Tag Archives: Allegro ma non troppo

great compositions/performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

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Best Classical Music, Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575, great compositions/performances


 


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

 

Itzhak Perlman – Beethoven Violin Concerto – Daniel Barenboim , great compositions/performances


Itzhak Perlman – Beethoven Violin Concerto – Daniel Barenboim

Dvořák / String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 “American” (Cleveland Quartet, (Telarc, 1991), great compositions/perofrmances)


Dvořák / String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 “American” (Cleveland Quartet)

Max Bruch – Symphony No.3 in E-major, Op.51 (1887) , great compositions/performances


Max Bruch – Symphony No.3 in E-major, Op.51 (1887)

Itzhak Perlman – Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D Op 61 – Daniel Barenboim


Itzhak Perlman – Beethoven Violin Concerto – Daniel Barenboim

Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale”: make music part of your life series



From: ChamberMusicTube ChamberMusicTube

Ludwig van BeethovenSymphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale

From Wikipedia

The Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, also known as the Pastoral Symphony (German Pastoral-Sinfonie[1]), is a symphony composed by Ludwig van Beethoven, and completed in 1808. One of Beethoven’s few works containing explicitly programmatic content,[2] the symphony was first performed in the Theater an der Wien on 22 December 1808[3] in a four hour concert.[4]

Form

The symphony has five movements, rather than the four typical of symphonies of the Classical era. Beethoven annotated the beginning of each movement as follows:

  1. Erwachen heiterer Empfindungen bei der Ankunft auf dem Lande (Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the countryside): Allegro ma non troppo

  2. Szene am Bach (Scene by the brook): Andante molto mosso

  3. Lustiges Zusammensein der Landleute (Merry gathering of country folk): Allegro

  4. Gewitter, Sturm (Thunder. Storm): Allegro

  5. Hirtengesang. Frohe und dankbare Gefühle nach dem Sturm (Shepherd’s song; cheerful and thankful feelings after the storm): Allegretto

great compostions/performances: Dvořák / String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 “American” (Cleveland Quartet)


[youtube.com/watch?v=DxtAHpYIXdU]
Dvořák / String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 “American” (Cleveland Quartet)

Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904):

String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96, B. 179 “American” (1893)

00:00 Allegro ma non troppo
09:08 – Lento
16:14 – Molto vivace
20:00 – Finale. Vivace ma non troppo

Performed by the Cleveland Quartet (Telarc, 1991).

“From its first performance, Dvořák’s  ‘American’ Quartet has enjoyed lasting popularity for its tunefulness, its rhythmic verve, and its happy interplay of the four instruments. Given all the publicity afforded Dvořák’s ideas on American music, one might reasonably ask just how ‘American’ Op. 96 really is. A theme in the third movement qualifies as having been borrowed from an American: ‘a damned bird (red, only with black wings)’ that kept singing where he was working. Dvořák worked the native bird’s song into the scherzo (measures 21 and following). Beyond that we are on less firm ground. Many of the themes are entirely or nearly pentatonic, and some have wanted to see in this the influence of the black spiritual. But in fact Bohemian music is just as frequently pentatonic, and similar themes can be found in Dvořák’s music long before he came to America. The opening of the work was based on Smetana‘s First Quartet, though Dvořák’s mood is entirely diferent — lighter and livelier throughout, with the poignant exception of the lyrical second movement, the plaintive melody of which — echoed between violin and cello — is a wonderful foil to the high spirits of the remaining three movements.” – Steven Ledbetter

Painting: Airborne (1996), Andrew Wyeth

great compositions/performances:Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575


[youtube.com/watch?v=obkheDWz9_w]

Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in B Major D575:
Mvt.I: Allegro ma non troppo 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 08:04
Mvt.III: Scherzo. Allegretto 13:49
Mvt.IV: Allegro giusto 19:25

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schumann – Symphony n°2 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Published on Mar 6, 2013
Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The Symphony in C major by German composer Robert Schumann was published in 1847 as his Symphony No. 2, Op. 61, although it was the third symphony he had completed, counting the B-flat major symphony published as No. 1 in 1841, and the original version of his D minor symphony of 1841 (later revised and published as No. 4).

Schumann began to sketch the symphony on December 12, 1845, and had a robust draft of the entire work by December 28. He spent most of the next year orchestrating, beginning February 12, 1846.[1] His depression and poor health, including ringing in his ears, prevented him finishing the work until October 19. Publication followed in 1847.

The uplifting tone of the symphony is remarkable in the face of Schumann’s health problems—the work can be seen as a Beethovenian triumph over fate/pessimism. It is written in the traditional four-movement form, and as often in the nineteenth century the Scherzo precedes the Adagio. All four movements are in C major, except the first part of the slow movement (in C minor); the work is thus homotonal:

  1. Sostenuto assai — Allegro, ma non troppo
  2. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
  3. Adagio espressivo
  4. Allegro molto vivace
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Fabulous Performers: Roggiero Ricci plays Antonín Dvořák’s – Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53, B. 108



Ruggiero Ricci, violin. Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, Walter Susskind (1977)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 (B.108) is a concerto for violin and orchestra composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1879. The concerto was premiered in 1883 by František Ondříček in Prague. He also gave the premieres in Vienna and London. Today it remains an important work in the violin repertoire.

The concerto’s structure is the classical three movements of fast-slow-fast.

  1. Allegro ma non troppo
  2. Adagio ma non troppo
  3. Finale: Allegro giocoso ma non troppo

Antonín Dvořák was inspired to write his concerto after having met Joseph Joachim in 1878 and composed the work with the intention of dedicating it him. However, when he finished the concerto in 1879, Joachim became skeptical about it. Joachim was a strict classicist and objected to Dvořák’sinter alia, or his abrupt truncation of the first movement’s orchestral tutti. Joachim also didn’t like the fact that the recapitulation was cut short and that it led directly to the slow second movement. It is also assumed that he was upset with the persistent repetition found in the third movement. However, Joachim never said anything outright and instead claimed to be editing the solo part. He never actually performed the piece.

Notable recordings of the concerto include:

 

 

Beethoven: Symphony No.6, “Pastorale”;Jarvi, DKB



Beethoven: Symphony No.6 in F, “Pastorale”, Op.68
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Paavo Jarvi, dir.

0:01 I. Pleasant, Cheerful feelings awakened in a person on arriving in the country. Allegro ma non troppo
12:10 II. Scene by the brook. Andante molto mosso
23:48 III. Merry gathering of country folk. Allegro
28:51 IV. Thunderstorm. Allegro
32:20 V. Shepherd’s Song. Happy and thankful feelings to the deity after the storm. Allegretto

 

Walters Pyramid-Long Beach: An Unlike Pyramid (my Photo Collection)


Walters Pyramid-Long Beach

Walters Pyramid-Long Beach

Walters Pyramid-Long Beach: An Unlike Pyramid (my Photo Collection)