Tag Archives: Alaska

this day in the yesteryear: Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)


Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)

One of the first major crises of the Cold War, the Berlin blockade began in June 1948 during the multinational occupation of post-WWII Germany. In an attempt to force its former wartime allies—the US, the UK, and France—out of Berlin, the USSR began a blockade of all rail, road, and water traffic through East Germany to West Berlin. Rather than withdraw, the Western powers bypassed the blockade by airlifting thousands of tons of supplies into the city each day. What was Operation Little Vittles? More… Discuss

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today’s holiday: Bering Sea Ice Golf Classic (2015)


Bering Sea Ice Golf Classic (2015)

This golfing challenge, played on a six-hole course with bright orange golf balls, takes place on the frozen Bering Sea off Nome, Alaska, at a time when the winds can be gale-strength. Par is 41, but winners have claimed scores as low as 23. Entry fees benefit the Lions Club. The tournament, not a wholly serious affair, coincides with the final days of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race that starts about the first of March and ends in Nome about two weeks later. More… Discuss

today’s holiday/celebration: Fairbanks Winter Carnival (2015)


Fairbanks Winter Carnival (2015)

The Winter Carnival is a week of festivities in Fairbanks, Alaska, highlighted by sled dog races. The carnival opens with the two-day Limited North American Sled Dog Race, and concludes, on the last two days, with the Open North American Sled Dog Race. Other events include dances, a parka parade, a campstove chili contest, a native potlatch, snow- and ice-sculpting contests, snowshoe races and softball, musical and dramatic presentations, and a trade fair. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Monday, January 5th, 2015: St. John Neumann


Saint of the Day for Thursday, December 18th, 2014: St. Rufus


Just a thought: “Wouldn’t it be nice if we didn’t have to blog about anything else but blue skies,…


Just a thought:  Wouldn’t it be nice if we didn’t have to blog about anything else but blue skies, and lukewarm waters, and mist beautiful pics, and images or far away places, and most adoring pets, and, and and and…and yet: what would occur if everybody would only blog about those this that don’t affect anybody, except their excite their sense of beauty and serenity, and leave the world unattended to the reality of day to day life.”
– George-B.

Willie Nelson & Kenny Rogers “Blue Skies

On the 30th anniversary of Bhopal: No one talks much about toxic Superfund sites anymore. But 49 million Americans live close to one.|National Geografic


National Geografic- Waateland - About Toxic Superfund Sites

National Geografic- Waateland – About Toxic Superfund Sites

No one talks much about toxic Superfund sites anymore. But 49 million Americans live close to one.

By Paul Voosen
Photographs by Fritz Hoffmann

For most of his adult life Jun Apostol has lived, willingly, in the shadow of a mountain of waste. An accountant who’s now retired, he planted his family in 1978 in a modest new house in Montebello, an industrial cum bedroom community just east of Los Angeles. Behind the house, in neighboring Monterey Park, sat an active landfill—but don’t worry, the developer said. Soon it would close and become a park or maybe even a golf course.

The greens never came. It turned out that the landfill, a former gravel pit that had welcomed so much ordinary trash it had filled to ground level and then kept on rising, had also accepted some 300 million gallons of liquid industrial waste—and it hadn’t been selective. Was your waste laced with arsenic, 1,4-dioxane, or mercury? No problem. The nodding pump jacks nearby, left from the oil boom, wouldn’t care. Some of the waste might have come from drilling those oil wells.

Los Angeles had buried the hazardous waste, but it was far from gone. A few years after Apostol’s development was built, his neighbors began complaining of nausea. Gas had intruded into six homes. Property values plummeted. In 1986 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency marched in and listed the landfill as a Superfund site, part of its new program to contain the nation’s hazardous waste crisis.

CROWD CONTROL AIRS MONDAYS at 9P.


Crowd Control: Rule Your World: Travel Tricks

Spelunking


Spelunking

Spelunking, or caving, is the recreational sport of exploring caves. The term comes from spelunk, the Middle English word for “cave.” Many people are drawn to spelunking because virgin cave systems comprise some of the last unexplored regions on Earth. Edouard-Alfred Martel pioneered caving in the 19th century, and widespread interest in the activity led to the creation of the National Speleological Society in 1941. What distinction do purists draw between “cavers” and “spelunkers”? More… Discuss

Valentina Lisitsa. Chopin Nocturne Op 27 # 2 D Flat Major: great compositions/performances


Valentina Lisitsa. Chopin Nocturne Op 27 # 2 D Flat Major

just a thought: “the reality of a conspiracy is that it stays a theory!”


just a thought:  “the reality of a conspiracy is that it stays a theory!” –George-B

Evangelical <b>Conspiracy</b> <b>Theories</b> by Gary Ellis

Health and Civilization: Happiness and Aging (


Happiness and Aging

Polls of populations around the globe show that life satisfaction often waxes and wanes with age and differs depending on where people live. In Western nations, happiness bottoms out between the ages of 45 and 54 before rising again into old age, while in the former Soviet Union and Latin America, it declines throughout life. The reasons for these trends are complex and multifaceted, but one factor that seems to have a strong influence is a region’s economic prosperity, suggesting that money does in fact buy some measure of happiness. More… Discuss

this pressed – for information: CDC running twofold probe of EV-D68 cases, neuro illnesses | CIDRAP


While the nationwide outbreak of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) cases may be starting to subside, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is still in the early stages of investigating it and determining whether it’s connected to unexplained neurologic illnesses in children in Colorado and elsewhere, says a top CDC virology expert.

Today the count of confirmed cases rose by 13, to 691, according to the CDC. The illnesses have been confirmed in all but four states: Alaska, Hawaii, Nevada, and Arizona. The cases confirmed yesterday and today mark a slowdown from earlier this week and much of last week.

“We’re getting a sense that on average there’s at least an indication of a decline in the number of cases,” Mark Pallansch, PhD, director of the CDC’s Division of Viral Diseases, told CIDRAP News today.

via CDC running twofold probe of EV-D68 cases, neuro illnesses | CIDRAP.

Robert Schumann : Arabesque Op.18 in C Major, Piano – Thurzo Zoltan: make music part of your life series


Robert Schumann : Arabesque Op.18 in C Major

Robert Schumann : Arabesque Op.18 in C Major
Piano – Thurzo Zoltan
Recorded at the Partium University – Oradea -Romania
Video Mastering : Balajti Robert

from Wikipedia:


Oradea, mai demult Oradea
Mare, (în maghiară Nagyvárad, în germană Großwardein, în idiș גרויסווארדיין Groysvardeyn, în latină Magnovaradinum

article: Totem Poles


Totem Poles

Totem poles are towering sculptures carved from trees by a number of Native American peoples along the Pacific Northwest coast of North America. They display mythological images, usually animal spirits. The poles

Totem poles in front of houses in Alert Bay, B...

Totem poles in front of houses in Alert Bay, British Columbia in the 1900s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

are erected to identify the owner of a house or other property, welcome visitors, indicate a portal or passageway, mark a gravesite, and even to ridicule an important person who failed in some way. Why was this last type of pole—a “shame pole”—erected in Cordova, Alaska, in 2007? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SEWARD’S DAY


Seward’s Day

When William Henry Seward, Secretary of State for U.S. President Andrew Johnson, signed the treaty authorizing the purchase of Alaska from Czarist Russia for $7 million on March 30, 1867, most Americans thought he was crazy. But public opinion quickly changed when gold was discovered in the region, and its natural gas, coal, and oil reserves, in addition to its seafood and lumber industries, have proved to be far more valuable than its gold. Unfortunately, Seward did not live to see his foresight commemorated as alegal holiday in the state of AlaskaMore… Discuss

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This Day in the Yesteryear: CHRISTOPHER MCCANDLESS’S BODY FOUND (1992)


Christopher McCandless’s Body Found (1992)

The tragic story of Christopher McCandless begins in southern California and ends in the wilds of Alaska, where the 24-year-old’s emaciated remains were found weeks after he had apparently starved to death while trying to live off the land on his own. His journal, in which he chronicled his 113 days in the wilderness, has shed some light on his final months, including where he sheltered—an abandoned bus—and what he last ate, but much will never be known. What was his final message to the world? More… Discuss