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Watch “Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake – The Kirov Ballet” on YouTube


Swan Lake

This article is about the ballet. For other uses, see Swan Lake (disambiguation).

Swan Lake (Russian: Лебеди́ное о́зеро, romanized: Lebedínoye ózero), Op. 20, is a ballet composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1875–76. Despite its initial failure, it is now one of the most popular of all ballets.
The scenario, initially in two acts, was fashioned from Russian and German folk tales[a] and tells the story of Odette, a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer’s curse. The choreographer of the original production was Julius Reisinger(Václav Reisinger). The ballet was premiered by the Bolshoi Ballet on 4 March [O.S. 20 February] 1877[1][2] at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. Although it is presented in many different versions, most ballet companies base their stagings both choreographically and musically on the 1895 revival of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, first staged for the Imperial Ballet on 15 January 1895, at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg. For this revival, Tchaikovsky’s score was revised by the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatre’s chief conductor and composer Riccardo Drigo.[3]

History

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Design by F. Gaanen for the décor of act 2, Moscow 1877

Origins of the ballet

There is no evidence to prove who wrote the original libretto, or where the idea for the plot came from. Russian and German folk tales have been proposed as possible sources, including “The White Duck” and “The Stolen Veil” by Johann Karl August Musäus, but both those tales differ significantly from the ballet.[4]
One theory is that the original choreographer, Julius Reisinger, who was a Bohemian (and therefore likely to be familiar with The Stolen Veil), created the story. Another theory is that it was written by Vladimir Petrovich Begichev, director of the Moscow Imperial Theatres at the time, possibly with Vasily Geltser, danseurof the Moscow Imperial Bolshoi Theatre (a surviving copy of the libretto bears his name). Since the first published libretto does not correspond with Tchaikovsky’s music in many places, one theory is that the first published version was written by a journalist after viewing initial rehearsals (new opera and ballet productions were always reported in the newspapers, along with their respective scenarios).
Some contemporaries of Tchaikovsky recalled the composer taking great interest in the life story of Bavarian King Ludwig II, whose life had supposedly been marked by the sign of Swan and could have been the prototype of the dreamer Prince Siegfried.[5] However, Ludwig’s death happened 10 years after the first performance of the ballet.
Begichev commissioned the score of Swan Lake from Tchaikovsky in May 1875 for 800 rubles. Tchaikovsky worked with only a basic outline from Julius Reisinger of the requirements for each dance.[6] However, unlike the instructions for the scores of The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, no written instruction is known to have survived.

Tchaikovsky’s influences

From around the time of the turn of the 19th century until the beginning of the 1890s, scores for ballets were almost always written by composers known as “specialists,” who were highly skilled at scoring the light, decorative, melodious, and rhythmically clear music that was at that time in vogue for ballet. Tchaikovsky studied the music of “specialists” such as the Italian Cesare Pugni and the Austrian Ludwig Minkus, before setting to work on Swan Lake.
Tchaikovsky had a rather negative opinion of the “specialist” ballet music until he studied it in detail, being impressed by the nearly limitless variety of infectious melodies their scores contained. Tchaikovsky most admired the ballet music of such composers as Léo Delibes, Adolphe Adam, and later, Riccardo Drigo. He would later write to his protégé, the composer Sergei Taneyev, “I listened to the Delibes ballet Sylvia … what charm, what elegance, what wealth of melody, rhythm, and harmony. I was ashamed, for if I had known of this music then, I would not have written Swan Lake.” Tchaikovsky most admired Adam’s 1844 score for Giselle, which used the Leitmotiftechnique: associating certain themes with certain characters or moods, a technique he would use in Swan Lake, and later, The Sleeping Beauty.
Tchaikovsky drew on previous compositions for his Swan Lake score. According to two of Tchaikovsky’s relatives – his nephew Yuri Lvovich Davydov and his niece Anna Meck-Davydova – the composer had earlier created a little ballet called The Lake of the Swans at their home in 1871. This ballet included the famous Leitmotif, the Swan’s Theme or Song of the Swans. He also made use of material from The Voyevoda, an opera he had abandoned in 1868. The Grand adage (a.k.a. the Love Duet) from the second scene of Swan Lake was fashioned from an aria from that opera, as was the Valse des fiancéesfrom the third scene. Another number which included a theme from The Voyevoda was the Entr’acte of the fourth scene.
By April 1876 the score was complete, and rehearsals began. Soon Reisinger began setting certain numbers aside that he dubbed “undanceable.” Reisinger even began choreographing dances to other composers’ music, but Tchaikovsky protested and his pieces were reinstated. Although the two artists were required to collaborate, each seemed to prefer working as independently of the other as possible.[7]

Composition process

Tchaikovsky’s excitement with Swan Lake is evident from the speed with which he composed: commissioned in the spring of 1875, the piece was created within one year. His letters to Sergei Taneyev from August 1875 indicate, however, that it was not only his excitement that compelled him to create it so quickly but his wish to finish it as soon as possible, so as to allow him to start on an opera. Respectively, he created scores of the first three numbers of the ballet, then the orchestration in the fall and winter, and was still struggling with the instrumentation in the spring. By April 1876, the work was complete. Tchaikovsky’s mention of a draft suggests the presence of some sort of abstract but no such draft has ever been seen. Tchaikovsky wrote various letters to friends expressing his longstanding desire to work with this type of music, and his excitement concerning his current stimulating, albeit laborious task.[8]

Performance history

Adelaide Giuri as Odette and Mikhail Mordkin as Prince Siegfried in Aleksandr Gorsky’s staging of the Petipa/Ivanov Swan Lake for the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow, 1901. A young Vera Karalli is seen kneeling.

Moscow première (world première)

Date: 4 March (OS 20 February) 1877

Place: Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow

Balletmaster: Julius Reisinger

Conductor: Stepan Ryabov

Scene Designers: Karl Valts (acts 2 & 4), Ivan Shangin (act 1), Karl Groppius (act 3)

St. Petersburg première

Date: 27 January 1895

Place: Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg

Balletmaster: Marius Petipa (acts 1 & 3), Lev Ivanov (acts 2 & 4)

Conductor: Riccardo Drigo

Scene Designers: Ivan Andreyev, Mikhail Bocharov, Henrich Levogt

Costume Designer: Yevgeni Ponomaryov[9]

Other notable productions

1880 and 1882, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Joseph Hansenafter Reisinger, conductor and designers as in première

1901, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Aleksandr Gorsky, conducted by Andrey Arends, scenes by Aleksandr Golovin (act 1), Konstantin Korovin (acts 2 & 4), N. Klodt (act 3)

1911, London, Ballets Russes, Sergei Diaghilev production, choreography by Michel Fokineafter Petipa–Ivanov, scenes by Golovin and Korovin

Original interpreters
RoleMoscow 1877Moscow 1880St. Petersburg 1895[9]Moscow 1901London 1911QueensopranoOlga NikolayevaGiuseppina CecchettiSiegfriedtenorVictor GillertAlfred BekefiPavel GerdtMikhail MordkinVaslav NijinskyBennoSergey NikitinAleksandr OblakovWolfgangWilhelm WannerGillertOdettePelageya KarpakovaYevdokiya KalmїkovaPierina LegnaniAdelaide GiuriMathilde KschessinskaVon RothbartSergey SokolovAleksey BulgakovK. KubakinOdilesopranoPierina LegnaniMathilde Kschessinska

Original production of 1877

The première on Friday, 4 March 1877, was given as a benefit performance for the ballerina Pelageya Karpakova (also known as Polina Karpakova), who performed the role of Odette, with première danseur Victor Gillert as Prince Siegfried. Karpakova may also have danced the part Odile, although it is believed the ballet originally called for two different dancers. It is now common practice for the same ballerina to dance both Odette and Odile.
The Russian ballerina Anna Sobeshchanskaya was originally cast as Odette, but was replaced when a governing official in Moscow complained about her, claiming she had accepted jewelry from him, only to then marry a fellow danseur and sell the pieces for cash.
The première was not well-received. Though there were a few critics who recognised the virtues of the score, most considered it to be far too complicated for ballet. It was labelled, “too noisy, too ‘Wagnerian’ and too symphonic.”[10] The critics also thought Reisinger’s choreography was “unimaginative and altogether unmemorable.”[10] The German origins of the story were “treated with suspicion while the tale itself was regarded as ‘stupid’ with unpronounceable surnames for its characters.”[10] Karpakova was a secondary soloist and “not particularly convincing.”[10]

The poverty of the production, meaning the décor and costumes, the absence of outstanding performers, the Balletmaster’s weakness of imagination, and, finally, the orchestra … all of this together permitted (Tchaikovsky) with good reason to cast the blame for the failure on others.

— Modest Tchaikovsky, brother of the composer

Yet the fact remains (and is too often omitted in accounts of this initial production) that this staging survived for six years with a total of 41 performances – many more than several other ballets from the repertoire of this theatre.[11]

Tchaikovsky pas de deux 1877

Anna Sobeshchanskaya [ru] as Odette in Julius Reisinger’s original production

Pierina Legnani as Odette (1895)

During the late 1880s and early 1890s, Petipa and Vsevolozhsky discussed with Tchaikovsky the possibility of reviving Swan Lake. However, Tchaikovsky died on 6 November 1893, just when plans to revive Swan Lake were beginning to come to fruition. It remains uncertain whether Tchaikovsky was prepared to revise the music for this revival. Whatever the case, as a result of Tchaikovsky’s death, Drigo was forced to revise the score himself, after receiving approval from Tchaikovsky’s younger brother, Modest. There are major differencesbetween Drigo’s and Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake score. Today, it is Riccardo Drigo’s revision of Tchaikovsky’s score, and not Tchaikovsky’s original score of 1877, that most ballet companies use.

Pavel Gerdt as Prince Siegfried (Mariinsky Theatre, 1895)

In February 1894, two memorial concerts planned by Vsevolozhsky were given in honor of Tchaikovsky. The production included the second act of Swan Lake, choreographed by Lev Ivanov, Second Balletmaster to the Imperial Ballet. Ivanov’s choreography for the memorial concert was unanimously hailed as wonderful.

The revival of Swan Lake was planned for Pierina Legnani‘s benefit performance in the 1894–1895 season. The death of Tsar Alexander III on 1 November 1894 and the ensuing period of official mourning brought all ballet performances and rehearsals to a close for some time, and as a result all efforts could be concentrated on the pre-production of the full revival of Swan Lake. Ivanov and Petipa collaborated on the production, with Ivanov retaining his dances for the second act while choreographing the fourth, with Petipa staging the first and third acts.

Modest Tchaikovsky was called upon to make changes to the ballet’s libretto, including the character of Odette changing from a fairy swan-maiden into a cursed mortal woman, the ballet’s villain changing from Odette’s stepmother to the magician von Rothbart, and the ballet’s finale: instead of the lovers simply drowning at the hand of Odette’s stepmother as in the original 1877 scenario, Odette commits suicide by drowning herself, with Prince Siegfried choosing to die as well, rather than live without her, and soon the lovers’ spirits are reunited in an apotheosis.[13] Aside from the revision of the libretto the ballet was changed from four acts to three—with act 2 becoming act 1, scene 2.

All was ready by the beginning of 1895 and the ballet had its première on Friday, 27 January. Pierina Legnani danced Odette/Odile, with Pavel Gerdtas Prince Siegfried, Alexei Bulgakov as Rothbart, and Alexander Oblakov as Benno. Most of the reviews in the St. Petersburg newspapers were positive.

Unlike the première of The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake did not dominate the repertory of the Mariinsky Theatre in its first season. It was given only sixteen performances between the première and the 1895–1896 season, and was not performed at all in 1897. Even more surprising, the ballet was performed only four times in 1898 and 1899. The ballet belonged solely to Legnani until she left St. Petersburg for her native Italy in 1901. After her departure, the ballet was taken over by Mathilde Kschessinskaya, who was as much celebrated in the rôle as was her Italian predecessor.

Later productions

The best pianist of our generation, YouTube generation: Valentina Lisitsa


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valentina_Lisitsa

Valentina Lisitsa

Valentina Lisitsa (Ukrainian: Валенти́на Євге́нівна Лиси́ця, romanized: Valentýna Jevhénivna Lysýcja, IPA: [wɐlenˈtɪnɐ jeu̯ˈɦɛn⁽ʲ⁾iu̯nɐ lɪˈsɪtsʲɐ]; Russian: Валентина Евгеньевна Лисица, romanized: Valentina Evgen’evna Lisica, IPA: [vɐlʲɪnˈtʲinə jɪvˈɡʲenʲɪvnə lʲɪˈsʲitsə]; born 25 March 1973) is a Ukrainian-American[1] pianist. She previously resided in North Carolinabefore moving to Canada, and then to France.[2][3]

Valentina Lisitsa

Background informationBorn25 March 1973(age 46)
Kiev, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet UnionGenresClassicalOccupation(s)Classical pianistInstrumentsPianoYears active1977-presentWebsitevalentinalisitsa.com
Lisitsa is among the most frequently viewed pianists on YouTube – particularly her renderings of Romantic Era virtuoso piano composers, including Franz Liszt, Frédéric Chopin and Sergei Rachmaninoff.[4][5] Lisitsa independently launched her career on social media, without initially signing with a tour promoter or record company.[4][5]

Life and career

Lisitsa was born in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1973. Her mother, also named Valentina, is a seamstress and her father, Evgeny, was an engineer.[4] Her older brother Eugene died in 2009.[6][4]
She started playing the piano at the age of three, performing her first solo recital at the age of four.[7] She is of Russian and Polish descent.[8]
Despite her early aptitude for music, her dream at that point was to become a professional chess player.[9]Lisitsa attended the Lysenko music school and, later, the Kiev Conservatory,[10] where she and her future husband, Alexei Kuznetsoff, studied under Dr. Ludmilla Tsvierko.[11]When Lisitsa met Kuznetsoff, she began to take music more seriously.[12] In 1991, they won the first prize in The Murray Dranoff Two Piano Competition in Miami, Florida.[10][13]That same year, they moved to the United States to further their careers as concert pianists.[4] In 1992 the couple married.[4] Their New York debut was at the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center in 1995.[11]

Lisitsa posted her first YouTube video in 2007. Her set of Chopin etudes reached the number-one slot on Amazon’s list of classical video recordings, and became the most-viewed online collection of Chopin etudes on YouTube.[14][15]

To advance her career, in 2010 Lisitsa and her husband put their life savings into recording a CD of Rachmaninoff concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra.[4] In the spring of 2012, before her Royal Albert Hall debut, Lisitsa signed with Decca Records, who later released her Rachmaninoff CD set.[4] By mid-2012 she had logged nearly 50 million views of her YouTube videos.[5]
Lisitsa has performed in various venues around the world, including Carnegie Hall, David Geffen Hall, Benaroya Hall, Musikverein and the Royal Albert Hall. She is well known for her online recitals and practicing streams. She has also collaborated with violinist Hilary Hahn at various recital engagements.[10]

Controversy

Lisitsa has received criticism for her opposition to the Ukrainian government and support of pro-Russian separatists since the 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine and the ensuing armed conflict.[16] In April 2015, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra cancelled concerts with Lisitsa, citing her “provocative” online remarks on her Twitter account; the orchestra initially did not specify which tweets or other commentary it believed crossed a line.[17][18] Later, on 8 April 2015, the CEO of Toronto Symphony, Jeff Melanson provided a PDF document of seven pages listing the most “offensive” tweets. Melanson alleged that the document would “help people understand why we made this decision, and understand as well how this is not a free speech issue, but rather an issue of someone practicing very intolerant and offensive expression through Twitter.”[19]
In response, the Toronto Star criticized the orchestra’s decision in an editorial, noting that, “Lisitsa was not invited to Toronto to discuss her provocative political views. She was scheduled to play the piano. And second, banning a musician for expressing “opinions that some believe to be offensive” shows an utter failure to grasp the concept of free speech.”[20] Lisitsa said that the orchestra threatened her if she spoke about the cancellation.[21]
According to Paul Grod, then president of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress: “Ms. Lisitsa has been engaged in a long campaign on social media belittling, insulting and disparaging the people of Ukraine as they face direct military aggression at the hands of the Russian Federation”. Grod elaborated that “Most disturbing are Ms. Lisitsa’s false allegations that the government of Ukraine is “Nazi”, and stating that the Government of Ukraine is setting up ‘filtration camps.'” The New Jersey-based Ukrainian Weekly has described her postings as “anti-Ukraine hate speech.”[8][17] In response she commented that “satire and hyperbole [are] the best literary tools to combat the lies”.[8][17]

DiscographyEdit

Lisitsa has recorded six CDs for Audiofon Records, including three solo CDs and two discs of duets with her husband Alexei Kuznetsoff; a Gold CD for CiscoMusic label with cellist DeRosa; a duet recital on VAI label with violinist Ida Haendel; and DVDs of Frédéric Chopin’s 24 Études and Schubert-Liszt Schwanengesang.[22]
Her recording of the four sonatas for violin and piano by composer Charles Ives, made with Hilary Hahn, was released in October 2011 on Deutsche Grammophon label. Her album Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall (based on her debut performance at that venue 19 June 2012) was released 2 July 2012.
Lisitsa has reproduced several compositions by various artists, including Sergei Rachmaninoff, Franz Liszt, Frédéric Chopin and Ludwig van Beethoven. Decca Records released her complete album of Rachmaninoff concertos in October 2012.[23] An album of Liszt works was released in October 2013 on Decca label in 2 formats – CD and 12″ LP which was cut unedited from analog tape. An even more recent album comprises a number of works of the composer and pianist Philip Glass.[24] As of July 2019, her latest release on Decca records is a 10CD set titled Tchaikovsky: The Complete Solo Piano Works.

ReferencesEdit

^ Everett-Green, Robert (7 December 2012). “Valentina Lisitsa: Playing the odds – by way of Rachmaninoff”. The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Retrieved 8 April 2015.

^ “Valentina Lisitsa and Alexei Kuznetsoff”. Southern Arts Federation. Retrieved 12 July2009.

^

Watch “Rachmaninov: The Isle of the Dead, Symphonic poem Op. 29 – Andrew Davis” on YouTube, painting Isle of the Dead, by Arnold Böecklin


FROM WIKIPEDIA

Isle of the De (Rchmaninoff)

A black and white reproduction of Isle of the Dead by Arnold Böcklin was the inspiration for the piece.

Isle of the Dead (Russian: Остров мёртвых), Op. 29, is a symphonic poem composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff, written in the key of A minor. He concluded the composition while staying in Dresden in 1908.[1] It is considered a classic example of Russian late-Romanticism of the beginning of the 20th century.

The piece was inspired by a black and white reproduction of Arnold Böcklin‘s painting, Isle of the Dead, which Rachmaninoff saw in Paris in 1907. Rachmaninoff was disappointed by the original painting when he later saw it, saying, “If I had seen first the original, I, probably, would have not written my Isle of the Dead. I like it in black and white.”[2]

The music begins by suggesting the sound of the oars as they meet the waters on the way to the Isle of the Dead. The slowly heaving and sinking music could also be interpreted as waves. Rachmaninoff uses a recurring figure in 5/8 time to depict what may be the rowing of the oarsman or the movement of the water, and as in several other of his works, quotes the Dies Irae plainchant, an allusion to death. In contrast to the theme of death, the 5/8 time also depicts breathing, creating a holistic reflection on how life and death are intertwined.

In 1929, Rachmaninoff conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in a recording of the music for the Victor Talking Machine Company, which was purchased by RCA that same year and became known as RCA Victor. This recording was made in the Academy of Music in Philadelphia, using one microphone, and was later reissued on LP and CD by RCA Victor.

References

  1. ^ Wehrmeyer (2006:51)
  2. ^ Tarasti, Eero (2012). Semiotics of Classical Music: How Mozart, Brahms and Wagner Talk to Us. Berlin/Boston: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co., KG. p. 385. ISBN .

BibliographyEdit

External links

Watch “Immortal Music: Schubert Piano Quintet D667/The Trout/Jacqueline du Pré, Barenboim, Perlman, Pinchas” on YouTube


From WIKIMEDIA

Trout Quintet

The Trout Quintet (Forellenquintett) is the popular name for the Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667, by Franz Schubert. The piano quintet was composed in 1819,[1] when he was 22 years old; it was not published, however, until 1829, a year after his death.[2]

Rather than the usual piano quintet lineup of piano and string quartet, the Trout Quintet is written for piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass. The composer Johann Nepomuk Hummel had rearranged his own Septet for the same instrumentation,[3]and the Trout was actually written for a group of musicians coming together to play Hummel’s work.

Nickname

The piece is known as the Troutbecause the fourth movement is a set of variations on Schubert’s earlier LiedDie Forelle” (“The Trout”). The quintet was written for Sylvester Paumgartner, of Steyr in Upper Austria, a wealthy music patron and amateur cellist, who also suggested that Schubert include a set of variations on the Lied.[1] Sets of variations on melodies from his Lieder are found in four other works by Schubert: the Death and the Maiden Quartet, the “Trockne Blumen” Variations for Flute and Piano (D. 802), the Wanderer Fantasy, and the Fantasia for Violin and Piano in C major (D. 934, on “Sei mir gegrüßt”).

Music

The quintet consists of five movements:

The rising sextuplet figure from the song’s accompaniment is used as a unifying motif throughout the quintet, and related figures appear in four out of the five movements – all but the Scherzo. As in the song, the figure is usually introduced by the piano, ascending.[1]

I. Allegro vivace

The first movement is in sonata form. As is commonplace in works of the Classical genre, the exposition shifts from tonic to dominant; however, Schubert’s harmonic language is innovative, incorporating many mediants and submediants. This is evident from almost the beginning of the piece: after stating the tonic for ten bars, the harmony shifts abruptly into F major (the flatted submediant) in the eleventh bar.

The development section starts with a similar abrupt shift, from E major (at the end of the exposition) to C major. Harmonic movement is slow at first, but becomes quicker; towards the return of the first theme, the harmony modulates in ascending half tones.

The recapitulation begins in the subdominant, making any modulatorychanges in the transition to the second theme unnecessary, a frequent phenomenon in early sonata form movements written by Schubert.[1] It differs from the exposition only in omitting the opening bars and another short section, before the closing theme.

II. Andante

This movement is composed of two symmetrical sections, the second being a transposed version of the first, except for some differences of modulation which allow the movement to end in the same key in which it began. Tonal layout (with some intermediate keys of lower structural significance omitted) as follows:

III. Scherzo: Presto

This movement also contains mediant tonalities, such as the ending of the first section of the Scherzo proper, which is in C major, the flattened mediant, or the relative major of the parallel minor (A minor).

IV. Andantino – Allegretto

The fourth movement is a theme and variations on Schubert’s Lied Die Forelle“. As typical of some other variation movements by Schubert (in contrast to Beethoven’s style),[4] the variations do not transform the original theme into new thematic material; rather, they concentrate on melodic decoration and changes of mood. In each of the first few variations, the main theme is played by a different instrument or group. In the fifth variation, Schubert begins in the flat submediant (B major), and creates a series of modulations eventually leading back to the movement’s main key, at the beginning of the final sixth variation.

A similar process is heard in three of Schubert’s later compositions: the Octet in F major, D. 803 (fourth movement); the Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (second movement); and the Impromptu in B major, D. 935 No. 3. The concluding variation is similar to the original Lied, sharing the same characteristic accompaniment in the piano.

V. Allegro giust

The Finale is in two symmetrical sections, like the second movement. However, the movement differs from the second movement in the absence of unusual chromaticism, and in the second section being an exact transposition of the first (except for some changes of octave register). A repeat sign is written for the first section: if one adheres meticulously to the score, the movement consists of three lengthy, almost identical repeats of the same musical material. Performers sometimes choose to omit the repeat of the first section when playing.

Although this movement lacks the chromaticism of the second movement, its own harmonic design is also innovative: the first section ends in D major, the subdominant. This is contradictory to the aesthetics of the Classical musical style, in which the first major harmonic event in a musical piece or movement, is the shift from tonic to dominant (or, more rarely, to mediant or submediant – but never to the subdominant).[5][6]

Musical significance

Compared to other major chamber works by Schubert, such as the last three string quartets and the string quintet, the Trout Quintet is a leisurely work, characterized by lower structural coherence, especially in its outer movements and the Andante. These movements contain unusually long repetitions of previously stated material, sometimes transposed, with little or no structural reworking, aimed at generating an overall unified dramatic design (“mechanical” in Martin Chusid’s words[1]).

The importance of the piece stems mainly from its use of an original and innovative harmonic language, rich in mediants and chromaticism, and from its timbral characteristics. The Trout Quintet has a unique sonority among chamber works for piano and strings, due mainly to the piano part, which for substantial sections of the piece concentrates on the highest register of the instrument, with both hands playing the same melodic line an octave apart (having been freed to do so by the inclusion of both cello and bass in the ensemble). Such writing also occurs in other chamber works by Schubert, such as the piano trios, but to a much lesser extent,[1][3] and is characteristic of Schubert’s works for piano four-hands,[3] one of his most personal musical genres. Such timbral writing may have influenced the works of Romantic composers such as Frédéric Chopin, who admired Schubert’s music for piano four-hands.[7]

The quintet forms the basis of Christopher Nupen‘s 1969 film The Trout, in which Itzhak Perlman, Pinchas Zukerman, Jacqueline du Pré, Daniel Barenboim and Zubin Mehtaperform it at Queen Elizabeth Hall in London.[8]

Other Uses

The song, in MIDI format, is used on modern Samsung washers and dryers to indicate that the wash or dry cycle is complete. [9]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Chusid, Martin (April 1997). “Schubert’s chamber music: before and after Beethoven”. In Christopher H. Gibbs (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Schubert. Cambridge Companions to Music. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 174–192. ISBN 978-0-521-48424-4.
  2. ^ Gibbs, Christopher H. (April 1997). “German reception: Schubert’s ‘journey to immortality“. In Christopher H. Gibbs (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Schubert. Cambridge Companions to Music. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 241–253. ISBN 978-0-521-48424-4.
  3. ^

Euzicasa: 9 years achievement


Achievement

Achievement

Watch “Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 6, (Full version)” on YouTube


Published on Mar 30, 2017

I (0:00)

II (10:56)

in (24:10)

W (29:21)

v (32:22)

Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 6, (Full version) I. Happy Arrival 0:00

It. By the Brook 10:56

III.

V. Shepherd’s Song 32:22

Conducted by Frans Briiggen (Orchestra of the 18th Century) I’m happy for you all. Thank you for watching this nice symphony. Beethoven’s 6th Symphony (Pastoral) A Love of Nature The Pastoral Symphony is a charming masterpiece which both paints a picture of nature and describes man’s feelings towards it. Beethoven‘s great love of nature, the delight in strolling through the countryside in Vienna, the fact that he always found his equilibrium in the heart of nature, all these inspired him to create his sixth symphony. Beethoven’s 6th Symphony is filled with colorful sounds, simple folk tunes. nice development, and a feeling of calm beauty. It contains meaningful emotional aspect which reflects mankind’s feelings towards the natural world. Beethoven began sketching out his 6th symphony in 1802 and finished it in 1808. ‘How happy I am to be able to walk among the shrubs. the trees, the woods, the grass and the rocks! For the woods, the trees and the rocks give man the resonance he needs.‘ Beethoven said in the summer of 1808. The premiere of the 6th Symphony was probably the grandest musical event in Beethoven’s life. It was a massive conceit packed with lndelible moments of brand new Beethoven music! This programmatic endeavor is clearly expressed through the suggestive title of the symphony, as well as through the titles of each movement. When Beethoven found refuge in the midst of nature, he jotted down themes inspired by the trill of birds, the trickling of creeks or the rustle of leaves. In a notebook from 1803 was found an outline of a river’s trickling with the additional note: ‘The greater the river, the more grave the tone.’-Beethoven spread out the sympho-y into five movements and gave each movement a little subtitle explaining what it was about. I. ‘Happy Arrival’ (Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the country) The Pastoral symphony opens with warmth and calm, setting the scene as we arrive in the countryside. This has a programmatic indication. In this movement, we find a genuine popular sonority through the choice of instruments neatly weaved together. [Allegro ma non troppo]

II. ‘By the Brook’ (T he natural scene of the stream) This slow movement is a beautiful depiction of the delicate nature of… nature itself. It is a wonderful scene of nature with exceptionally musical themes in the pure pastoral air. You can almost breathe the fresh country air! It is more of a description of sensations rather than images. Towards the end, we find the onomatopoeic sounds of birds. [Andante molto mosso]

III. ‘Merrymaking’ (Joyful gathering of countryfolk) Now we turn our attention to the loud, jolly peasants who live in the countryside. Here we see them celebrate with a joyful dance. Of course. these are simple folks, so the music itself is simple, but very energetic. [Allegro]

IV. ‘ThunderStorm’ (Heavy rumblings of natural forces) 29.21 With no pause between the previous movement and this movement, there is a dramatic surprise, hinting at trouble ahead. Yes, a storm is brewing! Beethoven inserts fantastic lightning crashes and a whirl of wind. He renders the stages of the storm as it unravels on the horizon and moves closer more and more threatening.

The instruments with grave chords cellos and double basses through their sounds announce the storm, then the staccato sounds of the violins render the falling raindrops, and through the timpani and the flutes we sense the thunder and lightning. Then comes the rainbow. Above all these images, we feel the tense disposition that captures man facing the realities of nature. There is an urgent sense of human fear since humanity is powerless against the forces of nature. When the storm is over, all living creatures come to the surface, taking their place in the natural cycle. This is rendered by a choral of flutes which come as a sunray. [Allegro]

V. ‘Shepherd‘s Song’ (Expression of thanks when the storm is over) As the storm fades away, all the animals emerge, and there‘s a general feeling of relief. Sunshine reappears, and everyone’s mind is relaxed aqain. This is
the song of gratitude towards nature. It is a calm movement, full of mind is relaxed again. This is the song of gratitude towards nature. It is a calm movement, full of grace. It starts out quiet, but quickly gets faster and happier. The music is fairly simple. but this makes Its emotions of gratitude endearing. [Allegretto]

Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony, through its simplicity. is just sincere and natural.

‘IV. Allegro (Storm and tempest) (extract)’ by Roger Norrington

ESL: OPPOSITE WORDS


ESL: OPPOSITE WORDS

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Watch “The Blacklist ( Best of Raymond Reddington ) part 2” on YouTube


Watch “The Blacklist ( Best of Raymond Reddington ) part 1” on YouTube


Mr. Tambourine Man (Live at the Newport Folk Festival. 1964)” on YouTube


Mr. Tambourine Man
Song by Bob Dylan

Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Though I know that evening’s empire has returned into sand
Vanished from my hand
Left me blindly here to stand but still not sleeping
My weariness amazes me, I’m branded on my feet
I have no one to meet
And the ancient empty street’s too dead for dreaming
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Take me on a trip upon your magic swirling ship
My senses have been stripped
My hands can’t feel to grip
My toes too numb to step
Wait only for my boot heels to be wandering
I’m ready to go anywhere, I’m ready for to fade
Into my own parade
Cast your dancing spell my way, I promise to go under it
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Though you might hear laughing, spinning, swinging madly across the sun
It’s not aimed at anyone
It’s just escaping on the run
And but for the sky there are no fences facing
And if you hear vague traces of skipping reels of rhyme
To your tambourine in time
It’s just a ragged clown behind
I wouldn’t pay it any mind
It’s just a shadow you’re seeing that he’s chasing
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
And take me disappearing through the smoke rings of my mind
Down the foggy ruins of time
Far past the frozen leaves
The haunted frightened trees
Out to the windy beach
Far from the twisted reach of crazy sorrow
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
With one hand waving free
Silhouetted by the sea
Circled by the circus sands
With all memory and fate
Driven deep beneath the waves
Let me forget about today until tomorrow
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Bob Dylan
Mr. Tambourine Man lyrics © Audiam, Inc

Watch “El Condor Pasa ” If I Could ” | Guitar and Pan Flute” on YouTube


I’d rather be a sparrow than a snail
Yes I would, if I could, I surely would
I’d rather be a hammer than a nail
Yes I would, if I only could, I surely would

Away, I’d rather sail away
Like a swan that’s here and gone
A man gets tied up to the ground
He gives the world its saddest sound
Its saddest sound
I’d rather be a forest than a street
Yes I would, if I could, I surely would
I’d rather feel the earth beneath my feet
Yes I would, if I only could, I surely would
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Paul Simon / Jorge Milchberg / Daniel Alomia Robles
El Condor Pasa (If I Could) lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Watch “Lady Diana – Candle in the wind (Goodbye Englands rose) – Elton John – Lyrics in text” on YouTube


Goodbye Norma Jean
Though I never knew you at all
You had the grace to hold yourself
While those around you crawled
They crawled out of the woodwork
And they whispered into your brain
They set you on the treadmill
And they made you change your name

And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Loneliness was tough
The toughest role you ever played
Hollywood created a superstar
And pain was the price you paid
Even when you died
Oh the press still hounded you
All the papers had to say
Was that Marilyn was found in the nude
And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Goodbye Norma Jean
Though I never knew you at all
You had the grace to hold yourself
While those around you crawled
Goodbye Norma Jean
From the young man in the twenty second row
Who sees you as something more than sexual
More than just our Marilyn Monroe
And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Elton John / Bernie Taupin
Candle in the Wind lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, BMG Rights Management

Haiku: Twenty five hours days (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)


Haiku: Twenty five hours days

Twenty five hours days

Are unlike twenty three hours

In autumn and spring.

(© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Quote: Albert Einstein


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ESL: “TAKE” IN SENTENCES


ESL:

ESL: “TAKE” IN SENTENCES

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Watch “Jim James – State Of The Art (A.E.I.O.U.)” on YouTube



Daylight come
Daylight go
How far will it reach?
Ain’t nobody know
And when the dawn breaks
The cradle will fall
And down come baby
Cradle and all
Now I know you need the dark
Just as much as the sun
But you signin’ on forever
When you ink it in blood

A.E.I.O.U.
E.I.O.U.
A.E.I.O.U.
I, I use my state of the art
Technology
Supposed to make for better living
Are we better human beings?
We’ve got our wires all crossed
The tubes are all tied
And I’m straining to remember
Just what it means to be alive
A life worth living
Now you can feel it in your chest
Buildin’ like little birds
Just building up the nest
And you build it up strong
And you fill it up with love
And you pray for good rain
All from the lord above
A.E.I.O.U.
E.I.O.U.
A.E.I.
I use my state of the art
Technology
Now don’t you forget it
It ain’t using me
‘Cause when the power’s goes out
I got over me
‘Cause the power’s goin’ out
I think the power’s goin’ out
I mean it, the power’s goin’ out
I really mean it the powers goin’ out
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: James Edward Olliges Jr.
State of the Art (A.E.I.O.U.) lyrics © Words & Music A Div Of Big Deal Music LLC

Watch “Keith Jarrett & Chick Corea – Play MORZART #12” on YouTube


Watch “JOHN COLTRANE , STAN GETZ Autumn in New York” on YouTube


ESL: “COME” IN SENTENCES


ESL:

ESL: “COME” IN SENTENCES

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Watch “The Doors – Riders On The Storm (ORIGINAL!) – driving with Jim” on YouTube


The Doors Lyrics

“Riders On The Storm”

Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Into this house we’re born
Into this world we’re thrown
Like a dog without a bone
An actor out on loan
Riders on the storm

There’s a killer on the road
His brain is squirmin’ like a toad
Take a long holiday
Let your children play
If you give this man a ride
Sweet family will die
Killer on the road, yeah

Girl, you gotta love your man
Girl, you gotta love your man
Take him by the hand
Make him understand
The world on you depends
Our life will never end
Gotta love your man, yeah

Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Into this house we’re born
Into this world we’re thrown
Like a dog without a bone
An actor out on loan.
Riders on the storm

Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm

Watch “The Doors The End” on YouTube


“The End”

This is the end
Beautiful friend
This is the end
My only friend

The end
Of our elaborate plans
The end
Of everything that stands
The end
No safety or surprise
The end
I’ll never look into your eyes
Again

Can you picture what will be
So limitless and free
Desperately in need of some stranger’s hand
In a desperate land

Lost in a Roman wilderness of pain
And all the children are insane
All the children are insane
Waiting for the summer rain, yeah

There’s danger on the edge of town
Ride the king’s highway, baby
Weird scenes inside the gold mine
Ride the highway west, baby

Ride the snake, ride the snake
To the lake
The ancient lake
Baby

The snake is long, seven miles
Ride the snake
He’s old
And his skin is cold

The west is the best
The west is the best
Get here, and we’ll do the rest

The blue bus is callin’ us
The blue bus is callin’ us
Driver, where you taking us

The killer awoke before dawn, he put his boots on
He took a face from the ancient gallery
And he walked on down the hall
He went into the room where his sister lived, and…then he
Paid a visit to his brother, and then he
He walked on down the hall, and
And he came to a door…and he looked inside
“Father?” “Yes, son.” “I want to kill you.”
“Mother, I want to…”

C’mon babe

C’mon baby, take a chance with us
C’mon baby, take a chance with us
C’mon baby, take a chance with us
And meet me at the back of the blue bus
Doin’ a blue rock
On a blue bus
Doin’ a blue rock
C’mon, yeah

Fuck, fuck-ah, yeah
Fuck
Fuck
Fuck, fuck
Fuck, fuck, fuck, yeah
C’mon, yeah, c’mon, yeah
Fuck me, baby, fuck yeah
Fuck, fuck, fuck, yeah!
Fuck, yeah! C’mon, baby
Fuck me, baby, fuck, fuck, yeah
Whoa, whoa, yeah, fuck, baby
C’mon, yeah, huh, huh, huh, huh, yeah
All right

Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill

This is the end
Beautiful friend
This is the end
My only friend, the end

It hurts to set you free
But you’ll never follow me
The end of laughter and soft lies
The end of nights we tried to die

This is the end

Watch “Léo Ferré – Avec le temps (enregistrement TRS)” on YouTube



Avec le temps
Avec le temps va tout s’en va
On oublie le visage et l’on oublie la voix
Le cœur quand ça bat plus
C’est pas la peine d’aller chercher plus loin
Faut laisser faire et c’est très bien

Avec le temps
Avec le temps va tout s’en va
L’autre qu’on adorait, qu’on cherchait sous la pluie
L’autre qu’on devinait au détour d’un regard
Entre les mots, entre les lignes et sous le fard
D’un serment maquillé qui s’en va faire sa nuit
Avec le temps tout s’évanouit
Avec le temps
Avec le temps va tout s’en va
Même les plus chouettes souvenirs ça t’as une de ces gueules
À la Galerie j’farfouille dans les rayons d’la mort
Le samedi soir quand la tendresse s’en va toute seule
Avec le temps
Avec le temps va tout s’en va
L’autre à qui l’on croyait pour un rhume pour un rien
L’autre à qui l’on donnait du vent et des bijoux
Pour qui l’on eût vendu son âme pour quelques sous
Devant quoi l’on s’traînait comme traînent les chiens
Avec le temps va tout va bien
Avec le temps
Avec le temps va tout s’en va
On oublie les passions et l’on oublie les voix
Qui vous disaient tout bas les mots des pauvres gens
Ne rentre pas trop tard surtout ne prend pas froid
Avec le temps
Avec le temps va tout s’en va
Et l’on se sent blanchi comme un cheval fourbu
Et l’on se sent glacé dans un lit de hasard
Et l’on se sent tout seul peut-être mais peinard
Et l’on se sent floué par les années perdues
Alors vraiment
Avec le temps on n’aime plus
Translate to English

Source: Musixmatch


Songwriters: Leo Ferre
Avec le temps lyrics © Les Nouvelles EDI.MERIDIAN, Editorial Avenue, Les Nouvelles Editions Meridian, La Memoire Et La Mer, Editions Chanson Music, S D R M, MATHIEU FERRE ET CIE, MERIDIAN ED

Watch “Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia – Svetlanov “In Central Asia” by State Academic Symphony Orch” on YouTube


Three main themes from the composition

In the Steppes of Central Asia (Russian: В средней Азии, romanized: V srednyeĭ Azii, lit. ‘In Central Asia’) is a symphonic poem (or “musical tableau”) composed by Alexander Borodin in 1880. It is dedicated to Franz Liszt.

BackgroundEdit

In the Steppes of Central Asia had been intended to be presented as one of several tableaux vivants to celebrate the silver anniversary of the reign of Emperor Alexander II of Russia, who had done much to expand the Russian Empire
eastward. The intended production never occurred, but the work has been
a concert favorite since its first performance, on 20 April 1880 (8
April Old style) in St. Petersburg by the orchestra of the Russian Opera under the conductorship of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.[1]

StructureEdit

The work depicts an interaction between Russians and Asians in the steppe lands of the Caucasus.
A caravan of Central Asians is crossing the desert under the protection
of Russian troops. The opening theme, representing the Russians, is
heard first; after it, the strains of an ornamented eastern melody on English horn, representing the Asians. The melodies eventually combine contrapuntally. Amid these two ethnic melodies Borodin inserts a “traveling” theme in pizzicato that represents the plodding hoofs of the horses and camels. At the end, only the Russian theme is heard.

InstrumentationEdit

The piece is scored for two flutes, oboe, cor anglais, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns in F, two trumpets in F, two trombones, bass trombone, timpani and strings.

Somewhat unusually, the two scores available via the IMSLP show different tempo markings at the start. The Eulenberg score is marked Allegretto con moto, whereas the Russian Muzyka score shows Allegro con moto.

Borodin also transcribed the piece for piano four hands.

Composer’s noteEdit

The composer provided the following description in a note to the score:

In
the silence of the monotonous steppes of Central Asia is heard the
unfamiliar sound of a peaceful Russian song. From the distance we hear
the approach of horses and camels and the bizarre and melancholy notes
of an oriental melody. A caravan approaches, escorted by Russian
soldiers, and continues safely on its way through the immense desert. It
disappears slowly. The notes of the Russian and Asiatic melodies join
in a common harmony, which dies away as the caravan disappears in the
distance.

References

External links

ESL: PREPOSITIONS OF MOVEMENT IN ENGLISH GRAMMAR


ESL: PREPOSITIONS OF MOVEMENT IN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

ESL: PREPOSITIONS OF MOVEMENT IN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

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ESL: WHAT TIME IS IT?


ESL: WHAT TIME IS IT?

ESL: WHAT TIME IS IT?

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ESL: COLLECTIVE NOUNS


ESL: COLLECTIVE NOUNS

ESL: COLLECTIVE NOUNS

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Watch “Rimsky-Korsakov – Scheherazade: Symphonic Suite, Op. 35” on YouTube


Watch “Charlotte Church – The Lord’s Prayer (Live From Jerusalem 2001)” on YouTube


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord%27s_Prayer

Lord’s Prayer

Read in another language
Watch this page
Edit

For other uses, see Lord’s Prayer (disambiguation), Our Father (disambiguation) and Pater Noster (disambiguation).
James Tissot—The Lord’s Prayer (Le Pater Noster)—Brooklyn Museum

The Lord’s Prayer, also called the Our Father (Latin, Pater Noster), is a venerated Christian prayer which, according to the New Testament, Jesus taught as the way to pray:

Pray then in this way … (Matthew 6:9 NRSV)
When you pray, say … (Luke 11:2 NRSV)

Two versions of this prayer are recorded in the gospels: a longer form within the Sermon on the Mount in the Gospel of Matthew, and a shorter form in the Gospel of Luke when “one of his disciples said to him, ‘Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'” (Luke 11:1 NRSV). Lutheran theologian Harold Buls suggested that both were original, the Matthean version spoken by Jesus early in his ministry in Galilee, and the Lucan version one year later, “very likely in Judea”.[1]

The first three of the seven petitions in Matthew address God; the other four are related to human needs and concerns. The Matthew account alone includes the “Your will be done” and the “Rescue us from the evil one” (or “Deliver us from evil”) petitions. Both original Greek texts contain the adjective epiousios, which does not appear in any other classical or Koine Greek literature; while controversial, “daily” has been the most common English-language translation of this word. Protestants usually conclude the prayer with a doxology, a later addendum appearing in some manuscripts of Matthew.
Matthew 6:9-13 (NRSV) Luke 11:2-4 (NRSV)
Our Father in heaven, Father, [Other ancient authorities read Our father in heaven]
hallowed be your name. hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come. Your kingdom come.
[A few ancient authorities read Your Holy Spirit come upon us and cleanse us.]
Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. [Other ancient authorities add Your will be done, on earth as in heaven]
Give us this day our daily bread. [Or our bread for tomorrow] Give us each day our daily bread. [Or our bread for tomorrow]
And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. and forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us.
And do not bring us to the time of trial, [Or us into temptation] but rescue us from the evil one. [Or from evil] And do not bring us to the time of trial. [Or us into temptation. Other ancient authorities add but rescue us from the evil one (or from evil)]
[Other ancient authorities add, in some form, For the kingdom and the power and the glory are yours forever. Amen.]

Initial words on the topic from the Catechism of the Catholic Church teach that it “is truly the summary of the whole gospel”.[2] The prayer is used by most Christian churches in their worship; with few exceptions, the liturgical form is the Matthean. Although theological differences and various modes of worship divide Christians, according to Fuller Seminary professor Clayton Schmit, “there is a sense of solidarity in knowing that Christians around the globe are praying together … and these words always unite us.”[3]

In biblical criticism, the prayer’s absence in the Gospel of Mark together with its occurrence in Matthew and Luke has caused scholars who accept the two-source hypothesis (against other document hypotheses) to conclude that it is probably a logion original to Q.[4]
Text
Analysis
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YOGA: NAMASTE

YOGA: NAMASTE

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American Suite – Wikipedia


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Suite

The American Suite in A major (Czech: Suita A dur), Op. 98b, B. 190, is an orchestral suite written in 1894–1895 by Czech composer Antonín Dvořák.

BackgroundEdit

MovementsEdit

The suite is written in five movements, each with a marked rhythm:

  1. Andante con moto
  2. Allegro
  3. Moderato (alla pollacca)
  4. Andante
  5. Allegro

Analysis and receptionEdit

As often is the case with
Dvořák, the orchestral version gives the work a new breadth. The cyclic
aspects of Dvořák’s composition are apparent, in that the principal
theme of the first movement recurs during the conclusion of the work.
This opening theme is marked by his American-influenced style. It is difficult to determine whether it comes from the typical folk music of the New World or simply from the music of the Czech emigrants, to which the Dvořák liked to listen during his stay in the United States.

This mix of American influence with Slavic tradition is also
perceptible in the rhythm of the “alla Polacca” third movement, and in
the last movement’s themes native to the Far East, played by flute and oboe in unison, where the orchestra passes easily from the minor theme to the major one.

Far from any exoticism, the art of Dvořák’s orchestral work is in the field of pure music, and it is undoubtedly for this reason that Brahms
appreciated it. Even in New York, when Dvořák encouraged his pupils to
work on their own folk melodies, it was authentic recreation of the
popular folk musics that he called for.

Appearances in popular cultureEdit

Along with several other works by Dvořák (including some of the Slavonic Dances and the second movement of the New World Symphony), the first movement, Andante con moto is part of the sound track to Sid Meier’s Civilization IV.
The allegro was used in the trailer for The Elder Scrolls II Daggerfall.

NotesEdit

  1. Klaus Döge, Grove

References and further readingEdit

  • Döge, Klaus: “Antonín Dvořák”, Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy (Accessed December 16, 2006), (subscription access)

See also

External links

Symphony No. 6 (Beethoven) – Wikipedia


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No.6%28Beethoven%29

Symphony No. 6 (Beethoven)

The Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, also known as the Pastoral Symphony (German: Pastorale[1]), is a symphony composed by Ludwig van Beethoven and completed in 1808. One of Beethoven’s few works containing explicitly programmatic content,[2] the symphony was first performed in the Theater an der Wien on 22 December 1808[3] in a four-hour concert.[4]

Symphony No. 6
by Ludwig van Beethoven
Beethoven sym 6 script.PNG

Part of a sketch by Beethoven for the symphony

Other namePastoral SymphonyKeyF majorOpusOp. 68PeriodClassical periodFormSymphonyBased onNatureComposed1802–1808DedicationPrince Lobkowitz
Count RazumovskyDurationAbout 40 minutesMovementsFiveScoringOrchestraPremiereDateDecember 22, 1808LocationTheater an der Wien, ViennaConductorLudwig van Beethoven

Background

Instrumentation

Form

In film

Notes

References

External links

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5478661

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MUSIC
Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68
June 12, 200610:39 AM ET
Audio will be available later today.
Hear an Interview with Conductor Christoph Eschenbach
“Pastoral”

Composed in 1808

Premiered December 1808

Published 1809 in Leipzig

Many of Beethoven’s works are titled, yet many of these names came from friends or from those to whom the pieces were dedicated. The Sixth Symphony, however, is one of only two symphonies Beethoven intentionally named. Beethoven’s full title was “Pastoral Symphony, or Recollections of Country Life.” Although it was composed in the same time period and dedicated to the same people as the Fifth, the works have many differences. The “Pastoral” is known as a “characteristic” symphony and closely resembles “Le musical de la nature” by Rheinish composer Justin Heinrich Knecht. Beethoven publicly declared the piece’s “extramusical” purpose: an expression of nature. His affinity for nature and his love for walks through the country outside Vienna were captured in the Sixth, as well as in the notes scribbled on sketches of the symphony.

Notes on Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony
CHRISTOPHER H. GIBBS

Most of the familiar titles attached to Beethoven’s works were put there by someone other than the composer. Critics, friends, and publishers invented the labels “Moonlight,” “Tempest,” and “Appassionata” for popular piano sonatas. Prominent patrons’ names—Archduke Rudolph, Count Razumovsky, Count Waldstein—became wedded to compositions they either commissioned or that are dedicated to them, thereby winning a sort of immortality for those who supported the composer.

Beethoven himself crossed out the heading “Bonaparte” from the title page of the Third Symphony, but later wrote in “Sinfonia eroica” (Heroic Symphony), and it is his only symphony besides the Sixth to bear an authentic title. To be sure, stories about “fate knocking at the door” in the Fifth and the choral finale of the Ninth have encouraged programmatic associations for those works, beginning in Beethoven’s own time. But, in the end, it is the Sixth Symphony, the “Pastoral,” that stands most apart from his others, and indeed from nearly all of Beethoven’s instrumental and keyboard music, in its intentional, publicly declared, and often quite audible extramusical content. Beethoven’s full title is: “Pastoral Symphony, or Recollections of Country Life.”

“More an Expression of Feeling Than Painting”

And yet the Sixth Symphony does not aspire to the level of musical realism found in a work like Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique or in Richard Strauss’s later tone poems. In the program for its premiere, Beethoven famously noted that the “Pastoral” contained “more an expression of feeling than painting.” He had earlier objected to some of the musical illustration in Haydn’s oratorios The Creation (1798) and The Seasons (1801), with their imitations of storms, frogs, and other phenomena. He probably would not have cared much for what the “New German School” of Berlioz, Liszt, and Wagner would later advocate and create.

Beethoven’s “Pastoral” Symphony belongs to a tradition, going back to the previous century, of “characteristic” symphonies. Indeed, the titles for the movements that Beethoven provided closely resemble those of “Le Portrait musical de la nature,” written nearly 25 years earlier by the Rheinish composer Justin Heinrich Knecht. (It is doubtful Beethoven knew the music of the piece, but he did know the titles.) Scattered comments that Beethoven made in his sketches for the Symphony are revealing: “The hearers should be allowed to discover the situations / Sinfonia caracteristica—or recollection of country life / All painting in instrumental music is lost if it is pushed too far / Sinfonia pastorella. Anyone who has an idea of country life can make out for himself the intentions of the composer without many titles / Also without titles the whole will be recognized as a matter more of feeling than of painting in sounds.”

Regardless of the musical and aesthetic implications that the “Pastoral” Symphony raises with respect to the program music—a key issue for debate over the rest of the century—it unquestionably offers eloquent testimony to the importance and power of nature in Beethoven’s life. The composer reveled in walking in the environs of Vienna and spent nearly every summer in the country. When Napoleon’s second occupation of the city in 1809 meant that he could not leave, he wrote to his publisher: “I still cannot enjoy life in the country, which is so indispensable to me.” Indeed, Beethoven’s letters are filled with declarations of the importance of nature in his life, such as one from 1810: “How delighted I will be to ramble for awhile through the bushes, woods, under trees, through grass, and around rocks. No one can love the country as much as I do. For surely woods, trees, and rocks produce the echo that man desires to hear.”

Companion Symphonies

Beethoven wrote the “Pastoral” primarily during the spring and fall of 1808, although some sketches date back years earlier. Its composition overlapped in part with that of the Fifth Symphony, which might be considered its non-identical twin. Not only did both have the same period of genesis and the same dedicatees (Count Razumovsky and Prince Lobkowitz), but they were also published within weeks of one another in the spring of 1809 and premiered together (in reverse order and with their numbers switched).

The occasion was Beethoven’s famous marathon concert of December 22, 1808, at the Theater an der Wien, and was the only time he premiered two symphonies together. Moreover, the program also included the first public performance of the Fourth Piano Concerto, two movements from the Mass in C, the concert aria Ah! perfido, and the “Choral” Fantasy. Reports indicate that all did not go well, as musicians playing after limited rehearsal struggled their way through this demanding new music, and things fell apart during the “Choral” Fantasy. Although the Fifth and Sixth symphonies are extremely different from one another in overall mood, there are notable points of convergence, such as the innovations in instrumentation (the delayed and dramatic introduction of piccolo and trombones in the fourth movements) and the splicing together of the final movements.

A Closer Look

Beethoven’s descriptive movement titles for the “Pastoral” were made public to the audience before the premiere. The first movement, “Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arriving in the country,” engages with a long musical tradition of pastoral music. From the opening drone of an open fifth in the lower strings to the jovial coda, the leisurely and often repetitive pace of the movement is far from the intensity of the Fifth Symphony. The second movement, “Scene by the brook,” includes the famous birdcalls: flute for the nightingale, oboe for the quail, and two clarinets for the cuckoo (Berlioz copied the effect for two of the birds in the pastoral third movement of his Symphonie fantastique).

This is Beethoven’s only symphony with five movements and the last three lead one into the next. The third is entitled “Merry gathering of peasants” and suggests a town band of limited ability playing dance music. The dance is interrupted by a “Tempest, storm” that approaches from afar as ominous rumblings give way to the full fury of thunder and lightning. The storm is far more intense than other well-known storms—such as by Vivaldi and Haydn—and presages later ones by Berlioz and Wagner. Just as the storm had approached gradually, so it passes, leaving some scattered moments of disruption before the “Shepherds’ hymn—Happy and thankful feelings after the storm” brings the work to its close. Regardless of Beethoven’s declared intentions, this music seems to function on both descriptive and expressive levels, therein fueling arguments about the issue ever since his time.

Program note © 2006. All rights reserved. Program note may not be reprinted without written permission from The Philadelphia Orchestra Association.

Web Resources
The Philadelphia Orchestra’s Site
Philadelphia Orchestra
Ludwig van Beethoven
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ESL: FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE


ESL: FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

ESL: FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

https://pin.it/xewq43xel44oeg

ESL: FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE


ESL: FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

ESL: FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

https://pin.it/4ksdhppfc2azn2

Haiku: Roberta Flack (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)


Haiku: Roberta Flack

(© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Killing me softly

with her voice, like the wind

In the dry corn, rows.

Unpainting…a perfectly painted tableau ( ©poetic thought by GeorgeB @euzicasa)


Unpainting…a perfectly painted tableau

( ©poetic thought by GeorgeB @euzicasa)

Everyday I…I efface another color

of my perfectly painted tableau,

accomplishment of the day past…

I aim for a unicolor, a pure black or white, I can’t make up my mind…

So, every morning, seated at my easel, I use the widest paintbrush, and chose, today will be white over black, to cover the painting behind, to hide yesternight hard work, to start anew,

a new memory, painted over an older one,

no holidays,

weekends,

only Monday Mornings,

nonstop,

in perpetuity,

forever Amen!

Haiku: Nights (poetic thought by GeorgeB)


Haiku: Night(© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Nights get much longer

Than days, year in and out.

Will it ever stop?

俳句:夜
(GeorgeBによる詩的思考)
夜はずっと長くなります
日よりも、年も年も。
止まるでしょうか?

Note: I do not speak Japanese, therefore I had Google Translate di the translation for me (from English to Japanese). Please correct, if you find it unnecessary!
Thank you!

Watch “La mauvaise herbe Brassens” on YouTube



Quand le jour de gloire est arrivé
Comme tous les autres étaient crevés
Moi seul connus le déshonneur
De ne pas être mort au champ d’honneur

Je suis de la mauvaise herbe, braves gens, braves gens
C’est pas moi qu’on rumine et c’est pas moi qu’on met en gerbe
La mort faucha les autres, braves gens, braves gens
Et me fit grâce à moi c’est immoral et c’est comme ça
La la la la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
Et je me demande pourquoi, Bon Dieu
Ça vous dérange que je vive un peu
Et je me demande pourquoi, Bon Dieu
Ça vous dérange que je vive un peu
La fille à tout le monde a bon cœur
Elle me donne au petit bonheur
Les petits bouts de sa peau, bien cachés
Que les autres n’ont pas touché
Je suis de la mauvaise herbe, braves gens, braves gens
C’est pas moi qu’on rumine et c’est pas moi qu’on met en gerbe
Elle se vend aux autres, braves gens, braves gens
Elle se donne à moi, c’est immoral et c’est comme ça
La la la la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
Et je me demande pourquoi, Bon Dieu
Ça vous dérange qu’on m’aime un peu
Et je me demande pourquoi, Bon Dieu
Ça vous dérange qu’on m’aime un peu
Les hommes sont faits, nous dit-on
Pour vivre en bande, comme les moutons
Moi, je vis seul, et c’est pas demain
Que je suivrai leur droit chemin
Je suis de la mauvaise herbe, braves gens, braves gens
C’est pas moi qu’on rumine et c’est pas moi qu’on met en gerbe
Je suis de la mauvaise herbe, braves gens, braves gens
Je pousse en liberté dans les jardins mal fréquentés
La la la la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
Et je me demande pourquoi, Bon Dieu
Ça vous dérange que je vive un peu
Et je me demande pourquoi, Bon Dieu
Ça vous dérange que je vive un peu
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Georges Brassens
La mauvaise herbe lyrics © Warner Chappell Music France

Watch “je vous salue marie-georges brassens” on YouTube


Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
Tandis que des enfants s’amusent au parterre
Et par l’oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
Son aile tout à coup s’ensanglante et descend
Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent
Je vous salue, Marie
Par les gosses battus, par l’ivrogne qui rentre
Par l’âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
Et par l’humiliation de l’innocent châtié
Par la vierge vendue qu’on a déshabillée
Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée
Je vous salue, Marie

Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids
S’écrie “mon Dieu !” par le malheureux dont les bras
Ne purent s’appuyer sur une amour humaine
Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu’il traîne
Je vous salue, Marie

Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde
Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe
Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains
Par le malade que l’on opère et qui geint
Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins
Je vous salue, Marie

Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri
Par l’oiseau rappelant l’oiseau tombé du nid
Par l’herbe qui a soif et recueille l’ondée
Par le baiser perdu par l’amour redonné
Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie
Je vous salue, Marie

Translate to English
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Georges Charles Brassens / Francis Jammes / Oswald Antoine Marie D’Andrea
La prière lyrics © Warner Chappell Music France

For interpretation of the lyrics see:

https://fr.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Pri%C3%A8re?wprov=sfla1

ESL: CONDITIONALS


ESL: CONDITIONALS

ESL: CONDITIONALS

https://pin.it/qgqqnfijuz43iw

ESL: ACTION MOVEMENTS


ESL: ACTION MOVEMENTS

ESL: ACTION MOVEMENTS

https://pin.it/eqshpsvdommu4f

ESL: EMOTIONAL EQUATIONS


ESL: EMOTIONAL EQUATIONS

ESL: EMOTIONAL EQUATIONS

https://pin.it/usdv3kk75flxfp

ESL PHRASAL VERBS – “COOKING”


ESL PHRASAL VERBS -

ESL PHRASAL VERBS – “COOKING”

https://pin.it/zzazmasngjkwk4

ESL: TENSES EXPLAINED


ESL: TENSES EXPLAINED

ESL: TENSES EXPLAINED

https://pin.it/mrev2cxjypwi24

ESL: NUMBERS


ESL: NUMBERS

ESL: NUMBERS

https://pin.it/cpa7fbngtd7vo2

Watch “Leonard Cohen Interview – Part 1 of 3” on YouTube


Word of the day: snark (snärk)


Word of the day:

snark (snärk)
n. Slang

  1. A snide, sarcastic, or disrespectful attitude: “On the issue of mainstream monotheistic religions and the irrationality behind many of religion’s core tenets, scientists often set aside their skewers, their snark, and their impatient demand for proof, and instead don the calming cardigan of a kiddie-show host on public TV” (Natalie Angier).
  2. Commentary expressing such an attitude: “He must now endure days of media scrutiny, schadenfreude from his rivals and an overflow of social media scorn, snark and satire” (Alessandra Stanley).
    [Back-formation from snarky.]
    snark v.
    American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
    snark (snɑːk)
    n
  3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an imaginary creature in Lewis Carroll’s poetry
  4. (Poetry) an imaginary creature in Lewis Carroll’s poetry
    Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
    snark – A blend of snake and shark by Lewis Carroll, it is a synonym for “snore” or “snort.”
    See also related terms for snake.
    Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Snark?sr=FGy3

How To Get Over An Affair | Recovering From A Cheating Betrayal


https://www.truthfinder.com/infomania/dating-relationships/getting-over-an-affair/?utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=social

How To Get Over An Affair — 9 Survival Tips For The Brokenhearted

April 30, 2019

When
your partner cheats on you, you feel like the world made you its
punching bag. At first, you stumble, stagger, and fall to pieces. But
then, you come out swinging. Hell hath no fury like a man or woman
scorned by a cheating partner.

Enter Your Partner’s Name

But there is a silver lining to this cruel tragedy. It is
possible to get over an affair. Here’s what you can learn from
being betrayed by your partner, and how you can use the heartache to
find a happier, healthier relationship.

How To Get Over An Affair

how to get over an affair

It’s Not You — It’s Them

Seriously.
They cheated because of their own insecurities. Sure, you might have
contributed to their unhappiness. (Maybe you were selfish. Maybe you
neglected them. Maybe you had a wandering eye.)

But your unfaithful partner is at fault. Cheating is not a sign that they wanted to fix things
— it’s a sign they wanted the easy way out. Your partner’s affair was a
Band-Aid for their own unhappiness, not a healthy remedy for your
crippled relationship.

You Have To Face The Pain

No
pain, no gain, right? Think of their betrayal as boot camp for your
soul. Once you’ve been knocked down by an unfaithful partner, this is
your chance to get yourself in shape for a better future relationship.
So embrace the heartache. Be the boss of your pain. It will only make you (and your other relationships) stronger.

Jealousy Will Eat You Alive

Your
cheating partner has already done enough damage. If you let your mind
get drunk off anger and jealousy, you’re letting them win. Don’t start
thinking you weren’t smart enough, hot enough, loving enough, whatever
enough. That kind of thinking is a trap.

This affair is your partner’s problem. Let them, not you, suffer the consequences of their mistakes.

Trust Has To Be Earned

You didn’t fall for your mate overnight. It took time for the puppy love to mature into a deep, devoted connection.

Once
you’re ready to date again, you need time to build a connection with
someone new. You will be guarded, but you won’t be naive. Before you
fall for a new partner, ask the right questions. Then find out what
secrets they might be hiding with an online background check. Once you know their history, you can decide if a potential mate is worth your trust.

Enter Your Partner’s Name

You’re A Phoenix

Fans
of Harry Potter and/or ancient mythology know that a phoenix is a
vibrant bird reincarnated from its own ashes. But it has to combust
before it can be reborn.

When you get cheated on, your confidence
explodes into a million pieces. But like a phoenix, you can rebuild it —
this time with a more realistic idea of what to expect from yourself
and your partner.

You’re Vulnerable

When you’re
heartbroken, upset, and a little bit desperate, you risk falling for
someone who will take advantage of your vulnerability. Dating might help
you forget the pain for a while. But remember how your partner used
cheating as a Band-Aid for their own issues? If you jump into dating
before you’ve grieved your past relationship, dating will be your
Band-Aid for a broken heart.

You Need To Pick Better Partners

couple fighting

Do
you thrive off the drama of rocky relationships? They can be exciting,
like your favorite ride at Six Flags. But the butterflies from that big
drop only last a few seconds — and then the thrill is gone.

Look for similar patterns of instability in your past relationships. If you depended on their lows to revel in the highs, you’re addicted to the drama.

A
little piece of advice: When you’re ready to date again, don’t go
straight for your “type.” Go for someone different, someone with — and
we know this is a scary word — stability. Just think
how much extra time you’ll have for yourself (and your new mate) when
you don’t have to waste it waiting, worrying, and checking up on a two-timing jerk.

You’re Not God

You
can’t control everything that happens to you. How can you control what
happens to your partner? Every relationship has its flaws, and that’s
OK. You’re doing the best you can. All you can ask is that you end up
with something who’s doing the best they can for you and your relationship.

This Affair Was Good For You

You never have to be glad they cheated, but you should be relieved you found out.
Between all the lies, cover-ups, anger, and jealousy, this relationship
has really put you through the wringer. Thankfully, now you know what
you don’t want, and what you actually deserve.

Should You Stay Or Go?

couple breaking up

This
affair doesn’t have to be a dealbreaker for you and the cheater. But it
is a very necessary wake-up call. If you stay with an unfaithful
partner, you have a lot of issues to work out. Can you ever rebuild the
trust that was completely destroyed?

If so, expect your
relationship to feel very different. But don’t expect your partner to
change. The affair might be a one-time thing. Or it might not.

Whether
you stay or go, keep tabs on your partner with an online background
check. It could save you from another devastating heartbreak.

Enter Your Partner’s Name

Comments

DISCLAIMER: It is PROHIBITED by law to use our service or the
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subject to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 USC 1681 et seq.
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By Megan Brown

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Article of the Day: The Sikha


Article of the Day:
The Sikha

The sikha is a long tuft or lock of hair left on the top or back of the shaven head of an orthodox Hindu male. During childhood, many Hindu boys have their heads shaved in a special ritual. Sometimes, a lock of hair is left at the crown and allowed to grow throughout the man’s life. Although traditionally all Hindus were required to wear a sikha, today it is seen mainly among ascetic monks. The sikha signifies one-pointed spiritual purpose and is always knotted, except under what circumstances? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

ESL: ANTONYMS


ESL: ANTONYMS

ESL: ANTONYMS

https://pin.it/a73xuixosjp3i5

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