Category Archives: QUOTATION

quotation: If you would grow great and stately, You must try to walk sedately. Robert Louis Stevenson


If you would grow great and stately,

You must try to walk sedately.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

quotation: One man’s ways may be as good as another’s, but we all like our own best. Jane Austen


One man’s waysmay be as good as another’s, but we all like our own best.Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

quotation: If you are not a thinking man, to what purpose are you a man at all? Samuel Taylor Coleridge


If you are not a thinking man, to what purpose are you a man at all?

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

quotation: The more thou stir it, the worse it will be. Miguel de Cervantes


The more thou stir it, the worse it will be.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

quotation: Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. Jane Austen


Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

this pressed for your information: Judicial Watch: Homeland Security Releases 165,900 Illegals via Judicial Watch


Judicial Watch: Homeland Security Releases 165,900 Illegals

Monday, 23 Mar 2015 06:26 PM

By Greg Richter

Judicial Watch on Monday released documents showing that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) released 165,900 illegal aliens, some of whom had been convicted of violent crimes.

The release of 76 pages of documents showed that as of April 26, 2014, the illegal aliens had been released throughout the United States. Crimes included such serious offenses as homicide, sexual assault, kidnapping, and aggravated assault.

That number, added to another 30,000 released in the past fiscal year, brings the total to 195,900.

The documents were released as a result of a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by Judicial Watch on July 21, 2014. Judicial Watch filed the suit after the Department of Homeland Security failed to respond to a May 15, 2014, FOIA request.

“It’s appalling that we’ve had to sue in federal court to get key information about the Obama administration’s release of 165,950 convicted criminal aliens,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton in a press release.

“These documents show the Obama administration is lying when it says that its ‘enforcement priorities’ include deporting illegal aliens who have committed heinous crimes,” Fitton said.

via Judicial Watch: Homeland Security Releases 165,900 Illegals.

,: Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies. Friedrich Nietzsche


Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) Discuss

quotation: Man’s worst ill is stubbornness of heart. Sophocle


Man’s worst ill is stubbornness of heart.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

quotation: The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt. Rene Descartes


The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt.

Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Discuss

quotation: Sir Walter Scott


There is a vulgar incredulity, which in historical matters, as well as in those of religion, finds it easier to doubt than to examine.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) Discuss

word of wisdom: BIBLE – †Luke 16:13†


Parallel Verses New International Version “No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money.”

 

Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary

16:13-18 To this parable our Lord added a solemn warning. Ye cannot serve God and the world, so divided are the two interests. When our Lord spoke thus, the covetous Pharisees treated his instructions with contempt. But he warned them, that what they contended for as the law, was a wresting of its meaning: this our Lord showed in a case respecting divorce. There are many covetous sticklers for the forms of godliness, who are the bitterest enemies to its power, and try to set others against the truth.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 13No servant can serve two masters… Ye cannot serve God and mammon. Very vividly is this experience brought out in the great parable which immediately follows There the rich man was evidently one who observed the sacred ritual of the Law of Moses: this we learn without doubt from his conversation after death with Abraham. Thus he tried, after his light, to serve God, but he also served mammon: this we learn, too, clearly from the description given to us of his life, from the mention of the gorgeous apparel and the sumptuous feeding. The service of the two was incompatible, and we know from the sombre sequel of the story to which master the rich man really held, and whom – alas for him! – in his heart he despised.

Gill’s Exposition of the Entire Bible

No servant can serve two masters,…. See Gill on Matthew 6:24.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

Back in the USSR? Spying and control in the new Crimea – CNN.com (‘davai ceas, davai palton…’)


Photos: Crisis in Crimea and Ukraine 44 photos
Ukraine crisis captured by CNN Teams – KIEV, UKRAINE: After the deaths of 25 people during clashes a day earlier, Ukrainian protesters prepare to stand and fight again on February 19. Photo taken by CNN’s Andrew Carey on February 19.

KIEV, UKRAINE:  After the deaths of 25 people during clashes a day earlier, Ukrainian protesters prepare to stand and fight again on February 19.  Photo taken by CNN's Andrew Carey on February 19.

Photos: Crisis in Crimea and Ukraine 44 photos Ukraine crisis captured by CNN Teams – KIEV, UKRAINE: After the deaths of 25 people during clashes a day earlier, Ukrainian protesters prepare to stand and fight again on February 19. Photo taken by CNN’s Andrew Carey on February 19.

 

Story highlights

Life under total surveillance and control now the norm in Crimea, says writer

Old Soviet practice of denunciation has become commonplace, he says

He writes: The harder life gets in Crimea, the more people support Putin

editor’s Notes:  “The writer lives and works in Crimea and has asked CNN to protect their identity. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.”

(CNN)How can I describe life in Crimea after a year under Russia’s control?

You start saying things like “Let’s not talk about this on the phone” and become careful about the Facebook pages you “like.”

Because total surveillance and control has become routine — like it was in the Soviet Union.

In just one year so much has been lost and many Crimeans seem to have forgotten rights that were part of everyone’s life.

There is a growing level of censorship, inequality and political repression of those who don’t agree with the government.

via Back in the USSR? Spying and control in the new Crimea – CNN.com.

Further reference:


Back in the U.S.S.R. The Beatles (With Lyrics)

quotation: Samuel Taylor Coleridge


And the Devil did grin, for his darling sin is pride that apes humility.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

just a thought: ‘Change in social life is like a treacherous river…’


just a thought: ‘Change in social life is like a treacherous river: if you know the dangers and you are a good swimmer than you  may be able to survive it. If you know nothing about its currents, even if you know how to swim in a bean shaped backyard pool, chances are you’re not survive the river currents: You’ll by drown by change that is not understood for what is really bringing about!’

Above all do not become a proponent of change out of boredom…Deceiving  forces are hard at work to  make you believe that they have your best interest at heart!’
– George-B.

Copyright ©2010 – 2015 George Bost. All Rights Reserved.

SPIRITUAL REFLECTION, March 19, 2015: Feast of St. Joseph



Lumen Fidei_Holy Father Francis' First Encyclical

Lumen Fidei_Holy Father Francis’ First Encyclical (click to access NEWS.VA)

SPIRITUAL REFLECTION

Feast of St. Joseph

“In Saint Joseph’s heart we see great tenderness, which is not the virtue of the weak but rather a sign of strength”

Pope Francis, Homily, March 19, 2015

“Joseph did as the angel of the Lord commanded him and took Mary as his wife” (Mt 1:24). These words already point to the mission which God entrusts to Joseph: he is to be the custos, the protector. The protector of whom? Of Mary and Jesus; but this protection is then extended to the Church. […]

How does Joseph exercise his role as protector? Discreetly, humbly and silently, but with an unfailing presence and utter fidelity, even when he finds it hard to understand. From the time of his betrothal to Mary until the finding of the twelve-year-old Jesus in the Temple of Jerusalem, he is there at every moment with loving care. […]

In him… we learn how to respond to God’s call, readily and willingly, but we also see the core of the Christian vocation, which is Christ! Let us protect Christ in our lives, so that we can protect others, so that we can protect creation! The vocation of being a “protector”… means respecting each of God’s creatures and respecting the environment in which we live. It means protecting people, showing loving concern for each and every person, especially children, the elderly, those in need, who are often the last we think about. […]

Caring, protecting, demands goodness, it calls for a certain tenderness. In the Gospels, Saint Joseph appears as a strong and courageous man, a working man, yet in his heart we see great tenderness, which is not the virtue of the weak but rather a sign of strength of spirit and a capacity for concern, for compassion, for genuine openness to others, for love. We must not be afraid of goodness, of tenderness!

quotation: The pen is the tongue of the mind. Miguel de Cervantes


The pen is the tongue of the mind.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

 

Related Articles

quotation: H.G. Wells


There’s nothing wrong in suffering, if you suffer for a purpose. Our revolution didn’t abolish danger or death. It simply made danger and death worthwhile.

H.G. Wells (1866-1946) Discuss

St. Patrick Prayers: St Patrick’s Breastplate (and thirteen more)


Christ be with me, Christ within me
Christ behind me, Christ before me
Christ beside me, Christ to win me
Christ to comfort me and restore me.
Christ beneath me, Christ above me
Christ in quiet, Christ in danger
Christ in hearts of all that love me
Christ in mouth of friend or stranger.

(390-461 A.D.)

quotation: A picture is an intermediate something between a thought and a thing. Samuel Taylor Coleridge


A picture is an intermediate something between a thought and a thing.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

quotation: Edith Wharton


In spite of illness, in spite even of the archenemy sorrow, one can remain alive long past the usual date of disintegration if one is unafraid of change, insatiable in intellectual curiosity, interested in big things, and happy in small ways.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

Antonin Dvorak: Requiem Op. 89 (Dedicate to the Christians, cowardly slaughtered by terrorists in Pakistan and elsewhere in the world!)


Antonin Dvorak: Requiem Op. 89 / Faces on Earth

quotation: We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be. Jane Austen


We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

quotation: As covetousness is the root of all evil, so poverty is, I believe, the worst of all snares. Daniel Defoe


As covetousness is the root of all evil, so poverty is, I believe, the worst of all snares.

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) Discuss

quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


In the multitude of middle-aged men who go about their vocations in a daily course determined for them much in the same way as the tie of their cravats, there is always a good number who once meant to shape their own deeds and alter the world a little.George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Like it at EUZICASA: the very best of Bones soundtrack: “Bring on the Wonder” by Susan Enan


Bones: “Bring on the Wonder” by Susan Enan

I can’t see the stars anymore living here
Let’s go to the hills where the outlines are clear

Bring on the wonder
Bring on the song
I pushed you down deep in my soul for too long

I fell through the cracks at the end of our street
Let’s go to the beach, get the sand through our feet

Bring on the wonder
Bring on the song
I pushed you down deep in my soul for too long

Bring on the wonder
We got it all wrong
We pushed you down deep in our souls for too long

I don’t have the time for a drink from the cup
Let’s rest for a while ’til our souls catch us up

Bring on the wonder
Bring on the song
I pushed you down deep in my soul for too long

Bring on the wonder
We got it all wrong
We pushed you down deep in our souls, so hang on

Bring on the wonder
Bring on the song
I pushed you down deep in my soul for too long.

Pope Francis carries his late grandma’s words with him every day :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


by Elise Harris

by Elise Harris

Rome, Italy, Mar 11, 2015 / 08:23 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Francis said Wednesday that the elderly play a key role in the lives of the youth, and revealed that he still keeps the letter his grandmother wrote him for his ordination in his daily prayer book.

“I still treasure the words my grandmother wrote to me on the day of my ordination. I carry them with me to this day inside my breviary,” the Pope told pilgrims gathered in St. Peter’s Square for his March 11 general audience.

Francis, the eldest of five children, spent much of his childhood under the guidance of his grandmother, Rosa, who looked after the future Pope when his younger siblings were born. She played a key role in his upbringing, and he had a great respect for her.

via Pope Francis carries his late grandma’s words with him every day :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

quotation: P. G. Wodehouse


My only objection to the custom of giving books as Christmas presents is perhaps the selfish one that it encourages and keeps in the game a number of writers who would be far better employed if they abandoned the pen and took to work.P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) Discuss

Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77


Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77

“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you” From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop


“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you”  From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop (Tract. 15, 10-12. 16-17: CCL 36, 154-156)
“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you”
From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop
(Tract. 15, 10-12. 16-17: CCL 36, 154-156)  (Click to access Website)

“Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you”

From a treatise on John by Saint Augustine, bishop
(Tract. 15, 10-12. 16-17: CCL 36, 154-156)

“A woman came”. […] Jesus says to her: “Give me water to drink. For his disciples had gone to the city to buy food. The Samaritan woman therefore says to him: How is it that you, though a Jew, ask me for water to drink, though I am a Samaritan woman? For Jews have nothing to do with Samaritans” (Jn 4:7-9). […] But the one who was asking for a drink of water was thirsting for her faith.

“Jesus answered her and said: If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, “Give me a drink,” perhaps you might have asked him and he would have given you living water” (Jn 4:10). He asks for a drink, and he promises a drink. He is in need, as one hoping to receive, yet he is rich, as one about to satisfy the thirst of others. He says: “If you knew the gift of God”. The gift of God is the Holy Spirit. But he is still using veiled language as he speaks to the woman and gradually enters into her heart. […]

“The woman says to him, Master, give me this drink, so that I may feel no thirst or come here to draw water” (Jn 4:15). Her need forced her to this labor, her weakness shrank from it. If only she could hear those words: “Come to me, all who labor and are burdened, and I will refresh you” (Mt 11:28). Jesus was saying this to her, so that her labors might be at an end.

Marginalizing women leads to sterile society, says Pope :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

Pope Francis greets pilgrims in Saint Peter’s Square during his General Audience on Oct 1, 2013 Credit: Petrik Bohumil / CNA

Vatican City, Mar 8, 2015 / 05:06 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Women across the globe received a special greeting on Sunday from Pope Francis, who stressed the importance of their unique perspectives on the world.

“A world where women are marginalized is a sterile world,” the Pope said during his address to the crowds who had gathered in St. Peter’s Square to take part in the recitation of the Angelus with the Pope.

“Not only do women carry life,” he said, “but they transmit to us the capacity to see otherwise– they see things differently.”

Women also pass on the ability to “understand the world with different eyes, to feel the most creative, most patient, most tender things with the heart.”

The Pope’s words came on International Woman’s Day, celebrated each year on March 8 throughout the world.

To mark the occasion, the Holy Father offered his greeting to all those who “seek each day to build a more human and welcoming society.”

He also offered a “fraternal thanks” to those women who, in thousands of ways, bear witness to the Gospel and work in the Church.”

Pope Francis’ remarks coincided with a conference held on Sunday at the Vatican aimed at giving a voice to those women working on the fringes of society.

The gathering, titled “Voices of Faith,” brought together various women – human rights activists, policy makers, academics — to give witness to their work in areas of poverty and the defense of human dignity and equality.

via Marginalizing women leads to sterile society, says Pope :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.


Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

Related Articles:
“Waldo” Audiobook at EUZICASA

Itzhak Perlman Vivaldi The Four Seasons Spring : (“vine, vine primavara, se astene-n toata tara…”


just a thought: Frunza verde de mohor, usor Martie, usor- doar ca din cand in cand primavara vine peste noapte, si cu un explozie senzoriala de culori calde, miresme-ametitoare, iinsecte ametite si ieranteti astenici, adormiti pe bancile insorite din, Cismigiu (desi s-ar putea sa fie orice parc, cu sau fara iaz, din Bucuresti, sau din alte orase, si orasele! Primavara e sezonunul meu favorit, si nimeni nu o celebreaza asa de frumos ca Vivaldi

–George-B

Itzhak Perlman Vivaldi The Four Seasons Spring

Dark Ages (historiography)


Dark Ages (historiography)

 

Petrarch, who conceived the idea of a European “Dark Age #1″. From Cycle of Famous Men and Women, Andrea di Bartolo di Bargilla, c. 1450

 The Dark Ages is a historical periodization used originally for the Middle Ages, which emphasizes the cultural and economic deterioration that supposedly occurred in Western Europe following the decline of the Roman Empire.[1][2] The label employs traditional light-versus-darkness imagery to contrast the “darkness” of the period with earlier and later periods of “light”.[3] The period is characterized by a relative scarcity of historical and other written records at least for some areas of Europe, rendering it obscure to historians. The term “Dark Age” derives from the Latin saeculum obscurum, originally applied by Caesar Baronius in 1602 to a tumultuous period in the 10th and 11th centuries.[4]

The term once characterized the bulk of the Middle Ages, or roughly the 6th to 13th centuries, as a period of intellectual darkness between extinguishing the “light of Rome” after the end of Late Antiquity, and the rise of the Italian Renaissance in the 14th century.[3][5] This definition is still found in popular use,[1][2][6] but increased recognition of the accomplishments of the Middle Ages has led to the label being restricted in application. Since the 20th century, it is frequently applied to the earlier part of the era, the Early Middle Ages (c. 5th–10th century).[7][8] However, many modern scholars who study the era tend to avoid the term altogether for its negative connotations, finding it misleading and inaccurate for any part of the Middle Ages.[9][10][11]

The concept of a Dark Age originated with the Italian scholar Petrarch (Francesco Petrarca) in the 1330s, and was originally intended as a sweeping criticism of the character of Late Latin literature.[3][12] Petrarch regarded the post-Roman centuries as “dark” compared to the light of classical antiquity. Later historians expanded the term to refer to the transitional period between Roman times and the High Middle Ages (c. 11th–13th century), including the lack of Latin literature, and a lack of contemporary written history, general demographic decline, limited building activity and material cultural achievements in general. Later historians and writers picked up the concept, and popular culture has further expanded on it as a vehicle to depict the early Middle Ages as a time of backwardness, extending its pejorative use and expanding its scope.[13]

History

Main article: Medievalism

The term “Dark Ages” originally was intended to denote the entire period between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance; the term “Middle Ages” has a similar motivation, implying an intermediate period between Classical Antiquity and the Modern era. In the 19th century scholars began to recognize the accomplishments made during the period, thereby challenging the image of the Middle Ages as a time of darkness and decay.[6] Now the term is not used by scholars to refer to the entire medieval period;[10] when used, it is generally restricted to the Early Middle Ages.[1]

The rise of archaeology and other specialties in the 20th century has shed much light on the period and offered a more nuanced understanding of its positive developments.[13] Other terms of periodization have come to the fore: Late Antiquity, the Early Middle Ages, and the Great Migrations, depending on which aspects of culture are being emphasized. When modern scholarly study of the Middle Ages arose in the 19th century, the term “Dark Ages” was at first kept, with all its critical overtones. On the rare occasions when the term “Dark Ages” is used by historians today, it is intended to be neutral, namely, to express the idea that the events of the period often seem “dark” because of the scarcity of artistic and cultural output,[14] including historical records, when compared with both earlier and later times.[10]

Petrarch

Triumph of Christianity by Tommaso Laureti (1530–1602), ceiling painting in the Sala di Constantino, Vatican Palace. Images like this one celebrate the triumph of Christianity over the paganism of Antiquity

 
The idea of a Dark Age originated with Petrarch in the 1330s.[3][6] Writing of those who had come before him, he said: “Amidst the errors there shone forth men of genius; no less keen were their eyes, although they were surrounded by darkness and dense gloom”.[15] Christian writers, including Petrarch himself,[3] had long used traditional metaphors of “light versus darkness” to describe “good versus evil“. Petrarch was the first to co-opt the metaphor and give it secular meaning by reversing its application. Classical Antiquity, so long considered the “dark” age for its lack of Christianity, was now seen by Petrarch as the age of “light” because of its cultural achievements, while Petrarch’s time, allegedly lacking such cultural achievements, was seen as the age of darkness.[3]

As an Italian, Petrarch saw the Roman Empire and the classical period as expressions of Italian greatness.[3] He spent much of his time travelling through Europe rediscovering and republishing classic Latin and Greek texts. He wanted to restore the classical Latin language to its former purity. Humanists saw the preceding 900-year period as a time of stagnation. They saw history unfolding, not along the religious outline of Saint Augustine‘s Six Ages of the World, but in cultural (or secular) terms through the progressive developments of classical ideals, literature, and art.

Petrarch wrote that history had two periods: the classic period of the Greeks and Romans, followed by a time of darkness, in which he saw himself as still living. In around 1343, in the conclusion to his epic Africa, he wrote: “My fate is to live among varied and confusing storms. But for you perhaps, if as I hope and wish you will live long after me, there will follow a better age. This sleep of forgetfulness will not last for ever. When the darkness has been dispersed, our descendants can come again in the former pure radiance.”[16] In the 15th century, historians Leonardo Bruni and Flavio Biondo developed a three tier outline of history. They used Petrarch’s two ages, plus a modern, “better age”, which they believed the world had entered. The term “Middle Ages,” in Latin media tempestas (1469) or medium aevum (1604), was later used to describe the period of supposed decline.[17]

Reformation

During the Protestant Reformation of the 16th and 17th centuries, Protestants wrote of the Middle Ages as a period of Catholic corruption. Just as Petrarch’s writing was not an attack on Christianity per se — along with his humanism, he was deeply occupied with the search for God — neither was this an attack on Christianity: it was a drive to restore what Protestants saw as biblical Christianity.

The Magdeburg Centuries was a work of ecclesiastical history compiled by Lutheran scholars and published between 1559 and 1574. Devoting a volume to each century, it covered the first thirteen centuries of Christianity up to 1298. The work was virulently anti-Catholic. Identifying the Papacy as the Antichrist, it painted a “dark” picture of church history after the 5th century, characterizing it as “increments of errors and their corrupting influences”.

Baronius

In response to the Protestants, Roman Catholics developed a counter-image, depicting the High Middle Ages in particular as a period of social and religious harmony, and not “dark” at all.[18] The most important Catholic reply to the Magdeburg Centuries was the Annales Ecclesiastici by Cardinal Caesar Baronius. Baronius was a trained historian who kept theology in the background and produced a work that the Encyclopædia Britannica in 1911 described as “far surpassing anything before his day”[19] and that Acton regarded as “the greatest history of the Church ever written”.[20] The Annales, covering the first twelve centuries of Christianity up to 1198, was published in twelve volumes between 1588 and 1607. It was in Volume X that Baronius coined the term “dark age” for the period between the end of the Carolingian Empire in 888[21] and the first inklings of the Gregorian Reform under Pope Clement II in 1046:

The new age (saeculum) which was beginning, for its harshness and barrenness of good could well be called iron, for its baseness and abounding evil leaden, and moreover for its lack of writers (inopia scriptorum) dark (obscurum).[22]

Significantly, Baronius termed the age “dark” because of the paucity of written records capable of throwing light on it for the historian. The “lack of writers” he referred to may be illustrated by comparing the number of volumes in Migne‘s Patrologia Latina containing the work of Latin writers from the 10th century (the heart of the age he called “dark”) with the number of volumes containing the work of writers from the preceding and succeeding centuries. A minority of these writers were historians.

Volumes of Patrologia Latina per century[23]
Century Migne Volume Nos Volumes
7th 80–88 8
8th 89–96 7
9th 97–130 33
10th 131–138 7
11th 139–151 12
12th 162–191 39
13th 192–217 25

Medieval production of manuscripts.[24] The beginning of the Middle Ages was also a period of low activity in copying.

 There is a sharp drop from 33 volumes in the 9th century to just 7 in the 10th. The 11th century, with 12 volumes, evidences a certain recovery, and the 12th century, with 39, surpasses the 9th, something the 13th, with just 25 volumes, fails to do. There was indeed a “dark age”, in Baronius’s sense of a “lack of writers”, between the Carolingian Renaissance in the 9th century and the beginnings, some time in the 11th, of what has been called the Renaissance of the 12th century. Furthermore, besides the “dark age” named by Baronius, there was an earlier one, for regarding “lack of writers” the 7th and 8th centuries are pretty much on a par with the 10th. In short, in Western Europe during the 1st millennium, two “dark ages” can be identified, separated by the brilliant but all too brief Carolingian Renaissance.

Baronius’s “dark age” seems to have struck historians as something they could use, for it was in the 17th century that the terms “dark age” and “dark ages” started to proliferate in the various European languages, with his original Latin term, “saeculum obscurum”, being reserved for the period he had applied it to. But while some historians, following Baronius’s lead, used “dark age” neutrally to refer to a dearth of written records, others, in the manner of the early humanists and Protestants (and later the Enlightenment writers and their successors right up to the present day) used it pejoratively, lapsing into that lack of neutrality and objectivity that has quite spoilt the term for many modern historians.

The first British historian to use the term was most likely Gilbert Burnet, in the form “darker ages”, which appears several times in his work in the last quarter of the 17th century. His earliest use of it seems to have been in 1679 in the “Epistle Dedicatory” to Volume I of The History of the Reformation of the Church of England, where he writes: “The design of the reformation was to restore Christianity to what it was at first, and to purge it of those corruptions, with which it was overrun in the later and darker ages.”[25] He uses it again in 1682 in Volume II of the History, where he dismisses the story of “St George’s fighting with the dragon” as “a legend formed in the darker ages to support the humour of chivalry”.[26] Burnet was a Protestant bishop chronicling how England became Protestant and his use of the term is invariably pejorative.

Enlightenment

During the 17th and 18th centuries, in the Age of Enlightenment, many critical thinkers saw religion as antithetical to reason. For them the Middle Ages, or “Age of Faith”, was therefore the polar opposite of the Age of Reason.[27] Kant and Voltaire, among others, were vocal in attacking the religiously dominated Middle Ages as a period of social regress, while Gibbon in The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire expressed contempt for the “rubbish of the Dark Ages”.[28] Yet just as Petrarch, seeing himself on the threshold of a “new age”, was criticizing the centuries until his own time, so too were the Enlightenment writers criticizing the centuries until their own. These extended well after Petrarch’s time, since religious domination and conflict were still common into the 17th century and beyond, albeit diminished in scope.

Consequently, an evolution had occurred in at least three ways. Petrarch’s original metaphor of light versus dark had been expanded in time, implicitly at least. Even if the early humanists after him no longer saw themselves living in a dark age, their times were still not light enough for 18th-century writers who saw themselves as living in the real Age of Enlightenment, while the period covered by their own condemnation had been stretched to include what we now call Early Modern times. Additionally, Petrarch’s metaphor of darkness, which he used mainly to deplore what he saw as a lack of secular achievements, was sharpened to take on a more explicitly anti-religious and anti-clerical meaning.

In spite of this, the term “Middle Ages”, used by Biondo and other early humanists after Petrarch, was the name in general use before the 18th century to denote the period until the Renaissance. The earliest recorded use of the English word “medieval” was in 1827. The concept of the Dark Ages was also in use, but by the 18th century, it tended to be confined to the earlier part of this medieval period. The earliest entry for a capitalised “Dark Ages” in the Oxford English Dictionary is a reference in Henry Thomas Buckle‘s History of Civilization in England in 1857.[1] Starting and ending dates varied: the Dark Ages were considered by some to start in 410, by others in 476 when there was no longer an emperor in Rome, and to end about 800, at the time of the Carolingian Renaissance under Charlemagne, or to extend through the rest of the 1st millennium.

Romanticism

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the Romantics reversed the negative assessment of Enlightenment critics and launched a vogue for medievalism.[29] The word “Gothic” had been a term of opprobrium akin to “Vandal” until a few self-confident mid-18th-century English “Goths” like Horace Walpole initiated the Gothic Revival in the arts. This sparked off an interest in the Middle Ages, which for the following Romantic generation began to take on an idyllic image of the “Age of Faith”. This image, in reaction to a world dominated by Enlightenment rationalism in which reason trumped emotion, expressed a romantic view of a Golden Age of chivalry. The Middle Ages were seen with romantic nostalgia as a period of social and environmental harmony and spiritual inspiration, in contrast to the excesses of the French Revolution and, most of all, to the environmental and social upheavals and sterile utilitarianism of the emerging industrial revolution.[30] The Romantics’ view of these earlier centuries can still be seen in modern-day fairs and festivals celebrating the period with costumes and events.

Just as Petrarch had turned the meaning of light versus darkness, so had the Romantics turned the judgment of Enlightenment critics. However, the period idealized by the Romantics focused largely on what is now known as the High Middle Ages, extending into Early Modern times. In one respect, this was a reversal of the religious aspect of Petrarch’s judgment, since these later centuries were those when the universal power and prestige of the Church was at its height. To many users of the term, the scope of the Dark Ages was becoming divorced from this period, denoting mainly the earlier centuries after the fall of Rome.

Modern academic use (read more HERE)

this pressed- Think about it: Afrique – Pour Abdoulaye Diop, “l’attaque à Bamako est “une attaque contre la paix” – France 24


© Capture d’écran France 24 | Abdoulaye Diop, ministre malien des Affaires étrangères, était l’invité de France 24, lundi 9 mars 2015

Deux jours après les attaques de Bamako, le ministre malien des Affaires étrangères a dénoncé “les forces hostiles à la paix”. Il appelle les Mouvements de l’Azawad à “se déterminer dans les meilleurs délais”.

Abdoulaye Diop, ministre malien des Affaires étrangères, a rencontré, lundi 9 mars, son homologue français, Laurent Fabius, à Paris. La sécurité a été au centre des discussions après un week end meurtrier au Mali. Dimanche, une attaque a eu lieu contre un camp de l’ONU dans le nord du pays faisant 3 morts. La capitale malienne a également été frappée par un premier attentat antioccidental, revendiqué par le groupe jihadiste al-Mourabitoune, samedi 7 mars.

“Ce qui se joue, c’est essentiellement une attaque contre la paix”, a déclaré Abdoulaye Diop sur le plateau de France 24. Selon le ministre malien, ces attaques viennent freiner le processus de paix en cours. Il appelle la coordination des Mouvements de l’Azawad à “se déterminer dans les meilleurs délais” afin de parapher l’accord sur le Mali conclu le 1er mars à Alger. “Il y a urgence, le temps n’est pas en notre faveur”, a-t-il prévenu, pointant la menace terroriste. M. Diop demande à la communauté internationale et au Conseil de sécurité de faire pression sur les rebelles du nord afin qu’ils se positionnent.

via Afrique – Pour Abdoulaye Diop, “l’attaque à Bamako est “une attaque contre la paix” – France 24.

Google Translator says: 

Mali
Rebellion
Terrorism

Africa
To Abdoulaye Diop, “the attack in Bamako is” an attack against peace “


Text by FRANCE 24

Last modified: 03/09/2015
Two days after the attacks of Bamako, Mali’s foreign minister denounced “the forces hostile to peace.” He calls the Movements of Azawad to “determine as soon as possible.”

Abdoulaye Diop, Mali’s foreign minister, met Monday, March 9, his French counterpart Laurent Fabius in Paris. Security has been the focus of discussion after a deadly weekend getaway in Mali. On Sunday, an attack took place against a UN camp in the north of the country by 3 dead. Mali’s capital was also hit by a first anti-Western attack, claimed by the jihadist group Al-Mourabitoun, Saturday, March 7.

“What is at stake, it is essentially an attack against peace,” said Abdoulaye Diop on the board of France 24. The Malian Minister, these attacks are slow peace process underway. He calls the coordination of movements of Azawad to “determine as soon as possible” to initial the agreement concluded on March 1, Mali in Algiers. “It is urgent, time is not on our side,” he warned, pointing to the terrorist threat. Diop called on the international community and put pressure on the Security Council to the northern rebels so that they are positioned.

Abdoulaye Diop also thanked France for its support after the attack of Bamako, while calling for calm. “Do not panic,” he insisted, even if “zero risk does not exist (…), continue to live normally.” “We take all measures to protect our foreign friends,” said the Malian Foreign Minister.

Google Translator: Get yours HERE

The Gospel is more important than soap operas or gossip, Pope says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Vatican City, Feb 3, 2015 / 05:59 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his homily Tuesday Pope Francis noted the importance of contemplating scripture, and urged faithful to read the Gospel for 10-15 minutes a day, rather than watching soap operas or exchanging gossip.

“At home, 15 minutes, pick up the Gospel, a small passage, imagine what happened and talk with Jesus about it,” the Pope told those present in the Vatican’s Saint Martha guesthouse for his Feb. 3 daily Mass.

By reading the Bible every day, he said, “your gaze will be fixed on Jesus and not so much on a TV soap opera, for example. Your ears will be focused on the words of Jesus and not so much on your neighborhood gossip.”

via The Gospel is more important than soap operas or gossip, Pope says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Coliva (Koliva)


Koliva

Koliva

Koliva
Koljivo from wheat.jpg

Colivă from wheat seeds with raisins
Origin
Alternative name(s) Kollyva
Details
Type Ritual food
Main ingredient(s) Wheat kernels, honey or sugar

Koliva (also transliterated kollyva or kollyba) (Greek, κόλλυβα, kóliva; Serbian, кољиво, koljivo; Romanian, colivă; Bulgarian, коливо, kolivo; Ukrainian, коливо, kolyvo) is boiled wheat which is used liturgically in the Eastern Orthodox Churches and Eastern Catholic Churches.

This ritual food most likely was used even before Christianity since the ingredients used have symbolic value relating to the Greek pantheon, though not to Christian iconography. In the Eastern Churches, koliva is blessed during the memorial Divine Liturgy performed at various intervals after a death; at funerals and during the mnemosyna, i.e. the Orthodox Memorial services. It may also be used on the first Friday of the Great Lent,[1] at slavas, or at mnemosyna in the Christmas meal. In some countries, though not in Greece, it is consumed on non-religious occasions as well.

A similar food item is widely popular in Lebanon where it is known as snuniye and, more commonly, as berbara as it is prepared for Saint Barbara‘s day, December 4th, which is celebrated with Halloween-like festivities.

Etymology

The word is derived from classical Greek κόλλυβος, kollybos, i.e. a small coin or a small gold weight.In the Hellenistic period the neuter plural form of the word, i.e. κόλλυβα, kollyba, took the meaning of small pies made of boiled wheat.The sense of the ritual food is of a latter period.[2][3]

Recipe

A bowl of koliva, with lit candle, as part of a Serbian family feast (slava) in honor of their Patron Saint.

While recipes may vary widely, the primary ingredient is wheat kernels which have been boiled until they are soft and then sweetened with honey or sugar. Koliva also contains some or all of the following: sesame seeds, almonds, ground walnuts, cinnamon, sugar, pomegranate seeds, raisins, anise and parsley. Romanians decorate the koliva with crosses of cocoa, chocolate or candy. In terms of the Greek Pantheon, the wheat symbolized the earth goddess Demeter, while pomegranates stood for her daughter, Persephone, queen of the underworld. Almonds were sacred to Aphrodite and raisins to Dionysis. Sesame seeds were considered to open the doors of consciousness.

The practice of offering koliva is traditional in Greece, Bulgaria, Romania and Moldova, Russia, Balkan countries, and among Christians in the Middle East. When served, the koliva mixture, which looks like earth, is shaped into a mound to resemble a grave. The whole is then covered with powdered sugar and the initials of the deceased are outlined on the top. A candle, usually placed in the center of the koliva, is lit at the beginning of the memorial service and extinguished at its end. After the liturgy, those attending share in eating the koliva as they speak of the deceased and say, “May God forgive him/her.”

Some Orthodox parishes have a designated individual charged with making the koliva. This is in part due to the health risk of fermented wheat if the koliva is not prepared correctly.

Sometimes koliva is made with rice or barley instead of wheat. This custom began as a practical response to a famine that occurred in Soviet Russia, when the faithful did not have wheat available for koliva, so they used rice instead. Some communities continue to use rice for their koliva to this day. In the Japanese Orthodox Church where rice is mainly eaten, koliva is commonly made from rice sweetened with sugar and decorated with raisins, without reference to famine.

History

The origins of koliva predate Christianity. The word koliva itself stems from the Ancient Greek word κόλλυβoς (kollybos), which originally meant “a small coin” and later in the neuter plural form “small pies made of boiled wheat”. In the Ancient Greek panspermia, a mixture of cooked seeds and nuts were offered during the pagan festival of the Anthesteria. For this reason, in Greece koliva is also called sperma, i.e. seed(s).

In the 5th century CE koliva in the sense of boiled wheat, constituted along with raw vegetables the diet of monks who refused to eat bread.[4] The 12th century canonist Theodore Balsamon maintained that koliva as a ritual food practice was originated by Athanasius of Alexandria during the reign of the Emperor Julian the Apostate.[5]

The association between death and life, between that which is planted in the ground and that which emerges, is deeply embedded in the making and eating of koliva. The ritual food passed from paganism to early Christianity in Byzantium and later spread to the entire Orthodox world.

Christian interpretation

Orthodox Christians consider koliva to be the symbolic of death and resurrection, according to the words of the Gospel:

Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a grain of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit. (John 12:24)

Wheat which is planted in the earth and rises in new life is symbolic of those beloved departed who have died in the hope of resurrection, in accordance with the words of Saint Paul:

So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorruption. It is sown in dishonour, it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness, it is raised in power. It is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body….(I_Corinthians 15:42-44)

This symbolism has its highest expression in the Saints, whose blessed state in heaven have been manifested to the world. For this reason, koliva is blessed not only at memorials for the departed, but also in commemoration of saints.

Occasions of use

Postcard, undated (ca.1916), showing an Orthodox service with the blessing of koliva.

Koliva is used on a number of different occasions:

St Theodore Saturday

The tradition of blessing and eating koliva at the end of the first week of Great Lent is connected with an event in the reign of Julian the Apostate. The tradition states that the Emperor knew that the Christians would be hungry after the first week of strict fasting, and would go to the marketplaces of Constantinople on Saturday to buy food. So he ordered that blood from pagan sacrifices be sprinkled over all the food that was sold there. This made the food unsuitable as Lenten fare (since the Christians could not eat meat products during Lent), and in general as food for Christians, who are forbidden to eat food from such sacrifices. However, St. Theodore Tyro appeared in the dream to Archbishop Eudoxius and advised him that the people should not eat food bought at the marketplace that day, but only boiled wheat mixed with honey. As a result, this first Saturday of Great Lent has come to be known as Theodore Saturday.

Memorial services

During requiem services (Greek: Parastas, Slavonic: Panikhida), the family or friends of the departed will often prepare a koliva which is placed in front of the memorial table before which the service is chanted.

Memorial services are held on the third, ninth, and fortieth days after the repose of an Orthodox Christian, as well as on the one-year anniversary. In addition, there are several Soul Saturdays during the church year (mostly during Great Lent), as well as Radonitsa (on the second Tuesday after Pascha), on each of which general commemorations are made for all the departed.

Commemoration of saints

It is also customary in the Slavic practice on the feast of the Patron Saint of a church or of a family, or on the feast of saints of special significance to offer koliva. Instead of serving a memorial service, the koliva is set in front of an icon of the saint and a Moleben is served to that saint.

See also

References

  1. ^ “1st Saturday of Great Lent St Theodore the Recruit”. Retrieved 2007-03-02.
  2. ^ Lemma κόλλυβος. Liddell, Henry George; Scott, Robert; A Greek–English Lexicon at the Perseus Project.
  3. ^ Lemma κόλλυβα (in Greek). Dictionary of Standard Modern Greek, Center for the Greek Language.
  4. ^ Kazhdan, Alexander P., ed. (1991). “KOLLYBA”. The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium. Oxford University Press. Available (limitedly) online at the Oxford Reference.
  5. ^ Chambers’ Cyclopædia, “Colyba” entry

† Prayer For World Peace (1986) – Pope John Paul II †: The Rosary The Vigil of the Feast of Pentecost


“Memento homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverem reverteris.”

†Prayer For World Peace (1986) – Pope John Paul II †

quotation: Rene Descartes (about dreams)


I am accustomed to sleep and in my dreams to imagine the same things that lunatics imagine when awake.

Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Discuss

this pressed- the realities that feed your insomnia: This Congressman Doesn’t Wantthis pressed: reading to prevent you from falling asleep: Federal Science Board to Be Allowed to Consider Science | Mother Jones


This story originally appeared in Grist and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.
This Congressman Doesn’t Want a Federal Science Board to Be Allowed to Consider Science

Because ignoring science is even easier than denying it.

—By David Roberts

| Fri Mar. 6, 2015 3:50 PM EST

Last year, the House of Representatives passed two absurd anti-science bills, the Secret Science Reform Act and the EPA Science Advisory Board Reform Act. It will come as no surprise that both bills, under the guise of “reform,” would have the practical effect of crippling the EPA’s efforts to assess science in a fair and timely way. I don’t have the heart to get into it — follow the links above for the details.

The bills are back; the House considered them both again yesterday. Emily Atkin has the gory details if you’re interested. They might get a little further this time—the Democratic Senate didn’t take them up last year, obviously, but the GOP-controlled Senate might this year—though it won’t matter in the end, as Obama has threatened to veto both. So it’s mainly yet another act of reactionary symbolism from the right.

All that is by way of background so I can draw your attention to a hilarious amendment attached to the Science Advisory Board bill. It comes by way of the bill’s sponsor, Rep. David McKinley (R-W.Va.), a far-right, coal-country, climate-denying conservative of the old school.

Here’s the amendment. Its sole purpose is to prohibit the EPA’s Science Advisory Board from taking into consideration, for any purpose, the following reports:

So. When considering what to do about carbon pollution, EPA may not consider what America’s best scientists have concluded about it, what an international panel of scientists has concluded about it, how the federal government has officially recommended calculating its value, or the most comprehensive solutions for it. Oh, and it can’t consider Agenda 21 either. Otherwise the EPA can go nuts.

As I’ve said many, many times, most Americans have no idea how batshit crazy the House GOP has gone. They serve the base, and only the base (and Politico obsessives) pay close attention. But imagine, if you will, a GOP House and Senate paired with President Jeb Bush. A bill like this might pass. Politicians might be picking and choosing, based on ideological criteria, which scientific reports administrative agencies are allowed to consider. It’s amusing in its own dark way, but it’s not a sitcom or a satire. It’s real life.

via This Congressman Doesn’t Want a Federal Science Board to Be Allowed to Consider Science | Mother Jones.

Note: Category: Storied to keep you from falling asleep and awake all night long!

Catholic News Agency: For Middle East Christians, UN indifference is deadly


Refugees who have fled from ISIS and arrived in Ankawa, in the northern part of Erbil, Iraq. Credit: www.ankawa.com.

Refugees who have fled from ISIS and arrived in Ankawa, in the northern part of Erbil, Iraq. Credit: http://www.ankawa.com. Refugees who have fled from ISIS and arrived in Ankawa, in the northern part of Erbil, Iraq. Credit: http://www.ankawa.com.

For Middle East Christians, UN indifference is deadly

.- Inaction on the part of the United Nations and international community toward the brutality of ISIS has drawn criticism from a refugee and scholar who says the lives of Christians are at risk.

Raad Salam Naaman, a Chaldean Catholic and professor of Islamic Studies, sees a “totally deplorable and very strange” attitude on the part of the United Nations and the international community in the face of “the murders and crimes” of the Islamic State.

He told CNA that the international community is acting “as if Middle Eastern Christians mean nothing to them,” despite their sufferings under the violent Islamic radicals.

“They don’t care about the expansion and growth of this group,” said Naaman, who teaches Arabic philology and Islamic Studies at Complutense University of Madrid.

Born near Mosul, the professor has lived as a political refugee in Spain since 1991.

For Naaman, the Islamic State group, also known as ISIS, is not a state but a “band of murderers and thieves.”

He charged that the group is “the fruit of the so called ‘Arab Spring,’ one of the many mistakes made by the West.” He said the Arab Spring uprisings “aided these revolts and protests pulled off by Islamic radicals.” Many of the radicals had ties to the Muslim Brotherhood and helped overthrow governments run by secular Arab dictators, he argued.

The year 2010 marked the beginning of several popular “Arab Spring” uprisings that has toppled the governments of Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen.  Political instability and sometimes violence followed. An uprising against Syria’s President Bashar Al-Assad unleashed a civil war now in its fourth year.

There is continued political instability in Iraq, which has worsened since the withdrawal of American troops between 2010 and 2011.

The Islamic State group, especially active in Iraq and Syria, witnessed significant successes in 2014 when it took the major city of Mosul. The group’s leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, then proclaimed an Islamic caliphate in its territory in both countries. The group has imposed a strict version of Islamic law and persecuted Christians, other religious minorities, and Muslims they consider to be apostate. The group has enslaved women, murdered children, and destroyed churches.

It has encouraged radical groups such as the Libyan group Ansar al Sharia to join them. The Libyan group in February released a video of the beheading of 20 Coptic Christians from Egypt and a non-Christian from Chad.

Naaman said the Islamic State group “threatens our Western civilization and is a danger for the future of our human rights, for liberty and democracy which western society was able to attain after centuries of struggle.”

He said that the West should “correct its mistakes” and eliminate “this radical gang of Islamic murderers.”

In that respect, the Iraqi refugee echoes the call of the Vatican’s Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin, who warned that rise of the caliphate in Libya demands “quick intervention.”

However, the cardinal said any military intervention should be “under the auspices of the U.N.”

Naaman said that bombing Islamic State targets will not eliminate them. He said the U.S. and the U.N. need to call for a U.N.-led coalition to attack the group and its followers “on the ground, and with a resolute army.”

“That is the only solution,” he said.

Naaman’s statements came as the Islamic State perpetrated a mass kidnapping of more than 200 Assyrian Christians in northwestern Syria. While at least 19 of the victims were released, it is feared the rest will be executed en masse.
 

This Pressed for your reflection: “Abandonment is the greatest suffering of the elderly”, Pope says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


By Elise Harris

Vatican City, Mar 5, 2015 / 01:00 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Francis said Thursday that when it comes to caring for the elderly, palliative care is necessary because it counters a mentality of utility that often leaves elderly persons marginalized and alone.

“Abandonment is the most serious ‘illness’ of the elderly, and also the greatest injustice they can suffer: those who helped us to grow must not be abandoned when they need our help, our love and our tenderness,” the Pope said March 5.

With its emphasis on alleviating the suffering of the sick and accompanying them with tenderness for the duration of their illness, palliative care serves as a crucial support for the elderly, “who, for reasons of age, often receive less attention from curative medicine, and are often abandoned.”

The Pope’s words came in an audience with members of the Pontifical Academy for Life, who are gathered in Rome March 5-6 for their annual assembly, which this year reflected on the theme: “Assisting the elderly and palliative care.”

What palliative care offers as a unique and essential element in the medical field is the recognition of “the value of the person,” Francis said.

He noted that many elderly are either “left to die or made to die” due to their physical or social condition, and stressed that all types of medicine have the societal responsibility to bear witness to the honor due not only to elderly persons, but to each and every human being.

All medical knowledge, Francis said, “is truly science, in its most noble sense, only if it finds its place as a help in view of the good of man, a good that is never achieved by going ‘against’ his life and dignity.”

The Pope also emphasized that the criteria governing the actions of doctors must not be limited to medical evidence and efficiency, nor to the rules of heath care systems and economic profit.

“A state cannot think of making a profit with medicine. On the contrary, there is no more important duty for a society than safeguarding the human person.”

Palliative care then, bears witness to the fact that the human person always has value, even when suffering from age and illness, the Pope continued.

The human person, he said, “is a good in and of himself and for others, and is loved by God. For this reason, when life becomes very fragile and the end of earthly existence approaches, we feel the responsibility to assist and accompany the person in the best way.”

Francis then praised the efforts made on the part of those who work in the field of palliative care, and encouraged both professionals and students to specialize in the topic.

Although this type of care is not geared toward saving lives, it centers on the equally important recognition of the value of the human person, he said, and encouraged those working in the field to carry out their tasks with an attitude of service.

“It is this capacity for service to the life and dignity of the sick, even when they are old, that is the measure of the true progress of medicine, and of all society,” the Pope observed, and repeated an appeal made by St. John Paul II to “Respect, protect, love and serve life, every human life!”

However, while palliative care is necessary, it does not remove the need for the family in caring for the elderly, Francis added.

“The elderly, first of all, need the care of family members – whose affection cannot be replaced by the most efficient structures or the most competent and charitable healthcare workers,” he said.

When family members are not able to offer the needed care, or if the illness of their elderly loved one is advanced or terminal, then the “truly human” assistance offered by palliative care is a good option so long as it “supplements and supports” the care already provided by family members, he said.

Pope Francis closed his speech by encouraging those present to continue advancing in their studies and research, so that “the work of the promotion and defense of life might be ever more efficacious and fruitful.”

via Abandonment is the greatest suffering of the elderly, Pope says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

†”Hold Fast to God, the one true God”†: Angelus Domini 2015.03.08 (access from Euzicasa)


"Hold fast to God, the one true good"

“Hold fast to God, the one true good” (Click to access the mass live)

SPIRITUAL REFLECTION (http://www.news.va/en)

“Hold fast to God, the one true good”

From the treatise on Flight from the World by Saint Ambrose, bishop
(Cap. 6, 36; 7, 44: 8, 45; 9, 52: CSEL 32, 192, 198-199, 204)

Where a man’s heart is, there is his treasure also. God is not accustomed to refusing a good gift to those who ask for one. Since he is good, and especially to those who are faithful to him, let us hold fast to him with all our soul, our heart, our strength, and so enjoy his light and see his glory and possess the grace of supernatural joy. […]

Let us take refuge from this world. You can do this in spirit, even if you are kept here in the body. You can at the same time be here and present to the Lord. Your soul must hold fast to him, you must follow after him in your thoughts, you must tread his ways by faith, not in outward show. You must take refuge in him. He is your refuge and your strength. David addresses him in these words: I fled to you for refuge, and I was not disappointed.

“Hold fast to God, the one true good”

From the treatise on Flight from the World by Saint Ambrose, bishop
(Cap. 6, 36; 7, 44: 8, 45; 9, 52: CSEL 32, 192, 198-199, 204)

Where a man’s heart is, there is his treasure also. God is not accustomed to refusing a good gift to those who ask for one. Since he is good, and especially to those who are faithful to him, let us hold fast to him with all our soul, our heart, our strength, and so enjoy his light and see his glory and possess the grace of supernatural joy. […]

Let us take refuge from this world. You can do this in spirit, even if you are kept here in the body. You can at the same time be here and present to the Lord. Your soul must hold fast to him, you must follow after him in your thoughts, you must tread his ways by faith, not in outward show. You must take refuge in him. He is your refuge and your strength. David addresses him in these words: I fled to you for refuge, and I was not disappointed.

 

 

 

Quotation: Be good and you will be lonesome. Mark Twain


Quotation 

Be good and you will be lonesome.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

quotation: Bill Clinton


They may walk with a little less spring in their step, and the ranks are growing thinner, but let us never forget, when they were young, these men saved the world.Bill Clinton (1946-) Discuss

‘Capital punishment must end’ – Catholic publications unite in rare joint statement :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Washington D.C., Mar 5, 2015 / 04:02 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Four U.S. Catholic publications with a broad range of audiences have come together in a joint editorial citing Church leaders in calling for an end to the death penalty in the United States.

“Capital punishment must end,” stated a March 5 editorial by America magazine, the National Catholic Register, the National Catholic Reporter and Our Sunday Visitor.

The death penalty is both “abhorrent and unnecessary,” the publications said, arguing that the practice of capital punishment drains resources in court battles that would be “better deployed in preventing crime in the first place and working toward restorative justice for those who commit less heinous crimes.”

via ‘Capital punishment must end’ – Catholic publications unite in rare joint statement :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

quotation: “Death is the only physician,…”, George Eliot


Death is the only physician, the shadow of his valley the only journeying that will cure us of age and the gathering fatigue of years.George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: “There is no religion without love…” Anna Sewell


There is no religion without love, and people may talk as much as they like about their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to man and beast, it is all a sham.Anna Sewell (1820-1878) Discuss

quotation: Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same. Ralph Waldo Emerson


Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

MORE

just a thought: “Pirates worst day at work: No matter how much they hammered at those statues…the gold was not hidden in there!”


just a thought: “Pirates worst day at work: No matter how much they hammered at those statues…the gold was not hidden in there!”

euzicasa, o cugetare: despre dor, scoverzi, si Ioana Radu


Dor este in engleza “longing” , in franceza “désir”… apoi daca oamenii de pe acele meleaguri, sufera la fel de dor, asa cum suferim noi, sua daca sufera de dor de casa la fel cum sufera de dor de ibit sau iubita, daca sufera la fel la tinerete, asa cum sufera la batrineta, cred ca la urma urmei, dupa ce tot evestejit, si iarna nu mai pleaca…e dorul de soare si de ultima primavara care e cel mai puternic EUZICASA.
Am vazut niste scoverzi, aici, pe Facebook, si mi s-a facut dor din mai multe puncte de vedere: pentru ca stiu ca nimeni nu face scoverzi asa cum facea mama mare, deasemenea din cauza ca nu as putea sa le ating (din cauza zaharului) chiar daca erau aurite, si din cauza ca era o vreme cand puteam sa maninc cate as fi dorit, pana al refuz. Tot asa cum puteam sa mananc un borcan ce heciumpeci (pasta de macese), si cate si mai cate… spec ca nu am luat prea mult din poezia dorului, numai ca sa umplu spatiul virtual cu sentimente negative. ”
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