Category Archives: SPIRITUALITY

Rusinea Romanilor cei ce au fost trimisi in rusia bolsevica si cate nu s-au mai intors!


Quote: Regret is stronger than Gratitude…(Anne Frank)


Quote: Regret is stronger than Gratitude...(Anne Frank)

Quote: Regret is stronger than Gratitude…(Anne Frank)

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Quote: Regret is stronger than Gratitude…(Anne Frank)


Quote: Regret is stronger than Gratitude...(Anne Frank)

Quote: Regret is stronger than Gratitude…(Anne Frank)

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Quote: Don’t limit a child…(Rabindranath Tagore)


Quote: Don't limit a child...(Rabindranath Tagore)

Quote: Don’t limit a child…(Rabindranath Tagore)

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Quote: The one who plants trees…(Rabindranath Tagore)


Quote: The one who plants trees...(Rabindranath Tagore)

Quote: The one who plants trees…(Rabindranath Tagore)

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Access many fabulous websites from EUZICASA! (SEVERAL OF THEM ARE FEATURED IN THE SCREENSHOT BELLOW)


https://euzicasa.wordpress.com/

Access many fabulous websites from EUZICASA! (SEVERAL OF THEM ARE FEATURED IN THE SCREENSHOT BELLOW)

Access many fabulous websites from EUZICASA! (SEVERAL OF THEM ARE FEATURED IN THE SCREENSHOT BELLOW)

Quote: no one is more hated…Plato


Quote: no one is more hated...Plato

Quote: no one is more hated…Plato

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Quote: understand the nature of impurity RUMI


Quote: understand the nature of impurity RUMI

Quote: understand the nature of impurity RUMI

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Thought: Consumarism


Thought: Consumarism

Thought: Consumarism

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Intrebare de 30 de ani: cum e mai bine…


Cum e mai bine:

Sa fi pribeag binevenit printre straini

Sau

Sa te simti pribeag nedorit in tara in care te-ai nascut si care

ti-ngropat pe toti si toate?

Godly music: “29/06/1985, Sat.: First performance in the St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome: “Krönungs-Messe” by Mozart” on YouTube


Watch “Rie Sinclair Island of Loneliness” on YouTube


☆Rie Sinclair – Island of Loneliness

☆Lyrics:

Where do I go, when it’s all blown over?
Where do I start, when it’s all gone to the dogs?
I am not bitter, I’m just trying to recover,
From my island of loneliness.
Where do I hide from the careless words you speak?
The words aren’t chic,
I can’t be pulled underneath.
I’m not immune, I just want to see beyond.
Beyond my island of loneliness.
I don’t want a fraction of your kiss to fill my empty heart.
I sail in my own sinking ship to the place where I belong.
So, what should I say?
I hear the cannons fire in the distance.
Is there a place for the tide to change my heart?
Stop wasting time, collecting lines of girls.
Wake up out of it
In my arms, out of your island of loneliness.

☆pictures credits:

☆Ilia Efimovich Repin (1844-1930):
☆Volga Boatmen (1870-1873)

Watch “Love Is Blue (1968 original version) – PAUL MAURIAT” on YouTube


Watch “Love Is Blue (1968 original version) – PAUL MAURIAT” on YouTube


  1. Blue, blue, my world is blue

    Blue is my world now I’m without you

    Gray, gray, my life is gray

    Cold is my heart since you went away

    Red, red, my eyes are red

    Crying for you alone in my bed

    Green, green, my jealous heart

    I doubted you and now we’re apart

    When we met how the bright sun shone

    Then love died, now the rainbow is gone

    Black, black, the nights I’ve known

    Longing for you so lost and alone

    Source: Musixmatch

    Songwriters: POPP ANDRE CHARLES JEAN / LEMAIRE PIERRE LOUIS / BLACKBURN BRYAN ANDRE

    Love Is Blue lyrics © Sony/ATV Tunes LLC, Warner Chappell Music France, Radio Tele Music Gmbh, Intersong Tutti Editions Music, Radio Tele Music, S D R M, Radio-tele-music Gmbh, INTERSONG-USA, INC., INTERSONG U S A INC, EDITIONS MUSICALES TUTTI INTERSONG SARL, CROMA MUSIC CO., INC. % MCCG, RADMUS PUBLISHING INC, THE MUSIC GOES ROUND B.V. DBA RADMUS PUBLISHING, INC.

Quote: Silence and Smile are two powerful words. Smile is the way to solve many problems and Silence is the way to solve many problems. BUDDHA


Quote: Silence and Smile are two powerful words. Smile is the way to solve many problems and Silence is the way to solve many problems.  BUDDHA

Quote: Silence and Smile are two powerful words. Smile is the way to solve many problems and Silence is the way to solve many problems. BUDDHA

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QUOTE: Suffering is not holding you, you are holding suffering. BUDDHA


QUOTE: Suffering is not holding you, you are holding suffering.  BUDDHA

QUOTE: Suffering is not holding you, you are holding suffering. BUDDHA

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Quote: Stop trying to leave…Lao Tzu


Quote: Stop trying to leave...Lao Tzu

Quote: Stop trying to leave…Lao Tzu

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A semi-legendary figure, Laozi was usually portrayed as a 6th-century BC contemporary of Confucius, but some modern historians consider him to have lived during the Warring States period of the 4th century BC. A central figure in Chinese culture, Laozi is claimed by both the emperors of the Tang dynasty and modern people of the Li surname as a founder of their lineage. Laozi’s work has been embraced by both various anti-authoritarian movements and Chinese Legalism.

Names

In traditional accounts, Laozi’s personal name is usually given as Li Er (李耳, Old *ʔ ʔ, Mod. Ěr) and his courtesy name as Boyang (trad. 伯陽, simp. 伯阳, Old *Pˤrak-lang, Mod. Bóyáng). A prominent posthumous name was Li Dan (李聃, Dān).

Laozi itself is a honorific title: (Old *rˤu ʔ, “old, venerable”) and (Old *tsəʔ, “master”). It has been romanized numerous ways, sometimes leading to confusion. The most common present form is Laozi or Lǎozǐ, based on the Hanyu Pinyin system adopted by Mainland China in 1958 and by Taiwan in 2009. During the 20th century, Lao-tzu was more common, based on the formerly prevalent Wade–Giles system. In the 19th century, the title was usually romanized as Lao-tse. Other forms include the variants Lao-tze and Lao-tsu.

As a religious figure, he is worshipped under the name “Supreme Old Lord (太上老君, Tàishàng Lǎojūn) and as one of the “Three Pure Ones“. During the Tang dynasty, he was granted the title “Supremely Mysterious and Primordial Emperor” (太上玄元皇帝, Tàishàng Xuānyuán Huángdì).

Historical views

In the mid-twentieth century, a consensus emerged among scholars that the historicity of the person known as Laozi is doubtful and that the Tao Te Ching was “a compilation of Taoist sayings by many hands”. Alan Watts urged more caution, holding that this view was part of an academic fashion for skepticism about historical spiritual and religious figures and stating that not enough would be known for years – or possibly ever – to make a firm judgment.

The earliest certain reference to the present figure of Laozi is found in the 1st‑century BC Records of the Grand Historian collected by the historian Sima Qian from earlier accounts. In one account, Laozi was said to be a contemporary of Confucius during the 6th or 5th century BC. His surname was Li and his personal name was Er or Dan. He was an official in the imperial archives and wrote a book in two parts before departing to the west. In another, Laozi was a different contemporary of Confucius titled Lao Laizi (老莱子) and wrote a book in 15 parts. In a third, he was the court astrologer Lao Dan who lived during the 4th century BC reign of Duke Xian of the Qin Dynasty. The oldest text of the Tao Te Ching so far recovered was written on bamboo slips and dates to the late 4th century BC; see Guodian Chu Slips.

According to traditional accounts, Laozi was a scholar who worked as the Keeper of the Archives for the royal court of Zhou. This reportedly allowed him broad access to the works of the Yellow Emperor and other classics of the time. The stories assert that Laozi never opened a formal school but nonetheless attracted a large number of students and loyal disciples. There are many variations of a story retelling his encounter with Confucius, most famously in the Zhuangzi.

He was sometimes held to have come from the village of Chu Jen in Chu. In accounts where Laozi married, he was said to have had a son named Zong who became a celebrated soldier.

Quote: Enlightenment


Quote: Enlightenment

Quote: Enlightenment

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Watch “Ottorino Respighi: Pini di Roma (“The Pines of Rome”) CSO Fritz Reiner conducting.” on YouTube


Watch “Ottorino Respighi: Pini di Roma (“The Pines of Rome”) CSO Fritz Reiner conducting.” on YouTube


Quote: Chang Jian (708-763)


Quote:  Chang Jian (708-763)

Quote: Chang Jian (708-763)

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Watch “The Traitor_Martha Wainwright_Leonard Cohen_I’m Your Man_720HD-022711.avi” on YouTube


Play “The Traitor”

on Amazon Music (ad)

Now the Swan it floated on the English river
Ah the Rose of High Romance it opened wide
A sun tanned woman yearned me through the summer
And the judges watched us from the other side

I told my mother “Mother I must leave you
Preserve my room but do not shed a tear
Should rumour of a shabby ending reach you
It was half my fault and half the atmosphere”

But the Rose I sickened with a scarlet fever
And the Swan I tempted with a sense of shame
She said at last I was her finest lover
And if she withered I would be to blame

The judges said you missed it by a fraction
Rise up and brace your troops for the attack
Ah the dreamers ride against the men of action
Oh see the men of action falling back

But I lingered on her thighs a fatal moment
I kissed her lips as though I thirsted still
My falsity had stung me like a hornet
The poison sank and it paralyzed my will

I could not move to warn all the younger soldiers
That they had been deserted from above
So on battlefields from here to Barcelona
I’m listed with the enemies of love

And long ago she said “I must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that Rose and wind the Swan”

So daily I renew my idle duty
I touch her here and there, I know my place
I kiss her open mouth and I praise her beauty
And people call me traitor to my face

GeorgeB

General Comment:

Well I guess, it is fundamentally positive, and for a long time I just amaze myself at the beauty of the methaphore, the idea of the world as a stage, as the scene of a quest, in which the spectators are the judges as well, then I heard Leonard Cohen’s explaantion of the line of thought that made him write the poem. It goes like this:

“It was called “The traitor”. It was about the feeling that we have of betraying some mission that we were mandated to fulfill, and being unable to fulfill it, and then coming to understand that the real mandate was not to fulfill it, and that the deeper courage was to stand guiltless in the predicament in which you found yourself”.

It talks about the unvoidable predicament of failure from without, and the only right posture when one’s faced with a situation in which one cannot but fail: standing guiltless, in the predicament in which you find yourself. I think that is positive: not blaming yourself for outcomes of which you could not fully control.

Rating: +1

No Replies

12 Years AgoWinters

General Comment:

  1. It seems to be about a man settling for someone who is not right for him rather than what his heart desires. He becomes an enemy of love, The Men of Action Falling back is the man too weak to take action and leave, following his heart. He has a relationship of physical love but not real love. He is a traitor to himself.

Rating: 0

No Replies

11 Years Agobhoover247

General Comment:

The rose is the womans genitals, the swan would be his. The line “run some wire through the rose and wind the swan” would be the woman asking him to have sex with her. He daily performs his “idle duty” but he doesn’t love her. He has become an “enemy of love” for betraying his true love.

Rating: 0

1 Reply

9 Years AgoRJSoftware

General Comment:

Damb, aint any Cohen song remotley happy?

Rating: 0

No Replies

9 Years AgoStrangerinme

General Comment:

And long ago she said “I must be leaving,
Ah but keep my body here to lie upon
You can move it up and down and when I’m sleeping
Run some wire through that Rose and wind the Swan”

God what a punishment ( the cruelty of the victim is almost far more than of the criminal)
He betrayed her , she doesn’t love him no more but she keeps her body for him to have sex with while her soul is somewhere else …

Rating: 0

No Replies

6 Years AgoJohnnyBee

My Interpretation:

What the Traitor has betrayed is the ideal of love. His ‘scarlet fever’ is lust, but when it is satisfied by ‘lingering on her thighs’, the Traitor is shamed. He recognises that other young men go off to battle without high ideals and they too become ‘the enemies of love’.
Lovely metaphors – great Leonard Cohen.

Rating: 0

No Replies

4 Months Agoalerique

General Comment:

Please, note parallels with famous ‘O Rose Thou Art Sick’ by William Blake, with specific reference to Englishness to remove further doubts. This is widened reinterpretation of the famous poem from the worm’s point of view.

O Rose thou art sick.
The invisible worm,
That flies in the night
In the howling storm:

Has found out thy bed
Of crimson joy:
And his dark secret love
Does thy life destroy.

Rating: 0

Watch “Fischer/Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64/Myung Whun Chung/Festival de Saint Denis.” on YouTube


Violin Concerto (Mendelssohn
Felix Mendelssohn’s Violin Concertoin E minor, Op. 64, is his last large orchestral work. It forms an important part of the violin repertoire and is one of the most popular and most frequently performed violin concertosin history.[1][2][3] A typical performance lasts just under half an hour.
Violin Concertoby Felix Mendelssohn

Mendelssohn in 1846

KeyE minorCatalogueOp. 64Year1844PeriodRomanticGenreConcertoComposed1838–1844Movements3ScoringViolin and orchestraPremiereDate13 March 1845LocationLeipzig
Mendelssohn originally proposed the idea of the violin concerto to Ferdinand David, a close friend and then concertmaster of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. Although conceived in 1838, the work took another six years to complete and was not premiered until 1845. During this time, Mendelssohn maintained a regular correspondence with David, who gave him many suggestions. The work itself was one of the foremost violin concertos of the Romantic era and was influential on many other composers.

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ESL: DESCRIBING A PERSON


ESL: DESCRIBING A PERSON

ESL: DESCRIBING A PERSON

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Message to the world: Our world is different, our goals are the same (euzicasa)


Poem: ROBERT BROWNING HAMILTON


Poem: ROBERT Browning Hamilton

Poem: ROBERT BROWNING HAMILTON

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Watch “[Updated] Possible Chinese lyrics for “Anything Goes” from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” on YouTube


My pot with flowers today 12/16/19


My pot with flowers today 12/16/19

My pot with flowers today 12/16/19

“Monday’s Prospects” (my virtual graphic arts work)


“Monday’s Prospects” (my virtual graphic arts work)

Monday’s Prospects

Thoughts of Wisdom: Givers Have To Learn to Set Limits…


Thoughts of Wisdom: Givers Have To Learn to Set Limits...

Thoughts of Wisdom: Givers Have To Learn to Set Limits…

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Thoughts of Wisdom: Forgive them, even when they are not sorry…


Thoughts of Wisdom:  Forgive them, even when they are not sorry...

Thoughts of Wisdom: Forgive them, even when they are not sorry…

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Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark…


Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark...

Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark…

https://pin.it/7or7jczwclluls

Quote: I used to be afraid of the dark…


https://pin.it/7or7jczwclluls

Watch “Hugh Laurie – Saint James Infirmary (Let Them Talk, A Celebration of New Orleans Blues)” on YouTube


It was down by old Joe’s barroom, on the corner of the square
They were serving drinks as usual, and the usual crowd was there
On my left stood Big Joe McKennedy, and his eyes were bloodshot red
And he turned his face to the people, these were the very words he said
I was down to St. James infirmary, I saw my baby there
She was stretched out on a long white table,
So sweet, cool and so fair
Let her go, let her go, God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this whole wide world over
Never find a sweeter man as me
When I die please bury me in my high top Stetson hat
Put a twenty dollar gold piece on my watch chain
The gang’ll know I died standing pat
Let her go, let her go God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this wide world over
Never find a sweeter man as me
I want six crapshooters to be my pallbearers
Three pretty women to sing a song
Stick a jazz band on my hearse wagon
Raise hell as I stroll along
Let her go Let her go
God bless her
Wherever she may be
She may search this whole wide
World over
She’ll never find a sweeter
Man as me
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Joe Primrose / Irving Mills
St. James Infirmary lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, Downtown Music Publishing, Spirit Music Group, BMG Rights

St. James Infirmary Blues

“St. James Infirmary” on tenor sax

St. James Infirmary Blues” is an American jazz song of uncertain origin. Louis Armstrong made the song famous in his 1928 recording on which Don Redman was credited as composer; later releases gave the name Joe Primrose, a pseudonym of Irving Mills. The melody is 8 bars long, unlike songs in the classic blues genre, where there are 12 bars. It is in a minor key, and has a 4/4 time signature, but has also been played in 3/4.

Authorship and historyEdit

“St. James Infirmary Blues”, sometimes known as “Gambler’s Blues”, is often regarded as an American folk song of anonymous origin. Moore and Baxter published a version of “Gambler’s Blues” in 1925.[1]In 1927, Carl Sandburg published a book called The American Songbagwhich contained lyrics for two versions of a song called “Those Gambler’s Blues”.[2] However, the song “St. James Infirmary Blues” is sometimes credited to the songwriter Joe Primrose (a pseudonym for Irving Mills), who held copyrights for several versions of the song, registering the first in 1929. He claimed the rights to this specific title and won a case in the U.S. Supreme Court on this basis, the defendants having failed to produce the documentary evidence required by the court that the song had been known by that name for some years.[1]

“St. James Infirmary Blues” is sometimes said to be based on an eighteenth-century traditional folk song called “The Unfortunate Rake” (also known as “The Unfortunate Lad” or “The Young Man Cut Down in His Prime”) about a soldier who uses his money on prostitutes and then dies of venereal disease. But the familiar recorded versions (such as Armstrong’s) bear little relation to the older traditional song. The earliest known form of this song was called “The Buck’s Elegy” and is set in Covent Garden, London.[3]

According to Robert W. Harwood, A. L. Lloyd was the first person to connect “St. James Infirmary” with “The Unfortunate Lad/Rake”.[1]:36 Harwood refers to a five-page article by Lloyd in the January 1947 issue of the English music magazine Keynote.[4] In 1956, Lloyd published a revised version of this article in Sing magazine.[5] In both articles Lloyd refers to an English broadside song entitled “The Unfortunate Lad”, commenting that the song is sometimes known as “The Unfortunate Rake”. No date or source for the latter title is given. The opening line of this version of the song refers to the “lock hospital”, not to an institution named St James. The term “lock hospital” was the name of an institution in Southwark, London, where lepers were isolated and treated. The lock in Southwark was used for those suffering from venereal diseases. The longer term came into use as a generic term for a hospital treating venereal diseases. Its first recorded use is 1770.

Lloyd claims that a song collected by Cecil Sharp in the Appalachians in 1918 which contains the words “St James Hospital” is the parent song and that it looks like an elder relative of “The Dying Cowboy”. The opening of that song, as quoted by Lloyd, is:

As I went down by St James Hospital one morning,
So early one morning, it was early one day,
I found my son, my own son,
Wrapped up in white linen, as cold as the clay.

He also claims that this Appalachian version derives in turn from the version published by Such in London in the 1850s which refers to a lock hospital. The opening verse of this song, entitled “The Unfortunate Lad”, is:

As I was walking down by the Lock Hospital,
As I was walking one morning of late,
Who did I spy but my own dear comrade,
Wrapp’d up in flannel, so hard was his fate.

Lloyd’s articles comment on the jazz hit “St. James Infirmary Blues”. The first article asserts that “the song is, or was before it became corrupted, a narrative ballad. Such ballads are rare in Negro song…So doubts are raised about whether ‘St. James Infirmary’ began life as a Negro song”.[4]:10 The second article includes the following comment on the song: “Most versions of ‘Infirmary’ include a number of stanzas from other songs, grafted on to the main stem – a confusion especially common with songs current among Negroes. The curious switchover from the actual death of the girl to the hypothetical death of the gambler creates some ambiguity too”.[5]:19 Lloyd points out that in some early variants of “The Unfortunate Rake” the sex of the victim of venereal disease was female. “We realise that the confusion in the ‘Infirmary’, where the dead person is a woman but the funeral is ordered for a man, is surely due to the fact that the original ballad was commonly recorded in a form in which the sexes were reversed, so singers were often in two minds whether they were singing of a rakish man or a bad girl”.[5]:21

Lloyd’s second article is cited as a reference by Kenneth Goldstein in his liner notes for a 1960 Folkways LP called The Unfortunate Rake. These liner notes are often used as a source for the history of “St. James Infirmary Blues”. One example is an article by Rob Walker.[6] The liner notes raise the question of whether St. James’ Hospital was a real place and, if so, where it was. Goldstein claimed in the notes that “St. James” refers to London’s St. James Hospital, a religious foundation for the treatment of leprosy. His references list an article by Kenneth Lodewick. That article states, giving no reference or source for the idea, that the phrase “St. James Hospital” refers to a hospital of that name in London.[7]There is some difficulty in this because the hospital in question closed in 1532 when Henry VIIIacquired the land to build St James’s Palace.[8]

Another possibility suggested by Higginbotham on the basis of his claim that the song “St. James Infirmary” dates at least from the early nineteenth century, is the Infirmary section of the St James Workhousewhich the St. James Parish opened in 1725 on Poland Street, Piccadilly, and which continued well into the nineteenth century.[9] This St. James Infirmary was contemporaneous with the estimated advent of the song “The Unfortunate Lad”, but it is not the London Lock Hospital. Another difficulty is that, out of the early versions of the song mentioned in the references given by Goldstein, only the one collected by Cecil Sharp in the Appalachians in 1918, and one found in Canada in the 1920s, make use of the phrase “St. James”.

The liner notes link the Rake to an early fragment called “My Jewel, My Joy”, stating that it was heard in Dublin. The same statement appears in the Lodewick article referenced in those notes[7] The notes given in the source cited for this fragment, a collection of songs collected by William Forde and published by P. W. Joyce, state that the song was heard in Cork, not Dublin.[10]

The version of the “Unfortunate Rake” on the LP of that name is sung by Lloyd, of whom it has been said that he “sometimes modified lyrics or melodies to make the songs more palatable for contemporary listeners”,[1]:38 and its first verse is as follows:

As I was a-walking down by St. James Hospital,
I was a-walking down by there one day.
What should I spy but one of my comrades
All wrapped up in a flannel though warm was the day.[a]

The liner notes[11] state that Lloyd is singing a nineteenth century broadside version, but do not specify which. The Lloyd article cited in the references given in the liner notes,[5]refers to a version published by Such and to no other version. The title and words sung by Lloyd are not those of the Such broadside[12] which has no reference to St. James and is not called “The Unfortunate Rake”. Lloyd recorded a slightly different version in 1966, this time calling the song “St James Hospital”.[13] In 1967, his book Folk Song in England was published.[14] This includes some comment on the song, claims without any supporting references or information that a Czech version pre-dates the British ones, repeats the confusion between Dublin and Cork as the place where the “My Jewel My Joy” fragment had been heard, and includes an unattributed quotation of two verses that differ from the versions sung by Lloyd.

Variations typically feature a narrator telling the story of a young man “cut down in his prime” (occasionally, a young woman “cut down in her prime”) as a result of morally questionable behaviour. For example, when the song moved to America, gambling and alcohol became common causes of the youth’s death.[15]

There are numerous versions of the song throughout the English-speaking world. For example, it evolved into other American standards such as “The Streets of Laredo“.[16]

The song, “Dyin’ Crapshooter’s Blues”, has sometimes been described as a descendant of “The Unfortunate Rake”, and thus related to “St. James Infirmary Blues”. This song was issued as a record four times in 1927, and attributed to pianist, arranger, and band-leader Porter Grainger.[17] Blind Willie McTell recorded a version of the former for John Lomax in 1940 and claimed to have begun writing the song around 1929.

Gottlieb considered whether there were Jewish American influences through the use of the Ukrainian Dorian mode, but only found hints of this in a version published by Siegmeister and Downes.[18] He also suggests that there may have been Jewish influences on the rendition by Cab Calloway.[18]:211 A melody very similar to the Armstrong version can be found in an instrumental composition entitled “Charleston Cabin”, which was recorded by Whitey Kaufman’s Original Pennsylvania Serenaders in 1924 (three years before the earliest recording of “Gambler’s Blues”).[1]:39

As with many folk songs, there is much variation in the lyric from one version to another. These are the first two stanzas as sung by Louis Armstrong on a 1928 Odeon Records release:

I went down to St. James Infirmary,
Saw my baby there,
Stretched out on a long white table,
So cold, so sweet, so fair.

Let her go, let her go, God bless her,
Wherever she may be,
She can look this wide world over,
But she’ll never find a sweet man like me.

Some of the versions, such as the one published as “Gambler’s Blues” and attributed to Carl Moore and Phil Baxter, frame the story with an initial stanza or stanzas in which a separate narrator goes down to a saloon known as “Joe’s barroom” and encounters a customer who then relates the incident about the woman in the infirmary. Later verses commonly include the speaker’s request to be buried according to certain instructions, which vary according to the version.[19]

Other versionsEdit

Koko the clown (a rotoscopedCab Calloway) performing the song in the 1933 Betty Boopanimation Snow White

The song was first recorded (as “Gambler’s Blues”) in 1927 by Fess Williams and his Royal Flush Orchestra with credits given to Moore and Baxter.[1]:150This version mentions an infirmary but not by name. The song was popular during the jazz era, and by 1930 at least eighteen different versions had been released.[1]:30 The Duke Ellington Orchestra recorded the song using pseudonyms such as “The Ten Black Berries”, “The Harlem Hot Chocolates”, and “The Jungle Band”,[1]:19 while Cab Callowayperformed a version in the 1933 Betty Boop animated film Snow White, providing vocals and dance moves for Koko the clown.[20]

In 1961, Bobby “Blue” Bland released a version of “Saint James Infirmary” on the flip side of his No. 2 R&B hit “Don’t Cry No More” and included it in his album Two Steps from the Blues.[21][22]In 1967 the French-American singer Joe Dassin recorded the song. In 1968, Don Partridge released a version on his self-named album, as did Eric Burdon and the Animals on their album Every One of Us.[23]Dock Boggs recorded a version of the song entitled “Old Joe’s Barroom” (1965)[24]

The song was often performed by cabaret surrealists The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo in South California; the band’s vocalist and songwriter, Danny Elfman, often cited Cab Calloway as his inspiration in his youth. The White Stripes covered the song on their self-titled debut album, and Jack White says he and fellow band member, Meg White, were introduced to the song from a Betty Boop cartoon.[25] In 1981, Bob Dylan adapted the song when he wrote and recorded “Blind Willie McTell”. The song was written for his 1983 release, Infidels, but was not released until The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3: Rare and Unreleased, 1961-1991 (Columbia, 1991).[26] In 2012, Trombone Shortyand Booker T. Jones performed an instrumental version as the opening number of the “Red, White, and Blues” concert at the White House.[27]

See alsoEdit

Watch “In the Upper Room” on YouTube


In the upper room with Jesus
Singing in tears blessed fears
Daily there my sins confessing
Beggin for his mercy sweet
Trusting his grace and power
Seeking help in loving prayers
It is this how I feel the spirit
And I sat with him and pray
Oh, he’s in in the upper room
With Jesus
Oh, it’s in the upper room
When my lord and your god
When he’s in the upper room
Yes, he’s in the upper room
Well he’s in the upper room
Talking with the Lord
Oh my, Hallelujah, Lord
He’s in the upper room
With Jesus
Oh, he’s in the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Yes, and your God
I know he’s in the upper room
It’s in the upper room
Lord, he’s in, yeah, the upper room
Talking with the Lord, oh yes
But Hallelujah
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room, Lord
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room
In the upper room, Lord
In the upper room
Yeah, in the upper room, Lord
In the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Oh, and your God
Hallelujah
It’s in the upper room
With Jesus
Oh, in the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Yes, and your God
You know I’m in the upper room, whoo
It’s in the upper room
Lord, he in the upper room
Talking with the Lord
Oh, yeah, yeah
Hallelujah
It’s in the upper room
With Jesus
Now I’m in the upper room
Talking with my Lord
Yes, and you God
You know I’m in the upper room
Yeah, I’m in the upper room
Lord, he’s in, in the upper room
Talking with my Lord, oh yeah
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Mahalia Jackson
In the Upper Room lyrics © Bess Music

Watch “Johnny Cash – Supper Time” on YouTube


Many years ago in days of childhood
I used to play till evenin’ shadows come
Then windin’ down that old familiar pathway
I’d hear my mother call at set of sun

Come home, come home it’s supper time
The shadows lengthen fast
Come home, come home it’s supper time
We’re going home at last

Some of the fondest memories of my childhood
Were woven around supper time
When my mother used to call
From the backsteps of the old homeplace
“Come on home now son, it’s supper time”

Ah, but I’d love to hear that once more
But you know for me time has woven the realization of
The truth that’s even more thrilling and that’s when
The call come up from the portals of glory
To come home, for it’s supper time

When all of God’s children
Shall gather around the table
Of the Lord himself
And the greatest supper time of them all

Come home, come home, it’s supper time
The shadows lengthen fast
Come home, come home, it’s supper time
We’re going home at last

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Ira F. Stanphill
Suppertime lyrics © Capitol Christian Music Group

From Wikipedia:

Supper Time

Supper Time” is a popular song written by Irving Berlin for the 1933 musical As Thousands Cheer, where it was introduced by Ethel Waters.

It is about a wife’s reaction to news of her husband’s lynching.[1]

Notable recordingsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lyrics of Supper Time at lyrics.astraweb.com

Watch “Green, Green Grass of Home (Live at Folsom State Prison, Folsom, CA – January 1968)” on YouTube



The old home town looks the same
As I step down from the train
And there to meet me is my Mama and Papa
Down the road I look and there runs Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries

It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
Yes, they’ll all come to meet me, arms reaching, smiling sweetly
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home

The old house is still standing tho’ the paint is cracked and dry
And there’s that old oak tree that I used to play on
Down the lane I walk with my sweet Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home

Then I awake and look around me
At four grey walls that surround me
And I realize, yes, I was only dreaming
For there’s a guard and there’s a sad old padre
Arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak
Again I touch the green, green grass of home

Yes, they’ll all come to see me
In the shade of that old oak tree
As they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Curly Putman
Green Green Grass Of Home lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Green, Green Grass of Home

Song written by Curly Putman


Green, Green Grass of Home“, written by Claude “Curly” Putman Jr. and first recorded by singer Johnny Darrell, is a country song originally made popular by Porter Wagoner in 1965, when it reached No. 4 on the country chart. That same year, it was sung by Bobby Bare and by Jerry Lee Lewis, who included it in his album Country Songs for City Folks (later re-issued as All Country). Tom Jones learned the song from Lewis’ version, and in 1966, he had a worldwide No. 1 hit with it.

Quick facts: Released, Genre
Quick facts: B-side, Released

Lyrics

A man returns to his childhood home; it seems that this is his first visit home since leaving in his youth. When he steps down from the train, his parents are there to greet him, and his beloved, Mary, comes running to join them. All is welcome and peace; all come to meet him with “arms reaching, smiling sweetly.” With Mary, the man strolls at ease among the monuments of his childhood, including “the old oak tree that I used to play on.” It is “good to touch the green, green grass of home.” Yet the music and the words are full of foreshadowing, strongly suggestive of mourning.

Abruptly, the man switches from song to speech as he awakens in prison: “Then I awake and look around me, at four grey walls that surround me. And I realize that I was only dreaming.” He is, indeed, on death row. As the singing resumes, we learn that the man is waking on the day of his scheduled execution (“there’s a guard, and there’s a sad old padre, arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak”), and he will return home only to be buried: “Yes, they’ll all come to see me in the shade of that old oak tree, as they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home.”

The Joan Baez version ends: “Yes, we’ll all be together in the shade of the old oak tree / When we meet beneath the green, green grass of home.”

Tom Jones version

Welsh singer Tom Jones, who was appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1965, visited Colony Records while staying in New York City. On asking if they had any new works by Jerry Lee Lewis, he was given the new country album.

Impressed with the song, Jones recorded and released the song in the UK in 1966 and it reached No. 1 on 1 December, staying there for a total of seven weeks. The song has sold over 1.25 million copies in the UK as of September 2017. Jones’ version also reached #11 pop, #12 easy listening on the Billboard US charts.

In February 2009, Jones performed the song live on a special Take-Away Show with Vincent Moon, along with “If He Should Ever Leave You” and “We Got Love“, live in front of a camera in a hotel room in New York.

In September 2006, Jones performed the song as a duet with Jerry Lee Lewis during the taping of the latter’s Last Man Standing TV special in New York City, and credited Lewis with providing the inspiration behind his own recording.

Jones sang the song on the 2009/10 edition of Jool’s Annual Hootenanny on 1 January 2010.

Chart performance

More information: Chart (1967), Peak position

Other versions

Since then it has been recorded by many other solo vocalists and groups including:

Watch “Green, Green Grass of Home (Live at Folsom State Prison, Folsom, CA – January 1968)” on YouTube


The old home town looks the same
As I step down from the train
And there to meet me is my Mama and Papa
Down the road I look and there runs Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
Yes, they’ll all come to meet me, arms reaching, smiling sweetly
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
The old house is still standing tho’ the paint is cracked and dry
And there’s that old oak tree that I used to play on
Down the lane I walk with my sweet Mary
Hair of gold and lips like cherries
It’s good to touch the green, green grass of home
Then I awake and look around me
At four grey walls that surround me
And I realize, yes, I was only dreaming
For there’s a guard and there’s a sad old padre
Arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak
Again I touch the green, green grass of home
Yes, they’ll all come to see me
In the shade of that old oak tree
As they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home

From Wikipedia:

Green, Green Grass of Home

Song written by Curly Putman


Green, Green Grass of Home“, written by Claude “Curly” Putman Jr. and first recorded by singer Johnny Darrell, is a country song originally made popular by Porter Wagoner in 1965, when it reached No. 4 on the country chart. That same year, it was sung by Bobby Bare and by Jerry Lee Lewis, who included it in his album Country Songs for City Folks (later re-issued as All Country). Tom Jones learned the song from Lewis’ version, and in 1966, he had a worldwide No. 1 hit with it.

Quick facts: Released, Genre
Quick facts: B-side, Released

Lyrics

A man returns to his childhood home; it seems that this is his first visit home since leaving in his youth. When he steps down from the train, his parents are there to greet him, and his beloved, Mary, comes running to join them. All is welcome and peace; all come to meet him with “arms reaching, smiling sweetly.” With Mary, the man strolls at ease among the monuments of his childhood, including “the old oak tree that I used to play on.” It is “good to touch the green, green grass of home.” Yet the music and the words are full of foreshadowing, strongly suggestive of mourning.

Abruptly, the man switches from song to speech as he awakens in prison: “Then I awake and look around me, at four grey walls that surround me. And I realize that I was only dreaming.” He is, indeed, on death row. As the singing resumes, we learn that the man is waking on the day of his scheduled execution (“there’s a guard, and there’s a sad old padre, arm in arm, we’ll walk at daybreak”), and he will return home only to be buried: “Yes, they’ll all come to see me in the shade of that old oak tree, as they lay me ‘neath the green, green grass of home.”

The Joan Baez version ends: “Yes, we’ll all be together in the shade of the old oak tree / When we meet beneath the green, green grass of home.”

Tom Jones version

Welsh singer Tom Jones, who was appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1965, visited Colony Records while staying in New York City. On asking if they had any new works by Jerry Lee Lewis, he was given the new country album.

Impressed with the song, Jones recorded and released the song in the UK in 1966 and it reached No. 1 on 1 December, staying there for a total of seven weeks. The song has sold over 1.25 million copies in the UK as of September 2017. Jones’ version also reached #11 pop, #12 easy listening on the Billboard US charts.

In February 2009, Jones performed the song live on a special Take-Away Show with Vincent Moon, along with “If He Should Ever Leave You” and “We Got Love“, live in front of a camera in a hotel room in New York.

In September 2006, Jones performed the song as a duet with Jerry Lee Lewis during the taping of the latter’s Last Man Standing TV special in New York City, and credited Lewis with providing the inspiration behind his own recording.

Jones sang the song on the 2009/10 edition of Jool’s Annual Hootenanny on 1 January 2010.

Chart performance

More information: Chart (1967), Peak position

Other versions

Since then it has been recorded by many other solo vocalists and groups including:

Watch “Strangers In The Night – Frank Sinatra (LYRICS/LETRA) [60s]” on YouTube


Frank Sinatra Lyrics

Listen to music like Frank Sinatra

live near Downey

“Something”

Something in the way she moves
Attracts me like no other lover
Something in the way that she woos me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

Somewhere in her smile she knows
I don’t need no other lover
Something in her style that shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

You’re asking me will my love grow
Well, I don’t know, no, I don’t know
You stick around, Jack, it might show
I don’t know, no, I don’t know

Something in the way she knows
All I gotta do is just think of her
Something in the things that she shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

[instrumental]

You’re asking me will my love grow
I don’t know, no, I don’t know
But you hang around, Jack, it might show
I don’t know, no, I don’t know

Something in the way she knows me
And all I gotta do is just think of her
Something in those things that she shows me
Don’t want to leave her now
Better believe, and how

Mm, mm, mm, mm, mm, mm

I don’t plan to leave her now

Haiku: Haiku def.(noun) (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)


Haiku: Haiku def. (noun)

(© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Five syllables words

Seven syllables follow

End… as it started.

Haiku

Haiku

Haiku

Haiku

Watch “You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me – Dusty Springfield (Original Soundtrack with Lyrics♪)” on YouTube



When I said I needed you
You said you would always stay
It wasn’t me who changed but you and now you’ve gone away
Don’t you see that now you’ve gone
And I’m left here on my own
That I have to follow you and beg you to come home

You don’t have to say you love me just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever I will understand
Believe me, believe me I can’t help but love you
But believe me I’ll never tie you down
Left alone with just a memory
Life seems dead and quite unreal
All that’s left is loneliness there’s nothing left to feel
You don’t have to say you love me just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever
I will understand believe me, believe me
You don’t have to say you love me just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever
I will understand, believe me, believe me
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Giuseppe Donaggio / Simon Napier-Bell / Vito Pallavicini / Vicki Heather Wickham
You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me lyrics © Downtown Music Publishing

Dr. Gabi Greve, Daruma Museum, Japan World Kigo Database


! Haiku and Happiness ! (02)

To enjoy on a rainy day !
To enjoy on a sunny day !

My Haiku Gallery of Life in Japan

All Haiku and Photos are Copyright © by Gabi Greve, unless quoted otherwise.

Dr. Gabi Greve, Daruma Museum, Japan
World Kigo Database


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Watch “Brenda Lee – All Alone Am I (1963) [HQ]” on YouTube



All alone am I ever since your goodbye
All alone with just a beat of my heart
People all around but I don’t hear a sound
Just the lonely beating of my heart

No use in holding other hands
For I’d be holding only emptiness
No use in kissing other lips
For I’d be thinking just of your caress
All alone am I ever since your goodbye
All alone with just a beat of my heart
People all around but I don’t hear a sound
Just the lonely beating of my heart
No other voice can say the words
My heart must hear to ever sing again
The words you used to whisper low
No other love can ever bring again
All alone am I ever since your goodbye
All alone with just a beat of my heart
People all around but I don’t hear a sound
Just the lonely beating of my heart
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Manos Hadjidakis / Arthur Altman / Ioannis Ioannidis
All Alone Am I lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, A.E.P.I.

Watch “Brenda Lee – The end of the world(1963)” on YouTube



Why does the sun go on shining?
Why does the sea rush to shore?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
‘Cause you don’t love me anymore

Why do the birds go on singing?
Why do the stars glow above?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
It ended when I lost your love
I wake up in the morning and I wonder
Why everything’s the same as it was
I can’t understand, no, I can’t understand
How life goes on the way it does
Why does my heart go on beating?
Why do these eyes of mine cry?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
It ended when you said goodbye
Why does my heart go on beating?
Why do these eyes of mine cry?
Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?
It ended when you said goodbye
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Peter Mcnulty-Connolly / Marcus Mybe / Louie St. Louis / Kurtis Deshaun Williams / Michael Angelo
The End of the World lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Quote: In matter of style…Thomas Jefferson


Quote: In matter of style...Thomas Jefferson

Quote: In matter of style…Thomas Jefferson

https://pin.it/arpmjfjokckg4b

Quote: one useless man is a shame…John Adams


Quote: one useless man is a shame...John Adams

Quote: one useless man is a shame…John Adams

https://pin.it/hmx4ig47nwdjwb

Watch “Best Classical Music: Dvořák Symphony No 9 “New World” Celibidache, Münchner Philharmoniker, 1991″ on YouTube


Watch “Dvořák – Violin concerto – Oistrakh / Kondrashin” on YouTube


Violin Concerto (Dvořák)

Concerto composed by Antonín Dvořák


The Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 (B.108), is a concerto for violin and orchestra composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1879. It was premiered in Prague in 1883 by František Ondříček, who also gave the Vienna and London premieres. Today it remains an important work in the violin repertoire.

Quick facts: Key, Catalogue

The concerto is scored for solo violin and an orchestra consisting of 2 flutes, 2 oboes 2 clarinets (in A), 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, and strings. Its structure is the classical three movements, fast–slow–fast.

  1. Allegro ma non troppo (A minor)
  2. Adagio ma non troppo (F major)
  3. Finale: Allegro giocoso ma non troppo (A major)

The first movement and the second movement are interconnected (attacca subito).

Dvořák was inspired to write the concerto after meeting Joseph Joachim in 1878, and composed the work with the intention of dedicating it to him. However, when he finished the concerto in 1879, Joachim became skeptical about it. Joachim was a strict classicist and objected, inter alia, to Dvořák’s abrupt truncation of the first movement’s orchestral tutti. Joachim also didn’t like the fact that the recapitulation was cut short and that it led directly to the slow second movement. It is also assumed that he was upset with the persistent repetition found in the third movement. However, Joachim never said anything outright and instead claimed to be editing the solo part. He never actually performed the piece in public.

The concerto was first performed in the United States on October 30, 1891, at the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago. Max Bendix was soloist with the Chicago Orchestra led by Theodore Thomas.

Recordings

Notable recordings of the concerto include: