Tag Archives: allegro vivace

Schubert Symphony No 2 B flat major, D 125 / Maazel Bavarian RSO: make music part of your life series


Schubert Symphony No. 2, D125 B flat major Maazel Bavarian RSO

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Pyotr Tchaikovsky – String Quartet No 1 in D Major, op.11: great compositions/performances


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – String Quartet No 1 in D Major, op.11

Mendelssohn / String Symphony No. 2 in D major: make music part of your life series


Mendelssohn / String Symphony No. 2 in D major

 

 

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815): make music part of your life series



***from  KuhlauDilfeng2  KuhlauDilfeng2

Franz SchubertSymphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

***Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Abendliches Vergnügen vor den Toren Konstantinopels

***Franz Schubert:  Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

Mov.I: Largo – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 14:07
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegro vivace 22:20
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 25:32

***Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra
***Conductor: Michael Halász

In the opening movement, the initial theme of the Allegro vivace is based on the corresponding first theme of Ludwig van Beethoven’s overture to The Creatures of Prometheus.

The second movement is a theme with five variations in E flat major. Although there is some variation in the melody, the primary focus of the variations are on instrumentation and tone color. The first variation features violins and winds. The second variation passes the theme between the low strings and the woodwinds. The third variation is again violins and winds. The fourth variation is in C minor and features some acceleration with the use triplet-sixteenth notes. The fifth variation maintains the triplet-sixteenths, but they move into the background with the melody returning close to its original form as a kind of recapitulation. A coda concludes the movement.

The minuet is in C minor and mainly scored for the tutti and fortissimo. The contrasting Trio in E flat major is more thinly scored winds, violins and pizzicato bass. The melody of the trio is actually a variation of the theme used in the second movement forming a melodic and harmonic (E-flat/C minor) link is made between the inner two movements.

The finale is a galop in fast 2/4 time.

***From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

List of compositions by Franz Schubert by genre

make music part of your life series: Antonín Dvořák – Waltzes, Op. 54


[youtube.com/watch?v=8qyn3j4wYgE]

Antonín Dvořák – Waltzes, Op. 54

Kai Adomeit, piano
Antonín Dvořák – Waltzes, Op. 54

1. No. 1, moderato in A major 3’35
2. No. 2, allegro con fuoco in A minor 3’20
3. No. 3, poco allegro in E major 2’43
4. No. 4, allegro vivace in D flat major 2’48
5. No. 5, allegro in B flat major 2’34
6. No. 6, allegro in F major 3’49
7. No. 7, allegro in D minor 2’20
8. No. 8, allegro vivace in E flat major 2’47

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great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


[youtube.com/watch?v=CnoI-sYtCOU]

F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)



Picture: Carlo Bossoli – A Bustling Market on the Piazza Navona in Rome

Franz Schubert 

Work: Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Mov.I: Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 11:47
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegretto 19:17
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 23:30

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. 

The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. 

Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schumann – Symphony n°2 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Published on Mar 6, 2013
Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The Symphony in C major by German composer Robert Schumann was published in 1847 as his Symphony No. 2, Op. 61, although it was the third symphony he had completed, counting the B-flat major symphony published as No. 1 in 1841, and the original version of his D minor symphony of 1841 (later revised and published as No. 4).

Schumann began to sketch the symphony on December 12, 1845, and had a robust draft of the entire work by December 28. He spent most of the next year orchestrating, beginning February 12, 1846.[1] His depression and poor health, including ringing in his ears, prevented him finishing the work until October 19. Publication followed in 1847.

The uplifting tone of the symphony is remarkable in the face of Schumann’s health problems—the work can be seen as a Beethovenian triumph over fate/pessimism. It is written in the traditional four-movement form, and as often in the nineteenth century the Scherzo precedes the Adagio. All four movements are in C major, except the first part of the slow movement (in C minor); the work is thus homotonal:

  1. Sostenuto assai — Allegro, ma non troppo
  2. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
  3. Adagio espressivo
  4. Allegro molto vivace
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Schubert: Rondo el la mayor para violin y cuerdas D 438



Federico Agostini, violin 
Orquesta de Camara Abril. Concierto de Clausura.
0:11
3:43

Schubert Symphony No 1in D major Maazel Bavarian RSO


 

The Symphony No. 1 in D major, D. 82, was composed by Franz Schubert in 1813, when he was just 16 years old. Despite his youth, No. 1 is an impressive piece of orchestral music for both its time and size. The first movement opens with a stately Adagio introduction, reminiscent of the Haydn‘s 104 in its format. The short Adagio sets off a lively Allegro vivace.

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto No. 1 in F sharp minor, Op. 1



Earl Wild – Jascha Horenstein – Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Sergei Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto No. 1 in F sharp minor, Op. 1
I. Vivace
II. Andante
III. Allegro vivace

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake – 28 No. 13 Danses des cygnes g – Coda (Allegro vivace)


Buy “Swan Lake, Op. 20: Act II, No. 13, “Dances of the swans”: VII. Coda – Allegro vivace” on

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