Category Archives: running

this pressed: Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse…with Diabetes|via Lilly


Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse…with Diabetes by Amy O’Connor 11/17/15 1 Comment Facebook Twitter Google+ Email Spoiler Alert: This post contains details about last weekend’s episode of The Walking Dead. But, don’t worry, I don’t tell you what happens to Glenn because we still don’t know! On this week’s The Walking Dead, viewers faced a previously unexplored danger in the post-Apocalyptic world—managing diabetes. AMC’s Sunday night favorite introduced Tina, a young woman with more than just hordes of the undead on her mind as she wandered the roads near Alexandria; she also had diabetes. Let’s be honest, managing your diabetes can be tricky. Many viewers on Twitter and Reddit had a hard time fathoming how exactly one survives months or even years into a zombie apocalypse. One thing’s clear to me: Tina had an emergency plan for her diabetes. Life is full of unexpected events, disasters and tragedies, both natural and man-made. For diabetics, these situations become even more challenging. That’s where your emergency plan comes in to play. Check out this handy graphic from our partnership with the American College of Endocrinology for tips on how to make sure you’re prepared for any emergency, zombie or otherwise. Tina may not have survived long in The Walking Dead universe, but, ultimately, it was the bites of two zombies that brought her to her end – not her diabetes. As the episode came to an end, I couldn’t help but feel disappointed that we couldn’t have had a few more weeks to understand just how Tina had made it this far. It seems I wasn’t the only one. Here are a few of my favorite tweets sent during last night’s episode:

Source: Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse…with Diabetes | via Lilly

Advertisements

this day in the yesteryear: Johnny Campbell Becomes World’s First Cheerleader (1898)


Johnny Campbell Becomes World’s First Cheerleader (1898)

Cheerleading first appeared in the US in the late 1880s with crowds chanting to encourage school spirit. The first recorded instance of organized cheering took place at Princeton University in 1884. Later, a Princeton graduate introduced the idea at University of Minnesota football games. In 1898, Minnesota student Johnny Campbell directed a crowd in a cheer—marking the official birth of organized cheerleading. The first cheer squads were all male. When did women enter the world of cheerleading? More… Discuss

this pressed: HEALTH – DIABETES: Pictures of Famous People With Diabetes|via WebMD


tom hanks

The Oscar-winning actor announced he has type 2 diabetes when late-night host David Letterman commented on his newly slim figure in October 2013. “I went to the doctor and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated. You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man.'” Hanks added that the condition is controllable, but he joked that he couldn’t get back down to his high-school weight of 96 pounds. “I was a very skinny boy!

This WebMD slideshow presents pictures of celebrities with type 1 or type 2 diabetes including Halle Berry, Larry King, and Nick Jonas from The Jonas Brothers.

Source: Pictures of Famous People With Diabetes

this pressed: Glycohemoglobin (HbA1c, A1c) |via Web MD


Hemoglobin

n5551170.jpg

Illustration copyright 2000 by Nucleus Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. http://www.nucleusinc.com Hemoglobin is the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen. ByHealthwise Staff Primary Medical ReviewerE. Gregory Thompson, MD – Internal Medicine Specialist Medical ReviewerBrian Leber, MDCM, FRCPC – Hematology Current as ofMarch 12, 2014 WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise Last Updated: March 12, 2014 This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information. © 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. (click to access the website)


Illustration copyright 2000 by Nucleus Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. http://www.nucleusinc.com

Hemoglobin is the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerE. Gregory Thompson, MD – Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerBrian Leber, MDCM, FRCPC – Hematology

Current as of March 12, 2014

Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: March 12, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

 Further Reading:

*******************************************************************

Glycohemoglobin (HbA1c, A1c)

A glycohemoglobin test, or hemoglobin A1c, is a blood test that checks the amount of sugar (glucose) bound to the hemoglobin camera.gif in the red blood cells. When hemoglobin and glucose bond, a coat of sugar forms on the hemoglobin. That coat gets thicker when there’s more sugar in the blood. A1c tests measure how thick that coat has been over the past 3 months, which is how long a red blood cell lives. People who have diabetes or other conditions that increase their blood glucose levels have more glycohemoglobin (sugar bound to hemoglobin) than normal.

An A1c test can be used to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes. The A1c test checks the long-term control of blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Most doctors think checking an A1c level is the best way to check how well a person is controlling his or her diabetes.

A home blood glucose test measures the level of blood glucose only at that moment. Blood glucose levels change during the day for many reasons, including medicine, diet, exercise, and the level of insulin in the blood.

It is useful for a person who has diabetes to have information about the long-term control of blood sugar levels. The A1c test result does not change with any recent changes in diet, exercise, or medicines.

Glucose binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells at a steady rate. Since red blood cells last 3 to 4 months, the A1c test shows how much glucose is in the plasma part of blood. This test shows how well your diabetes has been controlled in the last 2 to 3 months and whether your diabetes treatment plan needs to be changed.

Source: Glycohemoglobin (HbA1c, A1c)| via WebMD

Heart of L.A. is today! Join in on the fun:


//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

From the Hill : ON SUMAC TRAIL


From the Hill : ON SUMAC TRAIL

From the Hill : 1000 Yards up un Peppergrass Trail


From the Hill : 1000 Yards up un Peppergrass Trail

HAIKU-Rattlesnake, poetic thought by George-B (The Smudge and other poems page)


HAIKU – Rattlesnake, poetic thought by George-B

Rattlesnake crosses
trails heading for valleys’ shade
witness smudge behind.

to-rattlesnake-ridge.jpg

My first hike there! (found it on Yahoo search: isn’t that something?)

 More:

to-rattlesnake-ridge