Tag Archives: Alexander Borodin

Great compositions/performances: ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major


ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major

Borodin: Symphony No.2 in B minor – Gergiev / Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra


Borodin: Symphony No.2 in B minor – Gergiev / Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra

Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36 Conductor: Zubin Mehta Orchestra: Israel Philharmonic Orchestra


Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36

Jerusalem Quartet Alexander Borodin String Quartet N 2 Notturno


[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lz1b8YZj0f4[/embed]

Jerusalem Quartet Alexander Borodin String Quartet N 2 Notturno

Borodin Petite Suite with Maria Prokofieva


Borodin Petite Suite

Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana”, Op. 61 (FULL)


Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana“, Op. 61 (FULL)

Published on Apr 29, 2014

The Orchestral Suite No. 4, Op. 61, more commonly known as Mozartiana, is an orchestral suite by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, written in 1887 as a tribute to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on the 100th anniversary of that composer’s opera Don Giovanni. Because this suite consists of four orchestrations of piano pieces by (or in one case, based on) Mozart, Tchaikovsky did not number this suite with his previous three suites for orchestra. Instead, he considered it a separate work entitled Mozartiana. Nevertheless, it is usually counted as No. 4 of his orchestral suites.

Tchaikovsky conducted the premiere himself, in Moscow in November 1887. It was the only one of his suites he conducted, and only the second at whose premiere he was present.

Pyotr Iliyich Tchaikovsky (May 7, 1840 — November 6, 1893) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. His wide-ranging output includes symphonies, operas, ballets, instrumental, chamber music and songs. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, his last three numbered symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin.

Born into a middle-class family, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant, despite his obvious musical precocity. He pursued a musical career against the wishes of his family, entering the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1862 and graduating in 1865. This formal, Western-oriented training set him apart from the contemporary nationalistic movement embodied by the influential group of young Russian composers known as The Five, with whom Tchaikovsky’s professional relationship was mixed.
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Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov – Fantasia on Russian Themes / Фантазия на русские темы , great compositions/performances


Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov – Fantasia on Russian Themes / Фантазия на русские темы

Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov,Symphonic Suite:”Antar” (Symphony No.2) , great compositions/performances


Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov,Symphonic Suite:”Antar” (Symphony No.2).


Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36 (1888), played on period instruments

Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia – Svetlanov , great compositions/performances


Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia – Svetlanov

Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov


Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov

Borodin ~ Symphony No. 3 in A minor, great compositions/performances


Borodin ~ Symphony No. 3 in A minor ~ Complete

 

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K. 537, ‘Coronation’ (Murray Perahia): make music part of your life series


MozartPiano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K. 537, ‘Coronation’ (Murray Perahia)

Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers -: make music pat of your life series


Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers –

Great musical recordings: Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119): Great compositions/performances


Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119)

Tchaikovsky String Quartet Op. 11 – II. Andante cantabile (Kontras Quartet): great compositions/performances


Alexander Borodin – String Quartet No. 2: make music part of your life series


Alexander Borodin – String Quartet No. 2

Alexander Porfir’yevich Borodin, In the Steppes of Central Asia, In the Steppes Of Central Asia: great compositions/performances


Alexander Borodin: String Quartet no. 2 in D: Great compositions/performances


Alexander Borodin: String Quartet no. 2 in D

make music part of your life series Borodin: Steppes of Central Asia – Ashkenazy*


[youtube.com/watch?v=nAnXll57BZ8]

Borodin: Steppes of Central Asia – Ashkenazy*

 

make music pat of your life series: BORODIN – In the Steppes of Central Asia


[youtube.com/watch?v=X8znXcCwQWU]

BORODIN – In the Steppes of Central Asia

Alexander Borodin
In the Steppes of Central Asia 7:27

Exlusive BBC Studio Recording
BBC Philharmonic
Vassily Sinaisky (conductor)

Recorded in Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester
on 28 April 2007

The BBC Music Magazine Collection
Vol.16 No.3

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Great Compositions/Performances: Sviatoslav Richter plays Borodin “Au Convent” (from ‘Petite SUITE’)


 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kyoko Oyagi, plays ALEXANDER BORODIN’s ‘In the steppes of Central Asia’ (arrangement for piano by Ms. Oyagi)



Legendary virtuoso, Kyoko Oyagi, Japanese pianist (International competition Viotti 1st prize) plays Borodin arranged for solo-piano by Kyoko Oyagi.
1999/Tokyo,Japan, Live recording.Most successful Asian descendant pianist of Emil Sauer who combined Franz liszt’s and Russian pianism. Hans Kann’s favorite disciple,大八木恭子.

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Alexandr Glazunov – Oriental Rhapsody for Orchestra in G major, Op. 29, Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra – Antonio de Almeida



Alexandr Glazunov – Oriental Rhapsody for Orchestra in G major, Op. 29, Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra – Antonio de Almeida

Review

The highly-skilled Glazunov had as his primary weakness that he did not fully synthesize his many influences – Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Wagner, and Brahms – and hence remained a derivative rather than original composer. Here, he is in Rimsky-Korakov territory, reveling in the opportunities for exoticism afforded by Russia’s 19th Century expansion into neighboring Turkic and Mongol territories. At the time he wrote this piece, the genre was still fresh, and the result is a sparkling and piece fit to be a companion to the more famous such pieces of the time. The music is in the same exciting vein as that of Rimsky and Borodin. ~ Joseph Stevenson, Rovi

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/oriental-rhapsody-for-orchestra-in-g-major-op-29#ixzz2pklK3jzJ

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Sofronitsky plays Borodin: Petite Suite



Part 1
Alexander Borodin: Petite Suite
I. In the Monastery
II. Intermezzo
III. Mazurka

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Petite Suite is a suite of seven piano pieces, written by Alexander Borodin, and acknowledged as his major work for the piano.[1] It was published in 1885, although some of the pieces had been written as far back as the late 1870s.[2] After Borodin’s death, Alexander Glazunov orchestrated the work, and added his orchestration of another of Borodin’s pieces as an eighth number.

The suite was dedicated to the Belgian Countess Louise de Mercy-Argenteau, who had been instrumental in having Borodin’s First Symphonyperformed in Verviers and Liège. She had also arranged for French translations of some of his songs and excerpts from Prince Igor; and had initiated the sponsorship of Camille Saint-Saëns and Louis-Albert Bourgault-Ducoudray for Borodin’s membership of the French Society of Authors, Composers and Editors.[2]

Borodin’s original title for the work was Petit Poème d’amour d’une jeune fille (“Little poems on the love of a young girl”), but by publication time the name Petite Suite had been applied to it.[1]

The original suite consisted of the following 7 movements, with descriptions supplied by the composer:

  1. Au couvent, Andante religioso, C sharp minor (“The Church’s vows foster thoughts only of God”)
  2. Intermezzo, Tempo di minuetto, F major (“Dreaming of Society Life”)
  3. Mazurka I, Allegro, C major (“Thinking only of dancing”)
  4. Mazurka II, Allegretto, D flat major (“Thinking both of the dance and the dancer”)
  5. Rêverie, Andante, D flat major (“Thinking only of the dance”)
  6. Serenade, Allegretto, D flat major (“Dreaming of love”)
  7. Nocturne, Andantino, G flat major (“Lulled by the happiness of being in love”).[1][3]

After Borodin’s death in 1887, Alexander Glazunov orchestrated the suite, but incorporated into it another piano piece by Borodin, the Scherzo in A flat major, and slightly rearranged the order of the pieces.

  1. Au couvent
  2. Intermezzo
  3. Mazurka I
  4. Mazurka II
  5. Serenade
  6. Nocturne
  7. Rêverie
  8. Scherzo, Allegro vivace, A flat major

 

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36



Also known as The Great Russian Easter Overture, is a concert overture written by the Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov between August 1887 and April 1888, and dedicated to the memories of Modest Mussorgsky and Alexander Borodin, two members of the legendary “Mighty Handful“.

It is subtitled “Overture on Liturgical Themes”. It is the last of the composer’s series of three exceptionally brilliant orchestral works, preceded by Capriccio Espagnol and Scheherazade. The work received its premiere in St. Petersburg in late December 1888.

Conductor: Zubin Mehta 
Orchestra: Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

Picture: Il’ja Efimovič Repin, Easter Procession in the region of Kursk (1880-1883)

 

Borodin – In the Steppes of Central Asia (1880), played on period instruments



In the Steppes of Central Asia (1880)

A “musical tableau” for orchestra by Russian composer and chemist Alexander Borodin (1833-1887), a member of the group of composers known as The Five, or the Mighty Handful. The work was originally intended to celebrate the silver anniversary of the reign of Czar Alexander II, who had expanded the domain of Imperial Russia eastward into Central Asia. The celebration never came to fruition due to the assassination of the Czar; instead the piece was premiered in a concert in 1880 by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and the orchestra of the Russian Opera. Borodin dedicated it to Franz Liszt.

This recording was made by conductor Jos van Immerseel and the Anima Eterna Orchestra, which plays on period instruments.

 

Great Performances: Kyoko Oyagi Plays BORODIN’S “In the steppes of Central Asia”



Legendary virtuoso,Kyoko Oyagi,japanese female pianist (International competition Viotti 1st prize) plays Borodin arranged for solo-piano by herself.1999/Tokyo,Japan,Live recording.Most successful Asian descendant pianist of Emil Sauer who combined Franz liszt’s and Russian pianism.Hans Kann’s favorite disciple,大八木恭子.

 

Alexander Borodin – STRING QUARTET Nº 2 Notturno



Alexander Borodin
Quartet per a cordes nº 2
Notturno (andante)

Borodin Quartet
Rostislav Dubinsky i Yaroslav Alexandrov, violins
Dmitry Shebalin, viola
Valentin Berlinsky, cello

 

STRING QUARTET Nº 2 (Alexander Borodin) Notturno



Alexander Borodin
Quartet per a cordes nº 2
Notturno (andante)

Borodin Quartet
Rostislav Dubinsky i Yaroslav Alexandrov, violins
Dmitry Shebalin, viola
Valentin Berlinsky, cello

 

Drolc Quartet – Alexander Borodin, String Quartet No. 2



Eduard Drolc and Juergen Pnarmann, violin;
Stefano Passaggio, viola;
Georg Donderer, cello.  

The String Quartet No. 2, written in 1881, by Alexander Borodin is a work in four movements:
1. Allegro moderato in D major and 2/2 time, with 304 bars;
2. Scherzo. Allegro in F major and 3/4 time, with 299 bars;
3. Notturno (Nocturne): Andante in A major and 3/4 time, with 180 bars;
4. Finale: Andante — Vivace in D major and 2/4 time, with 671 bars.