Tag Archives: Advent

today’s holiday: Advent


Advent

The Advent season marks the beginning of the Christian year in Western Christianity. Its length varies from 22 to 28 days, beginning on the Sunday nearest St. Andrew’s Day and encompassing the next three Sundays, ending on Christmas Eve. Originally a period of reflection and penitence in preparation for Christmas, Advent has sometimes been referred to as the Winter Lent. Today, it is usually associated with the Advent calendars that parents give their children to help them count the days until Christmas. In Orthodox (Eastern) Christianity, Advent begins on November 15. More… Discuss

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The Eucharist teaches us to care for the weakest of society, Pope Francis says :: Catholic News (The Eucharist is a “school of charity and solidarity,” the Pope said. “Whoever is nourished by the Bread of Christ cannot remain indifferent to those who do not have bread daily.”)Agency (CNA)


Vatican City, Jun 7, 2015 / 08:29 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his Angelus address on Sunday, Pope Francis focused on the recent feast of Corpus Christi, saying the Eucharist is a “school of solidarity and charity,” which inspires us to care for the most vulnerable.

This feast, the Roman Pontiff said June 7 at St. Peter’s Square in the Vatican, “evokes this message of solidarity, and pushes us to welcome the intimate invitation to conversion and to service, to love and to forgiveness.”

In our daily lives, we encounter Christ, who nourishes us in the Eucharist, in the poor, the suffering, our brothers, and “in every human being, even the smallest and most defenseless.”

The roman Pontiff reflected on the feast’s Gospel, which recounts the institution of the Eucharist during Christ’s Last Supper before his crucifixion.

That night, Christ said that whoever eats his flesh and drinks his blood will “remain in me and I in him,” and will have eternal life.

“With this gesture and with these words, he gives bread a function that is no longer simply physical nourishment, but that which makes present his Person amid the community of believers.”

The Pope added that the Last Supper marks the end of Christ’s life, looking ahead to his death on the Cross, but also to the synthesis of “a life offered for the salvation of humanity.”

For this reason, it is not enough to affirm Christ’s presence in the Eucharist, the Pope said, but recognize it as “the presence of a life given, and take part.”

By receiving Christ in the Eucharist, taking part in his life and entering into communion with him, we in turn are called to promote unity among ourselves, transforming “our life into a gift,” especially to a poor.

The Eucharist is a “school of charity and solidarity,” the Pope said. “Whoever is nourished by the Bread of Christ cannot remain indifferent to those who do not have bread daily.”

Despite efforts by the international community, this is an increasing problem, and requires proposals to resolve its causes, he said.

The Pope concluded his address by invoking the intercession of Mary, that she may “awaken in everyone the joy in participating in the Mass, especially on Sunday, and the joyful courage to give witness to the charity of Christ.”

After leading the crowds in the recitation of the Angelus, Pope Francis spoke of his apostolic visit to Sarajevo the previous day.

Once described as the “Jerusalem of the West” owing to the coexistence of various peoples and religious, the recent past has made it into a “symbol of destruction and war,” he said.

Acknowledging the efforts toward reconciliation, Pope Francis encouraged “this journey toward of peaceful coexistence between diverse peoples; a hard, difficult, yet possible journey!”

Pope Francis’ visit on Saturday marked the twentieth anniversary of the signing of the signing of the Dayton Agreement which brought an end to the Bosnian War.

After the breakup of Yugoslavia, some 100,000 combatants and civilians were killed and a million more displaced during the war, which lasted between 1992-1995. The fighting split largely along ethnic lines, among the predominantly Orthodox Serbs, the predominantly Catholic Croats, and the predominantly Muslim Bosniaks.

“May the Lord bless Sarajevo, Bosnia, and Herzegovina.”

Tags: Corpus Christi

via The Eucharist teaches us to care for the weakest of society, Pope Francis says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

today’s holiday: St. Lucy’s Day


St. Lucy’s Day

According to tradition, St. Lucy, or Santa Lucia, was born in Syracuse, Sicily, in the 3rd or 4th century. Her day is widely celebrated in Sweden as Luciadagen, which marks the official beginning of the Christmas season. It is traditional to observe Luciadagen by dressing the oldest daughter in the family in a white robe tied with a crimson sash. Candles are set into her crown, which is covered with lingonberry leaves. The “Lucia Bride” wakes each member of the household on the morning of December 13 with a tray of coffee and special saffron buns or ginger cookies. More… Discuss

More Saints of the Day

word: sumptuous


sumptuous 

Definition: (adjective) Of a size or splendor suggesting great expense; lavish.
Synonyms: deluxe, opulent, princely, luxurious
Usage: The sumptuous homes of the wealthy were full of gilding and ornament. Discuss.

Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Sleepers Awake, BWV 645); Rodney Gehrke, organ:, Make music part of your life series


Saint of the Day for Sunday, November 30th, 2014 Image of St. Andrew: Patron Saint of Romania


Image of St. Andrew

St. Andrew

Andrew, like his brother Simon Peter, was a fisherman. He became a disciple of the great St. John the Baptist, but when John pointed to Jesus and said, “Behold the Lamb of God!” Andrew understood … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Saint Andrew in Romania

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Church of Saint Andrew in Ion Corvin, Constanța (completed 2002)

Church of Saint Andrew in Ion Corvin, Constanța (completed 2002)

The story of Saint Andrew in Romania tells that today’s territory of Romania was Christianized by Saint Andrew in the 1st century AD. These claims are backed by some historians and by several Christian artifacts discovered and dated to the third century BC.[1][2]

The story is based on references by 3rd century writer Hippolytus of Rome in “On Apostles”, mentioning Saint Andrew’s voyage to Scythia and on works by several authors which also mention the voyage, such as: Eusebius in the Chronicles of Eusebius,[3] Origen in the third book of his Commentaries on the Genesis (254 C.E.), Usaard in his Martyrdom written between 845-865, and Jacobus de Voragine in the Golden Legend (c. 1260). Scythia generally refers to a land in what is now Romania (Scythia Minor), Ukraine and southern Russia.

The Story

Historian Alexandru Barnea states that a tale started to circulate in the first half of the 20th century.[4] It tells of Saint Andrew’s arrival in Dobruja during a harsh winter, fighting wild beasts and the blizzard before reaching a cave. At the cave, Saint Andrew hit the ground with his walking stick and a spring came in to being, in the waters of which he baptized the locals and cured the ill, thus converting the whole area to Christianity.[4] This tale seems to be heavily based on the Chronicles of Eusebius.

According to some modern Romanian scholars, the idea of early Christianisation is unsustainable. They take the idea to be a part of an ideology of protochronism which purports that the Orthodox Church has been a companion and defender of the Romanian people for its entire history, which was then used for propaganda purposes during the communist era.[5] However, other works indicate that communists did not use this idea for propaganda but rather acted strongly against religion, persecuting Christians and promoting atheism as the belief system.[6][7][8]

Romanian researcher, George Alexandrou,[9] maintains that St. Andrew spent 20 years in the territories of the Daco-Romans, preaching and teaching. During that period St. Andrew traveled around the Lower Danube territories and along the coast of the Black Sea, but mostly he stayed in and around his cave in Dobruja (located in the vicinity of the Ion Corvin village). St. Andrew’s cave is still kept as a holy place. Later, John Cassian (360-435), Dionysius Exiguus (470-574) and Joannes Maxentius (leader of the so-called Scythian Monks) lived in the same area, known as Scythia Minor or Dobruja, in South East Romania.[10]

Saint Andrew’s Cave

According to Hippolyte of Antioch, (died c. 250 C.E.) in his On Apostles, Origen, in the third book of his Commentaries on the Genesis (254 C.E.), Eusebius of Caesarea in his Church History (340 C.E.), and other sources, like the Usaard’s Martyrdom written between 845-865, and Jacobus de Voragine in Golden Legend (c. 1260), Saint Andrew preached in Scythia Minor. St. Philip may have also preached in the area.[11] There are toponyms and numerous very old traditions (like carols) related to Saint Andrew, many of them having probably a pre-Christian substratum.[12][13][14] In Dobruja, a cave where he supposedly preached, is called “Saint Andrew’s Cave” and advertised as a pilgrimage site.

According to Radu Cinpoes (Cimpoesh?), there is no clear evidence concerning missionary work on the part of St. Andrew near Dobruja.[15]

Patron saint of Romania

In 1994, Saint Andrew was named the patron saint of Dobruja (Rom. Dobrogea), in 1997 the patron saint of Romania, while in 2012, November 30 became a public holiday.[4]
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St. Andrew’s Eve

The eve of St. Andrew’s Day is a special night for young Polish girls who want to find husbands. They play Andrzejki, or “Andrew’s games,” a kind of fortune telling. They break off dry branches from cherry trees, place them in wet sand, and tend them carefully for the next few weeks. If the branch blooms by Christmas, it is believed that they will marry within the year. Pouring liquid wax into cold water is another popular method of foretelling their romantic futures. The shapes formed by the hardened wax often provide clues with which they can read their fate. More… Discuss