Tag Archives: Alabama

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


clock_fall_back_animatedToday In History. What Happened This Day In History

Today in History June 3

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

1098   Christian Crusaders of the First Crusade seize Antioch, Turkey.
1539   Hernando De Soto claims Florida for Spain.
1861   Union troops defeat Confederate forces at Philippi, in western Virginia
1864   Some 7,000 Union troops are killed within 30 minutes during the Battle of Cold Harbor in Virginia.
1888   The classic baseball poem “Casey at the Bat,” written by Ernest L. Thayer, is published in the San Francisco Examiner.
1918   The Finnish Parliament ratifies a treaty with Germany.
1923   In Italy, dictator Benito Mussolini grants women the right to vote.
1928   Manchurian warlord Chian Tso-Lin dies as a result of a bomb blast set off by the Japanese.
1938   The German Third Reich votes to confiscate so-called “degenerate art.”
1940   The German Luftwaffe hits Paris with 1,100 bombs.
1942   Japanese carrier-based planes strafe Dutch Harbor in the Aleutian Islands as a diversion of the attack on Midway Island.
1952   A rebellion by North Korean prisoners in the Koje prison camp in South Korea is put down by American troops.
1965   Astronaut Edward White becomes the first American to walk in space when he exits the Gemini 4 space capsule.
1969   74 American sailors died when the destroyer USS Frank E. Evans was cut in two by an Australian aircraft carrier in the South China Sea.
1974   Charles Colson, an aide to President Richard Nixon, pleads guilty to obstruction of justice.
1989   The Chinese government begins its crackdown on pro-democracy activists in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Hundreds are killed and thousands are arrested.
Born on June 3
1726   James Hutton, Scottish scientist, pioneer in the field of geology.
1804   Richard Cobden, English economist and politician.
1808   Jefferson Davis, President of Confederate States of America.
1904   Charles R. Drew, American physician, researcher of blood plasma.
1906   Josephine Baker, dancer and singer.
1922   Alain Resnais, French film director.
1926   Allen Ginsberg, American poet (Howl).
1936   Larry McMurtry, novelist (The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.OIqWuMus.dpuf

picture of the day: Happy Days Photographer Gertrude Kasebier



Happy Days

Photographer Gertrude Kasebier captures a portrait of her grandson, Charles O’Malley, surrounded by girls (holding wildflowers and a kitten) in Newport, Rhode Island in 1902.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.nmD6kn3u.dpuf

today’s holiday: Bridge Crossing Jubilee (2015)


Bridge Crossing Jubilee (2015)

This annual event in Selma, Alabama, commemorates “Bloody Sunday,” which occurred on March 7, 1965, when a group of about 525 African-American demonstrators gathered at Browns Chapel to demand the right to vote. Every year on the first weekend in March, the Bridge Crossing Jubilee commemorates both the bloody confrontation at the Pettus Bridge and the march from Selma to Montgomery that followed. Events include a parade, a Miss Jubilee Pageant, a mock trial, and a commemorative march to the bridge. Every five years, celebrants continue all the way to Montgomery. More… Discuss

Tuesday: Did you know?


Did you know?

Tuesday

Harper Lee to Publish Second Novel


Harper Lee to Publish Second Novel

Harper Lee has announced that she will publish her second novel in 2015, a sequel of sorts to her beloved, Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird. Lee completed the manuscript, titled Go Set a Watchman, in the 1950s, but her editor persuaded her to more fully explore the childhood of the book’s main character, Scout, which resulted in To Kill a Mockingbird—until now, her only novel. Lee, now 88, became reacquainted with the manuscript when her lawyer came upon it last year. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Spiridon Louis (1873)


Spiridon Louis (1873)

Following the decision to revive the Olympic Games at the end of the 19th century, all eyes were on Athens, where the first modern games were held in 1896. Greek competitor Spiridon Louis won the first marathon event of the games and instantly became a national hero. He was first across the finish despite having allegedly taken a break from the race to have a glass of wine at an inn. It helped that some of his competitors collapsed along the way. Why was the third-place finisher disqualified? More… Discuss

CRUX: 2014: The year in review in Catholicism


2014 snapshot

 

Gounod Charles, “Petite Symphonie”, Pour instruments à vent, Conductor : Ohan Duryan: make music part of your life series


Gounod Charles, “Petite Symphonie”, Pour instruments à vent, Conductor : Ohan Duryan

today’s birthday: James Agee (1909)


James Agee (1909)

Agee was an American novelist, screenwriter, journalist, poet, and film critic who wrote for several magazines, including Fortune, Time, and The Nation. His first major book, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, a commentary on the lives of Southern tenant farmers in the 1930s with accompanying photographs by Walker Evans, was a commercial flop at the time of its original publication but has won high praise over the years. Which book earned Agee a posthumous Pulitzer Prize? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Tellabration


Tellabration

A nationwide night of storytelling, Tellabration was started in 1988 by storyteller J. G. (“Paw-Paw”) Pinkerton. The event began with storytelling in six communities in Connecticut. The next year, Texas and Missouri also had Tellabrations, and, by 1991, storytelling on this night was happening in 72 communities in 27 states, as well as in locations in Bermuda and Canada. Eventually, the length of Tellabrations extended to a weekend. Proceeds of the event go toward developing the archives of Storytelling Foundation International in Jonesborough, Tennessee. More… Discuss

this pressed for your information: 2 Closed Alabama Abortion Clinics Reopen|Truh24.com


2 Closed Alabama Abortion Clinics Reopen

Alabama clinics reported performing 8,469 abortions in 2013, and 1,046 of those involved females from out of state, according to reports the clinics filed with the health department. The Tuscaloosa clinic, which is closest to Mississippi, is the state’s busiest, with 3,600 pregnancies terminated last year.

via 2 Closed Alabama Abortion Clinics Reopen. |Truth24.com

this pressed-for information: 12 states confirm Enterovirus D68 cases|CNN


http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/16/health/enterovirus-outbreak/

Watch this video

click to access site and play the video.

(CNN) — Since mid-August, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed more than 100 cases of Enterovirus D68 in 12 states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, New York and Oklahoma.

Yet the real number of severe respiratory illnesses caused by this virus is probably even higher, the CDC says.

Enteroviruses are very common, especially in the early fall. The CDC estimates that 10 million to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year. These viruses usually present like the common cold; symptoms include sneezing, a runny nose and a cough.

Most people recover without any treatment. But Enterovirus D68 appears to be exacerbating breathing problems in children who have asthma.

What parents should know

The virus is hard to track, as many enteroviruses cause similar symptoms and hospitals generally do not test for specific types. But the CDC has asked hospitals across the country to send in samples if workers suspect that Enterovirus D68 has caused a patient’s severe respiratory illness.

Alabama, Indiana and Oklahoma are the latest to join the growing list of states with confirmed cases, health officials say.

Seven of 24 specimens sent to the CDC from Oklahoma hospitals and laboratories have tested positive for Enterovirus D68, the Oklahoma State Department of Health announced Tuesday. The state has seen an increase in pediatric admissions at hospitals in its central region.

Watch this video

So why all the concern now?

What’s unusual at the moment is the high number of hospitalizations.

The virus has sent more than 30 children a day to a Kansas City, Missouri, hospital, where about 15% of the youngsters were placed in intensive care, officials said.

“It’s worse in terms of scope of critically ill children who require intensive care. I would call it unprecedented,” said Dr. Mary Anne Jackson, a director for infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy Hospital, where about 475 children were recently treated.

“I’ve practiced for 30 years in pediatrics, and I’ve never seen anything quite like this,” she said.

What parents should know about EV-D68

What’s special about this particular type of enterovirus?

An analysis by the CDC showed at least 30 of the Kansas City children tested positive for EV-D68, Missouri health officials said.

It’s a type of enterovirus that’s uncommon, but not new.

It was first identified in the 1960s and there have been fewer than 100 reported cases since that time. But it’s possible, Pallansch said, that the relatively low number of reports might be because EV-D68 is hard to identify.

EV-D68 was seen last year in the United States and this year in various parts of the world. Over the years, clusters have been reported in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Arizona and various countries including the Philippines, Japan and the Netherlands.

Experts say they don’t know why it’s flared up this time around.

“Why one virus or another crops up in one part of the country or another part of the country from one year to the next is inexplicable,” said William Schaffner, head of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University. “It’s a mystery to me.”

What are the symptoms?

“Access the article published at CIDRAP, (you can access CIDRAP, as you recall with the side bar widget at euzicasa)
Another post (this pressed will follow shortly): get informed, be your family and yourselves best friends, no matter what the downplayer may want you to believe; then you can be level headed instead of fearing, and in denial!

this pressed: This Alabama Judge Has Figured Out How to Dismantle Roe v. Wade – ProPublica


via This Alabama Judge Has Figured Out How to Dismantle Roe v. Wade – ProPublica.

 

Inside the courtroom of the Alabama Supreme Court in downtown Montgomery. (William Widmer, special to ProPublica)

 

In 2005, the Witherspoon School of Law and Public Policy held a conference in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains. The school’s name was something of a misnomer: Rather than grant JDs, Witherspoon staged seminars and lectures offering lessons in what it summarized as “the comprehensive biblical foundation for our common law and constitutional government.” Its target audience was homeschooled young men. The school itself was a project of Vision Forum, a Texas-based ministry whose founder was also a leader in the Christian Patriarchy movement, which preaches, among other things, that husbands should vote for their wives.

Most sitting judges would go to great pains to avoid such a gathering. But Tom Parker,

References:

***Roe v. Wade Supreme Court Decision

The complete Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, January 22, 1973. Includes concurring and dissenting opinions.

From Jone Johnson Lewis,
Your Guide to Women’s History.

U.S. Supreme Court

ROE v. WADE, 410 U.S. 113 (1973)

410 U.S. 113 (find @ http://womenshistory.about.com/library/etext/gov/bl_roe_a.htm)
***http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roe_v._Wade

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: METEORITE STRIKES ANN ELIZABETH HODGES (1954)


Meteorite Strikes Ann Elizabeth Hodges (1954)

Thousands of people are struck by lightning every year, but in 1954, Ann Hodges of Sylacauga, Alabama, became the first person in modern history to be hit by a meteorite. Hodges was napping on her couch when she was rudely awakened by a grapefruit-sized meteorite crashing through her roof, bouncing off her radio, and striking her on the hip. The incident left her badly bruised. Who prevailed in the dispute between Hodges and her landlord over ownership of the meteorite? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: WALKER EVANS (1903)


Walker Evans (1903)

Evans was an American photographer known for his stark photos of the rural South during the Great Depression, taken for the Farm Security Administration. In 1936,Fortune magazine sent Evans and writer James Agee to document poverty in rural Alabama. The magazine rejected their work, but the two used the material for their landmark 1941 book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. A 2005 Fortune article revealed that some of their subjects were upset about the book for what reasons? More… Discuss

 

Weather Channel: Deadly Tornadoes In USA April 28, 2011


A prayer for those killed so far by the heavy tornadoes, one  the most devastating forces of nature.