Category Archives: QUOTATION

California’s soon-to-be saint hailed as a man ahead of his time : Bl. Junipero Serra


 

Statue of Fr Junipero Serra, Mission San Juan Bautista California. Credit: Ramon Lomeli via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

  Statue of Fr Junipero Serra, Mission San Juan Bautista California. Credit: Ramon Lomeli via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

California’s soon-to-be saint hailed as a man ahead of his time

Rome, Italy, May 3, 2015 / 05:02 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Experts in California history, archeology and the life of Bl. Junipero Serra have praised him as a passionate missionary with a vision that extended far beyond his own generation.

“I think that’s a characteristic of great people. They’re not bound up by the restrictions of their generation, they see ahead,” Mons. Francis J. Weber told CNA April 30, in reference to the life of Bl. Junipero Serra.

He compared Serra to former president of the United States Abraham Lincoln, who despite being heavily criticized during his life for working to abolish slavery, “was one of the greatest presidents we’ve ever had. But he was generations ahead of his time.”

“I think you could say that most great people are ahead of their own generation. I would probably say that they see things the way they should be done, but not as they are,” the priest said.

Mons. Weber is the author of more than 100 books, many of which focus on California’s Catholic history, and the former archivist of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

A pupil of the well-known Catholic Church historian John Tracy Ellis, Mons. Weber also taught history at Queen of Angels Seminary in Los Angeles and served as president of the Association of Catholic Diocesan Archivists.

He was one of four panelists present in Rome for an April 30 discussion on the life and legacy of Bl. Junipero Serra, who will be canonized by Pope Francis during his visit to the U.S. in September.

Fr. Serra was born in 1713 on the Spanish island of Majorca in the Mediterranean. He left his position as a university professor to become a missionary to the New World, helping to convert many of the native community to Christianity and teaching them new technologies. The Franciscan priest founded several of the missions that would go on to become the centers of major California cities.

The priest’s mission work often took place despite a painful ulcerated leg which is said to have been caused either by cancer or a spider bite soon after his arrival in Mexico. He died in 1784 at Mission San Carlos Borroméo del Carmelo in what is now the state of California.

St. John Paul II beatified Fr. Serra in 1988. In January, Pope Francis praised the missionary as “the evangelizer of the West” when he announced his intention to canonize him.

In the panel discussion, specific attention was given to Serra’s zeal to be a missionary. Mons. Weber said this can be seen in the priest’s decision to leave his home in Spain despite the fact that he wasn’t young anymore, and knowing that he likely wouldn’t see his aged parents again.

While praising Serra’s visionary perspective and the good that came out of the missions, panelists also addressed criticisms surrounding Serra and the missions in a conversation with journalists after the panel.

Controversy over the canonization has stemmed from claims that Serra’s missions enacted forced labor and conversions as well as corporal punishment. Scholarship on the issue is divided, and Serra supporters contend that many of the accusations against Serra are rife with misinterpretations and factual errors.

Robert Senkewicz, a history professor at Santa Clara University in California and co-author of a newly released 500 page biography on Junipero Serra, was also present at Thursday’s press conference.

He said he’s not surprised that there is contention over Serra’s canonization, and noted that much of the dissatisfaction likely surrounds a history of poor policies the U.S. had toward native Americans in the past.

Inevitably native populations will interpret their past to be a “prison” of previous U.S. policies toward Indians, because “it wasn’t nice,” he said.

“It was a policy of removal and extermination…so I’m not surprised that there’s a lot of dissatisfaction against the canonization Fr. Serra, because Californian Indians are American Indians, and American Indians interpret their past through the most catastrophic parts of it, which were the U.S. policies.”

Ruben Mendoza, an archeology professor at California State University, Monterey Bay, also spoke on the panel from a cultural perspective, being of both Mexican and Indian descent.

With extensive experience in the field of archeology as well as working in the California missions of San Juan Bautista, San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo, Nuestra Senora de la Soledad and the Royal Presidio of Monterey, Mendoza was initially hostile to Serra, but changed his view after studying about the blessed and working in the missions himself.

Mendoza pointed out that despite Serra’s critics, “many of us carry currencies in our pockets that contain the images of individuals who we see as heroes, they were the founders of our country, and yet if we judge them from the perspective of our histories then they were human traffickers.”

These people, he said, “were a whole host of things that today we would not even begin to dream of if we consider ourselves as patriots.”

Mendoza also referred to how some have argued that Serra had sought to be a martyr at one point in his life, saying that if we look at this life, the reality is that “if he had sought martyrdom he would have been mortified.”

Serra, he said, “would have realized that the very people that he loved, that he devoted his life to, would now see him as the culprit in their disintegration.”

“I believe that in the end, by virtue of the very attacks that those descendants bring to the table, they have martyred Junipero Serra and turned him into a saint.”

Tags: Bl Junipero Serra

quotation: True enthusiasm is a fine feeling whose flash I admire where-ever I see it. Charlotte Bronte


True enthusiasm is a fine feeling whose flash I admire where-ever I see it.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855) Discuss

quotation: George Eliot


It was not that she was out of temper, but that the world was not equal to the demands of her fine organism.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

just a thought: For every truth, a thousand lies


just a thought: “For every truth, a thousand lies.”

quotation: One crowded hour of glorious life Is worth an age without a name. Sir Walter Scott


One crowded hour of glorious life
Is worth an age without a name.Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) Discuss

quotation: Of all the bewildering things about a new country, the absence of human landmarks is one of the most depressing and disheartening. Willa Cather (1873-1947)


Of all the bewildering things about a new country, the absence of human landmarks is one of the most depressing and disheartening.

Willa Cather (1873-1947) Discuss

quotation: Charlotte Bronte


Reason sits firm and holds the reins, and she will not let the feelings burst away and hurry her to wild chasms. The passions may rage furiously, like true heathens, as they are; and the desires may imagine all sorts of vain things: but judgment shall still have the last word in every argument, and the casting vote in every decision.Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855) Discuss

quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


There is a sort of jealousy which needs very little fire; it is hardly a passion, but a blight bred in the cloudy, damp despondency of uneasy egoism.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

quotation: Nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose—a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye. Mary Shelle


Nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose—a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851) Discuss

FRANKENSTEIN – Frankenstein by Mary Shelley – Unabridged Audiobook 1831 Edition – FabAudioBooks

Complete Murrow Speech From Good Night, and Good Luck Evmonk Evmonk: ‘Our history will by what we make it’


Complete Murrow Speech From Good Night, and Good Luck

quotation: Jane Austen


 One may be continually abusive without saying any thing just; but one cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

today’s birthday: Edward R. Murrow (1908)


 

Edward R. Murrow (1908)

Known for his trademark signoff, “Good night, and good luck,” Murrow was an American journalist who became famous for his series of dramatic radio news broadcasts from London rooftops during German bombing raids in World War II. He later became a pioneer of television news broadcasting and produced a series of reports that helped turn public opinion against anti-Communist Senator Joseph McCarthy. Rarely seen without a cigarette, Murrow was said to smoke how many a day? More… Discuss



Uploaded on Nov 23, 2011

“The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves. – Good night, and good luck”

Famous CBS journalist, Edward R. Murrow speaks on Senator Joseph McCarthy and the fear he was creating by his insatiable quest for communists in the U.S.

***
As a journalism major, I find the study of Ed Murrow simply captivating. He is by far one of the greatest writers and journalists of all time.

Egbert Roscoe Murrow, the youngest of three brothers, was born to Quaker parents of Scott-Irish descent at Polecat Creek, Guilford County, North Carolina on April 25, 1908. The home he was born in was a simple primitive log cabin with no modern amenities whatsoever. He father was Roscoe C. Murrow and mother was Ethel F. née Lamb. Later his parents out of desperation migrated to Washington State and set up a homestead where Murrow received his education. He graduated from Washington State College with a degree in speech communications.

Murrow made his fame in radio when he broadcast live from Vienna, the annexation of Austria (Anschluss) by Germany in 1938. HIs broadcast with multiple journalists speaking from different cities in the western world captivated audiences. He would later report during the bombing raids over London known as “The Blitz” to historians. Murrow’s style and precedent in radio made him a news radio pioneer. He was best known by those close to him to be witty, honest and a man of integrity.

One of the highlights of his career was taking on the insatiable witch hunt by junior Senator, Joseph McCarthy. McCarthy became known for his quest to root out so-called communists in U.S. government and entertainment industry in Hollywood. Murrow had enough and over a period of a year, collected numerous video and recordings of McCarthy exposing his tactics on air. Historians believe because of Murrow’s bravery, it ended the career of Joseph McCarthy.

Murrow’s style of reporting with his pauses between words along with his unique way of driving home the point of his address set him apart from other radio personalities.. He is noted as one of the best, if not the best, journalist of all time. He was well known for his catch phrase after each editorial, “Good night, and Good Luck” as heard in this video.

Murrow passed away in April 27, 1965 just two days after celebrating his 57th birthday. His wife,Janet Huntington Brewster, passed away in 1998. They had one male child, Charles Casey Murrow born in 1945 and is now a Professor in New England.

 

quotation: Agatha Christie


Who is there who has not felt a sudden startled pang at reliving an old experience or feeling an old emotion?

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Armenian Genocide Begins (1915) (yet another day that will live in infamy forever)


Armenian Genocide Begins (1915)

Known by Armenians as the Great Calamity, the Armenian Genocide refers to the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Ottoman Empire’s Armenian population during and after World War I.

Characterized by the use of massacres and forced marches designed to lead to the death of deportees, the genocide is estimated to have claimed up to 1 million Armenian lives. The onset of the genocide is generally accepted to be April 24, 1915, the day that Ottoman authorities did what? More… Discuss
Related Articles:  HEREHERE ,

Pope: Christians must protect marriage |from CNA


Pope: Christians must protect marriage

quotation: Life is my college. May I graduate well, and earn some honors!


Quotation of the Day

Life is my college. May I graduate well, and earn some honors!Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) Discuss

Image

quotation: God is for us, who can be against us? Romans 8:31


quotation: Henry Fielding


Great vices are the proper objects of our detestation, smaller faults of our pity, but affectation appears to me the only true source of the ridiculous.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

this pressed for you: Middle East – Air strike on missile depot rocks Yemeni capital – France 24


© Mohammed Huwais, AFP | Yemenis walk along a damaged street following a raid by Saudi-led coalition warplanes on a nearby missile depot on Fajj Attan hill in southern Sanaa, on April 20, 2015

© Mohammed Huwais, AFP | Yemenis walk along a damaged street following a raid by Saudi-led coalition warplanes on a nearby missile depot on Fajj Attan hill in southern Sanaa, on April 20, 2015

© Mohammed Huwais, AFP | Yemenis walk along a damaged street following a raid by Saudi-led coalition warplanes on a nearby missile depot on Fajj Attan hill in southern Sanaa, on April 20, 2015

Video by FRANCE 24

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2015-04-20

An air strike on a Scud missile base in the Yemeni capital Sanaa caused a big explosion that blew out windows in homes, killing seven civilians and wounding dozens, medical sources told Reuters.

Yemen’s state news agency Saba, run by the Houthi movement which controls the capital, said the bombing resulted in “dozens of martyrs and hundreds of wounded,” citing a government official.

Saudi Arabia has led an alliance of Sunni Arab countries in air strikes against the Iran-allied Shi’ite Houthi group and army units loyal to ex-president Ali Abdullah Saleh.

The blast hit the base on Faj Attan mountain beside Hadda district, home to the presidential palace and many embassies, and sent a thick pillar of smoke into the air.

Resident Adel Mansour said it was the largest explosion in more than three weeks of bombing by the Saudi-led coalition.

“For the first time since the start of the bombing the windows of my house smashed,” Mansour said. “My children are terrified and one of my relatives fainted because of the force of the blast.”

An eyewitness at a hospital in the area said the emergency room was overwhelmed with victims, who screamed in pain from wounds sustained by the flying debris of their homes.

The campaign has repeatedly targeted the Faj Attan facility along with other military bases and airports in Sanaa and throughout the country.

The explosion also damaged the headquarters of a television station, Yemen Today, which is owned by ex-president Saleh, knocking its signal off air and wounding several people, employees told Reuters.

(REUTERS)

Date created : 2015-04-20

via Middle East – Air strike on missile depot rocks Yemeni capital – France 24.

related reading:>>>>> HERE <<<<<

quotation: Herman Melville


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

One: Rabindranath Tagore – Gitanjali (a moving introduction by W.B. Yeats, a must read)


‘1
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Thou hast made me endless, such is thy pleasure. This frail vessel thou emptiest again and again, and fillest it ever with fresh life.
This little flute of a reed thou hast carried over hills and dales, and hast breathed through it melodies eternally new.
At the immortal touch of thy hands my little heart loses its limits in joy and gives birth to utterance ineffable.
Thy infinite gifts come to me only on these very small hands of mine. Ages pass, and still thou pourest, and still there is room to fill.
17

‘Paintings of Pains’ (palette de Frida Kahlo_Mexico_1952-1_) (FotoSketcher_ Emergence 2)


'Paintings of Pains' (palette de Frida Kahlo_Mexico_1952-1_) (FotoSketcher_ Emergence 2)

‘Paintings of Pains’ (palette de Frida Kahlo_Mexico_1952-1_) (FotoSketcher_ Emergence 2)

quotation: Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis. Ralph Waldo Emerson (listening to two audiobooks here at EUZICASA)


Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

 

Free Audiobook: Ralph Waldo Emerson Self Reliance

Spiritual Reflection, April 18, 2015, John Paul II, Encyclical Letter “Dives in Misericordia” on Divine Mercy


Spiritual Reflection

John Paul II, Encyclical Letter “Dives in Misericordia” on Divine Mercy

The concept of “mercy” in the Old Testament has a long and rich history. We have to refer back to it in order that the mercy revealed by Christ may shine forth more clearly. By revealing that mercy both through His actions and through His teaching, Christ addressed Himself to people who not only knew the concept of mercy, but who also, as the People of God of the Old Covenant, had drawn from their age – long history a special experience of the mercy of God. This experience was social and communal, as well as individual and interior. […]

The truth, revealed in Christ, about God the “Father of mercies,” enables us to “see” Him as particularly close to man especially when man is suffering, when he is under threat at the very heart of his existence and dignity. And this is why, in the situation of the Church and the world today, many individuals and groups guided by a lively sense of faith are turning, I would say almost spontaneously, to the mercy of God. They are certainly being moved to do this by Christ Himself, who through His Spirit works within human hearts. […]

In fact, revelation and faith teach us not only to meditate in the abstract upon the mystery of God as “Father of mercies,” but also to have recourse to that mercy in the name of Christ and in union with Him.

address at a UN Conference on the theme: “The Persecution of Christians Globally: A Threat to International Peace and Security”, Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Representative of the Holy See to the United Nations


2015-04-18 Vatican Radio


In an address at a UN Conference on the theme: “The Persecution of Christians Globally: A Threat to International Peace and Security”, Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Representative of the Holy See to the United Nations, urged the international community to act in protecting Christians and religious minorities in the Middle East.

The following is the text of Archbishop Auza’s address:

United Nations, New York, 17 April 2015


Your Excellencies, Distinguished Panelists,

Friends, Ladies and Gentlemen:

Before the tens of thousands who came to St. Peter’s Square to listen to his Easter Message to the City of Rome and to the World last April 6, Pope Francis vigorously appealed to raise up “intense prayer” and “tangible help” for the Christians throughout the world, “who are being persecuted, exiled, killed, and decapitated for the sole reason that they are Christians.”

“They are our martyrs of today,” he continued, and “they are more numerous than in the early Christian centuries.”

The Pope prayed that “the international community will not remain mute and unmoved before such an unacceptable crime” — which he called “a worrisome deviation from the most basic human rights” — and articulated his sincere hope “that the international community does not turn a blind eye” to the situation.

Today in this setting where the deliberations of the international community take place, we come with both of our eyes wide open. And as we consider in depth the details of the persecution of Christians across the globe, it’s going to be very difficult to keep our eyes dry.

In Iraq and Syria, in Nigeria and Libya, in Kenya and in regions of the Asian subcontinent, the earth has been getting literally soaked with blood. We have seen barbaric images of Coptic Christians beheaded in Libya; churches filled with people blown up during liturgical celebrations in Iraq, Nigeria and Pakistan; ancient Christian communities driven out of their homes on the biblical Plain of Nineveh; Christian students executed in Kenya…

Even as we speak, thousands across the world are being persecuted, deprived of their fundamental human rights, discriminated against and killed simply because they are believers.

We know that these attacks against people of faith do not happen just to Christians. Less than a month ago, hundreds of Muslim worshippers were killed or wounded when suicide bombers allied with the so-called Islamic State attacked the two Mosques in which they were worshipping in Yemen. Muslim minorities elsewhere have also been attacked by extremists who claim to be Muslims themselves.

Ethnic minorities have been targeted as well. During a UN Security Council debate on the victims of attacks and abuses on ethnic and religious grounds in the Middle East, which was held March 27, Iraqi Yazidi congresswoman Vian Dakhil, with tears in her eyes, told the world: “We are being slaughtered, our girls are being sold, our children are being taken.”

Nevertheless, the fact is, in many parts of the world, Christians have been specifically targeted. As a 2014 Pew Research Center report on religious hostilities across the world documented, brutal attacks on people of faith happen to Christians more than to any other religious group. Between 2006 and 2012, Christians were targeted through harassment, persecution or martyrdom in 151 out of 193 Members States of the United Nations. This points to a collective failure of this international organization, whose primary objective is to spare peoples and nations from the scourge of violence and unjust aggressions.

His Excellency the UN Secretary-General Mr. Ban Ki Moon has repeatedly condemned “in the strongest terms all persecution and violations of the rights to life and physical integrity of individuals and communities based on religious, ethnic, national, racial or other grounds.” His presentation of the situation in the Middle East during the March Security Council briefing was very sobering: The so-called “Islamic State” (ISIL/ISIS) or Da’esh has been systematically killing ethnic and religious minorities and those who disagreed with its warped interpretation of Islam. He said that in Iraq, information strongly suggested that Da’esh had perpetrated genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, and that minorities had been victims of that violence. Syria has seen an exceptional rise in those atrocities. In Libya, Da’esh-affiliated groups were targeting minorities and attacking religious sights.

Pope Francis has expressed several times his “great pain to know that Christians in the world submit to the greatest amount of such discrimination.” He said, “This is happening more than 1700 years after the edict of Constantine, which gave Christians the freedom to publicly profess their faith.” He added, “This is not a fantasy; the numbers tell us.” Between 100 and 150 million Christians are persecuted in the world today.

According to the Religious Freedom in the World Report 2014 – which covers the period from October 2012 to June 2014 –acts of religious persecution are not only widespread, but also on the increase. In almost every country, the change in the status and condition of religious minorities has been for the worse. Religious persecution is alarmingly high, or high, or worrisome in 116 countries, or in 59% of all the countries in the world. In brief, global religious freedom has entered a period of serious decline in the last three years.

In the Middle East in particular, Christians have been specifically targeted, killed or forced to flee from their homes and countries. Only 25 years ago, there were nearly two million Christians living in Iraq; the most recent estimates are less than a quarter of this figure. Faced with the unbearable situation of living in a conflict zone controlled by terrorist and extremist organizations who constantly threaten them with death, and with a deep sense of feeling abandoned, they have been forced to flee their homes.

The disappearance of these communities from the Middle East would not only be a religious tragedy, but a loss of a rich cultural-religious patrimony that has contributed so much to the societies to which they belong. For 2,000 years, Christians have called the Middle East home; indeed, as we all know, the Middle East is the cradle of Christianity. Thus, it is painful and unfathomable that these ancient Christian communities in the region — especially those who still speak Aramaic, the language of Jesus Christ — are among those threatened with extinction.

Pope Francis has repeatedly stated that we cannot resign ourselves to thinking of the Middle East without Christians. Their uninterrupted existence in the region is testimony of many centuries of coexistence, side by side with Muslims and other religious and ethnic communities. The whole world has a great interest in preserving that coexistence and we must all join to prevent the expulsion of Christians before it’s too late.

Last month in Geneva, before the UN Human Rights Council, 65 nations signed a statement drafted by Lebanon, Russia and the Holy See supporting the human rights of Christians and other communities, particularly in the Middle East. It was the first time there has been explicit mention of the category of Christians before the Human Rights Council.

That statement called attention to the fact that “the existence of many religious communities is seriously threatened” with Christians “now especially affected.” It called on all States to join together and address this alarming situation by building together a culture of peaceful coexistence, recognizing religious and ethnic pluralism as an enrichment to the globalized world, and reaffirming their commitment to “respect the rights of everyone, in particular the right to freedom of religion, which is enshrined in the fundamental international human rights instruments.”

Is it now too late to act? When we call to mind those who have already lost their lives, any action would come too late. But any action to spare even just one from persecution and from all forms of atrocities will not only be timely, but most urgent. The fate of those persecuted urges us to do all that we can to prevent further victims of attacks and abuses. Christians and other religious minorities of the Middle East and elsewhere plead for action, not in some abstract form, but in a manner that is truly conscious of their pain and suffering and their existential fear for their survival.

I am grateful for your presence this afternoon. Your presence is already an act of solidarity with the persecuted Christians all over the globe. They are counting on us and praying for ever greater efforts on our part to spare them from protracted persecution. Their very own survival could depend on our acts of solidarity. We pray that we may be able together to open the eyes of the world to what is going, and help them not to take their focus off of the plight of persecuted Christians until their lives are secure, their dignity is defended, and their rights protected.

Thank you very much for your presence here this afternoon.

(from Vatican Radio)

 
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MOST READ STORIES, HIGH-PROFILE ROME EXORCIST: ‘ISIS IS SATAN’


MOST READ STORIES - ISIS IS SATAN

MOST READ STORIES – ISIS IS SATAN (CLICK TO ACCESS THE ARTICLE AT CN)


RELATED ARTICLE:

POEMS WITH A VOICE, The Lion poem , (‘…Fixing its eye on the rain…’), by Pablo Neruda ( from the volume “Selected poems”)


The Lion poem by Pablo Neruda ( from the volume “Selected poems”)

A great lion came from the distances.
It was huge as silence is,
it was thirsty, it was after blood,
and behind its posturing
it had fire, as a house has,
it burned like a mountain of Osorno.

It found only solitude,
it roared, out of uncertainty and hunger –
the only thing to eat was air,
the wild foam of the coast,
frozen sea lettuces,
air the colour of birds,
unacceptable nourishment.

Wistful lion from another planet,
cast up by the high tide
on the rocky coast of Isla Negra,
the salty archipelago,
with nothing more than an empty maw,
claws that were idle
and a tail like a feather duster.

It was well aware of the foolishness
of its aggressive appearance
and with the passing of years
it wrinkled up in shame.
Its timidity led it on
to worse displays of arrogance
and it went on aging like one
of the lions in the Plaza,
it slowly turned into an ornament
for a portico or a garden,
to the point of hiding its sad forehead,
fixing its eyes on the rain
and keeping still to wait for
the grey justice of stone,
its geological hour.


****The Lion poem by Pablo Neruda ( from the volume “Selected poems”)

 

Fifty Five – (‘Languor is upon your heart and the slumber is still on your eyes…’), Rabindranath Tagore, Gitanjali (from Collection of Indian Poems)


55
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Languor is upon your heart and the slumber is still on your eyes.
Has not the word come to you that the flower is reigning in splendour among thorns? Wake, oh awaken! Let not the time pass in vain!
At the end of the stony path, in the country of virgin solitude my friend is sitting all alone. Deceive him not. Wake, oh awaken!
What if the sky pants and trembles with the heat of the midday sun—what if the burning sand spreads its mantle of thirst—
Is there no joy in the deep of your heart? At every footfall of yours, will not the harp of the road break out in sweet music of pain?

***Rabindranath Tagore, Gitanjali (from Collection of Indian Poems)

quotation:, Argument, as usually managed, is the worst sort of conversation., Jonathan Swift


Argument, as usually managed, is the worst sort of conversation.

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) Discuss

Fifty Three-(‘Beautiful is thy wristlet,…’), Rabindranath Tagore, Gitanjali (from Collection of Indian Poems)


53
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Beautiful is thy wristlet, decked with stars and cunningly wrought in myriad-coloured jewels. But more beautiful to me thy sword with its curve of lightning like the outspread wings of the divine bird of Vishnu, perfectly poised in the angry red light of the sunset.
It quivers like the one last response of life in ecstasy of pain at the final stroke of death; it shines like the pure flame of being burning up earthly sense with one fierce flash.
Beautiful is thy wristlet, decked with starry gems; but thy sword, O lord of thunder, is wrought with uttermost beauty, terrible to behold or to think of.

Rabindranath Tagore, Gitanjali
(from Collection of Indian Poems)

Lazybones by Pablo Neruda (Selected Poems) (‘They will continue wandering,…I have no wish to change my planet…’)


Lazybones by Pablo Neruda

They will continue wandering,
these things of steel among the stars,
and weary men will still go up
to brutalize the placid moon.
There, they will found their pharmacies.

In this time of the swollen grape,
the wine begins to come to life
between the sea and the mountain ranges.

In Chile now, cherries are dancing,
the dark mysterious girls are singing,
and in guitars, water is shining.
The sun is touching every door
and making wonder of the wheat.

The first wine is pink in colour,
is sweet with the sweetness of a child,
the second wine is able-bodied,
strong like the voice of a sailor,
the third wine is a topaz, is
a poppy and a fire in one.

My house has both the sea and the earth,
my woman has great eyes
the colour of wild hazelnut,
when night comes down, the sea
puts on a dress of white and green,
and later the moon in the spindrift foam
dreams like a sea-green girl.

I have no wish to change my planet.

[A.R.]
379

quotation: Always desire to learn something useful. Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC)


Always desire to learn something useful.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

†Rome, Italy, Apr 15, 2015 / 02:25 am (CNA)†


Crucifix. Credit: Bluekdesign via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

High-profile Rome exorcist: ‘ISIS is Satan’ Crucifix. Credit: Bluekdesign via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0).

In a recent Facebook post, well-known Roman exorcist Father Gabriele Amorth said the Islamic State (ISIS) “is Satan,” and he also questioned the lack of response from Western nations.

“ISIS is Satan. Things first happen in the spiritual realms, then they are made concrete on this earth,” he said in an April 8 post on the social media website.

Father Amorth continued, “there are only two spiritual realms: The Holy Spirit and the demonic spirit.”

He said the demonic enters in “because evil is disguised in various ways: political, religious, cultural, and it has one source of inspiration: the devil. As a Christian I fight the beast spiritually.”

“The political world, which today seems to lack a response in face of the massacre of Christians, will also have to fight ISIS and it will do it in a different way. If it advances as it seems to be doing, we ask ourselves what has the West done over the course of the last decades.”

The priest, who founded the International Association of Exorcists, explained that Satan “keeps saying that the world is in his power, and what he says is true. Biblically speaking we are in the last days and the beast is working furiously.”

ISIS took control of the largest Christian city in Iraq, Qaraqosh, in August last year, causing tens of thousands of people to flee.

The terrorist group has persecuted and murdered Christians and other religious minorities in parts of Syria and Iraq.

Fr. Amorth, age 90, has performed over 70,000 exorcisms during the past 29 years. The number is so high because carrying out an exorcism can require multiple sessions and each time the rite is administered it is counted as one instance.

Fr. Amorth has previously spoken about the danger posed by people no longer believing in the devil, as well as a shortage of exorcists.
 

Tags: Exorcism, ISIS, Satan

quotation: ‘…Any coward can fight a battle when he’s sure of winning, but…’ George Eliot


Any coward can fight a battle when he’s sure of winning, but give me the man who has pluck to fight when he’s sure of losing.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: “Look now how mortals are blaming the gods,…”) Homer (900 BC-800 BC)


Look now how mortals are blaming the gods, for they say that evils come from us, but in fact they themselves have woes beyond their share because of their own follies.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC) Discuss

Pope recalls slaughter of Armenians in ‘first genocide of the 20th century’ (““Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it!”):: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


by Elise Harris

by Elise Harris

.- Pope Francis today referred to the mass killing of Armenians by the Ottoman Turks in 1915 as a “genocide,” prompting the Turkish government to summon the Vatican’s ambassador for questioning.

“In the past century our human family has lived through three massive and unprecedented tragedies. The first, which is widely considered ‘the first genocide of the twentieth century,’ struck your own Armenian people, the first Christian nation,” the Pope said April 12.

Francis’ reference to the genocide was taken from a common declaration signed by both Pope Saint John Paull II and Supreme Armenian Patriarch Karekin II in 2001.

His comments took place before celebrating Mass on Divine Mercy Sunday, which is a feast instituted by St. John Paul II and is celebrated on the Second Sunday of the Church’s liturgical Easter season.

Francis offered the Mass for faithful of the Armenian rite in commemoration of the centenary of the “Metz Yeghern,” or Armenian “martyrdom.” April 24 is recognized in Armenia as the official date honoring the start of the event.

Many faithful and members of the Armenian rite were present for Sunday’s Mass, including Armenian president Serz Azati Sargsyan, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of all Armenians Karekin II, Catholicos Aram I and Patriarch Nerses Bedros XIX.

The Pope has kept strong ties with the Armenian community since his time as archbishop of Buenos Aires, and a group of Argentinian Armenians were among those gathered for the Mass.

During the Mass Francis also proclaimed Armenian-rite Saint Gregory of Narek a Doctor of the Church, making the 10th century priest, monk, mystic, and poet the first Armenian to receive the title.

Widely referred to as a genocide, the mass killings took place in 1915-1916 when the Ottoman Empire systematically exterminated its historic minority Armenian population who called Turkey their homeland, most of whom were Christians. Roughly 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives.

Reports have circulated saying that the Turkish government summoned the Vatican’s papal nuncio, Archbishop Antonio Lucibello, for questioning after the Pope’s genocide comment.

When CNA phoned the Turkish embassy to the Holy See they declined to comment, however the apostolic nunciature in Ankara responded by saying that the nuncio had in fact been called.

After Francis made his comments, the Turkish Foreign Ministry released a statement expressing their “great disappointment and sadness” at the Pope’s remarks. They said the words signaled a loss of trust and contradicted his message of peace, the Associated Press reports.

The foreign ministry also held that Francis’ words were discriminatory, because he only mentioned the pain suffered by Christians, and not Muslims or any other religious group.

Turkey has repeatedly denied that the slaughter was a genocide, saying that the number of deaths was much smaller, and came as a result of conflict surrounding World War I. The country holds that many ethnic Turks also lost their lives in the event.

However, most non-Turkish scholars refer to the episode as a genocide. Argentina, Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, Russia and Uruguay are among the states that formally recognize the massacre as such.

In his greeting ahead of Sunday’s Mass, Pope Francis noted how “bishops and priests, religious, women and men, the elderly and even defenseless children and the infirm were murdered” in the 1915 massacre, which targeted Catholic and Orthodox Syrians, Assyrians, Chaldeans and Greeks.

Francis also called to mind other tragic events of the 20th century, including the violence perpetrated by Nazism and Stalinism, as well as other mass killings carried out in Cambodia, Rwanda, Burundi and Bosnia.

“It seems that humanity is incapable of putting a halt to the shedding of innocent blood (and) has refused to learn from its mistakes caused by the law of terror,” he said, noting that the enthusiasm to end such violence that came at the end of the Second World War seems to be “disappearing.”

By the “complicit silence of others who simply stand by,” the agenda of those who seek to eliminate others continues, the Pope said.

“Today too we are experiencing a sort of genocide created by general and collective indifference, by the complicit silence of Cain, who cries out: ‘What does it matter to me? Am I my brother’s keeper?’

It’s both necessary and a duty to honor the centenary of the “immense and senseless slaughter” the Armenians had to endure, Pope Francis said, because when memories fade evil can enter and make old wounds fester.

“Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it!” he said, and stressed that evil is never something that comes from God.

In a message given to the Armenian community after the celebration, Pope Francis said that to remember the event is not only the responsibility of Americans, but of the whole world, the Pope said, so that it can serve as a warning not to repeat similar “horrors” in the future.

He expressed his hope that Turkey and Armenia would work toward a greater reconciliation, and prayed that the Mass and proclamation of St. Gregory as a Doctor of the Church would be an occasion for all Christians to unite in prayer.

At the close of the Mass, Catholicos Karekin II spoke in English, saying that the Armenian genocide is “an unforgettable and undeniable fact of history.”

The genocide is deeply engrained into the consciousness of the Armenian people, the patriarch said, therefore “any attempt to erase it from history and from our common memory is doomed to fail.”

Karekin observed that according to international law a genocide is crime against humanity that closely intertwines condemnation, recognition and repatriation for the act, so therefore the Armenian cause is one of “justice.”

In the years after the genocide the Armenian Church has never forgotten “the continuous concern, assistance and solidarity of the Church of Rome toward Armenians,” he said.

The patriarch then expressed his “deep gratitude” to Pope Francis, praying that he would be strengthened in body and spirit so as to continue his ministry “with renewed dynamism and spiritual courage.”

Tags: Pope Francis, Divine Mercy, Armenian genocide

this pressed: Lakritz: The day the music died for ‘Je suis Charlie’ | Calgary Herald


The Calgary Flames celebrate their victory at the Scotiabank Saddledome in Calgary on Thursday, April 9, 2015.

Opinion

Valentina Lisitsa is entitled to her views and should not be censored, says Naomi Lakritz.

Calgary Flames’ head coach Bob Hartley celebrates with his players after a 3-1 victory over the Los Angeles Kings on Thursday, earning a trip to the playoffs for the first time since 2009. Reader says Flames’ status is a real mood-booster.

When you see the primitive prosthetic on which Terry took every third step, you’re not surprised it caused his stump to bleed, says Mark Sutcliffe.

If the assumption is that money belongs first to government, then there is less pressure for governments to justify the taxes taken and how the money is spent, says Mark Milke.

Six community agencies throughout the province will be the first to receive supplies of naloxone, including Calgary’s Safeworks needle exchange. Fentanyl was blamed for 120 deaths in Alberta last year alone.

 

Lakritz: The day the music died for ‘Je suis Charlie’

Naomi Lakritz, Calgary Herald More from Naomi Lakritz, Calgary Herald

Published on: April 11, 2015

Last Updated: April 11, 2015 3:01 AM MDT

Valentina Lisitsa is entitled to her views and should not be censored, says Naomi Lakritz.

Valentina Lisitsa is entitled to her views and should not be censored, says Naomi Lakritz.

Calgary Herald

It sure didn’t take long for Je Suis Charlie to bite the dust, did it? Three months ago, the West was ablaze with righteous indignation over the killings of the French journalists at Charlie Hebdo who had published cartoons of Muhammad.

Je ne suis pas Charlie anymore, to judge by the reaction to pianist Valentina Lisitsa’s tweets about the Russia-Ukraine civil war. Born in Ukraine, Lisitsa is an ethnic Russian. She has a different view of the conflict there, and her tweets about it prompted the Toronto Symphony Orchestra to cancel her performances.

This just goes to show how shallow and hypocritical “Je Suis Charlie” really was. The West is very happy to champion freedom of speech when that freedom is used to attack a cause that westerners aren’t necessarily cool with anyway, such as Islam: Prophet Muhammad isn’t supposed to be portrayed in any illustration? How dumb is that? Let’s poke a stick in Muslims’ eyes and declare it a noble act.

But when that same freedom of speech opposes a cause dear to western hearts, such as the proper side to be on in Ukraine’s conflict, then the speaker is punished. Je suis Charlie, but only when Charlie’s ox is not the one being gored.

TSO president Jeff Melanson said: “People were very offended over what (Lisitsa) was saying online starting in December, and that sort of crescendoed over the last three or four months. And when we reviewed the various tweets and asked Valentina to please explain the tweets and the content, unfortunately … we were left with no choice but to remove her from the program.”

On the contrary, the TSO had a choice — to respect Lisitsa’s freedom of speech. How can one support Ukraine’s fight for democracy, yet oppose the freedom of speech which would be a tenet of that democracy? You can’t have it both ways.

via Lakritz: The day the music died for ‘Je suis Charlie’ | Calgary Herald.

The Cross of Christ is not defeat: the Cross is love and mercy. (tweet by Pope Francis)Tweet by Pope Francis


NewsvaEnglish

The Cross of Christ is not defeat: the Cross is love and mercy. (tweet by Pope Francis) (click to access)

The Cross of Christ is not defeat: the Cross is love and mercy. (tweet by Pope Francis)

 

 

 

quotation: All virtue is summed up in dealing justly. Aristotle


All virtue is summed up in dealing justly.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) Discuss

quotation: None love the messenger who brings bad news. Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC)


I well believe it, to unwilling ears; None love the messenger who brings bad news.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

quotation: When writing about transcendental issues, be transcendentally clear. Rene Descartes


When writing about transcendental issues, be transcendentally clear.Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Discuss

Pablo Neruda – Always (…’I am not jealous of what came before me.’…)


Pablo Neruda – Always

I am not jealous
of what came before me.
Come with a man
on your shoulders,
come with a hundred men in your hair,
come with a thousand men between your breasts and your feet,
come like a river
full of drowned men
which flows down to the wild sea,
to the eternal surf, to Time!

Bring them all
to where I am waiting for you;
we shall always be alone,
we shall always be you and I
alone on earth
to start our life!
********************************************

forever poems: HOUSE Poem by Pablo Neruda (…’and stone I was, stone shall be, and for this caress this stone which has not died for me’…)


House Poem by Pablo Neruda

Perhaps this is the house in which I lived
when neither I, nor earth, existed,
 when everything was moon, or stone, or shadow,
 with the still light unborn.
This stone could then have been
 my house, my windows, or my eyes.
This granite rose recalls
 something that lived in me, or I in it,
a cave, a universe of dreams inside the skull:
 cup or castle, boat or birth.
I touch the rock’s tenacious thrust,
its bulwark pounded in the brine
and I know that flaws of mine subsisted here,
wrinkled substances that surfaced
from the depths into my soul,
and stone I was, stone shall be, and for this
caress this stone which has not died for me:
it’s what I was, and shall be – the tranquility
of struggle stretched beyond the brink of time.

quotation: Virginia Woolf


One likes people much better when they’re battered down by a prodigious siege of misfortune than when they triumph.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) Discuss

quotation: In her face excuse Came prologue, and apology too prompt. John Milton


In her face excuse

Came prologue, and apology too prompt.

John Milton (1608-1674) Discuss

quotation: If man had created man, he would be ashamed of his performance. Mark Twain


If man had created man, he would be ashamed of his performance.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

quotation: Elegance is inferior to virtue. Mary Shelley


Elegance is inferior to virtue.

Mary Shelley (1797-1851) Discuss

today’s birthday: Thomas Hobbes (1588)


Thomas Hobbes (1588)

Thomas Hobbes was an English philosopher and political theorist whose famous 1651 book Leviathan profoundly affected political-legal theory in general and influenced the early formation of US law in particular.

In Leviathan, Hobbes argues that man is by nature a selfishly individualistic animal and advocates absolutist government as the only means of securing civil society. A lack of such authority, he postulated, would lead to bellum omnium contra omnes, which means what? More… Discuss

† Streamed live on April 5, 2015: Easter Mass – 2015.04.05 †Cristos a Inviat†


Easter Mass – 2015.04.05