treated Like An Insect’ (Click to access report and video)

ONTARIO, N.Y. – Farm workers from New York and around the nation have flown to the nation’s capital to urge Congress to pass stronger legislation to reduce what one government estimate says are 10,000 to 20,000 acute pesticide poisonings yearly in the agricultural industry. Alina Diaz, a farmworkers’ organizer from the town of Ontario, is in Washington with several workers who toil in New York’s fields and orchards. “One of them told me, ‘I’m tired of being treated like a roach, like an insect. I’m tired of being sick,” said Diaz, vice president, Alianza Nacional de Campesinas. – See more at: http://www.publicnewsservice.org/index.php?/content/article/33462-2&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter#sthash.5jZ55XE4.dpuf

 

Greenpeace activists break into French nuclear plant | euronews, world news


 

Just because you hear not about...It doesn't mean it didn't happen!

Greenpeace activists break into French nuclear plant | euronews, world news.

WATCH: ‘Ag Gag’ Laws Silence Factory Farm Whistleblowers | Bill Moyers


 

Bill Moyers: Watch: 'Ag Gag' Laws Silence Factory Farm Whistleblowers

WATCH: ‘Ag Gag’ Laws Silence Factory Farm Whistleblowers | Bill Moyers.

Fukushima plant boss hailed as hero dies | World news | guardian.co.uk


 

Guilty: As not charged!

Fukushima plant boss hailed as hero dies | World news | guardian.co.uk.