Tag Archives: Air conditioning

today’s birthday: Ransom E. Olds (1864)


Ransom E. Olds (1864)

Olds was a pioneer of the American automobile industry and the namesake of the Oldsmobile and Reo car brands. After developing an internal combustion engine and incorporating it into a car, he opened the Olds Gasoline Engine Works. In 1899, he moved to Detroit, formed the Olds Motor Works, and designed and produced the popular Oldsmobile. With its low price and stylish curved dashboard, it was the first car to be produced in quantity. When was the Oldsmobile brand discontinued? More… Discuss

Bach – Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, great compositions/performances


Gabriel Faure : Dolly Suite Op 5,: make music part of your life series


CROWD CONTROL AIRS MONDAYS at 9P.


Crowd Control: Rule Your World: Travel Tricks

Today’s Birthday: WILLIS HAVILAND CARRIER (1876)


Willis Haviland Carrier (1876)

While developing a dehumidifier for the Buffalo Forge Company in the early 1900s, American engineer Willis Carrier discovered that circulating air over cold pipes not only removes water from the air but also cools it. He became the father of air conditioning, holding over 80 patents and dominating air conditioner manufacturing with his company, Carrier Corporation. He invented a practical air conditioning system for skyscrapers in 1939. What did he call his invention when he patented it in 1906? More… Discuss

 

4 more dead from heat-related causes – Chicago Tribune


4 more dead from heat-related causes - Chicago Tribune

4 more dead from heat-related causes - Chicago Tribune

Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness

The best defense is prevention. Here are some prevention tips:

  • Photo of athlete drinking water.Drink more fluids (nonalcoholic), regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Warning: If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask him how much you should drink while the weather is hot.
     
  • Don’t drink liquids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar–these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.
     
  • Stay indoors and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library–even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local health department to see if there are any heat-relief shelters in your area.
     
  • Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, fans will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath, or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off.
     
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
     
  • NEVER leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle.
     
  • Although any one at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on:
     

    • Infants and young children
    • People aged 65 or older
    • People who have a mental illness
    • Those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure
       
  • Visit adults at risk at least twice a day and closely watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Infants and young children, of course, need much more frequent watching.

If you must be out in the heat:

  • Photo of woman relaxing in the shade.Limit your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours.
     
  • Cut down on exercise. If you must exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, nonalcoholic fluids each hour.  A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. Warning: If you are on a low-salt diet, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage. Remember the warning in the first “tip” (above), too.
     
  • Try to rest often in shady areas.
     
  • Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat (also keeps you cooler) and sunglasses and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher (the most effective products say “broad spectrum” or “UVA/UVB protection” on their labels).

This information provided by NCEH’s Health Studies Branch.

(Source: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/heattips.asp)