Tag Archives: Agatha Christie

quotation: Agatha Christie


I have learnt that I am me, that I can do the things that, as one might put it, me can do, but I cannot do the things that me would like to do.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

quotation: If one sticks too rigidly to one’s principles, one would hardly see anybody.Agatha Christie


If one sticks too rigidly to one’s principles, one would hardly see anybody.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

quotation: Agatha Christie


Most successes are unhappy. That’s why they are successes—they have to reassure themselves about themselves by achieving something that the world will notice.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

quotation: Very few of us are what we seem. Agatha Christie (audiobook_Evil Under the Sun Reading by David Suchet)


Very few of us are what we seem.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

 

You can select audiobooks to listen to, of movies available on YouTubeLet’s listen to the “Evil under the Sun”:

Evil Under The Sun Audiobook Full By Agatha Christie

quotation: “Evil is not something superhuman, it’s something less than human.”


Evil is not something superhuman, it’s something less than human.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

Quotation: “I saw a creature, naked, bestial, Who, squatting upon the ground, Held his heart in his hands, And ate of it.” – Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


Quotation of the Day

I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.”Stephen Crane (1871-1900) Discuss

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 

Formal portrait of Stephen Crane taken in Washington, D.C., about March 1896

Stephen Crane (November 1, 1871 – June 5, 1900) was an American author. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation.

The eighth surviving child of Protestant Methodist parents, Crane began writing at the age of four and had published several articles by the age of 16. Having little interest in university studies, he left college in 1891 to work as a reporter and writer. Crane’s first novel was the 1893 Bowery tale Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, generally considered by critics to be the first work of American literary Naturalism. He won international acclaim in 1895 for his Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage, which he wrote without having any battle experience.

In 1896, Crane endured a highly publicized scandal after appearing as a witness in the trial of a suspected prostitute, an acquaintance named Dora Clark. Late that year he accepted an offer to travel to Cuba as a war correspondent. As he waited in Jacksonville, Florida, for passage, he met Cora Taylor, the madam of a brothel, with whom he began a lasting relationship. En route to Cuba, Crane’s ship sank off the coast of Florida, leaving him and others adrift for several days in a dinghy. Crane described the ordeal in “The Open Boat“. During the final years of his life, he covered conflicts in Greece (accompanied by Cora, recognized as the first woman war correspondent) and later lived in England with her. He was befriended by writers such as Joseph Conrad and H. G. Wells. Plagued by financial difficulties and ill health, Crane died of tuberculosis in a Black Forest sanatorium in Germany at the age of 28.

At the time of his death, Crane was considered an important figure in American literature. After he was nearly forgotten for two decades, critics revived interest in his life and work. Crane’s writing is characterized by vivid intensity, distinctive dialects, and irony. Common themes involve fear, spiritual crises and social isolation. Although recognized primarily for The Red Badge of Courage, which has become an American classic, Crane is also known for his poetry, journalism, and short stories such as “The Open Boat”, “The Blue Hotel“, “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky“, and The Monster. His writing made a deep impression on 20th-century writers, most prominent among them Ernest Hemingway, and is thought to have inspired the Modernists and the Imagists.

Crane’s gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery

 

Battle of Chancellorsville by Kurz and Allison; Crane’s realistic portrayal of war has earned him recognition from numerous critics and scholars throughout the years

 

Top 10 French Songs Of All Time


Top 10 French Songs Of All Time

quotation: “…I live now on borrowed time, waiting in the anteroom for the summons that will inevitably come…”: Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss


I live now on borrowed time, waiting in the anteroom for the summons that will inevitably come. And then – I go on to the next thing, whatever it is. One doesn’t luckily have to bother about that.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

quotation: “There is nothing more thrilling in this world, I think, than having a child that is yours, …”: Agatha Christie


There is nothing more thrilling in this world, I think, than having a child that is yours, and yet is mysteriously a stranger.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) on Childhood memories are one’s character foundation


The popular idea that a child forgets easily is not an accurate one. Many people go right through life in the grip of an idea which has been impressed on them in very tender years.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

The way we’re raised is the way we are: Some find it out, some don’t! 

Quotation: Agatha Christie


Any woman can fool a man if she wants to and if he’s in love with her.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

Death on the Nile – Love theme by Nino Rota – Piano solo



 From the film Agatha Christie‘s “Death on the Nile” 1978 – Love theme – Piano solo: Enzo de Rosa
Original music by Nino Rota.
Recorded in Montreal, 20 sept. 2010 at concert “Egyptomania” organized by 
L’Institut d’Études Méditerranéennes de Montréal .

One of the best scores of all time and such a great photography and great egypt locations! this film is just one superlative!
sir peter ustinov, sir david niven, bette davis, mia farrow, george kennedy, jane birkin, jack warden

Agatha Christie: On the gray cells (or neurons, or what ever you care to call them)


“These little grey cells. It is up to them.”

(From The 1920 book The Mysterious Affair at Styles. It was the first book that introduced the character of Hercule Poirot.)
Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss
My take on this is another quotation:

Mens Sana In corpore ( “A sound mind in a sound body.”) It is derived from Satire X of the Roman poet Juvenal (10.356).

My phrase in relation to Agatha Christie’s grey cells, and Juvenal’s Satire X (10): “Remind your grey cell, that they reside in your body, remind your body that it has a brain and willpower.”