Category Archives: SPIRITUALITY

Granduca Pietro Leopoldo tra la fine del Settecento e l’inizio dell’Ottocento.


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La Galleria è situata in alcuni fra i più bei saloni del Palazzo (dal quale deriva appunto il nome Palatina cioè del Palazzo), nel piano nobile. La superba collezione di dipinti è centrata sul periodo del tardo Rinascimento e il barocco, l’epoca d’oro del palazzo stesso, ed è il più importante esempio in Italia di quadreria, dove, a differenza di un allestimento museale moderno, i quadri non sono esposti con criteri sistematici, ma puramente decorativi, coprendo tutta la superficie della parete in schemi simmetrici, molto fedele all’allestimento originario voluto dal Granduca Pietro Leopoldo tra la fine del Settecento e l’inizio dell’Ottocento.

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 17:20-26.


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Christ in Majesty, 7th century. Church of Santa Maria Antiqua, Rome.

(Christ in Majesty, 7th century. Church of Santa Maria Antiqua, Rome.)

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 17:20-26.

Lifting up his eyes to heaven, Jesus prayed saying: “I pray not only for them, but also for those who will believe in me through their word,
so that they may all be one, as you, Father, are in me and I in you, that they also may be in us, that the world may believe that you sent me.
And I have given them the glory you gave me, so that they may be one, as we are one,
I in them and you in me, that they may be brought to perfection as one, that the world may know that you sent me, and that you loved them even as you loved me.
Father, they are your gift to me. I wish that where I am they also may be with me, that they may see my glory that you gave me, because you loved me before the foundation of the world.
Righteous Father, the world also does not know you, but I know you, and they know that you sent me.
I made known to them your name and I will make it known, that the love with which you loved me may be in them and I in them.”

Mural:  Christ in Majesty, 7th century. Church of Santa Maria Antiqua, Rome.

Cripta di San Vito Vecchio (Gravina in Puglia) fine XIII – inizio XIV secolo.ī


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Cripta di San Vito Vecchio (Gravina in Puglia) fine XIII – inizio XIV secolo.

The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.


The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

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The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

From a sermon by Saint Augustine, bishop
(Sermo de Ascensione Domini, Mai 98, 1-2: PLS 2, 494-495)

“No one has ever ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven”

Today our Lord Jesus Christ ascended into heaven; let our hearts ascend with him. […] For just as he remained with us even after his ascension, so we too are already in heaven with him, even though what is promised us has not yet been fulfilled in our bodies. […]

While in heaven he is also with us; and we while on earth are with him. He is here with us by his divinity, his power and his love. We cannot be in heaven, as he is on earth, by divinity, but in him, we can be there by love.

He did not leave heaven when he came down to us; nor did he withdraw from us when he went up again into heaven. The fact that he was in heaven even while he was on earth is borne out by his own statement: No one has ever ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven, the Son of Man, who is in heaven. […]

These words are explained by our oneness with Christ, for he is our head and we are his body. No one ascended into heaven except Christ because we also are Christ: he is the Son of Man by his union with us, and we by our union with him are the sons of God. So the Apostle says: Just as the human body, which has many members, is a unity, because all the different members make one body, so is it also with Christ. He too has many members, but one body.

The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 17:20-26.


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Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 17:20-26.

Lifting up his eyes to heaven, Jesus prayed saying: “I pray not only for them, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, so that they may all be one, as you, Father, are in me and I in you, that they also may be in us, that the world may believe that you sent me.
And I have given them the glory you gave me, so that they may be one, as we are one,
I in them and you in me, that they may be brought to perfection as one, that the world may know that you sent me, and that you loved them even as you loved me.
Father, they are your gift to me. I wish that where I am they also may be with me, that they may see my glory that you gave me, because you loved me before the foundation of the world.
Righteous Father, the world also does not know you, but I know you, and they know that you sent me.
I made known to them your name and I will make it known, that the love with which you loved me may be in them and I in them.”

Ascension,  les Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. By the Limbourg brothers, 15th century. Musée Condé, Chantilly, France

Questioning, by GeorgeB


Questioning,  by GeorgeB

I’m closing my eye, now,
Over the vast desert of the skies filled with shine…
Covered by the green grass, with a pillow…of sea grass…
I let my inner eye open…
to alert me…
                                        should
The rain will fall
The thunder clouds will explode
The snow will engulf me alive
The fire will not be extinguished in time
The earth will open
where I lay…
Oh God, what a good guardian you are…

Do I deserve your love?
———————————

(Copywright 2016,
The smudge and other poems page)

I love this little Forest Chapel in Vermont


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I love this little Forest Chapel in Vermont …🙂
.
a single beam of sunlight
broke through the clouds
and rained down into the
clearing in the woods
onto the church standing
quite all by itself
.
the peculiar shaft of light
drew one’s gaze
past the wild sunflowers
that stood guard next to
a barbed wire fence
with rugged weathered poles
that looked like the thick
branches of trees
past the horses grazing
in the afternoon sunlight
past the rocks and stones
half-buried scattered in the field
at the foot of these ancient hills
.
the hills stood like sentries
overlooking their domain below
watching and waiting for parishioners
to grace her walls in prayer and song
.
and if you listened carefully
you can hear them still
.
oh so faintly like a distant echo
their voices rising lifting up
to the heavens
the children at play
after service
their laughter
their joy
flitting here
and there
like butterflies
glittering
in the sun
.
~ poem “Another Time” by Michael Traveler, author
.
.
about Photo:  this little chapel in the woods is located in Stowe, Vermont on  a hillside behind the Trapp family home (the real life family that the movie the Sound of Music was based on), Werner von Trapp built a stone chapel in thanksgiving for his safe return from World War II (in the early 1940s). 

Learn more about the von Trapp family here … http://www.trappfamily.com/story
.
.
photo by Greg Camilleri
http://www.gcamilleri.com/
.
.

A Mother’s Touch…what an inspirational photo!


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A Mother’s Touch ❤❤

NU-TI UITA ISTORIA… La 6 mai 1600, Mihai Viteazul il alunga pe Ieremia Movila, domnul Moldovei, reusind astfel sa uneasca cele 3 voivodate romane, Tara Romaneasca, Moldova si Transilvania sub o singura coroana


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NU-TI UITA ISTORIA…

La 6 mai 1600, Mihai Viteazul il alunga pe Ieremia Movila, domnul Moldovei, reusind astfel sa uneasca cele 3 voivodate romane, Tara Romaneasca, Moldova si Transilvania sub o singura coroana, a sa. Astfel se infaptuieste prima unire din istoria Romaniei .
“Şi hotarul Ardealului
pohta ce-am pohtit
Moldova şi Ţara Românească”.

Viorel Simionescu Mânăstirea Dealu_ cca 1980 _2 _ O conversatie


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Mânăstirea Dealu _ cca 1980 _2 _ O conversatie cu smerenie a prietenului meu Paul care demult nu mai este

Watch “Leonard Cohen – A Thousand Kisses Deep” on YouTube



The ponies run, the girls are young,
The odds are there to beat.
You win a while, and then it’s done ?
Your little winning streak.
And summoned now to deal
With your invincible defeat,
You live your life as if it?s real,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

I’m turning tricks, I’m getting fixed,
I’m back on Boogie Street.
You lose your grip, and then you slip
Into the Masterpiece.
And maybe I had miles to drive,
And promises to keep:
You ditch it all to stay alive,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

And sometimes when the night is slow,
The wretched and the meek,
We gather up our hearts and go,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

Confined to sex, we pressed against
The limits of the sea:
I saw there were no oceans left
For scavengers like me.
I made it to the forward deck.
I blessed our remnant fleet…
And then consented to be wrecked,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

I’m turning tricks, I’m getting fixed,
I’m back on Boogie Street.
I guess they won’t exchange the gifts
That you were meant to keep.
And quiet is the thought of you,
The file on you complete,
Except what we forgot to do,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

And sometimes when the night is slow,
The wretched and the meek,
We gather up our hearts and go,
A Thousand Kisses Deep.

The ponies run, the girls are young,
The odds are there to beat .

O, ce mult este urâtă această invenție de către industria de benzină: Inventie in ROMANIA: masina care merge 5000 de km cu trei litri de apa – Alternative News Romania


 
Inventie in ROMANIA: masina care merge 5000 de km cu trei litri de apa

Alternative News Romania   auto  , bacau  , inginer  , inventie  , masina  , merge cu apa  , motor ecologic  , romania
Un inginer din Bacău a inventat motorul ecologic care arde hidrogenul şi eliberează în aer oxigenul, urmând ca în scurt timp să primească omologarea de la Institutul de Motoare Termice din Graz – Austria.

BUCUREŞTI, 3 mai — Sputnik. Gheorghe Bordeianu, inginer TCM, a obţinut în 1985 brevetul pentru motorul care merge 5000 de km cu trei litri de apă, informează recentnews.ro si sputnik.md

Gheorghe Bordeianu are de 50 ani, este inginer şi a reușit să creeze primul motor care merge doar cu apă. Inventatorul spune că mașina dotată cu motorul creat de el consumă trei litri de apă la 5000 de kilometri. Este de fapt un generator de ioni care separă hidrogenul de oxigen. Dispozitivul se ataşează motoarelor clasice şi înlocuiește alimentarea cu benzină sau motorină. Preţul unui astfel de motor este de aproximativ 200-300 lei românești.

“Brevetul l-am obținut în 1985, iar invenția este acum în curs de omologare la Institutul de Motoare termice din Graz- Austria. Omologarea are trei etape, iar eu mă aflu acum la ultima dintre ele. Imediat cum o obțin vreau să înființez în Bacău o fabrică de producție în serie a dispozitivului”, a declarat Gheorghe Bordeianu.

De ani de zile băcăuanul merge cu un Cielo la mâna a doua cumpărat din Spania pe care îl alimentează doar cu apă sau chiar cu suc și urină. El spune că orice lichid care conţine hidrogen poate fi folosit drept combustibil pentru motor. Testele făcute la RAR au arătat că Cielo cu care circulă nu are deloc emisii de noxe.

http://alternativenewsromania.blogspot.ro/2016/05/inventie-in-romania-masina-care-merge-cu-apa.html?m=1

From the New York Times : ‘President Trump?’ Here’s How He Says It Would Look


From the New York Times

‘President Trump?’ Here’s How He Says It Would Look

“I think about a U.N. ambassador, about a secretary of defense and secretary of treasury, but I think more about winning first,” Mr. Trump said. “Otherwise I’m wasting time. I want people in those jobs who care about winning. The U.N. isn’t doing anything to end the big conflicts in the world, so you need an ambassador who would win by really shaking up the U.N.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/05/us/politics/donald-trump-president.html

Tudor Duică : Blaj, clădirea fostei mânăstiri Bizantine a Bunei Vestiri


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Clădirea fostei mănăstiri bazilitane a Bunei Vestiri (primul stareț a fost viitorul episcop Atanasie Rednic), aparținând confesiunii greco-catolice, devenită mai apoi sediul Cancelariei Mitropolitane.

După interzicerea BRU și după naționalizare, a aparținut de  Stațiunea de Cercetări Viticole.

Prin anii ’70 din bibliotecile confiscate ale Blajului dublurile și în general alte lucrări fără mare valoare, au fost aduse aici de la Biblioteca Academiei din Cluj, înjghebându-se ”Biblioteca documentară Timotei Cipariu”, retrocedată scriptic la începutul anilor ’90, faptic prin 2010…

Citat/Quotation: Socrates!


“The children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise.”
― Socrates

Hubert Rossel: Le livre / Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules / Hubert Rossel


La « petite église » (Szent Katalin templom) de Gyergyóditró/ Ditrău, celle de Gyergyóalfalu/Joseni et celle de Csíkdelne/Delniţa sont toutes les trois parmi les 80 églises fortifiées à être analysées et replacées dans leur contexte historique dans le livre “Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules”… Pour plus d’informations on peut aussi se rendre sur le site http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net

TRANSYLVANIE – ERDÉLY – SIEBENBÜRGEN – TRANSYLVANIA

La Transylvanie a été choisie par les guides Lonely Planet comme la région la plus tendance pour un voyage en 2016. Parmi les différents points d’attraction de cette région figurent les églises fortifiées des communautés saxonne et sicule. De nombreux ouvrages existent en français pour présenter les églises saxonnes, les plus grandes et les plus connues. Mais il n’y en a qu’un seul en français pour parler des églises sicules et les remettre dans leur contexte historique et culturel : Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules (http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net/). Songez-y lorsque vous préparez votre voyage, si vous compter aller dans cette région!
La photo ci-dessous présente l’église fortifiées de Zabola/Zăbala, dans le judeţ de Kovaszna/Covasna.

Transylvania has been selected by the Lonely Planet travel guidebooks as the first of the most likely areas for a trip in 2016. Of the various points of attraction of this area are the fortified churches of the Saxon and the Szekler communities. Many books exist in French to introduce the Saxon churches, the largest ones and best known. But there is only one in French to talk about the Szekler churches and put them in their historical and cultural context: Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules. (http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net/). Consider this when planning your trip, if you plan to go to this region!
The picture below figures the Zabola/Zăbala fortified church, in the judeţ Kovaszna/Covasna
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Le livre / Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules / Hubert Rossel


http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net/
TRANSYLVANIE – ERDÉLY – SIEBENBÜRGEN – TRANSYLVANIA

La Transylvanie a été choisie par les guides Lonely Planet comme la région la plus tendance pour un voyage en 2016. Parmi les différents points d’attraction de cette région figurent les églises fortifiées des communautés saxonne et sicule. De nombreux ouvrages existent en français pour présenter les églises saxonnes, les plus grandes et les plus connues. Mais il n’y en a qu’un seul en français pour parler des églises sicules et les remettre dans leur contexte historique et culturel : Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules (http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net/). Songez-y lorsque vous préparez votre voyage, si vous compter aller dans cette région!
La photo ci-dessous présente l’église fortifiées de Zabola/Zăbala, dans le judeţ de Kovaszna/Covasna.

Transylvania has been selected by the Lonely Planet travel guidebooks as the first of the most likely areas for a trip in 2016. Of the various points of attraction of this area are the fortified churches of the Saxon and the Szekler communities. Many books exist in French to introduce the Saxon churches, the largest ones and best known. But there is only one in French to talk about the Szekler churches and put them in their historical and cultural context: Transylvanie – Les églises fortifiées du pays des Sicules. (http://eglises-fortifiees-sicules.prossel.net/). Consider this when planning your trip, if you plan to go to this region!
The picture below figures the Zabola/Zăbala fortified church, in the judeţ Kovaszna/Covasna

The Source That Is Alive For Thousands of Years: Sarmizegetusa Regia, Grădiștea Muncelului, Hunedoara, Banat, România


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Sarmizegetusa Regia (cea regească) a fost capitala și cel mai important centru militar, religios și politic al statului dac înainte de războaiele cu Imperiul Roman. A fost nucleul unui sistem defensiv strategic format din șase fortărețe dacice din Munții Orăștiei, folosit de Decebal pentru apărare contra cuceririi romane. Situl arheologic Sarmizegetusa este situat în satul Grădiștea Muncelului din județul Hunedoara.

The Traitor, Leonard Cohen With Martha Wainright (from I’m Your Man Show)


New! Read & write lyrics explanations

  • Highlight lyrics and explain them to earn Karma points.

Now the swan it floated on the english river
Ah the rose of high romance it opened wide
A sun tanned woman yearned me through the summer
And the judges watched us from the other side

I told my mother “mother I must leave you
Preserve my room but do not she’d a tear
Should rumour of a shabby ending reach you
It was half my fault and half the atmosphere”

But the rose I sickened with a scarlet fever
And the swan I tempted with a sense of shame
She said at last I was her finest lover
And if she withered I would be to blame

The judges said you missed it by a fraction
Rise up and brace your troops for the attack
Ah the dreamers ride against the men of action
Oh see the men of action falling back

But I lingered on her thighs a fatal moment
I kissed her lips as though I thirsted still
My falsity had stung me like a hornet
The poison sank and it paralysed my will

I could not move to warn all the younger soldiers
That they had been deserted from above
So on battlefields from here to barcelona
I’m listed with the enemies of love

And long ago she said “i must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that rose and wind the swan”

So daily I renew my idle duty
I touch her here and there — I know my place
I kiss her open mouth and I praise her beauty
And people call me traitor to my face

Watch “Doru Stanculescu – Hai, hai, haidi, hai (Pe sub flori ma leganai)” on YouTube


Ai, hai lyrics

Artist: Doru Stănculescu
Translations: English, French, German
Romanian
Ai, hai

N-a ști nimeni că m-am dus,
Numa’ m-or vedea că nu-s.

Sus e cerul, largă-i lumea,
Bine c-a-nfrunzit pădurea!

Ai, hai, ai, haidi, haidi, hai,
Pe sub flori mă legănai.

Sus e cerul, largă-i lumea,
N-a ști nimeni că m-am dus.

Bine c-a-nfrunzit pădurea,
Numa’ m-or vedea că nu-s

Ai, hai, ai, haidi, haidi, hai,
Pe sub flori mă legănai.

© 2008-2016 LyricsTranslate.com

Christians United By One Faith


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#ChriatiansUnitedByOneFaith

#ChriatiansUnitedByOneFaith

QUOTATION: NU EXISTA SCLAV MAI BUN DECAT CEL CARE CREDE CA ESTE LIBER


NU EXISTA SCAL MAI BUN...

NU EXISTA SCLAV MAI BUN…

Saint of the Day for Saturday, January 9th, 2016: St. Adrian, Abbot


Image of St. Adrian, Abbot

St. Adrian, Abbot

Born in Africa, Adrian became abbot of the monastery at Nerida, near Naples. He declined an appointment as archbishop of Canterbury, but accompanied St. Theodore to England when the latter was … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

 

historic musical bits: Dinu Lipatti plays Liszt Concerto No. 1 in E flat Orchestre de la Suisse Romande Ernest Ansermet, rec. 1947


Dinu Lipatti plays Liszt Concerto No. 1 in E flat Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
Ernest Ansermet
rec. 1947

 
 
 
 
 

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, January 5th, 2016 : St. John Neumann


Image of St. John Neumann

St. John Neumann

This American saint was born in Bohemia in 1811. He was looking forward to being ordained in 1835 when the bishop decided there would be no more ordinations. It is difficult for us to imagine now, … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

today’s holiday: Twelfth Night


Twelfth Night

In England, the evening before the Epiphany is called Epiphany Eve, or Twelfth Night, and it traditionally marks the end of the Christmas season. Celebrations reflect ancient Winter Solstice rites encouraging the rebirth of the New Year and also the Magi‘s visit to the Christ child. Pageants held on this night typically include masked figures, costumed musicians, and traditional dances. Customarily, the Twelfth Night cake is sliced and served, and the man who gets the hidden bean and the woman the pea are the king and queen for the festivities. More… Discuss

Fabulous Renditions: Ennio Morricone – The Mission Main Theme (Morricone Conducts Morricone)


Ennio Morricone – The Mission Main Theme (Morricone Conducts Morricone)

 

 

Fabulous Renditions: Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays “Gabriel’s Oboe”


Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays “Gabriel’s Oboe”

great compositions/performances: The Mission – Gabriel’s Oboe


The Mission – Gabriel’s Oboe (Full HD)

today’s holiday: St. John the Evangelist’s Day


St. John the Evangelist’s Day

John the Evangelist was thought to be not only the youngest of the Apostles but the longest-lived, dying peacefully of natural causes at an advanced age. Although he escaped actual martyrdom, St. John endured considerable persecution and suffering for his beliefs. He is said to have drunk poison to prove his faith, been cast into a cauldron of boiling oil, and at one point banished to the Greek island of Patmos. He remained miraculously unharmed throughout these trials and returned to Ephesus, where it is believed he wrote the Gospel according to John. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Saturday, December 26th, 2015: St. Stephen


Image of St. Stephen

St. Stephen

Stephen’s name means “crown,” and he was the first disciple of Jesus to receive the martyr’s crown. Stephen was a deacon in the early Christian Church. The apostles had found that they … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Saturday, December 19th, 2015: St. Nemesius


Image of St. Nemesius

St. Nemesius

Martyr of Egypt. He was burned alive in Alexandria, Egypt, during the persecutions under Emperor Trajanus Decius. Nemesius was arrested and scourged and then burned to death. Like Christ, he was … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Friday, December 18th, 2015: St. Rufus


Image of St. Rufus

St. Rufus

Rufus and Zosimus were citizens of Antioch (or perhaps Philippi) who were brought to Rome with St. Ignatius of Antioch during the reign of Emperor Trajan. They were condemned to death for their … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

this pressed for our soul: Where Christ Drove Demons into Sea: Archeological Proof


MOREby Thomas D. Williams, Ph.D.17 Dec 2015373Evidence has been uncovered corroborating the site of one of Jesus’ most powerful and dramatic miracles: the casting out of demons into a herd of swine in the land of the Gadarenes (or Gerasenes). Israeli archaeologists have unearthed a 1,500-year-old marble slab with Hebrew inscriptions near Kursi, the spot traditionally associated with the miracle of Christ’s banishment of demons into a herd of swine. Archeologists believe the slab to be a commemoration tablet dating from around 500 AD. The inscription in Hebrew begins with the words “Remembered for good. ”The biblical description of the miracle is one of the most evocative in the entire Gospel. Recounted by Matthew, Mark, and Luke with different nuances, the Gospels depict Jesus in one of His most direct confrontations with Satan.  Mark describes the possessed man as fiercely strong and dangerous. Local citizens had tried in vain to restrain him with shackles and chains, but he broke them to pieces. The man lived among the tombs, howling night and day and gashing himself with stones. He terrified the people so much that no one dared go near. On seeing Jesus approach, the man ran and bowed down before him, while the demons inside him howled and begged Jesus not to torment them.Jesus, meanwhile, was ordering them, “Come out of the man, you unclean spirit! ”When Jesus commanded the demons to identify themselves, they replied, “My name is Legion; for we are many. ”Jesus then cast the demons into a herd of about 2,000 swine grazing on a nearby hillside. The pigs rushed headlong down the steep bank into the sea, where they drowned, to the utter amazement and shock of the townspeople.The healed demoniac, now clothed and in his full senses, begged Jesus to take him back with him, but Jesus told him to stay and proclaim the mercy of God to his family and friends.  The University of Haifa researchers found the marble on the eastern shores of the Sea of Galilee, in Kursi, the historically Gentile district of the Decapolis.  On the slab, scientists also identified the words “amen” and “marmaria,” which could refer to marble or to Mary, Jesus’ mother.Kursi has been identified in Christian tradition with Gadarenes, where the Miracle of the Swine took place. In the fifth and sixth centuries, a Christian church was built to mark the spot of the biblical location but was destroyed by invading Persians in 614 AD and, after being rebuilt, was demolished by fire shortly afterward. The site remained abandoned for most of the following 1,300 years. The church was lost to history until it was uncovered by accident during the building of a new road in 1970. Archaeological excavations continued at the site from 1970-74.  Around the vicinity of the church, caves are still visible, and there is a mountain that drops down into the sea, such as described in the biblical account.Christ’s trip to the land of the Gadarenes (Kursi) was one of his rare visits to Gentile territory, which also explains the presence of the herd of pigs, which was forbidden to the Jews. Jesus Himself had said that He was sent only “to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”Celebrated Christian apologist Steve Ray, a frequent visitor to Kursi who often leads groups through biblical sites in the Holy Land, told Breitbart News that since Kursi had the largest monastery in Israel, it was obviously held in high esteem by the first Christians. “The early Judeo-Christians remembered the places and events surrounding the life of Christ, and as soon as Christianity was legalized, churches were built on these different sites,” he said. “The more archaeology uncovers,” Ray said, “the more the Bible is confirmed.”Follow Thomas D. Williams on Twitter @tdwilliamsrome.Read More Stories About:Big Government, National Security, Faith, Israel, Bible, satan, Jesus Christ, exorcism, demons, Kursi, archeology, Gadarenes, Gerasenes

Source: Where Christ Drove Demons into Sea: Archeological Proof

this pressed for our spirit!: Orthodox Rabbis Issue Groundbreaking Declaration Affirming ‘Partnership’ With Christianity


MOREA group of prominent Orthodox rabbis in Israel, the United States and Europe have issued a historic public statement affirming that Christianity is “the willed divine outcome and gift to the nations” and urging Jews and Christians to “work together as partners to address the moral challenges of our era.”“Jesus brought a double goodness to the world,” the statement reads. “On the one hand he strengthened the Torah of Moses majestically” and on the other hand “he removed idols from the nations,” instilling them “firmly with moral traits.
”This year 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Nostra Aetate, the declaration issued in 1965 by the Second Vatican Council, which marked a watershed in Jewish-Christian relations.In language unusual for its day, Nostra Aetate stated that “God holds the Jews most dear,” stressed the great “spiritual patrimony common to Christians and Jews,” and condemned “hatred, persecutions, displays of anti-Semitism, directed against Jews at any time and by anyone.”Now, a group of Jewish leaders has responded in kind, expressing their desire to accept “the hand offered to us by our Christian brothers and sisters.”

“Christians are congregations that work for the sake of heaven who are destined to endure, whose intent is for the sake of heaven and whose reward will not denied,” the text reads. The statement bears the title, “To Do the Will of Our Father in Heaven: Toward a Partnership between Jews and Christians,” and is signed by over 25 prominent Orthodox rabbis, who invite fellow Orthodox rabbis to join in signing the statement. “Now that the Catholic Church has acknowledged the eternal Covenant between G-d and Israel, we Jews can acknowledge the ongoing constructive validity of Christianity as our partner in world redemption, without any fear that this will be exploited for missionary purposes,” it says.

Echoing recent words by Pope Francis, the document states:

“We are no longer enemies, but unequivocal partners in articulating the essential moral values for the survival and welfare of humanity.”“Neither of us can achieve G-d’s mission in this world alone,” it says.

According to Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, one of the statement’s initiators, the “real importance of this Orthodox statement is that it calls for fraternal partnership between Jewish and Christian religious leaders, while also acknowledging the positive theological status of the Christian faith.”“This proclamation’s breakthrough is that influential Orthodox rabbis across all centers of Jewish life have finally acknowledged that Christianity and Judaism are no longer engaged in a theological duel to the death and that Christianity and Judaism have much in common spiritually and practically. Given our toxic history, this is unprecedented in Orthodoxy.” said Rabbi Dr. Eugene Korn, Academic Director of CJCUC.Follow Thomas D. Williams on Twitter @tdwilliamsromeRead More Stories About:National Security, Faith, Breitbart Jerusalem, Vatican, Pope Francis, Christianity, Catholic Church, Judaism, Nostra Aetate, Jewish-Christian relations, orthodox rabbis

Source: Orthodox Rabbis Issue Groundbreaking Declaration Affirming ‘Partnership’ With Christianity

Ave Maria Schubert Liszt Valentina Lisitsa


Ave Maria Schubert Liszt Valentina Lisitsa

Fabulous renditions: Valentina Lisitsa plays Tchaikovsky Children’s Album Детский альбом , Op. 39


Tchaikovsky Children’s Album Детский альбом , Op. 39 Valentina Lisitsa


Published on Dec 17, 2015

This was my first recital repertory when I was 4 years old!

It’s so nice to re-visit this masterpiece and to enjoy it as an adult:)
Simple enough for little hands to master, yet not an “instructional” music but real REAL music, a gem of Tchaikovsky writing.

00:08 Morning Prayer (Утренняя молитва)
02:00 Winter Morning (Зимнее утро)
03:43 Playing Hobby-Horses (Игра в лошадки)
04:33 Mama (Мама)
06:00 March of the Wooden Soldiers (Марш деревянных солдатиков)
07:05 The Sick Doll (Болезнь куклы)
10:47 The Doll’s Funeral (Похороны куклы)
13:15 The New Doll (Новая кукла)
14:00 Waltz (Вальс)
15:30 Mazurka (Мазурка)
16:53 Russian Song (Русская песня)
17:38 The Accordion Player (Мужик на гармонике играет)
18:48 Kamarinskaya (Камаринская)
19:20 Polka (Полька)
20:19 Italian Song (Итальянская песенка)
21:16 Old French Song (Старинная французская песенка)
22:35 German Song (Немецкая песенка)
23:44 Neapolitan Song (Неаполитанская песенка)
24:52 Nanny’s Story (Нянина сказка)
25:55 The Sorcerer (Баба-Яга)
26:46 Sweet Dreams (Сладкая греза)
29:46 Lark Song (Песня жаворонка)
31:12 The Organ-Grinder Sings (Шарманщик поет)
32:31 In Church (В церкви)

this pressed for our mind: Anti-Christian persecution isn’t all about Islam, @JohnLAllenJr writes — Crux (@Crux) December 16, 2015


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Saint of the Day for Wednesday, December 16th, 2015: St. Ado of Vienne


Image of St. Ado of Vienne

St. Ado of Vienne

An archbishop and scholar, Ado was born in Sens and educated at the Benedictine abbey of Ferrieres. Abbot Lupus Servatus, an outstanding humanist of the time, trained Ado, and was impressed with the … continue reading

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Faith: Swami Vivekananda


Swami Vivekananda

Swami Vivekananda was a Hindu mystic, a disciple of Ramakrishna, and one of the most influential spiritual leaders of the Vedanta philosophy. In 1890, Vivekananda began a journey that would take him throughout India as a wandering monk. A few years later, he represented Hinduism at the US World Parliament of Religions and is credited with helping kindle Western interest in the religion. His Ramakrishna Mission, now one of the largest Hindu monastic orders in India, was founded on what principle? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, December 15th, 2015: St. Mary Di Rosa


Image of St. Mary Di Rosa

St. Mary Di Rosa

Saint Mary (Paula) Di Rosa December 15 The pounding on the barricaded door of the military hospital sent every heart thudding in terror. In the middle of the war in Brescia (Italy) in 1848, the … continue reading

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today’s holiday: Bill of Rights Day


Bill of Rights Day

The first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution of 1787—referred to collectively as the Bill of Rights—were ratified on December 15, 1791. This landmark document protected American citizens from specific abuses by their government and guaranteed such basic rights as the freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press. In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt designated December 15 as Bill of Rights Day and called upon Americans to observe it with appropriate patriotic ceremonies. More… Discuss

historic musical bits: Leonard Bernstein – Mozart Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) 1967


Leonard Bernstein – Mozart Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) 1967

historic musical bits: BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN


BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN

Historic musical bits: Dvorak String Quartet No.12, Op.96 “American” (The Smetana Quartet – WIKI), rec. 1967)


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-LJsnTexnOYg/Vmym6juh5oI/AAAAAAAAqb4/DWys5Tg0aC0/w346-h449/3+-+1.gif
Dvorak String Quartet No.12, Op.96 “American” (The Smetana Quartet 1967)

 
 
Published on Dec 4, 2014

Antonin Dvorak (1841- 1904)
String Quartet “American” No.12, Op.96

Allegro ma non troppo (00:00)
Lento (7:02)
Molto vivace (15:00)
Finale: vivace ma non troppo (18:26)

The Smetana Quartet
violin – Jiri Novak
violin – Lubomir Kostecky
viola – Milan Skampa
cello – Antonin Kohout

Recorded in 1967
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String Quartet No. 12 (Dvořák)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 The last page of the autograph score with Dvořák’s inscription: “Finished on 10 June 1893 in Spillville. Thanks God. I’m satisfied. It went quickly”

The String Quartet in F major Op. 96, nicknamed American Quartet, is the 12th string quartet composed by Antonín Dvořák. It was written in 1893, during Dvořák’s time in the United States. The quartet is one of the most popular in the chamber music repertoire.

Composition

Performance of the quartet by the Seraphina quartet (Caeli Smith and Sabrina Tabby, violins; Madeline Smith, viola; Genevieve Tabby, cello)
 
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Dvořák composed the Quartet in 1893 during a summer vacation from his position as Director (1892-1895) of the National Conservatory in New York. He spent his vacation in the town of Spillville, Iowa, which was home to a Czech immigrant community. Dvořák had come to Spillville through Josef Jan Kovařík who had finished violin studies at the Prague Conservatory and was about to return to Spillville, his home in the United States, when Dvořák offered him a position as secretary, which Josef Jan accepted, so he came to live with the Dvořák family in New York.[1] He told Dvořák about Spillville, where his father Jan Josef was a schoolmaster, which led to Dvořák deciding to spend the summer of 1893 there.[2]

In that environment, and surrounded by beautiful nature, Dvořák felt very much at ease.[3] Writing to a friend he described his state of mind, away from hectic New York: “I have been on vacation since 3 June here in the Czech village of Spillville and I won’t be returning to New York until the latter half of September. The children arrived safely from Europe and we’re all happy together. We like it very much here and, thank God, I am working hard and I’m healthy and in good spirits.”[4] He composed the quartet shortly after the New World Symphony, before that work had been performed.[5]

Dvořák sketched the quartet in three days and completed it in thirteen more days, finishing the score with the comment “Thank God! I am content. It was fast.”[3] It was his second attempt to write a quartet in F major: his first effort, 12 years earlier, produced only one movement.[6] The American Quartet proved a turning point in Dvořák’s chamber music output: for decades he had toiled unsuccessfully to find a balance between his overflowing melodic invention and a clear structure. In the American Quartet it finally came together.[3] Dvořák defended the apparent simplicity of the piece: “When I wrote this quartet in the Czech community of Spillville in 1893, I wanted to write something for once that was very melodious and straightforward, and dear Papa Haydn kept appearing before my eyes, and that is why it all turned out so simply. And it’s good that it did.”[7]

For his symphony Dvořák gave the subtitle himself: “From the New World“. To the Quartet he gave no subtitle himself, but there is the comment “The second composition written in America.”[8]

Negro, American or other influences?

For the London premiere of his New World symphony, Dvořák wrote: “As to my opinion I think that the influence of this country (it means the folk songs as are Negro, Indian, Irish etc.) is to be seen, and that this and all other works (written in America) differ very much from my other works as well as in couleur as in character,…”[9][10]

Dvořák’s appreciation of African-American music is documented: Harry T. Burleigh, a baritone and later a composer, who knew Dvořák while a student at the National Conservatory, said, “I sang our Negro songs for him very often, and before he wrote his own themes, he filled himself with the spirit of the old Spirituals.”[11] Dvořák said: “In the Negro melodies of America I discover all that is needed for a great and noble school of music.”[12] For its presumed association with African-American music, the quartet was referred to with nicknames such as Negro and Nigger, before being called the American Quartet.[13][14] Such older nicknames, without negative connotations at the time, were used until the 1950s.[15][16]

Dvořák wrote (in a letter he sent from America shortly after composing the quartet): “As for my new Symphony, the F major String Quartet and the Quintet (composed here in Spillville) – I should never have written these works ‘just so’ if I hadn’t seen America.”[17] Listeners have tried to identify specific American motifs in the quartet. Some have claimed that the theme of the second movement is based on a Negro spiritual, or perhaps on a Kickapoo Indian tune, which Dvořák heard during his sojourn at Spillville.[18]

A characteristic, unifying element throughout the quartet is the use of the pentatonic scale. This scale gives the whole quartet its open, simple character, a character that is frequently identified with American folk music. However, the pentatonic scale is common in many ethnic musics worldwide, and Dvořák had composed pentatonic music, being familiar with such Slavonic folk music examples, before coming to America.[19]

On the whole, specific American influences are doubted: “In fact the only American thing about the work is that it was written there,” writes Paul Griffiths.[20] “The specific American qualities of the so-called “American” Quartet are not easily identifiable, writes Lucy Miller, “…Better to look upon the subtitle as simply one assigned because of its composition during Dvořák’s American tour.”[21]

 Dvořák’s transcription of the song of the scarlet tanager (top) and the appearance of the song in the third movement of the quartet.

Some have heard suggestions of a locomotive in the last movement, recalling Dvořák’s love of railroads.[22]

The one confirmed musical reference in the quartet is to the song of the scarlet tanager, an American songbird. Dvořák was annoyed by this bird’s insistent chattering, and transcribed its song in his notebook. The song appears as a high, interrupting strain in the first violin part in the third movement.[23]

Structure

The Quartet is scored for the usual complement of two violins, viola, and cello, and comprises four movements:[24] A typical performance lasts around 30 minutes.

I. Allegro ma non troppo

 
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First theme of the first movement, played by the Seraphina Quartet.

The opening theme of the quartet is purely pentatonic, played by the viola, with a rippling F major chord in the accompanying instruments. This same F major chord continues without harmonic change throughout the first 12 measures of the piece. The movement then goes into a bridge, developing harmonically, but still with the open, triadic sense of openness and simplicity.

 
 
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Second theme of the first movement.

The second theme, in A major, is also primarily pentatonic, but ornamented with melismatic elements reminiscent of Gypsy or Czech music. The movement moves to a development section that is much denser harmonically and much more dramatic in tempo and color.

 
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Fugato at end of development

The development ends with a fugato section that leads into the recapitulation.

 
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Cello bridge in recapitulation

After the first theme is restated in the recapitulation, there is a cello solo that bridges to the second theme.

II. Lento

 
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Theme of the second movement

The theme of the second movement is the one that interpreters have most tried to associate with a Negro spiritual or with an American Indian tune. The simple melody, with the pulsing accompaniment in second violin and viola, does indeed recall spirituals or Indian ritual music. It is written using the same pentatonic scale as the first movement, but in the minor (D minor) rather than the major. The theme is introduced in the first violin, and repeated in the cello. Dvořák develops this thematic material in an extended middle section, then repeats the theme in the cello with an even thinner accompaniment that is alternately bowed and pizzicato.

III. Molto vivace

 
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First section of the Scherzo movement. Listen for the song of the scarlet tanager high in the first violin

The third movement is a variant of the traditional scherzo. It has the form ABABA: the A section is a sprightly, somewhat quirky tune, full of off-beats and cross-rhythms. The song of the scarlet tanager appears high in the first violin.

 
 
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Second section of the scherzo

The B section is actually a variation of the main scherzo theme, played in minor, at half tempo, and more lyrical. In its first appearance it is a legato line, while in the second appearance the lyrical theme is played in triplets, giving it a more pulsing character.

IV. Finale: vivace ma non troppo

 
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Main theme of the last movement

The final movement is in a traditional rondo form, ABACABA. Again, the main melody is pentatonic.

 
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“B” section of the rondo

The B section is more lyrical, but continues in the spirit of the first theme.

 
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“C” section of the rondo

The C section is a chorale theme.

Performance and influence

In a first “private” performance of the quartet, in Spillville, June 1893, Dvořák himself played first violin, Jan Josef Kovařík second violin, daughter Cecilie Kovaříková viola, and son Josef Jan Kovařík the cello.[8]

The first public performance of the quartet was by the Kneisel quartet in Boston in January 1894.[25] Burghauser mentions press notices in New York as well as Boston, the first New York Herald, 18 December 1893.[8]

While the influence of American folk song is not explicit in the quartet, the impact of Dvořák’s quartet on later American compositions is clear. Following Dvořák, a number of American composers turned their hands to the string quartet genre, including John Knowles Paine, Horatio Parker, George Whitefield Chadwick, and Arthur Foote. “The extensive use of folk-songs in 20th century American music and the ‘wide-open-spaces’ atmosphere of ‘Western’ film scores may have at least some of their origins” in Dvořák’s new American style, writes Butterworth.[26]
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Smetana Quartet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

The Smetana Quartet (Czech: Smetanovo kvarteto) was a Czech string quartet that was in existence from 1945 to 1989.

Personnel

1st violin

2nd violin

Viola

Cello

Origins and activities

The Smetana Quartet arose from the Quartet of the Czech Conservatory, which was founded in 1943 (during the Nazi occupation) in Prague by Antonín Kohout, the cellist. With Jaroslav Rybenský and Lubomír Kostecký as first and second violins, and Václav Neumann as violist, the group gave its first performance as the Smetana Quartet on 6 November 1945, at the Municipal Library in Prague. Neumann left to pursue conducting in 1947, at which point Rybenský went to the viola desk and Jiří Novák (who shared first violin desk with Josef Vlach, founder of the Vlach Quartet, under Vaclav Talich in the Czech Chamber Orchestra) came in as first violin.[2]

By 1949 the group had official connections with the Czech Philharmonic. The first foreign tour was in 1949, to Poland, and the first recording was of a quartet by Bedřich Smetana in 1950. Rybenský was obliged to retire after ill health in 1952, and was replaced by Milan Škampa. The performers were appointed professors at the Academy of Musical Arts in 1967. Of their many recordings, those made at that time for German Electrola are considered particularly fine.[3]

For many years this group, which has been called the finest Czech quartet of its time, played the Czech repertoire from memory, giving these works a special intensity and intimacy.[4]

Antonín Kohout trained the Kocian Quartet (founded 1972)[5] and the Martinů Quartet (1976),[6] though the latter’s members had been pupils of Professor Viktor Moučka, cellist of the Vlach Quartet.

 

Saint of the Day for Sunday, December 13th, 2015: St. Lucy


Image of St. Lucy

St. Lucy

Lucy’s history has been lost and all we really know for certain is that this brave woman who lived in Syracuse lost her life during the persecution of Christians in the early fourth century. Her … continue reading

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Our Lady of Guadalupe (Apparitions of the Virgin Mary in Mexico): School of Mary


Our Lady of Guadalupe (Apparitions of the Virgin Mary in Mexico)

Saint of the Day for Saturday, December 12th, 2015: Our Lady of Guadalupe


Image of Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe

An elder Mexican man makes his way to Mass in the early morning twilight of December 9, 1531. He is a peasant, a simple farmer and laborer, and he has no education. Born under Aztec rule, he is a … continue reading

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