Tag Archives: aaron copland

Aaron Copland: 4 Dance Episodes from “Rodeo” – III. Saturday Night Waltz


Aaron Copland: 4 Dance Episodes from “Rodeo” – III. Saturday Night Waltz

make music part of your life series: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy String Quartet No. 6 in F minor, Op. 80


Historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 (Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik)


Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

Wilhelm Kempff, piano
Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik

Movements:

Allegro affettuoso (A minor) 00:00:00
Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major) 00:15:43
Allegro vivace (A major) 00:21:27
*****************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54, is a Romantic concerto by Robert Schumann, completed in 1845. The work premiered in Leipzig on 1 January 1846 with Clara Schumann playing the solo part. Ferdinand Hiller, the work’s dedicatee, conducted.

History

Schumann had earlier worked on several piano concerti: he began one in E-flat major in 1828, from 1829–31 he worked on one in F major, and in 1839, he wrote one movement of a concerto in D minor. None of these works were completed.

In 1841, Schumann wrote a fantasy for piano and orchestra, his Phantasie. His pianist wife Clara urged him to expand this piece into a full piano concerto. In 1845 he added the intermezzo and finale to complete the work. It was the only piano concerto that Schumann completed.

The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg’s concerto, like Schumann’s, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano’s entrance with a similar descending flourish. Rachmaninov also used the work as a model for his first Piano Concerto.

After this concerto, Schumann wrote two other pieces for piano and orchestra: the Introduction and Allegro Appassionato in G major (Op. 92), and the Introduction and Allegro Concertante in D minor (Op. 134).

Instrumentation

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, strings, and solo piano.

Structure

The piece, as marked in the score, is in three movements:

  1. Allegro affettuoso (A minor)

  2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major)

  3. Allegro vivace (A major)

There is no break between these last two movements (attacca subito).

Schumann preferred that the movements be listed in concert programs as only two movements:[citation needed]

  1. Allegro affettuoso
  2. Andantino and Rondo

The three movement listing is the more common form used.

Allegro affettuoso

The piece starts with an energetic strike by strings and timpani, followed by a fierce, descending attack by the piano. The first theme is introduced by the oboe along with wind instruments. The theme is then given to the soloist. Schumann provides great variety with this theme. He first offers it in the A minor key of the piece, then we hear it again in major, and we can also hear small snatches of the tune in a very slow, A flat section. The clarinet is often used against the piano in this movement. Toward the end of the movement, the piano launches into a long cadenza before the orchestra joins in with one more melody and builds for the exciting finish.

Intermezzo

This movement is keyed in F major. The piano and strings open up the piece with a small, delicate tune, which is heard throughout the movement before the cellos and later the other strings finally take the main theme, with the piano mainly used as accompaniment. The movement closes with small glimpses of the first movement’s theme before moving straight into the third movement.

Allegro vivace

The movement opens with a huge run up the strings while the piano takes the main, A major theme. Schumann shows great color and variety in this movement. The tune is regal, and the strings are noble. Though it is in 3/4 timing, Schumann manipulates it so that the time signature is often ambiguous. The piece finishes with a restating of the previous material before finally launching into an exciting finale, and ending with a long timpani roll and a huge chord from the orchestra.

Further reading

 

Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Beethoven piano sonata no. 18, op. 31, in E flat major, Piano: Wilhelm Kempff , great compositions/performances


Beethoven piano sonata no. 18 op. 31 in E flat major

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN, great compositions/performances


BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN

AARON COPLAND: APPALACHIAN SPRING: Great compositions/performances


AARON COPLAND: APPALACHIAN SPRING

Aaron Copland- Quiet City (Wynton Marsalis): great compositions/performances


Aaron Copland- Quiet City (Wynton Marsalis)

Alicia de Larrocha plays ENRIQUE GRANADOS – Danzas Españolas: make music par of your life series


ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas

Goyescas: 3. Fandango By Candle Light: make music part of your life series


Goyescas: 3. Fandango By Candle Light

WEBER Clarinet Concerto No.2 – B.Goodman, J.Martinon, 1967 *vinyl remaster* [HD]: great compositions/performances



From:   Emilio Pessina

WEBER Clarinet Concerto No.2B.Goodman, J.Martinon, 1967 *vinyl remaster* [HD]

Cropped screenshot of Benny Goodman from the f...

Cropped screenshot of Benny Goodman from the film Stage Door Canteen. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Carl Maria von WEBER: Clarinet Concerto No.2 in E flat major, J.118 / Op.74 (1811)
0:04 / I. Allegro [8’38”]
8:48 / II. Andante con moto [6’42”]
15:39 / III. Alla polacca [6’46”]
Benny Goodman, clarinet
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Jean Martinon, conductor
(rec: 1967 – RCA SAR22043 26.41149 (p)1968)
transfer / remaster: Emilio Pessina, 2013
_______________________________________
Benny GOODMAN plays classical:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…
_______________________________________
(c) COPYRIGHT Disclaimer, Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976. Allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Aaron Copland. The Red Pony. Dream March and Circus Music. New Philharmonia (make music part of your life series)


Aaron Copland. The Red Pony. Dream March and Circus Music. New Philharmonia

Dream march and circus music from: “The Red Pony” – Suite from the film by the american composer Aaron Copland (1900-1990) performed by the New Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer.

make music part of your life series: Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.


[youtube.com/watch?v=t67SdkYubs4]

Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.

 

Make Music Part of Your Life -Series: Nikolaj Rimski-Korsakov – Symphony No.1 in E minor, Op. 1


Nikolaj Rimski-KorsakovSymphony No.1 in E minor, Op. 1

Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra

 

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FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: 2013-03-10 Detroit Symphony Civic Philharmonic Orchestra – Civic Family Experience II



0:00 An Outdoor OvertureAaron Copland
10:02 Bloom – Steven Bryant; 
19:08 – Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op.43, Finale – Jean Sibelius.

Music performed by the Detroit Symphony Civic Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Kenneth Thompson, at the Max M. Fisher Music Center in Detroit, Michigan, on March 10, 2013.

 

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COPLAND SUITE APPALACHIAN SPRING (RAFFI ARMENIAN)



AARON COPLAND
SUITE APPALACHIAN SPRING
STRATTFORD ENSEMBLE
(ONTARIO,CANADA)
DIR-RAFFI ARMENIAN

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Appalachian Spring is a composition by Aaron Copland that premiered in 1944 and has achieved widespread and enduring popularity as an orchestral suite. The ballet, scored for a thirteen-member chamber orchestra, was created upon commission of choreographer and dancer Martha Graham with funds from the Coolidge Foundation; it premiered on Monday, October 30, 1944, at the Library of Congress in Washington DC, withMartha Graham (1894-1991) dancing the lead role. The set was designed by the Japanese American sculptor Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988). Copland was awarded the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for Music for his achievement.[1][2]

O Appalachian Spring! I gained the ledge;
Steep, inaccessible smile that eastward bends
And northward reaches in that violet wedge
Of Adirondacks!

The orchestral suite is divided into eight sections. Copland describes each scene thus:

  1. Very slowly. Introduction of the characters, one by one, in a suffused light.
  2. Fast/Allegro. Sudden burst of unison strings in A major arpeggios starts the action. A sentiment both elated and religious gives the keynote to this scene.
  3. Moderate/Moderato. Duo for the Bride and her Intended – scene of tenderness and passion.
  4. Quite fast. The Revivalist and his flock. Folksy feeling – suggestions of square dances and country fiddlers.
  5. Still faster/Subito Allegro. Solo dance of the Bride – presentiment of motherhood. Extremes of joy and fear and wonder.
  6. Very slowly (as at first). Transition scene to music reminiscent of the introduction.
  7. Calm and flowing/Doppio Movimento. Scenes of daily activity for the Bride and her Farmer husband. There are five variations on a Shakertheme. The theme, sung by a solo clarinet, was taken from a collection of Shaker melodies compiled by Edward D. Andrews, and published under the title “The Gift to Be Simple.” The melody borrowed and used almost literally is called “Simple Gifts.”
  8. Moderate. Coda/Moderato – Coda. The Bride takes her place among her neighbors. At the end the couple are left “quiet and strong in their new house.” Muted strings intone a hushed prayerlike chorale passage. The close is reminiscent of the opening music.

 

Copland’s ‘Appalachian Spring’, conducted by Geoffrey Moull



Geoffrey Moull conducts members of the CBC Radio Orchestra in a live performance of Aaron Copland’sAppalachian Spring‘ (the original chamber orchestra version for 13 instruments composed in 1944); photo-collage created by Monika Starke-Moull. This radio recording is not commercially available.

 

The Tender Land Suite (part 1)



Marrowstone Concert Orchestra 2012 performs The Tender Land: Orchestral Suite (Aaron Copland)
I. Introduction and Love Music

Aaron Copland – The Promise of Living


Aaron Copland – The Promise of Living