Tag Archives: alexander glazunov

make music part of your life series: Alexander Glazunov – Concert Waltz Nr. 2


Alexander Glazunov – Concert Waltz Nr. 2

Alexander Glazunov: Symphony #7 “Pastoral” in F Op 77, great compositions/performances


The image of Russian conductor Gennady Rozhdes...

The image of Russian conductor Gennady Rozhdestvensky Das Foto von russisch Dirigent Gennadi Nikolajewitsch Roschdestwenski (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Alexandr Glazunov – Symphony No. 7 in F major, Op. 77

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op. 42 – III. Mélodie (“Chant sans paroles”)


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op. 42 – III. Mélodie (“Chant sans paroles”)

Scenes de Ballet for Orchestra in A Major, Op. 52, VII Valse, VIII Polonaise , great compositions/performances


Scenes de Ballet for Orchestra in A Major, Op. 52, VII Valse, VIII Polonaise

Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov


Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov

Borodin ~ Symphony No. 3 in A minor, great compositions/performances


Borodin ~ Symphony No. 3 in A minor ~ Complete

 

Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲 : great compositions/performances


Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲

Alexander Borodin – String Quartet No. 2: make music part of your life series


Alexander Borodin – String Quartet No. 2

Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor): make music part of your life series


Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor)

Parts/Movements

  1. Adagio – Allegro passionato
  2. Tema con varazioni
  3. Intermezzo. Allegretto
  4. Finale. Andante maestoso

Review :

While the Symphony No. 6 in C minor, Op. 58, of 1896 by Alexander Glazunov is not the most personally characteristic of his eight completed symphonies — the optimistic Third or the Olympian Fifth are more typical of his confident symphonic aesthetic — it is arguably the most typically Russian of his symphonies. Part of the reason for this is the scoring — violins in octaves above massed brass at its climaxes à la Tchaikovsky and gorgeously colorful woodwind writing in its central movements — part of it is the themes — ardent and powerful with a yearning quality characteristic of fin de siècle Russian symphonies — but most of it is the furious tone of the opening movement.
******With the darkly unfolding Adagio leading into a Allegro appassionato that balances a passionately despairing first theme with a fervently supplicating second theme, Glazunov’s Sixth sounds like a Russian symphony composed after the death of Tchaikovsky. But the Sixth is more than the work of a symphonic epigone. While the tone of the opening movement sounds typically Russian, its chromatic melodic and cogent harmonic structure makes it sound much more modern than contemporary symphonies by Kalinnikov or even Rachmaninov. Even more modern are the Sixth’s second and fourth movements.
******The second movement is a theme and seven variations that slowly transmutes the tone of the symphony from the fury of the opening movement to one of calm acceptance.
******The brief third-movement Intermezzo that precedes the Finale is lighter in tone than anything else in the symphony.
******The Finale itself is one of Glazunov’s most successful closing movements. With its magisterial Andante maestoso introduction announcing the chorale theme that will ultimately cap the movement, its highly contrasted themes — the first confidently striding in the winds Moderato maestoso, the second a lilting Scherzando theme for the flutes, horns, and strings — the Finale seems at first too episodic to cohere. Glazunov’s superb technical skills, however, form all the Finale’s material into an organic whole and the tone of the Finale — powerfully positive — is altogether Glazunov’s own. ~ James Leonard, Rovi

Read more:
               http://www.answers.com/topic/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58#ixzz3AkekJ1oA

               http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/5a0988a4-695c-4bff-bc68-4f312427495e.html
              http://www.allmusic.com/composition/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58-mc0002366895

 

Tchaikovsky-Meditation from Souvenir d’un lieu cher op. 42 no. 1 (Orchestrated by A. Glazunov): great compositions/performances



From: Kanaal van viool7  Kanaal van viool7

Tchaikovsky-Meditation from Souvenir d’un lieu cher op. 42 no. 1 (Orchestrated by A. Glazunov)

Tchaikovsky's tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Mon...

Tchaikovsky’s tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

*****Isaac Stern: violin-
*****National Symphony Orchestra-Mstislav                 Rostropovich: conductor-1977

 

make music part of your life series: Nathan Milstein – Glazunov – Meditation in D major, Op 32


[youtube.com/watch?v=tzTHc3x4odA]

Nathan Milstein – Glazunov – Meditation in D major, Op 32

Alexander Glazunov
Meditation in D major, Op 32

Nathan Milstein, violin

Unknown Orchestra
Robert Irving, conductor

Recorded, March 1962

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Great Compositions/Performances: Tchaikovsky-Meditation from Souvenir d’un lieu cher op. 42 no. 1 (Orchestrated by A. Glazunov)



Isaac Stern: violin-National Symphony Orchestra-Mstislav Rostropovich: conductor-1977

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Shostakovich – Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 [Kirill Kondrashin, USSR State SO, 1951]



Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 (1923-25)

I. Allegretto – Allegro non troppo [0:00]
II. Allegro (Scherzo) [9:16]
III. Lento – [13:43]
IV. Allegro molto [23:29]

The first symphony by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975), which he dedicated to his friend Mikhail Kvadri. Shostakovich completed the work at age 19 as his graduation assignment for the Petrograd (formerly St. Petersburg, later Leningrad) Conservatory, which was directed at the time by Alexander Glazunov. Shostakovich’s main composition teacher Maximilian Steinberg oversaw the project. The composer initially wished to use his Scherzo, Op. 7 (1923-24) as the second movement of the symphony, but Steinberg was appalled by its grotesque character and suggested that Shostakovich compose a different movement. He followed his teacher’s advice in composing a new movement, but it was ever more steeped in grotesquerie than the earlier scherzo, and the same brash, brittle character pervades much of the symphony; as Shostakovich wrote to his friend Lev Oborin, “It would be more fitting to call this work the ‘Symphony-Grotesque’.” Although the symphony is vintage Shostakovich, it also bears the influence of earlier Russian masters – from the piquant harmonies of Stravinsky’s Petrushka and the sharp wit of the young Prokofiev to the lush colours and chromaticism of Scriabin and the long-drawn lyricism of Tchaikovsky.

The symphony’s premiere on May 12, 1926 in the Great Hall of the Leningrad Philharmonic (conducted by Nikolai Malko) was a resounding success. Shostakovich’s mother recalled the performance: “All went more than brilliantly – a splendid orchestra and magnificent execution … At the end, Mitya was called to the stage over and over again. When our handsome young composer appeared, looking almost like a little boy, the enthusiasm turned into one long thunderous ovation.”

This recording dates from 1951. The conductor Kirill Kondrashin leads the USSR State Symphony Orchestra.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kyoko Oyagi, plays ALEXANDER BORODIN’s ‘In the steppes of Central Asia’ (arrangement for piano by Ms. Oyagi)



Legendary virtuoso, Kyoko Oyagi, Japanese pianist (International competition Viotti 1st prize) plays Borodin arranged for solo-piano by Kyoko Oyagi.
1999/Tokyo,Japan, Live recording.Most successful Asian descendant pianist of Emil Sauer who combined Franz liszt’s and Russian pianism. Hans Kann’s favorite disciple,大八木恭子.

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Great Composers/Compositions: Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov



Julian Lloyd Webber plays Melodie by Alexander Glazunov from the CD Cello Moods.

 

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Glazunov – The Seasons Op.67 Autumn:Petit Adagio



Prominent Russians: Aleksandr Glazunov

August 10, 1865 – March 21, 1936
Фотограф Альфред Федецкий. Портрет русского композитора и дирижёра Александра Константиновича Глазунова. Фотография. Харьков. 1899гPortrait photo of Aleksandr Glazunov taken by Alfred Fedetsky. 1899, Kharkov, Ukraine

Aleksandr Glazunov was a Russian composer, professor and rector of the St. Petersburg Conservatory. His works of the late Russian Romantic period reconciled nationalism and cosmopolitanism in Russian music.

Child musical prodigy

Glazunov was born into a wealthy merchant family – his father was a prominent publisher and book trader in St. Petersburg. Glazunov’s mother was a good pianist and had a major influence on Aleksandr’s music education. She hired the best piano teachers for her son. To her great satisfaction, Glazunov was an eager student and as early as 13 he revealed a great talent for composition. In 1879 he met Mily Balakirev, one of the founders of the Russian nationalist school of composers known as The Five or The Mighty Handful.

Impressed by Glazunov’s talent, Balakirev recommended him to Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, a composer and a member of The Five. Rimsky-Korsakov took it upon himself to teach Glazunov the theory of composition, harmony and instrumental accompaniment. Glazunov was a bright student and was able to cover the whole Conservatory program in just a year and a half.

Glazunov composed his first symphony at the age of 16, which was first played at a free school concert. It was also later performed at the Moscow Exhibition, conducted by Rimsky-Korsakov. Glazunov’s symphony was very well received and was followed by other works, which were just as fine as his first piece.

Glazunov with Fedor Chaliapin and Vladimir Stasov

Glazunov with Fedor Chaliapin and Vladimir Stasov
Portrait of the composer Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov. Portrait of Alexander Glazunov.

 

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Alexandr Glazunov – Oriental Rhapsody for Orchestra in G major, Op. 29, Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra – Antonio de Almeida



Alexandr Glazunov – Oriental Rhapsody for Orchestra in G major, Op. 29, Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra – Antonio de Almeida

Review

The highly-skilled Glazunov had as his primary weakness that he did not fully synthesize his many influences – Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Wagner, and Brahms – and hence remained a derivative rather than original composer. Here, he is in Rimsky-Korakov territory, reveling in the opportunities for exoticism afforded by Russia’s 19th Century expansion into neighboring Turkic and Mongol territories. At the time he wrote this piece, the genre was still fresh, and the result is a sparkling and piece fit to be a companion to the more famous such pieces of the time. The music is in the same exciting vein as that of Rimsky and Borodin. ~ Joseph Stevenson, Rovi

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/oriental-rhapsody-for-orchestra-in-g-major-op-29#ixzz2pklK3jzJ

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Alexander Glazunov “Ruses d’Amour” Op.61, Yevgeny Svetlanov



Alexander Glazunov Ruses d’Amour Op.61

1. Introduction 
2. Scene 1 
3. Mimic Recitative
4. Gavotte
5. Sarabande 
6. Farandole
7. Scene 2 
8. Puppet Dance
9. Scene 3 
10. Scene 4 
11. Scene 5
12. Variation 
13. Scene 6. March
14. Scene 7. Grand waltz
15. Scene 8 
16. Scene 9
17. Scene 10
18. Scene 11
19. Short Peasant’s Dance
20. Dance of the Groom and the Bride
21. Variation
22. Fricassee

Yevgeny Svetlanov,  Conductor

For  a complete  list of Glasunov’s composition visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Alexander_Glazunov

GREAT PERFORMANCES: Sofronitsky plays Borodin: Petite Suite



Part 1
Alexander Borodin: Petite Suite
I. In the Monastery
II. Intermezzo
III. Mazurka

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Petite Suite is a suite of seven piano pieces, written by Alexander Borodin, and acknowledged as his major work for the piano.[1] It was published in 1885, although some of the pieces had been written as far back as the late 1870s.[2] After Borodin’s death, Alexander Glazunov orchestrated the work, and added his orchestration of another of Borodin’s pieces as an eighth number.

The suite was dedicated to the Belgian Countess Louise de Mercy-Argenteau, who had been instrumental in having Borodin’s First Symphonyperformed in Verviers and Liège. She had also arranged for French translations of some of his songs and excerpts from Prince Igor; and had initiated the sponsorship of Camille Saint-Saëns and Louis-Albert Bourgault-Ducoudray for Borodin’s membership of the French Society of Authors, Composers and Editors.[2]

Borodin’s original title for the work was Petit Poème d’amour d’une jeune fille (“Little poems on the love of a young girl”), but by publication time the name Petite Suite had been applied to it.[1]

The original suite consisted of the following 7 movements, with descriptions supplied by the composer:

  1. Au couvent, Andante religioso, C sharp minor (“The Church’s vows foster thoughts only of God”)
  2. Intermezzo, Tempo di minuetto, F major (“Dreaming of Society Life”)
  3. Mazurka I, Allegro, C major (“Thinking only of dancing”)
  4. Mazurka II, Allegretto, D flat major (“Thinking both of the dance and the dancer”)
  5. Rêverie, Andante, D flat major (“Thinking only of the dance”)
  6. Serenade, Allegretto, D flat major (“Dreaming of love”)
  7. Nocturne, Andantino, G flat major (“Lulled by the happiness of being in love”).[1][3]

After Borodin’s death in 1887, Alexander Glazunov orchestrated the suite, but incorporated into it another piano piece by Borodin, the Scherzo in A flat major, and slightly rearranged the order of the pieces.

  1. Au couvent
  2. Intermezzo
  3. Mazurka I
  4. Mazurka II
  5. Serenade
  6. Nocturne
  7. Rêverie
  8. Scherzo, Allegro vivace, A flat major

 

Alexander Glazunov Ruses d’Amour Op.61, Yevgeny Svetlanov


Alexander Glazunov Ruses d’Amour Op.61, Yevgeny Svetlanov
Alexander Glazunov Ruses d’Amour Op.61

1. Introduction 
2. Scene 1 
3. Mimic Recitative
4. Gavotte
5. Sarabande 
6. Farandole
7. Scene 2 
8. Puppet Dance
9. Scene 3 
10. Scene 4 
11. Scene 5
12. Variation 
13. Scene 6. March
14. Scene 7. Grand waltz
15. Scene 8 
16. Scene 9
17. Scene 10
18. Scene 11
19. Short Peasant’s Dance
20. Dance of the Groom and the Bride
21. Variation
22. Fricassee

Yevgeny Svetlanov Conductor