Category Archives: SPIRITUALITY

Palestinian president may visit Vatican a second time for canonization Mass :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


By Andrea Gagliarducci

 

Jerusalem, Israel, Mar 26, 2015 / 02:04 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Nearly a year since taking part in a prayer for Middle East peace in the Vatican Gardens, Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas has been invited to the Vatican a second time, for the canonization Mass of two Palestinians.

Bl. Marie-Alphonsine Ghattas and Bl. Mariam Baouardy were both Palestinians born in the 19th century, and foundresses of religious orders. They are to be canonized at a Mass celebrated in the Vatican May 17.

The news site abouna.org, run by a priest of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, announced March 22 that Patriarch Fouad Twal of Jerusalem invited Abbas to the Mass while visiting his headquarters in Ramallah, in the West Bank of Palestine.

Patriarch Twal “noted that preparations are in full swing to celebrate the canonization of the two nuns, stressing that it is a historic and qualitative event at the religious, ecclesiastical and national levels,” according to the site.

Bl. Marie-Alphonsine (1843-1927) was a Turco-British Palestinian and co-foundress of the Congregation of the Rosary Sisters. She was born in Palestine and spent much of her life in Bethlehem and its environs, assisting the poor and establishing schools and orphanages.

A mystic and stigmatist, Blessed Mary of Jesus Crucified (Mariam Baouardy) was a Turkish Palestinian and foundress of the Discalced Carmelites of Bethlehem. She lived 1846-1878. Her family were of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, and in the religious life she spent time in France and India before helping to found a Carmel in Bethlehem in 1875.

Patriarch Twal released a pastoral letter, “Along the path to holiness,” on March 23 to celebrate the upcoming canonization of the two religious sisters, which he called “a blessing from heaven on our land, devastated by violence yet persevering in our longing for peace and justice.”

via Palestinian president may visit Vatican a second time for canonization Mass :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 28

1774   Britain passes the Coercive Act against rebellious Massachusetts.
1854   Britain and France declare war on Russia.
1864   A group of Copperheads attack Federal soldiers in Charleston, Illinois. Five are killed and twenty wounded.
1885   The Salvation Army is officially organized in the United States.
1908   Automobile owners lobby Congress in support of a bill that calls for vehicle licensing and federal registration.
1910   The first seaplane takes off from water at Martinques, France.
1917   The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) is founded, Great Britain’s first official service women.
1921   President Warren Harding names William Howard Taft as chief justice of the United States.
1930   Constantinople and Angora change their names to Istanbul and Ankara respectively.
1933   Nazis order a ban on all Jews in businesses, professions and schools.
1939   The Spanish Civil War ends as Madrid falls to Francisco Franco.
1941   The Italian fleet is routed by the British at the Battle of Battle of Cape Matapan
1941   English novelist Virginia Woolf throws herself into the River Ouse near her home in Sussex. Her body is never found.
1942   A British ship, the HMS Capbeltown, a Lend-Lease American destroyer, which was specifically rammed into a German occupied dry-dock in France, explodes, knocking the area out of action for the German battleship Tirpitz.
1945   Germany launches the last of its V-2 rockets against England.
1946   Juan Peron is elected President of Argentina. He will hold the office for six years.
1962   The U.S. Air Force announces research into the use of lasers to intercept missiles and satellites.
1969   Dwight D. Eisenhower dies at Walter Reed General Hospital in Washington, D.C.
1979   A major accident occurs at Pennsylvania’s Three Mile Island nuclear power plant
1986   The U.S. Senate passes $100 million aid package for the Nicaraguan contras.
1990   Jesse Owens receives the Congressional Gold Medal from President George Bush.
1999   An American Stealth F117 Nighthawk is shot down over northern Yugoslavia during NATO air strikes.
Born on March 28
1652   Samuel Sewall, British colonial merchant and one of the Salem witch trial judges.
1818   Wade Hampton, Confederate general in the American Civil War.
1862   Aristide Briand, premier of France (1909-22).
1868   Maxim Gorky, Russian short story writer and novelist.
1895   James McCudden, the first RAF pilot to receive the Victoria Cross.
1909   Nelson Algren, novelist (The Man with the Golden Arm, A Walk on the Wild Side).
1929   Frederick Exley, American novelist (A Fan’s Notes).
1930   Jerome Isaac Friedman, American physicist, helped confirm the existence of quarks.
1936   Mario Vargas Llosa, Peruvian novelist (Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, Death in the Andes).

- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.TfTSNyYq.dpuf

Catholics in England gather to pray for Richard III, one of their own :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Leicester, England – March 23, 2015. Requiem Mass for the Repose of the soul of King Richard III with Cardinal Vincent Nichols of Westminster at Holy Cross Priory.

Nottingham, England, Mar 25, 2015 / 02:25 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- In preparation for the reinternment of the remains of Richard III, a 15th century English king whose body was only recently rediscovered, Cardinal Vincent Nichols of Westminster has offered Compline and a Requiem Mass for the late monarch.

“This evening we fulfil a profound and essential Christian duty: that of praying for the dead, for the repose of their eternal souls,” Cardinal Nichols preached during a March 23 Requiem Mass said at Holy Cross Priory in Leicester.

“The prayer we offer for him this evening is the best prayer there is: the offering of the Holy Mass, the prayer of Jesus himself, made complete in the oblation of his body and blood on the altar of the cross, present here for us on this altar.”

Richard III was born in 1452, and reigned over England from 1483-1485, when he died in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York; he was succeeded by Henry VII, founder of the House of Tudor.

His corpse was buried without pomp, and subsequently lost. It was found in 2012 under a parking lot in Leicester, 30 miles south of Nottingham, on the site of Greyfriars, a Franciscan friary dissolved during the English Reformation.

His body has been kept at the University of Leicester, and was processed to Leicester Cathedral, an Anglican church, on Sunday.

That evening, Cardinal Nichols led a Compline service at the cathedral, during which Richard’s coffin was sprinkled with holy water, and incensed.

“This sprinkling with holy water is a reminder that King Richard, at the beginning of his life, was baptised,” the cardinal reflected. “He was thereby called to live as a follower of Jesus Christ.”

“The deepest intentions of Richard have always been hard to fathom. Yet that is often true for many of us. Within the depth of his heart, amidst all his fears and ambitions, there surely lay a strong desire to provide his people with stability and improvement.”

Cardinal Nichols noted Richard’s achievements, including a development of the presumption of innocence, the concept of blind justice, the practice of granting bail, and translating laws into the vernacular, while adding that “nevertheless his reign was marked by unrest and the fatal seepage of loyalty and support.”

“All of this reminds us, if we need reminding, that baptism does not guarantee holiness of life or saintliness of nature. But it gives a fundamental and enduring shape to a journey through life, in all its struggles and failures.”

He recalled Richard as a man of prayer and “anxious devotion,” who composed a surviving prayer and established chapels.

“We pray that, being brought into the presence of that Divine majesty, Richard may be embraced by God’s merciful love, there to await the final resurrection of all things in the fullness of time.”

Until its reburial, Richard III’s body will remain at Leicester Cathedral. More than 20,000 visited the cathedral to view the coffin. The reinternment will be held at the cathedral on Thursday, led by Justin Welby, the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury.

On Monday, March 23, Cardinal Nichols said a Requiem Mass at Holy Cross Priory, a Dominican parish in Leicester. He wore a chasuble known as the “Westminster Vestment,” which is believed to be from Richard III’s own wardrobe. The chasuble’s embroidery matches that described from his inventories, and has been dated to the third quarter of the 15th century.

The Mass was attended by several bishops from across England and Wales, as well as by Tim Stevens, the Anglican Bishop of Leicester.

Msgr. Thomas McGovern, administrator of the Diocese of Nottingham – which includes Leicester – commented that “it is fitting that, after 530 years, Richard III’s mortal remains are once again laid to rest, this time in Leicester Cathedral, the mediaeval Catholic parish church of Leicester, not far from where they were first buried by the Franciscan friars after the Battle of Bosworth.”

“Just as Mass would have been offered for the repose of his soul by the priests who buried him, we do him the same service tonight, asking Almighty God to receive him into the kingdom of heaven with his sins forgiven. May he rest in peace.”

Cardinal Nichols remarked during his homily that “during this week, Mass is being offered in many Catholic Churches for the repose of the soul of King Richard III. Rightly so. That is exactly what he would have wished, having himself set up at least one chantry chapel for Masses to be celebrated for the dead of both sides of the Battle of Towton in 1461.”

“This evening we pray that the merciful judgement of our loving God is extended to him in every degree, for we know that it is only the gift of God’s mercy that protects us from the demands of God’s justice … We offer this holy Mass that even while his remains are lying in the Cathedral nearby, his soul is united with God in the glory of heaven there to await the final resurrection of all things in Christ.”

via Catholics in England gather to pray for Richard III, one of their own :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

the amazing pianist Valentina Lisitsa plays Liszt Un Sospiro Concert Étude No. 3 , great compositions/performances


Liszt Un Sospiro Concert Étude No. 3 Valentina Lisitsa

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, March 24th, 2015: St. Aldemar


Image of St. Aldemar

St. Aldemar

Abbot and miracle worker, called “the Wise.” Born in Capua, Italy, he became a monk in Monte Cassino and was called to the attention of a Princess Aloara of the region. When she built a new … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Monday, March 23rd, 2015: St. Toribio Alfonso de Mogrovejo


Image of St. Toribio Alfonso de Mogrovejo

St. Toribio Alfonso de Mogrovejo

Bishop and defender of the rights of the native Indians in Peru, Born in Mayorga, Spain, he studied law and became a lawyer and then professor at Salamanca, receiving appointment-despite being a … continue reading

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happy birthday Bach: Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Dorische Toccata BWV 538, Deaken/Marcussen-organ Goes [NL]


happy birthday Bach!

Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Dorische Toccata BWV 538, Deaken/Marcussen-organ Goes [NL]

 

Pray the Rosary – Tuesday and Friday – The Sorrowful Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles


Pray the Rosary – Tuesday and Friday – The Sorrowful Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles

Saint of the Day for Friday, March 20th, 2015: Bl. John of Parma


just a thought: ‘Change in social life is like a treacherous river…’


just a thought: ‘Change in social life is like a treacherous river: if you know the dangers and you are a good swimmer than you  may be able to survive it. If you know nothing about its currents, even if you know how to swim in a bean shaped backyard pool, chances are you’re not survive the river currents: You’ll by drown by change that is not understood for what is really bringing about!’

Above all do not become a proponent of change out of boredom…Deceiving  forces are hard at work to  make you believe that they have your best interest at heart!’
– George-B.

Copyright ©2010 – 2015 George Bost. All Rights Reserved.

Pray the Rosary – Thursday – The Luminous Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles


Pray the Rosary – Thursday – The Luminous Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles

SPIRITUAL REFLECTION, March 19, 2015: Feast of St. Joseph



Lumen Fidei_Holy Father Francis' First Encyclical

Lumen Fidei_Holy Father Francis’ First Encyclical (click to access NEWS.VA)

SPIRITUAL REFLECTION

Feast of St. Joseph

“In Saint Joseph’s heart we see great tenderness, which is not the virtue of the weak but rather a sign of strength”

Pope Francis, Homily, March 19, 2015

“Joseph did as the angel of the Lord commanded him and took Mary as his wife” (Mt 1:24). These words already point to the mission which God entrusts to Joseph: he is to be the custos, the protector. The protector of whom? Of Mary and Jesus; but this protection is then extended to the Church. […]

How does Joseph exercise his role as protector? Discreetly, humbly and silently, but with an unfailing presence and utter fidelity, even when he finds it hard to understand. From the time of his betrothal to Mary until the finding of the twelve-year-old Jesus in the Temple of Jerusalem, he is there at every moment with loving care. […]

In him… we learn how to respond to God’s call, readily and willingly, but we also see the core of the Christian vocation, which is Christ! Let us protect Christ in our lives, so that we can protect others, so that we can protect creation! The vocation of being a “protector”… means respecting each of God’s creatures and respecting the environment in which we live. It means protecting people, showing loving concern for each and every person, especially children, the elderly, those in need, who are often the last we think about. […]

Caring, protecting, demands goodness, it calls for a certain tenderness. In the Gospels, Saint Joseph appears as a strong and courageous man, a working man, yet in his heart we see great tenderness, which is not the virtue of the weak but rather a sign of strength of spirit and a capacity for concern, for compassion, for genuine openness to others, for love. We must not be afraid of goodness, of tenderness!

this pressed to reflect upon: Is human society a covenant community or a marketplace? – By Msgr. M. Francis Mannion


March 19, 2015

Is human society a covenant community or a marketplace?

By Msgr. M. Francis Mannion *

The United States was founded as a covenant society – a society held together by a covenant with God and between citizens. This notion was uppermost in the minds of the Founding Fathers. Social institutions were to be inspired and directed by the concept of covenant.

Recent social commentators have lamented the break-down of this conception of society and the general social malaise it has wrought.

One of the most problematic trends that kills the notion of covenant is the industrialization and commercialization of social institutions. By this I mean that everything is viewed in commercial terms and evaluated by its worth in the market place.

If we pay attention to the growing use of the word “industry,” we will see how all-pervasive this trend is. We speak today of the health care industry, the funeral industry, the arts industry, the farming industry, the music industry, the entertainment industry. The list is endless.

The problematic results of commercialization and industrialization have become evident in the reorganization of the legal and medical professions according to industrial models.

Parishes today increasingly employ “business managers” – a troublesome capitulation to industrial culture. The church is not a business; the word “treasurer” would be better. A national liturgical music organization sponsored a panel some years ago on the “liturgical music industry.” (I’m not making this up!)

In the parish in which I serve, there are twenty-seven nursing and retirement homes. All of them are run for profit. The well run are expensive and available only to a minority. In the rest, every attempt is made to cut corners. The results are scandalous conditions of overcrowding and general neglect.

What all this underlines is a growing view of human society as a market place, where everything becomes a commodity to be bought or sold, and every service and talent turned into a profit-making venture.

To question this trend is not to suggest that we should try to return to the simpler world where the country doctor and the storekeeper were not overly concerned about money, and where the economic exchange system was more familial and neighborly.

It is to suggest that the demise of the covenant community concept of society is the demise of civilized living. Life becomes a rat race, and business is conducted without mercy.

In a covenant society, workers and professionals see their careers primarily in vocational terms. Society is viewed as an extended family. Goods and commodities are traded and sold, and realistic business does go on, but always in a manner that makes economics answerable to the concerns of social justice and charity.

One of the main challenges for the contemporary church, not least in regard to its hospitals and health care systems, is that of witnessing effectively to the possibility of living together as a covenanted people, a community of care, trust, and solidarity.

Safeguarding the covenant community view of human coexistence is one of the fundamental issues that has constantly engaged the American bishops. Pope Francis’ magnificent stances against the greedy commercial society have given this concern an enormous boost. For him, as for Pope John Paul II, the dignity of the human person, realized in community with others, is the criterion against which all economic life must be measured.

The commercialization and industrialization of society represents a very beguiling trend. It has much that is attractive about it, but it is finally idolatrous. Its ultimate achievement can only be to reduce the quality of life that it so deceivingly espouses.

Msgr. Mannion is pastor emeritus of St. Vincent de Paul parish in Salt Lake City. He holds a Ph.D in sacramental theology from The Catholic University of America. He was founding president of The Society for Catholic Liturgy in 1995 and the founding editor of the Societys journal, Antiphon. At the invitation of Cardinal Francis George of Chicago he founded the Mundelein Liturgical Institute in 2000.

via Is human society a covenant community or a marketplace? – By Msgr. M. Francis Mannion.


******related articles: 
HERE

Saint of the Day for Thursday, March 19th, 2015: St. Joseph


Image of St. Joseph

St. Joseph

Everything we know about the husband of Mary and the foster father of Jesus comes from Scripture and that has seemed too little for those who made up legends about him. We know he was a … continue reading

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today’s holiday: St. Joseph’s Day (2015)


St. Joseph’s Day (2015)

In Valencia, Spain, the feast of the foster-father of Jesus is a week-long festival called Fallas de San Jose (Bonfires of St. Joseph). On St. Joseph’s Eve, March 18, fallas—huge floats of intricate scenes made of wood and papier-mâché, satirizing everything from the high cost of living to political personalities—parade through the streets. At midnight on March 19, the celebration ends with the spectacular ceremony known as the crema, when all the fallas are set on fire. The festival is said to reflect the happy and satirical nature of the Valencians. More… Discuss

Psalter map, 13th c A map of the world, with Jerusalem at the centre and the monstrous races on the outermost edge,BL


Liszt Sonata B Minor Valentina Lisitsa, great compositions/performances


Liszt Sonata B Minor Valentina Lisitsa

From France 24 : GREECE ADOPTS ANTI-POVERTY LAW DESPITE ALLEGED EU ROW


Greece adopts ‘anti-poverty’ law despite alleged EU row

http://f24.my/1bfpgMG

 

Saint of the Day for Wednesday, March 18th, 2015: St. Cyril of Jerusalem


Image of St. Cyril of Jerusalem

St. Cyril of Jerusalem Pray for us!

“Make your fold with the sheep; flee from the wolves: depart not from the Church,” Cyril admonished catechumens surrounded by heresy. These were prophetic words for Cyril was to be hounded … continue reading

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†Pray the Rosary – Wednesday and Sunday – The Glorious Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles† : Enjoy Peace and Love


†Pray the Rosary – Wednesday and Sunday – The Glorious Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles†

Pray the Rosary – Tuesday and Friday – The Sorrowful Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles


Pray the Rosary – Tuesday and Friday – The Sorrowful Mysteries – Powerful Prayers for Miracles

St. Patrick Prayers: St Patrick’s Breastplate (and thirteen more)


Christ be with me, Christ within me
Christ behind me, Christ before me
Christ beside me, Christ to win me
Christ to comfort me and restore me.
Christ beneath me, Christ above me
Christ in quiet, Christ in danger
Christ in hearts of all that love me
Christ in mouth of friend or stranger.

(390-461 A.D.)


The most kids know of St. Patrick ‘s Day is that you must wear green or you’ll get a pinch from your friends. Adults see the day as an occasion to celebrate, sometimes with green beer and other assorted alcoholic beverages. However, few really know what they are celebrating or why the holiday is so important, particularly in the Americas. 

The following 10 facts may help you to better enjoy this popular holiday.

 
Saint Patrick in blue vestments.

Saint Patrick in blue vestments.

3/17/2014 (11 months ago)



10. March 17th is when Patrick died.

Saint Patrick is a saint of the Catholic Church, and his holy day is the day of his death, and subsequent entrance to heaven, rather than the day of his physical birth. After spending most of his adult life converting the pagans of Ireland to Christianity, St. Patrick went to his reward on March 17, 461 AD. 

Keep the Saint in St. Patrick’s Day! Shop these remarkable Catholic products.

9. St. Patrick wasn’t Irish.

St. Patrick wasn’t Irish, and he wasn’t born in Ireland. Patrick’s parents were Roman citizens living in modern-day England, or more precisely in Scotland or Wales (scholars cannot agree on which). He was born in 385 AD. By that time, most Romans were Christians and the Christian religion was spreading rapidly across Europe.

8. St. Patrick was a slave.

At the age of 16, Patrick had the misfortune of being kidnapped by Irish raiders who took him away and sold him as a slave. He spent several years in Ireland herding sheep and learning about the people there. At the age of 22, he managed to escape. He made his way to a monastery in England where he spent 12 years growing closer to God.

7. St. Patrick used the shamrock to preach about the trinity.

Many claim the shamrock represents faith, hope, and love, or any number of other things but it was actually used by Patrick to teach the mystery of the Holy Trinity, and how three things, the Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit could be separate entities, yet one in the same. Obviously, the pagan rulers of Ireland found Patrick to be convincing because they quickly converted to Christianity.

6. Legend says St. Patrick drove all the snakes from Ireland.

According to legend, St. Patrick drove all the snakes, or in some translations, “toads,” out of Ireland. In reality, this probably did not occur, as there is no evidence that snakes have ever existed in Ireland, the climate being too cool for them to thrive. Despite that, scholars suggest that the term “snakes” may be figurative and refer to pagan religious beliefs and practices rather than reptiles or amphibians. 

 5. Patrick’s color is blue. 

The original color associated with St. Patrick is blue, not green as commonly believed. In several artworks depicting the saint, he is shown wearing blue vestments. King Henry VIII used the Irish harp in gold on a blue flag to represent the country. Since that time, and possibly before, blue has been a popular color to represent the country on flags, coats-of-arms, and even sports jerseys.

Green was associated with the country later, presumably because of the greenness of the countryside, which is so because Ireland receives plentiful rainfall. Today, the country is also referred to as the “Emerald Isle.” 

4. The Shamrock is not the symbol of Ireland. 

The shamrock is a popular Irish symbol, but it is not the symbol of Ireland. As early as the medieval period, the harp has appeared on Irish gravestones and manuscripts. However, it is certain that the harp was popular in Irish legend and culture even well before that period. 

Since the medieval period, the harp has represented the nation. King Henry VIII used the harp on coins as early as 1534. Later, the harp was used on Irish flags and Irish coats of arms. The harp was also used as a symbol of the Irish people during their long struggle for freedom. Starting in 1642 the harp appeared on flags during rebellions against English rule. When Ireland became an independent country in 1921, it adopted the harp as the national symbol. 

3. There are more Irish in the USA than Ireland.

Well, sort of. An estimated 34 million Americans have Irish ancestry. Some are pure-blood Irish, meaning they or their parents came from Ireland, but many more have mixed ancestry today. By contrast, there are 4.2 million people living in Ireland. This peculiarity has a lot to do with the troubled history of Ireland. During the potato famine in Ireland, millions of Irish left the country for the US. This diaspora of Irish continued throughout much of the 19th century. Great numbers of Irish immigrants filled factories, served as railroad laborers –and even joined the military, sometimes immediately upon stepping foot on American soil! During the US Civil War, entire regiments of troops were comprised exclusively of Irish immigrants.  It wasn’t until the economic boom of the 1990s that more Irish stayed in their native country than traveled abroad searching for better opportunities. 

2. St. Patrick’s Day in the US has a strong political history.

In the mid 19th century, the Irish faced discrimination much like that faced by African Americans. In a few rare instances, prejudice against the Irish was even more fierce! The Irish were culturally unique, Catholic, and because of deplorable conditions in Ireland, flooded into the US in large numbers. They were perceived as a potentially disloyal and were treated harshly. To combat this, the American Irish began to organize themselves politically. By the end of the 19th century, St. Patrick’s Day was a large holiday for the Irish and an occasion for them to demonstrate their collective political and social might. While the political emphasis has faded along with the discrimination, the holiday remains ever popular as an opportunity for festivity regardless of one’s cultural background.

1. St. Patrick’s was a dry holiday in Ireland until 1970.

Aside from the color green, the activity most associated with St. Patrick’s Day is drinking. However, Irish law, from 1903 to 1970, declared St. Patrick’s Day a religious observance for the entire country meaning that all pubs were shut down for the day. That meant no beer, not even the green kind, for public celebrants. The law was overturned in 1970, when St. Patrick’s was reclassified as a national holiday – allowing the taps to flow freely once again.

Bonus Fact: Your odds of finding a four-leaf clover are:

About 1 in 10,000.

Pope Francis: end world hunger through ‘Prayer and Action’

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, March 17th, 2015: St. Patrick


Image of St. Patrick

St. Patrick

St. Patrick of Ireland is one of the world’s most popular saints. Apostle of Ireland, born at Kilpatrick, near Dumbarton, in Scotland, in the year 387; died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, 17 … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Monday, March 16th, 2015: St. Abban


Image of St. Abban

St. Abban

Abbot and Irish missionary. An Irish prince, Abban was the son of King Cormac of Leinster. He is listed as the nephew of St. Ibar. Abban founded many churches in the old district of Ui Cennselaigh, … continue reading

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THE HOLY ROSARY PORTAL: ACCESS HERE OR FROM THE NEW WIDGETON THE SIDEBAR (LISTEN TO SCHUBERT’S ‘AVE MARIA’


The_Holy_Rosary_Access

THE HOLY ROSARY PORTAL: ACCESS AND PRAY FOR THE CHRISTIAN WORLD!

Ave Maria Hymn with Lyrics – Latin

 

 

 

Pope Saint John Paul II: The rosary as a special ‘Prayer for World Peace’.


In the largest live telecast of its kind, Pope John Paul II leads a worldwide congregation of worshipers on five continents in a complete recitation of the rosary as a special ‘Prayer for World Peace.

Historic Musical Bits: Mozart Requiem Conductor Karl Bohm (Dedicate to the Christians, cowardly slaughtered by terrorists in Pakistan and elsewhere in the world!)


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Requiem in D minor, K 62

†Pope demands that the world stop ‘hiding’ anti-Christian persecution †| Crux


Pope demands that the world stop ‘hiding’ anti-Christian persecution

Pope demands that the world stop ‘hiding’ anti-Christian persecution

By Inés San Martín

Vatican correspondent March 15, 2015

ROME — Pope Francis on Sunday said he felt great pain over two recent bomb attacks outside Christian churches in Pakistan, and asserted that the world is “trying to hide” anti-Christian persecution.

† “These are Christian churches. Christians are persecuted, our brothers spill their blood simply because they are Christians,”† the pontiff said after his regular Sunday Angelus address.

† “I pray to the Lord that the persecution against Christians, that the world is trying to hide, comes to an end. Let there be peace!”†  Francis said.

Pope Francis has repeatedly spoken against attacks on Christians around the world. Last February, while condemning the beheading of 21 Egyptian Copts by militants of the Islamic State in Libya, the pontiff said

† “the blood of our Christian brothers and sisters is a testimony which cries out to be heard.

“It makes no difference whether they be Catholics, Orthodox, Copts, or Protestants,” he said. “The martyrs belong to all Christians.”

Pakistani Taliban suicide bombers exploded themselves near two churches — one Catholic, one Protestant — in the eastern city of Lahore on Sunday as worshippers were gathered inside, killing 14 people and injuring 80, officials said, in the latest attack against religious minorities in the increasingly fractured country.

via Pope demands that the world stop ‘hiding’ anti-Christian persecution | Crux.

†Pope grieves Pakistan bombings, says † world hides Christian persecution † :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


by Elise Harris

 

Rome, Italy, Mar 15, 2015 / 06:49 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his Sunday Angelus address Pope Francis lamented today’s terrorist attacks against two Christian churches – one of them Catholic – in Pakistan, and prayed that such violence will stop

Rome, Italy, Mar 15, 2015 / 06:49 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his Sunday Angelus address Pope Francis lamented today’s terrorist attacks against two Christian churches – one of them Catholic – in Pakistan, and prayed that such violence will stop.

† “With suffering, with much suffering, I have learned of today’s terrorist attacks against two churches in the city of Lahore, Pakistan, which have caused numerous deaths and injuries,”† the Pope told pilgrims gathered in St. Peter’s Square,
March 15.

Francis noted how both of the churches targeted, only a few meters apart,† “are Christian churches, the Christians who are persecuted,” and grieved how “our brothers shed their blood solely because they are Christians.”†

via Pope grieves Pakistan bombings, says world hides Christian persecution :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Saint of the Day for Sunday, March 15th, 2015: St. Louise de Marillac


Image of St. Louise de Marillac

St. Louise de Marillac

Louise de Marillac was born probably at Ferrieres-en-Brie near Meux, France, on August 12, 1591. She was educated by the Dominican nuns at Poissy. She desired to become a nun but on the advice of her … continue reading

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Catholic Prayers: ST. PATRICK’S BREASTPLATE


ST. PATRICK’S BREASTPLATE

St. Patrick’s Breastplate is a popular prayer attributed to one of Ireland’s most beloved patron saints. According to tradition, St. Patrick wrote it in 433 A.D. for divine protection before successfully converting the Irish
King Leoghaire and his subjects from paganism to Christianity. (The term breastplate refers to a piece of armor worn in battle.)

More recent scholarship suggests its author was anonymous. In any case, this prayer certainly reflects the spirit with which St. Patrick brought our faith to Ireland! St. Patrick’s Breastplate, also known as The Lorica (the cry of the deer), was popular enough to inspire a hymn based on this text as well.

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

I arise today
Through the strength of Christ’s birth with His baptism,
Through the strength of His crucifixion with His burial,
Through the strength of His resurrection with His ascension,
Through the strength of His descent for the judgment of doom.

I arise today
Through the strength of the love of cherubim,
In the obedience of angels,
In the service of archangels,
In the hope of resurrection to meet with reward,
In the prayers of patriarchs,
In the predictions of prophets,
In the preaching of apostles,
In the faith of confessors,
In the innocence of holy virgins,
In the deeds of righteous men.

I arise today, through
The strength of heaven,
The light of the sun,
The radiance of the moon,
The splendor of fire,
The speed of lightning,
The swiftness of wind,
The depth of the sea,
The stability of the earth,
The firmness of rock.

I arise today, through
God’s strength to pilot me,
God’s might to uphold me,
God’s wisdom to guide me,
God’s eye to look before me,
God’s ear to hear me,
God’s word to speak for me,
God’s hand to guard me,
God’s shield to protect me,
God’s host to save me
From snares of devils,
From temptation of vices,
From everyone who shall wish me ill,
afar and near.

I summon today
All these powers between me and those evils,
Against every cruel and merciless power
that may oppose my body and soul,
Against incantations of false prophets,
Against black laws of pagandom,
Against false laws of heretics,
Against craft of idolatry,
Against spells of witches and smiths and wizards,
Against every knowledge that corrupts man’s body and soul;
Christ to shield me today
Against poison, against burning,
Against drowning, against wounding,
So that there may come to me an abundance of reward.

Christ with me,
Christ before me,
Christ behind me,
Christ in me,
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ on my right,
Christ on my left,
Christ when I lie down,
Christ when I sit down,
Christ when I arise,
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.

[Note that people sometimes pray a shorter version of this prayer just with these 15 lines about Christ above. The conclusion follows below.]

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

When St. Paul referred to putting on the “Armor of God” in his letter to the Ephesians (6:11) to fight sin and evil inclinations, he could have been thinking of prayers just like this one! We may not wear combat gear in our daily lives, but St. Patrick’s Breastplate can function as divine armor for protection against spiritual adversity.

Saint of the Day for Saturday, March 14th, 2015: St. Matilda


Image of St. Matilda

St. Matilda

Matilda was the daughter of Count Dietrich of Westphalia and Reinhild of Denmark. She was also known as Mechtildis and Maud. She was raised by her grandmother, the Abbess of Eufurt convent. Matilda … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Friday, March 13th, 2015: Bl. Agnello of Pisa


Image of Bl. Agnello of Pisa

Bl. Agnello of Pisa

The founder of the English Franciscan province, Blessed Agnello, was admitted into the Order by St. Francis himself on the occasion of his sojourn in Pisa. He was sent to the Friary in Paris, of … continue reading

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Beethoven Bagatelle in A minor WoO 59 Für Elise Alfred Brendel ,great compositions/performances


Beethoven Bagatelle in A minor WoO 59 Für Elise Alfred Brendel

Saint of the Day for Thursday, March 12th, 2015: St. Fina


Image of St. Fina

St. Fina

St. Fina or Seraphina, Virgin A.D. 1253 The old town of San Geminiano in Tuscany treasures with special veneration the memory of Santa Fina, a young girl whose claim to be recognized as a saint lay … continue reading

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Pope Francis carries his late grandma’s words with him every day :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


by Elise Harris

by Elise Harris

Rome, Italy, Mar 11, 2015 / 08:23 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Francis said Wednesday that the elderly play a key role in the lives of the youth, and revealed that he still keeps the letter his grandmother wrote him for his ordination in his daily prayer book.

“I still treasure the words my grandmother wrote to me on the day of my ordination. I carry them with me to this day inside my breviary,” the Pope told pilgrims gathered in St. Peter’s Square for his March 11 general audience.

Francis, the eldest of five children, spent much of his childhood under the guidance of his grandmother, Rosa, who looked after the future Pope when his younger siblings were born. She played a key role in his upbringing, and he had a great respect for her.

via Pope Francis carries his late grandma’s words with him every day :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Saint of the Day for Wednesday, March 11th, 2015: St. Constantine


Image of St. Constantine

St. Constantine

Constantine was king of Cornwall. Unreliable tradition has him married to the daughter of the king of Brittany who on her death ceded his throne to his son and became a monk at St. Mochuda monastery … continue reading

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Adulterated food


Adulterated food

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adulterated food is impure, unsafe, or unwholesome food. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), regulates and enforces laws on food safety and has technical definitions of adulterated food in various United States laws.

History

Products that are adulterated under these laws’ definitions cannot enter into commerce for human consumption. In India, food adulteration is increasing daily.

Adulteration Definition

“Adulteration” is a legal term meaning that a food product fails to meet federal or state standards. Adulteration is an addition of a non food item to increase the quantity of the food item in raw form or prepared form, which may result in the loss of actual quality of food item. Among meat and meat products one of the items used to adulterate are water, dead carcasses, Carcasses of animals other than the animal meant to be consumed.

1938 – Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act== The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD&C) Act (1938) provides that food is “adulterated” if it meets any one othe following criteria: (1) it bears or contains any “poisonous or deleterious substance” which may render it injurious to health; (2) it bears or contains any added poisonous or added deleterious substance (other than a pesticide residue, food additive, color additive, or new animal drug, which are covered by separate provisions) that is unsafe; (3) its container is composed, in whole or in part, of any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render the contents injurious to health; or (4) it bears or contains a pesticide chemical residue that is unsafe. (Note: The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) establishes tolerances for pesticide residues in foods, which are enforced by the FDA.)

Food also meets the definition of adulteration if: (5) it is, or it bears or contains, an unsafe food additive; (6) it is, or it bears or contains, an unsafe new animal drug; (7) it is, or it bears or contains, an unsafe colour additive; (8) it consists, in whole or in part, of “any filthy, putrid, or decomposed substance” or is otherwise unfit for food; or (9) it has been prepared, packed, or held under unsanitary conditions (insect, rodent, or bird infestation) whereby it may have become contaminated with filth or rendered injurious to health.

Further, food is considered adulterated if: (10) it has been irradiated and the irradiation processing was not done in conformity with a regulation permitting irradiation of the food in question (the FDA has approved irradiation of a number of foods, including refrigerated or frozen uncooked meat, fresh or frozen uncooked poultry, and seeds for sprouting [21 C.F.R. Part 179].); (11) it contains a dietary ingredient that presents a significant or unreasonable risk of illness or injury under the conditions of use recommended in labeling (for example, foods or dietary supplements containing aristolochic acids, which have been linked to kidney failure, have been banned.); (12) a valuable constituent has been omitted in whole or in part or replaced with another substance; damage or inferiority has been concealed in any manner; or a substance has been added to increase the product’s bulk or weight, reduce its quality or strength, or make it appear of greater value than it is (this is “economic adulteration”); or (13) it is offered for import into the United States and is a food that has previously been refused admission, unless the person reoffering the food establishes that it is in compliance with U.S. law [21 U.S.C. § 342].

Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Poultry Products Inspection Act

The Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Poultry Products Inspection Act of 1957 contain similar provisions for meat and poultry products. [21 U.S.C. § 453(g), 601(m).

Poisonous or deleterious substances

Generally, if a food contains a poisonous or deleterious substance that may render it injurious to health. It can cause various harms. It is adulterated. For example, apple cider contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and Brie cheese contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes are adulterated. There are two exceptions to this general rule. First, if the poisonous substance is inherent or naturally occurring and its quantity in the food does not ordinarily render it injurious to health, the food will not be considered adulterated. Thus, a food that contains a natural toxin at very low levels that would not ordinarily be harmful (for instance, small amounts of amygdalin in apricot kernels) is not adulterated.

Second, if the poisonous or deleterious substance is unavoidable and is within an established tolerance, regulatory limit, or action level, the food will not be deemed to be adulterated. Tolerances and regulatory limits are thresholds above which a food will be considered adulterated. They are binding on FDA, the food industry, and the courts. Action levels are limits at or above which FDA may regard food as adulterated. They are not binding on FDA. FDA has established numerous action levels (for example, one part per million methylmercury in fish), which are set forth in its booklet Action Levels for Poisonous or Deleterious Substances in Human Food and Animal Feed.

If a food contains a poisonous substance in excess of a tolerance, regulatory limit, or action level, mixing it with “clean” food to reduce the level of contamination is not allowed. The deliberate mixing of adulterated food with good food renders the finished product adulterated (FDA, Compliance Policy Guide [CPG § 555.200]).

Filth and foreign matter of adulteration

Filth and extraneous material include any objectionable substances in foods, such as foreign matter (for example, glass, metal, plastic, wood, stones, sand, cigarette butts), undesirable parts of the raw plant material (such as stems, pits in pitted olives, pieces of shell in canned oysters), and filth (namely, mold, rot, insect and rodent parts, excreta, decomposition). Under a strict reading of the FD&C Act, any amount of filth in a food would render it a, however, authorize the agency to issue Defect Action Levels (DALs) for natural, unavoidable defects that at low levels do not pose a human health hazard [21 C.F.R. § 110.110]. These DALs are advisory only; they do not have the force of law and do not bind FDA. DALs are set forth in FDA’s Compliance Policy Guides and are compiled in the FDA and Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) Defect Action Level Handbook.

In most cases, DALs are food-specific and defect-specific. For example, the DAL for insect fragments in peanut butter is an average of thirty or more insect fragments per 100 grams (g) [CPG § 570.300]. In the case of hard or sharp foreign objects, the DAL, which is based on the size of the object and the likelihood it will pose a risk of choking or injury, applies to all foods (see CPG § 555.425).

Economic-adulteration

A food is adulterated if it omits a valuable constituent or substitutes another substance, in whole or in part, for a valuable constituent (for instance, olive oil diluted with tea tree oil); conceals damage or inferiority in any manner (such as fresh fruit with food coloring on its surface to conceal defects); or any substance has been added to it or packed with it to increase its bulk or weight, reduce its quality or strength, or make it appear bigger or of greater value than it is (for example, scallops to which water has been added to make them heavier).

Microbiological contamination and adulteration of food

The fact that a food is contaminated with pathogens (harmful microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, or protozoa) may, or may not, render it adulterated. Generally, for ready-to-eat foods, the presence of pathogens will render the food adulterated. For example, the presence of Salmonella on fresh fruits or vegetables or in ready-to-eat meat or poultry products (such as luncheon meats) will render those products are adulterated.

For meat and poultry products, which are regulated by USDA, the rules are more complicated. Ready-to-eat meat and poultry products contaminated with pathogens, such as Salmonella or Listeria monocytogenes, are adulterated. (Note that hotdogs are considered ready-to-eat products.) For raw meat or poultry products, the presence of pathogens will not always render a product adulterated (because raw meat and poultry products are intended to be cooked, and proper cooking should kill pathogens). Raw poultry contaminated with Salmonella is not adulterated. then also, USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has ruled that raw meat or poultry products contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 are adulterated. This is because normal cooking methods may not reduce E. coli O157:H7 below infectious levels. E. coli O157:H7 is the only pathogen that is considered an adulterant when present in raw meat or poultry products.

Enforcement actions

If a food is adulterated, FDA and FSIS have a broad array of enforcement tools.They are of various types. These include seizing and condemning the product, detaining imported product, enjoining persons from manufacturing or distributing the product, or requesting a recall of the product. Enforcement action is usually preceded by a Warning Letter from FDA to the manufacturer or distributor of the adulterated product. In the case of an adulterated meat or poultry product, FSIS has certain additional powers. FSIS may suspend or withdraw federal inspection of an official establishment. Without federal inspection, an establishment may not produce or process meat or poultry products, and therefore must cease operations. With the exception of infant formula, neither FDA nor FSIS has the authority to require a company to recall an adulterated food product. However, the ability to generate negative publicity gives them considerable powers of persuasion.

State regulators generally have similar enforcement tools at their disposal to prevent the manufacture and distribution of adulterated food. In addition, many states have the authority to immediately embargo adulterated food and to impose civil fines. Federal agencies often will coordinate with state or local authorities to remove unsafe food from the market as quickly as possible.

Food Adulterant Detection
Arhar Pulse Kesarri Pulse Kesari Pulse has a characteristic wedge shape. Larger Kesari resembles Arhar (Tur). It can be separated by visual examination.
Asafoetida Resin and colour Take a little amount of small parts of the sample in test tube. Add 3 ml of distilled water and shake the tube gently. Pure asafoetida dissolves in water very quickly and produces a milky white colour, but in case of adulteration with a chemical colour the mixture turns to be coloured. The purity of asafoetida may also be examined by taking a little amount of it on the tip of a fork and placing the same on the flame of a spirit lamp. Asafoetida burns quickly, producing bright flame and leaving the impurities behind.
Black Pepper Papaya Seeds Papaya seeds do not have any smell and are relatively smaller in size. Adulteration of papaya seed with Black Pepper may be detected by way of visual examination as also by way of smelling.
Coffee powder Cereal starch Take a small quantity (one-fourth of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube and add 3 ml of distilled water in it. Light a spirit lamp and heat the contents to colourize. Add 33 ml of a solution of potassium permanganate and muratic acid (1:1) to decolourize the mixture. The formation of blue colour in mixture by addition of a drop of 1% aqueous solution of iodine indicated adulteration with starch.
Coffee powder Powder of scorched persimmon stones Take a small quantity (1 tea-spoon) of the sample and spread it on a moistened blotting paper. Pour on it, with much care, 3 ml of 2% aqueous solution of sodium carbonate. A red colouration indicates the presence of powder of scorched persimmon stones in coffee powder.
Coriander powder Saw Dust Take a little amount (a half of tea-spoon) of the sample. Sprinkle it on water in a bowl. Spice powder gets sedimented at the bottom and saw-dust floats on the surface.
Cumin Powder Saw Dust Take a little amount (a half of tea-spoon) of the sample. Sprinkle it on water in a bowl. Spice powder gets sedimented at the bottom and saw-dust floats on the surface.
Dry red chilli Rhodamine B colour Take a red chilli from the sample and rub the outer surface with a piece of cotton soaked in liquid paraffin. The sample is adulterated if the cotton becomes red.
Dry turmeric root Metanil yellow colour Take a piece of dry turmeric root and rub the outer surface with a piece of cotton soaked in liquid paraffin. A yellow colouration of cotton indicates adulteration of turmeric root with metanil yellow colour.
Gram powder Kesari powder Take a little amount (a half of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube with 3 ml of distilled water. Add 3 ml of muratic acid. Immerse the tube in warm water. Check the tube after 15 minutes. A violet colouration indicates the presence of Kesari powder in Gram powder.
Gram powder Metanil yellow colour Take a small quantity (a half of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube. Add 3 ml of alcohol. Shake the tube to mix up the contents thoroughly. Add 10 drops of hydrochloric acid in it. A pink colouration indicates adulteration of gram powder with metanil yellow.
Green vegetables like Bitter Gourd, Green Chilli and others Malachite Green Take a small part of the sample and place it on a piece of moistened white blotting paper. The impression of colour on the paper indicates the use of malachite green, or any other low priced artificial colour.
Green vegetables like Bitter Gourd, Green Chilli and others Malachite Green Rub the outer green surface of a small part of the sample with a liquid paraffin soaked cotton. The sample is adulterated when the white cotton turns green.
Jaggery Metanil yellow colour Take a little amount (one-fourth of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube. Add 3 ml of alcohol and shake the tube vigorously to mix up the contents. Pour 10 drops of hydrochloric acid in it. A pink colouration indicates the presence of metanil yellow colour in jaggery.
Jaggery Sodium bicarbonate Take a little amount (one-fourth of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube. Add 3 ml of muratic acid. The presence of sodium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate effects effervescence.
Parched rice Urea Take 30 pieces of parched rice in a test tube. Add 5 ml of distilled water. Shake the tube to mix up the contents thoroughly. After 5 minutes, filter water contents and add to it a little amount (a half of a tea-spoon) of powder of arhar or soyabean. Wait for another 5 minutes and then dip a red litmus paper in the mixture. Lift the paper after 30 seconds and examine it. A blue colouration indicates the use of urea in parched rice.
Pigeon Pea (Toor Dal) Metanil Yellow Take a small handful of the pulse and boil it. Strain the water and grind the boiled peas with a mortar and pestle. Transfer this sample into a test tube and add 10cc of distlled water.Shake the test tube rigorously to mix up the contents thoroughly. Add 10 drops of hydrochloric acid in it. A pink colouration indicates adulteration of peas with metanil yellow.
Processed food, sweetmeat or syrup Metanil Yellow Take little amount (a half of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube. Add 10 drops of muratic acid or hydrochloric acid in it. The appearance of rosy colour indicates adulteration of food with metanil yellow.
Processed food, sweetmeat or syrup Rhodamine B colour The presence of this chemical colour in food is very easy to detect as it shines very brightly under sun. A more precise methods of detection is also there.Take a little amount (a half of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube. Add 3 ml of carbon tetrachloride and shake the tube to mix up the contents thoroughly. The mixture becomes colourless and an addition of a drop of hydrochloric acid brings the colour back when food contains Rhodamine B colour.
Rice Earth, sand, grit, unhusked paddy, rice bran, talc, etc. These adulterants may be detected visually and removed by way of sorting, picking, and washing.
Sweet potato Rhodamine B colour Take a small part of the sample and rub the red outer surface with a piece of cotton soaked in liquid paraffin. The cotton adhering colour indicates the use of Rhodamine B colour on outer surface of the sweet potato.
Tea Leaves Coal Tar Dye Scatter a little amount (1 tea-spoon) of the sample on a moistened white blotting paper. After 5 minutes, remove the sample and examine the paper. A revelation of coloured spots indicates the use of the dye.
Tea Leaves Iron Flakes Spread a small quantity (2 tea-spoon) of the sample on a piece of paper. Draw a magnet over it. Iron flakes, if present, cling to the magnet. The same test may be carried out to trace iron flakes from tea half-dust and iron filings from tea dust.
Tea Leaves Leather Flakes Prepare a paper-ball. Fire the ball and drop a little amount of the sample on it. The presence of leather flakes emits an odour of burnt leather.
Turmeric powder Metanil yellow colour Take a little amount (one-fourth of a tea-spoon) of the sample in a test tube. Add 3 ml of alcohol. Shake the tube to mix up the contents thoroughly. Add 10 drops of muratic acid or hydrochloric acid in it. A pink colouration indicates the use of metanil yellow colour in turmeric powder.
Wheat Earth, sand, grit, chopped straw, bran, unhusked grain, and seeds of weeds. These adulterants may be detected visually and removed by way of sorting, picking, and washing.

Samuel Barber – Adagio for Strings, op.11 , Albert Hall in London ,September 15 2001. Leonard Slatkin , BBC Orchestra.


Samuel Barber – Adagio for Strings, op.11.

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev) Joseph Aknin Joseph Aknin


P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

Claude Debussy – Images pour orchestre


Claude Debussy – Images pour orchestre

“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you” From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop


“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you”  From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop (Tract. 15, 10-12. 16-17: CCL 36, 154-156)
“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you”
From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop
(Tract. 15, 10-12. 16-17: CCL 36, 154-156)  (Click to access Website)

“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you”

From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop
(Tract. 15, 10-12. 16-17: CCL 36, 154-156)

“A woman came”. […] Jesus says to her: “Give me water to drink. For his disciples had gone to the city to buy food. The Samaritan woman therefore says to him: How is it that you, though a Jew, ask me for water to drink, though I am a Samaritan woman? For Jews have nothing to do with Samaritans” (Jn 4:7-9). […] But the one who was asking for a drink of water was thirsting for her faith.

“Jesus answered her and said: If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, “Give me a drink,” perhaps you might have asked him and he would have given you living water” (Jn 4:10). He asks for a drink, and he promises a drink. He is in need, as one hoping to receive, yet he is rich, as one about to satisfy the thirst of others. He says: “If you knew the gift of God”. The gift of God is the Holy Spirit. But he is still using veiled language as he speaks to the woman and gradually enters into her heart. […]

“The woman says to him, Master, give me this drink, so that I may feel no thirst or come here to draw water” (Jn 4:15). Her need forced her to this labor, her weakness shrank from it. If only she could hear those words: “Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you” (Mt 11:28). Jesus was saying this to her, so that her labors might be at an end.

Marginalizing women leads to sterile society, says Pope :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

Pope Francis greets pilgrims in Saint Peter’s Square during his General Audience on Oct 1, 2013 Credit: Petrik Bohumil / CNA

Vatican City, Mar 8, 2015 / 05:06 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Women across the globe received a special greeting on Sunday from Pope Francis, who stressed the importance of their unique perspectives on the world.

“A world where women are marginalized is a sterile world,” the Pope said during his address to the crowds who had gathered in St. Peter’s Square to take part in the recitation of the Angelus with the Pope.

“Not only do women carry life,” he said, “but they transmit to us the capacity to see otherwise– they see things differently.”

Women also pass on the ability to “understand the world with different eyes, to feel the most creative, most patient, most tender things with the heart.”

The Pope’s words came on International Woman’s Day, celebrated each year on March 8 throughout the world.

To mark the occasion, the Holy Father offered his greeting to all those who “seek each day to build a more human and welcoming society.”

He also offered a “fraternal thanks” to those women who, in thousands of ways, bear witness to the Gospel and work in the Church.”

Pope Francis’ remarks coincided with a conference held on Sunday at the Vatican aimed at giving a voice to those women working on the fringes of society.

The gathering, titled “Voices of Faith,” brought together various women – human rights activists, policy makers, academics — to give witness to their work in areas of poverty and the defense of human dignity and equality.

via Marginalizing women leads to sterile society, says Pope :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, March 10th, 2015: St. John Ogilvie


Image of St. John Ogilvie

St. John Ogilvie

Born in 1579, John Ogilvie belonged to Scottish nobility. Raised a Calvinist, he was educated on the continent. Exposed to the religious controversies of his day and impressed with the faith of the … continue reading

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quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.


Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

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“Waldo” Audiobook at EUZICASA

The Gospel is more important than soap operas or gossip, Pope says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Vatican City, Feb 3, 2015 / 05:59 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his homily Tuesday Pope Francis noted the importance of contemplating scripture, and urged faithful to read the Gospel for 10-15 minutes a day, rather than watching soap operas or exchanging gossip.

“At home, 15 minutes, pick up the Gospel, a small passage, imagine what happened and talk with Jesus about it,” the Pope told those present in the Vatican’s Saint Martha guesthouse for his Feb. 3 daily Mass.

By reading the Bible every day, he said, “your gaze will be fixed on Jesus and not so much on a TV soap opera, for example. Your ears will be focused on the words of Jesus and not so much on your neighborhood gossip.”

via The Gospel is more important than soap operas or gossip, Pope says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Portal: Christianity / DYK Archive


Portal: Christianity / DYK Archive

Monday

…that there are approximately two billion Christians worldwide?
…that there are usually 66 books in the Christian Bible?
…that there are over 33 000 Protestant denominations in 238 countries worldwide?
…that Jesus worked as a carpenter until the age of 30, when he began his ministry?
…that during the Avignon Papacy from 1305 to 1378, several medieval popes resided in Avignon and not in Rome?

In Jesus’ cleansing of the Temple, #PopeFrancis sees a lesson about the liturgy #Catholic— Catholic News Agency


>>>READ MORE>>>

Saint of the Day for Monday, March 9th, 2015 : St. Frances of Rome


Image of St. Frances of Rome

St. Frances of Rome

Frances was born in the city of Rome in 1384 to a wealthy, noble family. From her mother she inherited a quiet manner and a pious devotion to God. From her father, however, she inherited a strong … continue reading

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